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List of all events occurring in the personshorttitle of a given text

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
120

Anne Whittle is an eighty year old woman woman from Pendle in the County of Lancaster. She is the mother of Anne Redferne. She was apprehended on suspicion of witchcraft, imprisoned at the Castle of Lancaster, found guilty of murder, and finally executed. Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, claimed to have been a witch 14 years, and to have been introduced to witchcraft by Elizabeth Southerns, alias Demdike. The Devil appeared to her in the shape of a man at Southerns' home and demanded her soul; she refused at first but was finally persuaded by Southerns. Whittle also agreed to take the Devil as a familiar under the name of Fancie and permit him to suck from her right side on her ribs. A spirit in the shape of a spotted dog then approached Southerns and offered her "Gould, Siluer, and worldly Wealth, at her will," and offered both of them their fill of " victuals, viz. Flesh, Butter, Cheese, Bread, and Drinke," but they never felt any fuller no matter how much they ate. Fancie and Southerns' Tibb carried away the remnants. She confessed to helping Southerns and Widow Lomshawe bewitch Robert Nutter to death. Whittle and Southerns later became rivals. Whittle claimed that Elizabeth Nutter, wife of Robert Nutter, tried to persuade her to kill young Robert Nutter, but that her son-in-law Thomas Redferne talked her out of it. Elizabeth Southerns alleged that she had seen Whittle and Anne Redferne making images of Christopher, Robert and Marie Nutter. James Robinson accused Whittle of spoiling all the drink in his home for several weeks straight, of causing young Robert Nutter to be sick, and of murdering old Robert Nutter. Whittle claimed to be able to help drink that had been forespoken with a prayer, to have used Fancie to kill a cow belonging to John Moore and one belonging to Anthony Nutter. Fancie would allegedly appear sometimes in the shape of a bear, and Whittle claimed he took away most of her sight. James Device accused Whittle of grave-robbing, taking three scalps and eight teeth for use alongside clay images. Alison Device claimed that her father, James Device, had made a deal with Whittle to give her a measure of meal yearly in exchange for not harming his family, but that Whittle had bewitched him to death. Alison also accused Whittle of bewitching Anne Nutter, John Moore's child, Hugh Moore and a cow of John Nutter's to death. John Nutter claimed that, 18 or 19 years before, Whittle and her daughter Anne both confessed to making clay images.(B4-B4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4-B4v

Anne Whittle Anne Whittle Relative of Witch
120

Anne Whittle is an eighty year old woman woman from Pendle in the County of Lancaster. She is the mother of Anne Redferne. She was apprehended on suspicion of witchcraft, imprisoned at the Castle of Lancaster, found guilty of murder, and finally executed. Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, claimed to have been a witch 14 years, and to have been introduced to witchcraft by Elizabeth Southerns, alias Demdike. The Devil appeared to her in the shape of a man at Southerns' home and demanded her soul; she refused at first but was finally persuaded by Southerns. Whittle also agreed to take the Devil as a familiar under the name of Fancie and permit him to suck from her right side on her ribs. A spirit in the shape of a spotted dog then approached Southerns and offered her "Gould, Siluer, and worldly Wealth, at her will," and offered both of them their fill of " victuals, viz. Flesh, Butter, Cheese, Bread, and Drinke," but they never felt any fuller no matter how much they ate. Fancie and Southerns' Tibb carried away the remnants. She confessed to helping Southerns and Widow Lomshawe bewitch Robert Nutter to death. Whittle and Southerns later became rivals. Whittle claimed that Elizabeth Nutter, wife of Robert Nutter, tried to persuade her to kill young Robert Nutter, but that her son-in-law Thomas Redferne talked her out of it. Elizabeth Southerns alleged that she had seen Whittle and Anne Redferne making images of Christopher, Robert and Marie Nutter. James Robinson accused Whittle of spoiling all the drink in his home for several weeks straight, of causing young Robert Nutter to be sick, and of murdering old Robert Nutter. Whittle claimed to be able to help drink that had been forespoken with a prayer, to have used Fancie to kill a cow belonging to John Moore and one belonging to Anthony Nutter. Fancie would allegedly appear sometimes in the shape of a bear, and Whittle claimed he took away most of her sight. James Device accused Whittle of grave-robbing, taking three scalps and eight teeth for use alongside clay images. Alison Device claimed that her father, James Device, had made a deal with Whittle to give her a measure of meal yearly in exchange for not harming his family, but that Whittle had bewitched him to death. Alison also accused Whittle of bewitching Anne Nutter, John Moore's child, Hugh Moore and a cow of John Nutter's to death. John Nutter claimed that, 18 or 19 years before, Whittle and her daughter Anne both confessed to making clay images.(B4-B4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4-B4v

Anne Whittle Anne Whittle Witch
119

A woman from the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be a widow and blind in her advanced age, who was apprehended on suspicion of witchcraft but died before she could be brought to trial. At the time of her death, she was about eighty years of age, and was thought to have been a witch for fifty. She had numerous children and grandchildren, with which she "tooke great care and paines to bring them to be Witches." Notable family includes daughter Elizabeth Device, son Christopher Howgate, and grandchildren Jennet Device, James Device and Alison Device. Southerns gave a confession at the time of her apprehension, claiming that twenty years before, she had met a spirit or devil in the shape of a boy who told her she could have anything she requested if she just gave him her soul, and told her his name was Tibb. She agreed, and he would appear at odd times threafter asking what she would have or have him do. Six years later, she lay drowsing with a small child on her knee when Tibb appeared in the shape of a brown dog and forced her to her knees to draw blood from under her left arm. Southerns woke, saying "Iesus saue my Child," which caused Tibb to vanish and left Southerns "almost starke madd for the space of eight weekes." She confessed to setting Tibb on Richard Baldwyn for refusing to compensate Southerns' daughter for her help with his mill. In her opinion, the best way to bewitch a man to death was to make an image of him out of clay, prick it and burn it. Anne Whittle (alias Chattox), matriarch of another alleged family of witches, claimed that Elizabeth Southerns had introduced her to witchcraft and persuaded her to make a malefic compact, and that Southerns' familar Tibb and another spirit named Fancie banqueted the two of them. Whittle and Southerns were rivals; Whittle also accused Southerns of bewitching to death Robert Nutter and Richard Ashton. Alison Device accused Southern of badgering her into accepting a familiar, bewitching John Nutter's cow to death, turning milk into butter without consuming the milk, cursing Richard Baldwyn and bewitching his daughter to death. James Device claimed to have heard strange sounds coming from Southerns' home. Elizabeth Device claimed Southerns "hath had a place on her left side by the space of fourty yeares." Southerns also gave witness against Whittle, claiming that she had made images of Christopher Nutter, his son Robert Nutter and Robert's wife Marie Nutter.(B1)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B1

Elizabeth Southerns Elizabeth Southerns Witch
119

A woman from the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be a widow and blind in her advanced age, who was apprehended on suspicion of witchcraft but died before she could be brought to trial. At the time of her death, she was about eighty years of age, and was thought to have been a witch for fifty. She had numerous children and grandchildren, with which she "tooke great care and paines to bring them to be Witches." Notable family includes daughter Elizabeth Device, son Christopher Howgate, and grandchildren Jennet Device, James Device and Alison Device. Southerns gave a confession at the time of her apprehension, claiming that twenty years before, she had met a spirit or devil in the shape of a boy who told her she could have anything she requested if she just gave him her soul, and told her his name was Tibb. She agreed, and he would appear at odd times threafter asking what she would have or have him do. Six years later, she lay drowsing with a small child on her knee when Tibb appeared in the shape of a brown dog and forced her to her knees to draw blood from under her left arm. Southerns woke, saying "Iesus saue my Child," which caused Tibb to vanish and left Southerns "almost starke madd for the space of eight weekes." She confessed to setting Tibb on Richard Baldwyn for refusing to compensate Southerns' daughter for her help with his mill. In her opinion, the best way to bewitch a man to death was to make an image of him out of clay, prick it and burn it. Anne Whittle (alias Chattox), matriarch of another alleged family of witches, claimed that Elizabeth Southerns had introduced her to witchcraft and persuaded her to make a malefic compact, and that Southerns' familar Tibb and another spirit named Fancie banqueted the two of them. Whittle and Southerns were rivals; Whittle also accused Southerns of bewitching to death Robert Nutter and Richard Ashton. Alison Device accused Southern of badgering her into accepting a familiar, bewitching John Nutter's cow to death, turning milk into butter without consuming the milk, cursing Richard Baldwyn and bewitching his daughter to death. James Device claimed to have heard strange sounds coming from Southerns' home. Elizabeth Device claimed Southerns "hath had a place on her left side by the space of fourty yeares." Southerns also gave witness against Whittle, claiming that she had made images of Christopher Nutter, his son Robert Nutter and Robert's wife Marie Nutter.(B1)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B1

Elizabeth Southerns Elizabeth Southerns Relative of Witch
121

A woman from the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be a spinster, the daughter of Elizabeth Device and John Device, sister to James Device and Jennet Device, the granddaughter of Elizabeth Southerns, and niece of Christopher Howgate; she was imprisoned on suspicion of witchcraft in Lancaster Castle, tried and ultimately executed. Alison comes from a family long suspected of and collectively accused of witchcraft; Southerns alleged that miller Richard Baldwin once called both her and Alison whores and witches. Alison claimed in her confession that Southerns badgered her into accepting a familiar and letting it suck from her. She would often assist Southerns, who was blind, and gave witness against her, drawing on their close association to accuse her of bewitching various people, animals and food items. According to her brother James, Henry Bullocke once accused Alison of bewitching Bullock's child, and that she had not only admitted to it but begged Bullocke's forgiveness. Elizabeth Device was thought to have provided all her children with familiars to assist them. Both Jennet and James claimed during their examinations to have attended a gathering of witches at Southerns' home for the purpose of naming Alison's familiar, but that Alison had not attended; James also claimed that Alison was involved in a plot to kill the gaoler at Lancaster and to blow up the Assizes. Alison stood accused in court of bewitching a peddler named John Law so that he was lamed and his body wasted and consumed. She confessed to having a familiar in the shape of a black dog, and that she gave it her soul and permitted it to suck at her breast just below her nipples, where the skin became blue for the next six months. She claimed that when the peddler refused to sell her pins, the black dog offered to lame him for her, and she agreed. Law claimed that the dog had " fearefull firie eyes, great teeth, and a terrible countenance." Abraham Law, John Law's son, claimed that his father gave Alison the pins, not refused to sell to her, and that furthermore she had not had the money to pay for them. Alison was found guilty on the strength of her own confession, and condemned to death.(B2v-B3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B2v-B3

Alison Device Alison Device Witch
121

A woman from the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be a spinster, the daughter of Elizabeth Device and John Device, sister to James Device and Jennet Device, the granddaughter of Elizabeth Southerns, and niece of Christopher Howgate; she was imprisoned on suspicion of witchcraft in Lancaster Castle, tried and ultimately executed. Alison comes from a family long suspected of and collectively accused of witchcraft; Southerns alleged that miller Richard Baldwin once called both her and Alison whores and witches. Alison claimed in her confession that Southerns badgered her into accepting a familiar and letting it suck from her. She would often assist Southerns, who was blind, and gave witness against her, drawing on their close association to accuse her of bewitching various people, animals and food items. According to her brother James, Henry Bullocke once accused Alison of bewitching Bullock's child, and that she had not only admitted to it but begged Bullocke's forgiveness. Elizabeth Device was thought to have provided all her children with familiars to assist them. Both Jennet and James claimed during their examinations to have attended a gathering of witches at Southerns' home for the purpose of naming Alison's familiar, but that Alison had not attended; James also claimed that Alison was involved in a plot to kill the gaoler at Lancaster and to blow up the Assizes. Alison stood accused in court of bewitching a peddler named John Law so that he was lamed and his body wasted and consumed. She confessed to having a familiar in the shape of a black dog, and that she gave it her soul and permitted it to suck at her breast just below her nipples, where the skin became blue for the next six months. She claimed that when the peddler refused to sell her pins, the black dog offered to lame him for her, and she agreed. Law claimed that the dog had " fearefull firie eyes, great teeth, and a terrible countenance." Abraham Law, John Law's son, claimed that his father gave Alison the pins, not refused to sell to her, and that furthermore she had not had the money to pay for them. Alison was found guilty on the strength of her own confession, and condemned to death.(B2v-B3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B2v-B3

Alison Device Alison Device Relative of Witch
122

A man from the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be a labourer and the son of Elizabeth Device and John Device, the brother to Jennet and Alison Device, the grandson of Elizabeth Southerns, and the nephew of Christopher Howgate. James Device was tried at the Lancaster Assizes and declared guilty of murder by witchcraft. He was accused foremost of bewitching John Duckworth to death. During his examination, he claimed that his grandmother had sent him to attend communion, but take the bread rather than eat it; he ate it anyway. On the way back he met a spirit in the shape of a hare, which demanded the bread, became angered when he didn't have it, and vanished when he prayed. Four days later, a sprit appeared to him in the shape of a brown dog, which demanded his soul and told him he'd be revenged of anyone he wanted if he complied. James replied "his Soule was not his to giue, but was his Sauiour Iesus Christs, but as much as was in him this Examinate to giue, he was contented he should haue it." A few days after that, he argued with Mistress Townley and she struck him. A black dog appeared to him and bade him make a clay image of Townley so the dog (which James called Dandy) could kill or destroy her; James did so, dried the image by the fire and crumbled it a bit each day for a week. Townley died two days after the image was destroyed. James also admitted to setting Dandy on Duckworth, causing his death, after Duckworth promised him an old shirt and then retracted the offer. James' sister Jennet gave deposition against him, claiming he had been a witch three years, had used Dandy to kill Townley, and took instruction in witchcraft from their grandmother and mother. Jennet also gave deposition implicating James in the death of John Hargraves. James also claimed to have attended a gathering of witches at his grandmother's house for the purpose of naming his sister Alison's familiar, planning a break-in at the Lancaster Assizes to free the prisoners and blow up the castle, and to discuss assisting a woman in killing Master Lister of Westby. He named numerous other witches and their familiars. Jennet added that their mother taught them a prayer that James had used to get drink, and James knew another that would cure a bewitched person. James gave deposition against his sister Alison.(Hv-H2V)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Hv-H2V

James Device James Device Relative of Witch
122

A man from the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be a labourer and the son of Elizabeth Device and John Device, the brother to Jennet and Alison Device, the grandson of Elizabeth Southerns, and the nephew of Christopher Howgate. James Device was tried at the Lancaster Assizes and declared guilty of murder by witchcraft. He was accused foremost of bewitching John Duckworth to death. During his examination, he claimed that his grandmother had sent him to attend communion, but take the bread rather than eat it; he ate it anyway. On the way back he met a spirit in the shape of a hare, which demanded the bread, became angered when he didn't have it, and vanished when he prayed. Four days later, a sprit appeared to him in the shape of a brown dog, which demanded his soul and told him he'd be revenged of anyone he wanted if he complied. James replied "his Soule was not his to giue, but was his Sauiour Iesus Christs, but as much as was in him this Examinate to giue, he was contented he should haue it." A few days after that, he argued with Mistress Townley and she struck him. A black dog appeared to him and bade him make a clay image of Townley so the dog (which James called Dandy) could kill or destroy her; James did so, dried the image by the fire and crumbled it a bit each day for a week. Townley died two days after the image was destroyed. James also admitted to setting Dandy on Duckworth, causing his death, after Duckworth promised him an old shirt and then retracted the offer. James' sister Jennet gave deposition against him, claiming he had been a witch three years, had used Dandy to kill Townley, and took instruction in witchcraft from their grandmother and mother. Jennet also gave deposition implicating James in the death of John Hargraves. James also claimed to have attended a gathering of witches at his grandmother's house for the purpose of naming his sister Alison's familiar, planning a break-in at the Lancaster Assizes to free the prisoners and blow up the castle, and to discuss assisting a woman in killing Master Lister of Westby. He named numerous other witches and their familiars. Jennet added that their mother taught them a prayer that James had used to get drink, and James knew another that would cure a bewitched person. James gave deposition against his sister Alison.(Hv-H2V)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Hv-H2V

James Device James Device Witch
123

A woman from the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be the daughter of Elizabeth Southerns, sister of Christopher Howgate, widow of John Device and mother of Jennet Device, Alison Device and James Device; her left eye was said to be lower than her right and always looking down when the other looked up. Elizabeth Device was indicted for witchcraft, with a final verdict of guilty of murder by witchcraft. Her children gave deposition against her, she gave deposition against her mother, and gave the names of numerous other witches. She was also implicated in a plot to blow up Lancaster Castle. Elizabeth allegedly raised her children to be witches, as she had been raised to be by her mother Elizabeth Southerns. She was charged with bewitching John Robinson, James Robinson and Henry Mytton to death. In her confession, she claimed to have a familiar named Ball which appeared in the shape of a brown dog; Ball instructed her to make a clay image of John Robinson, dry it in the fire and crumble it, resulting in his death. This was in retribution for harassing her for having a bastard child with a man named Seller. She also confessed to killing James Robinson, and to assisting Alice Nutter and her mother Southerns to bewitch Henry Mytton to death. Her son James claimed that she and her mother instructed and directed him in witchcraft.(C2-C3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2-C3v

Elizabeth Device Elizabeth Device Relative of Witch
123

A woman from the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be the daughter of Elizabeth Southerns, sister of Christopher Howgate, widow of John Device and mother of Jennet Device, Alison Device and James Device; her left eye was said to be lower than her right and always looking down when the other looked up. Elizabeth Device was indicted for witchcraft, with a final verdict of guilty of murder by witchcraft. Her children gave deposition against her, she gave deposition against her mother, and gave the names of numerous other witches. She was also implicated in a plot to blow up Lancaster Castle. Elizabeth allegedly raised her children to be witches, as she had been raised to be by her mother Elizabeth Southerns. She was charged with bewitching John Robinson, James Robinson and Henry Mytton to death. In her confession, she claimed to have a familiar named Ball which appeared in the shape of a brown dog; Ball instructed her to make a clay image of John Robinson, dry it in the fire and crumble it, resulting in his death. This was in retribution for harassing her for having a bastard child with a man named Seller. She also confessed to killing James Robinson, and to assisting Alice Nutter and her mother Southerns to bewitch Henry Mytton to death. Her son James claimed that she and her mother instructed and directed him in witchcraft.(C2-C3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2-C3v

Elizabeth Device Elizabeth Device Witch
125

A woman from the Carre (Carr Hall) in the County of Lancaster, known to be the wife of gentleman Henry Townley. Henry Townley accused James Device of bewitching Anne to death. James claimed in his examination that Townley accused him and his mother, Elizabeth Device, of stealing from her and had struck him. His familiar Dandy appeared to him a day or two later and bid him to make an image of Townley so that Dandy could kill or destroy her. James did so, dried the image by the fire, and crumbled slowly over the next week. Two days after the image had been crumbled entirely away, Townley is said to have died.(H2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, H2

Anne Townley Anne Townley Victim
126

A woman from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, known to be the grandmother of Grace Sowerbutts, mother of Henry Bierley, and mother-in-law to Ellen Bierley. She was indicted at the Lancaster Assizes, along with Ellen Bierley and Jane Southworth, for bewitching her granddaughter Grace so that her body wasted and was consumed. Jennet pleaded not guilty, and was eventually acquitted and released. Grace accused Jennet of numerous things. The accusations started with haunting and vexing her, drawing her by her hair, and laying her on top of a hay-mow. Grace also claimed that Jennet had shapeshifted into a black dog in front of her and picked her off a sty. Another time, Jennet came to Grace in dog shape and allegedly tried to persuade her to drown herself, but a spirit in a white sheet carried her away. Jennet-as-dog also buried Grace in hay and lay on top, robbing her of her speech, senses, and an entire day. Grace claimed to be unable to speak in Jennet's presence thereafter. Grace also accused Jennet and Ellen of stealing Thomas Walshman's child, driving a nail through its navel and sucking from the hole through a pen, then returning the child to its bed; the child languished and died thereafter. Once the child died, Jennet and Ellen allegedly took it from the churchyard, boiled it, ate it and rendered the fat from its bones to anoint themselves so they could change shape. Grace also said Jennet had brought her to attend a meeting of witches where four things like men carried them all across the water to eat strange meat, which Grace refused, and dance and "abuse their bodies." Thomas Walshman gave deposition confirming that he had a child who became sick and died, but he did not know the cause. Jennet accused Grace, in turn, of conspiring with the priest Master Thompson, who had been slandering her by calling her witch, and to whom Grace had been brought to by her mother. Grace retracted her accusations.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Jennet Bierley Jennet Bierley Witch
126

A woman from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, known to be the grandmother of Grace Sowerbutts, mother of Henry Bierley, and mother-in-law to Ellen Bierley. She was indicted at the Lancaster Assizes, along with Ellen Bierley and Jane Southworth, for bewitching her granddaughter Grace so that her body wasted and was consumed. Jennet pleaded not guilty, and was eventually acquitted and released. Grace accused Jennet of numerous things. The accusations started with haunting and vexing her, drawing her by her hair, and laying her on top of a hay-mow. Grace also claimed that Jennet had shapeshifted into a black dog in front of her and picked her off a sty. Another time, Jennet came to Grace in dog shape and allegedly tried to persuade her to drown herself, but a spirit in a white sheet carried her away. Jennet-as-dog also buried Grace in hay and lay on top, robbing her of her speech, senses, and an entire day. Grace claimed to be unable to speak in Jennet's presence thereafter. Grace also accused Jennet and Ellen of stealing Thomas Walshman's child, driving a nail through its navel and sucking from the hole through a pen, then returning the child to its bed; the child languished and died thereafter. Once the child died, Jennet and Ellen allegedly took it from the churchyard, boiled it, ate it and rendered the fat from its bones to anoint themselves so they could change shape. Grace also said Jennet had brought her to attend a meeting of witches where four things like men carried them all across the water to eat strange meat, which Grace refused, and dance and "abuse their bodies." Thomas Walshman gave deposition confirming that he had a child who became sick and died, but he did not know the cause. Jennet accused Grace, in turn, of conspiring with the priest Master Thompson, who had been slandering her by calling her witch, and to whom Grace had been brought to by her mother. Grace retracted her accusations.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Jennet Bierley Jennet Bierley Relative of Witch
126

A woman from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, known to be the grandmother of Grace Sowerbutts, mother of Henry Bierley, and mother-in-law to Ellen Bierley. She was indicted at the Lancaster Assizes, along with Ellen Bierley and Jane Southworth, for bewitching her granddaughter Grace so that her body wasted and was consumed. Jennet pleaded not guilty, and was eventually acquitted and released. Grace accused Jennet of numerous things. The accusations started with haunting and vexing her, drawing her by her hair, and laying her on top of a hay-mow. Grace also claimed that Jennet had shapeshifted into a black dog in front of her and picked her off a sty. Another time, Jennet came to Grace in dog shape and allegedly tried to persuade her to drown herself, but a spirit in a white sheet carried her away. Jennet-as-dog also buried Grace in hay and lay on top, robbing her of her speech, senses, and an entire day. Grace claimed to be unable to speak in Jennet's presence thereafter. Grace also accused Jennet and Ellen of stealing Thomas Walshman's child, driving a nail through its navel and sucking from the hole through a pen, then returning the child to its bed; the child languished and died thereafter. Once the child died, Jennet and Ellen allegedly took it from the churchyard, boiled it, ate it and rendered the fat from its bones to anoint themselves so they could change shape. Grace also said Jennet had brought her to attend a meeting of witches where four things like men carried them all across the water to eat strange meat, which Grace refused, and dance and "abuse their bodies." Thomas Walshman gave deposition confirming that he had a child who became sick and died, but he did not know the cause. Jennet accused Grace, in turn, of conspiring with the priest Master Thompson, who had been slandering her by calling her witch, and to whom Grace had been brought to by her mother. Grace retracted her accusations.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Jennet Bierley Jennet Bierley Accuser
126

A woman from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, known to be the grandmother of Grace Sowerbutts, mother of Henry Bierley, and mother-in-law to Ellen Bierley. She was indicted at the Lancaster Assizes, along with Ellen Bierley and Jane Southworth, for bewitching her granddaughter Grace so that her body wasted and was consumed. Jennet pleaded not guilty, and was eventually acquitted and released. Grace accused Jennet of numerous things. The accusations started with haunting and vexing her, drawing her by her hair, and laying her on top of a hay-mow. Grace also claimed that Jennet had shapeshifted into a black dog in front of her and picked her off a sty. Another time, Jennet came to Grace in dog shape and allegedly tried to persuade her to drown herself, but a spirit in a white sheet carried her away. Jennet-as-dog also buried Grace in hay and lay on top, robbing her of her speech, senses, and an entire day. Grace claimed to be unable to speak in Jennet's presence thereafter. Grace also accused Jennet and Ellen of stealing Thomas Walshman's child, driving a nail through its navel and sucking from the hole through a pen, then returning the child to its bed; the child languished and died thereafter. Once the child died, Jennet and Ellen allegedly took it from the churchyard, boiled it, ate it and rendered the fat from its bones to anoint themselves so they could change shape. Grace also said Jennet had brought her to attend a meeting of witches where four things like men carried them all across the water to eat strange meat, which Grace refused, and dance and "abuse their bodies." Thomas Walshman gave deposition confirming that he had a child who became sick and died, but he did not know the cause. Jennet accused Grace, in turn, of conspiring with the priest Master Thompson, who had been slandering her by calling her witch, and to whom Grace had been brought to by her mother. Grace retracted her accusations.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Jennet Bierley Jennet Bierley Relative of Victim
127

A woman from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, known to be the wife of Henry Bierley, aunt of Grace Sowerbutts, and daughter--in-law to Jennet Bierley. She was indicted at the Lancaster Assizes, along with Jennet Bierley and Jane Southworth, for bewitching her niece Grace so that her body wasted and was consumed. Ellen pleaded not guilty, and was eventually acquitted and released. Grace's accusations started with haunting and vexing her, drawing her by her hair, and laying her on top of a hay-mow. Later in the trial, Grace accused Ellen and Jennet of stealing Thomas Walshman's child, driving a nail through its navel and sucking from the hole through a pen, then returning the child to its bed; the child languished and died thereafter. Once the child died, they allegedly took it from the churchyard, boiled it, ate it and rendered the fat from its bones to anoint themselves so they could change shape. Grace also said she saw Ellen at a meeting of witches Jennet had brought Grace to, where four things like men carried them all across the water to eat strange meat, which Grace refused, and dance and "abuse their bodies." Thomas Walshman gave deposition confirming that he had a child who became sick and died, but he did not know the cause. Ellen accused Grace of conspiring with the priest Master Thompson in levelling the charges of witchcraft, but she could not say why, as she attended the church regularly. Grace retracted her accusations.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Ellen Bierley Ellen Bierley Witch
127

A woman from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, known to be the wife of Henry Bierley, aunt of Grace Sowerbutts, and daughter--in-law to Jennet Bierley. She was indicted at the Lancaster Assizes, along with Jennet Bierley and Jane Southworth, for bewitching her niece Grace so that her body wasted and was consumed. Ellen pleaded not guilty, and was eventually acquitted and released. Grace's accusations started with haunting and vexing her, drawing her by her hair, and laying her on top of a hay-mow. Later in the trial, Grace accused Ellen and Jennet of stealing Thomas Walshman's child, driving a nail through its navel and sucking from the hole through a pen, then returning the child to its bed; the child languished and died thereafter. Once the child died, they allegedly took it from the churchyard, boiled it, ate it and rendered the fat from its bones to anoint themselves so they could change shape. Grace also said she saw Ellen at a meeting of witches Jennet had brought Grace to, where four things like men carried them all across the water to eat strange meat, which Grace refused, and dance and "abuse their bodies." Thomas Walshman gave deposition confirming that he had a child who became sick and died, but he did not know the cause. Ellen accused Grace of conspiring with the priest Master Thompson in levelling the charges of witchcraft, but she could not say why, as she attended the church regularly. Grace retracted her accusations.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Ellen Bierley Ellen Bierley Relative of Witch
127

A woman from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, known to be the wife of Henry Bierley, aunt of Grace Sowerbutts, and daughter--in-law to Jennet Bierley. She was indicted at the Lancaster Assizes, along with Jennet Bierley and Jane Southworth, for bewitching her niece Grace so that her body wasted and was consumed. Ellen pleaded not guilty, and was eventually acquitted and released. Grace's accusations started with haunting and vexing her, drawing her by her hair, and laying her on top of a hay-mow. Later in the trial, Grace accused Ellen and Jennet of stealing Thomas Walshman's child, driving a nail through its navel and sucking from the hole through a pen, then returning the child to its bed; the child languished and died thereafter. Once the child died, they allegedly took it from the churchyard, boiled it, ate it and rendered the fat from its bones to anoint themselves so they could change shape. Grace also said she saw Ellen at a meeting of witches Jennet had brought Grace to, where four things like men carried them all across the water to eat strange meat, which Grace refused, and dance and "abuse their bodies." Thomas Walshman gave deposition confirming that he had a child who became sick and died, but he did not know the cause. Ellen accused Grace of conspiring with the priest Master Thompson in levelling the charges of witchcraft, but she could not say why, as she attended the church regularly. Grace retracted her accusations.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Ellen Bierley Ellen Bierley Relative of Victim
128

A woman from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, known to be the widow of John Southworth. She was indicted at the Lancaster Assizes, along with Jennet Bierley and Ellen Bierley, for bewitching Grace Bierley so that her body wasted and was consumed. Jane pleaded not guilty, and was eventually acquitted and released. Grace's accusations started with haunting and vexing her, drawing her by her hair, and laying her on top of a hay-mow. Grace also said she saw Jane at a meeting of witches Jennet had brought Grace to, where four things like men carried them all across the water to eat strange meat, which Grace refused, and dance and "abuse their bodies." John Singleton and William Alker both gave deposition alleging that Jane was "thought an euill woman, and a Witch," and that Sir John Southworth (kin to Jane's husband) feared she would kill or bewitch him. Jane said, during her examination, that she had spoken to the priest Master Thompson a month or so before her imprisonment, and challenged him for slandering her as a witch; she accused him of being the origin of the claims against her, and of trying to drive her out of the Church. Grace eventually retracted her charges.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Jane Southworth Jane Southworth Witch
128

A woman from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, known to be the widow of John Southworth. She was indicted at the Lancaster Assizes, along with Jennet Bierley and Ellen Bierley, for bewitching Grace Bierley so that her body wasted and was consumed. Jane pleaded not guilty, and was eventually acquitted and released. Grace's accusations started with haunting and vexing her, drawing her by her hair, and laying her on top of a hay-mow. Grace also said she saw Jane at a meeting of witches Jennet had brought Grace to, where four things like men carried them all across the water to eat strange meat, which Grace refused, and dance and "abuse their bodies." John Singleton and William Alker both gave deposition alleging that Jane was "thought an euill woman, and a Witch," and that Sir John Southworth (kin to Jane's husband) feared she would kill or bewitch him. Jane said, during her examination, that she had spoken to the priest Master Thompson a month or so before her imprisonment, and challenged him for slandering her as a witch; she accused him of being the origin of the claims against her, and of trying to drive her out of the Church. Grace eventually retracted her charges.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Jane Southworth Jane Southworth Accuser
129

A girl from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, known to be 14 years old and the granddaughter of Jennet Bierley and the niece of Henry Bierley and Ellen Bierley. She accused her grandmother, aunt and Jane Southworth of bewitching her so that her body wasted and was consumed. Grace eventually admitted to faking her afflictions and making false claims; she accused priest Master Thompson of having convinced her to make the claims. Grace accused all three women of haunting and vexing her, drawing her by her hair, and laying her on top of a hay-mow. Grace also claimed that Jennet had shapeshifted into a black dog in front of her and picked her off a sty. Another time, Jennet came to Grace in dog shape and allegedly tried to persuade her to drown herself, but a spirit in a white sheet carried her away. Jennet-as-dog also buried Grace in hay and lay on top, robbing her of her speech, senses, and an entire day; she claimed to be unable to speak in Jennet's presence thereafter. Grace also accused Jennet and Ellen of stealing Thomas Walshman's child, driving a nail through its navel and sucking from the hole through a pen, then returning the child to its bed; the child languished and died thereafter. Once the child died, Jennet and Ellen allegedly took it from the churchyard, boiled it, ate it and rendered the fat from its bones to anoint themselves so they could change shape. She also alleged that Jennet had brought her to attend a meeting of witches, at which Ellen and Jane were also present, where four things like men carried them all across the water to eat strange meat, which Grace refused, and dance; the black things pulled the women down to "abuse their bodies." Thomas Walshman gave deposition confirming that he had a child who became sick and died, but he did not know the cause. Jennet accused Grace, in turn, of conspiring with the priest Master Thompson when Grace's mother, brought her to him out of concern for Grace's fits. Grace retracted all her accusations before the court.(K3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K3

Grace Sowerbutts Grace Sowerbutts Relative of Witch
129

A girl from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, known to be 14 years old and the granddaughter of Jennet Bierley and the niece of Henry Bierley and Ellen Bierley. She accused her grandmother, aunt and Jane Southworth of bewitching her so that her body wasted and was consumed. Grace eventually admitted to faking her afflictions and making false claims; she accused priest Master Thompson of having convinced her to make the claims. Grace accused all three women of haunting and vexing her, drawing her by her hair, and laying her on top of a hay-mow. Grace also claimed that Jennet had shapeshifted into a black dog in front of her and picked her off a sty. Another time, Jennet came to Grace in dog shape and allegedly tried to persuade her to drown herself, but a spirit in a white sheet carried her away. Jennet-as-dog also buried Grace in hay and lay on top, robbing her of her speech, senses, and an entire day; she claimed to be unable to speak in Jennet's presence thereafter. Grace also accused Jennet and Ellen of stealing Thomas Walshman's child, driving a nail through its navel and sucking from the hole through a pen, then returning the child to its bed; the child languished and died thereafter. Once the child died, Jennet and Ellen allegedly took it from the churchyard, boiled it, ate it and rendered the fat from its bones to anoint themselves so they could change shape. She also alleged that Jennet had brought her to attend a meeting of witches, at which Ellen and Jane were also present, where four things like men carried them all across the water to eat strange meat, which Grace refused, and dance; the black things pulled the women down to "abuse their bodies." Thomas Walshman gave deposition confirming that he had a child who became sick and died, but he did not know the cause. Jennet accused Grace, in turn, of conspiring with the priest Master Thompson when Grace's mother, brought her to him out of concern for Grace's fits. Grace retracted all her accusations before the court.(K3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K3

Grace Sowerbutts Grace Sowerbutts Accuser
129

A girl from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, known to be 14 years old and the granddaughter of Jennet Bierley and the niece of Henry Bierley and Ellen Bierley. She accused her grandmother, aunt and Jane Southworth of bewitching her so that her body wasted and was consumed. Grace eventually admitted to faking her afflictions and making false claims; she accused priest Master Thompson of having convinced her to make the claims. Grace accused all three women of haunting and vexing her, drawing her by her hair, and laying her on top of a hay-mow. Grace also claimed that Jennet had shapeshifted into a black dog in front of her and picked her off a sty. Another time, Jennet came to Grace in dog shape and allegedly tried to persuade her to drown herself, but a spirit in a white sheet carried her away. Jennet-as-dog also buried Grace in hay and lay on top, robbing her of her speech, senses, and an entire day; she claimed to be unable to speak in Jennet's presence thereafter. Grace also accused Jennet and Ellen of stealing Thomas Walshman's child, driving a nail through its navel and sucking from the hole through a pen, then returning the child to its bed; the child languished and died thereafter. Once the child died, Jennet and Ellen allegedly took it from the churchyard, boiled it, ate it and rendered the fat from its bones to anoint themselves so they could change shape. She also alleged that Jennet had brought her to attend a meeting of witches, at which Ellen and Jane were also present, where four things like men carried them all across the water to eat strange meat, which Grace refused, and dance; the black things pulled the women down to "abuse their bodies." Thomas Walshman gave deposition confirming that he had a child who became sick and died, but he did not know the cause. Jennet accused Grace, in turn, of conspiring with the priest Master Thompson when Grace's mother, brought her to him out of concern for Grace's fits. Grace retracted all her accusations before the court.(K3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K3

Grace Sowerbutts Grace Sowerbutts Victim
130

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be the daughter of Anne Whittle and the wife of Thomas Redferne. She was charged with bewitching Robert Nutter to death and found guilty. Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, gave deposition stating that Nutter had propositioned her daughter, but that Redferne had denied him, which angered Nutter; he departed saying "in a great rage, that if euer the Ground came to him, shee should neuer dwell vpon his Land." Whittle claimed that she was responsible for Nutter's death, not her daughter, and that several other women had conspired with her to kill him. Elizabeth Southerns gave a contrary deposition, however, alleging that she had seen Redferne making images of Robert, Marie and Christopher Nutter. James Robinson gave a deposition stating that Redferne was commonly known to be a witch, Nutter claimed she had bewitched him, and that Nutter had said to Thomas Redferne "if euer he came againe he would get his Father to put the said Redferne out of his house, or he himselfe would pull it downe." James Device also implicated Redferne in a plot to blow up Lancaster Castle. Margaret Crooke, Robert Nutter's sister, claimed that Nutter languished ill a long time before dying, and that in his illness "he did a hundred times at the least say, That the said Anne Redferne and her associates had bewitched him to death." Despite Whittle's best efforts to protect her daughter, Anne Redferne was declared a particularly dangerous witch for the images she was said to have made. (D3-D4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, D3-D4

Anne Redferne Anne Redferne Witch
130

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be the daughter of Anne Whittle and the wife of Thomas Redferne. She was charged with bewitching Robert Nutter to death and found guilty. Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, gave deposition stating that Nutter had propositioned her daughter, but that Redferne had denied him, which angered Nutter; he departed saying "in a great rage, that if euer the Ground came to him, shee should neuer dwell vpon his Land." Whittle claimed that she was responsible for Nutter's death, not her daughter, and that several other women had conspired with her to kill him. Elizabeth Southerns gave a contrary deposition, however, alleging that she had seen Redferne making images of Robert, Marie and Christopher Nutter. James Robinson gave a deposition stating that Redferne was commonly known to be a witch, Nutter claimed she had bewitched him, and that Nutter had said to Thomas Redferne "if euer he came againe he would get his Father to put the said Redferne out of his house, or he himselfe would pull it downe." James Device also implicated Redferne in a plot to blow up Lancaster Castle. Margaret Crooke, Robert Nutter's sister, claimed that Nutter languished ill a long time before dying, and that in his illness "he did a hundred times at the least say, That the said Anne Redferne and her associates had bewitched him to death." Despite Whittle's best efforts to protect her daughter, Anne Redferne was declared a particularly dangerous witch for the images she was said to have made. (D3-D4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, D3-D4

Anne Redferne Anne Redferne Relative of Witch
131

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be the wife of Richard Nutter, and the mother of Myles Nutter. She was charged with bewitching Henry Mytton to death and pronounced guilty. She was elderly, wealthy and of good reputation, and maintained her innocence to the end. Alice is said to be "a rich woman; had a great estate, and children of good hope: in the common opinion of the world, of good temper, free from enuy or malice." According to James Device, Alice conspired with Elizabeth Southerns and Elizabeth Device in Mytton's death after Mytton refused to give Southerns a penny, that Alice had been seen attending a meeting at Southerns' home, and that she had been at a feast of witches held at Malking Tower.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Alice Nutter Alice Nutter Relative of Victim
131

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be the wife of Richard Nutter, and the mother of Myles Nutter. She was charged with bewitching Henry Mytton to death and pronounced guilty. She was elderly, wealthy and of good reputation, and maintained her innocence to the end. Alice is said to be "a rich woman; had a great estate, and children of good hope: in the common opinion of the world, of good temper, free from enuy or malice." According to James Device, Alice conspired with Elizabeth Southerns and Elizabeth Device in Mytton's death after Mytton refused to give Southerns a penny, that Alice had been seen attending a meeting at Southerns' home, and that she had been at a feast of witches held at Malking Tower.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Alice Nutter Alice Nutter Witch
132

A woman from Coine in the County of Lancaster, known to be the wife of clothier John Hewit; Katherine was charged with bewitching Anne Foulds to death and was declared guilty. James Device alleged in his deposition that Hewit confessed to it at a meeting of witches at Malkin Tower, and that she had also claimed to have "then in hanck a child of Michael Hartleys of Colne." Elizabeth Device claimed that, at that same meeting, Hewit "gaue her consent with the said Prestons wife for the murder of Master Lister."(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Katherine Hewit Katherine Hewit Witch
133

A man from Mosse-End in the County of Lancaster, known to be the son of Jane and Christopher Bulcocke. John and his mother Jane were jointly charged with bewitching Jennet Deane so that she wasted, consumed and became mad; he was acquitted at their trial.James Device alleged in his deposition that John was present for a meeting of witches at Elizabeth Southerns' home, and at a feast of witches at Malking Tower; Device and his mother Elizabeth Device also alleged that John confessed to giving consent at Malking Tower to join together with the other witches present to bewitch Leonard Lister to death. Jennet Device claimed to having seen John turning the spit at Malking Tower. John denied attending at Malking Tower, and pleaded not guilty of Deane's bewitchment. (C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

John Bulcock John Bulcock Witch
133

A man from Mosse-End in the County of Lancaster, known to be the son of Jane and Christopher Bulcocke. John and his mother Jane were jointly charged with bewitching Jennet Deane so that she wasted, consumed and became mad; he was acquitted at their trial.James Device alleged in his deposition that John was present for a meeting of witches at Elizabeth Southerns' home, and at a feast of witches at Malking Tower; Device and his mother Elizabeth Device also alleged that John confessed to giving consent at Malking Tower to join together with the other witches present to bewitch Leonard Lister to death. Jennet Device claimed to having seen John turning the spit at Malking Tower. John denied attending at Malking Tower, and pleaded not guilty of Deane's bewitchment. (C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

John Bulcock John Bulcock Relative of Witch
135

A woman from Paddiham in the County of Lancaster, known to be the wife of Edward Pearson, who was charged with witchcraft and sentenced to be pilloried for four market days with a paper on her head declaring her crimes, followed by one year's imprisonment. She was generally thought to be "A very dangerous Witch of long continuance, generally suspected and feared in all parts of the Countrie, and of all good people neare her, and not without great cause: For whosoeuer gaue her any iust occasion of offence, shee tormented with great miserie, or cut off their children, goods, or friends." She was charged with several counts of witchcraft, including bewitching a horse, the goods and chattel belonging to Dodgeson. Anne Whittle gave deposition alleging that Pearson had a familiar in the shape of a cloven-footed man, and that this familiar had aided Pearson in bewitching Dodgeson's mare to death. Whittle also claimed that Pearson had confessed to her that she had bewitched Childer's wife and daughter to death. Jennet Booth alleged that, a week after Pearson was imprisoned, Booth was carding wool in Pearson's home; while there, she found a toad sitting in the fire. (C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Margaret Pearson Margaret Pearson Witch
167

A woman from Burneley in the County of Lancaster, known to be a widow. According to Anne Whittle, Widow Lomshawe was allegedly approached, along with Whittle and Elizabeth Southerns, by Elizabeth Nutter to bewitching Robert Nutter to death. Whittle claimed that, when her son-in-law Thomas Redferne persuaded Whittle not to participate, Lomeshawe was angry with Redfearne but the local schoolmaster M. Baldwyn talked her out of hurting him. Redferne gave her a capon for staying her hand against him. Whittle went on to say that she thought that Lomshawe and Jane Boothman both did what they could to kill Nutter. Lomshawe is said to have died well before the apprehensions for witchcraft and trials at Lancaster Assizes.(B4-B4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4-B4v

Lomshawe Widow Lomeshaw Witch
964

A man from Downeham in the County of Lancaster, known to be the son of Richard Ashton, Esquire. According to Anne Whittle's confession, Richard Ashton the younger was bewitched to death by Elizabeth Southerns.(B5-B5v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B5-B5v

Richard Ashton Richard Ashton Victim
965

A young girl from Weethead within the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be the daughter of Richard Baldwin, who was allegedly betwitched to death by Elizabeth Southerns. According to Alison Device's deposition, Southerns had a falling-out with Richard Baldwin, and once had Device take her to Baldwin's home late at night. The next morning, Device heard that Baldwin's daughter was sick. The child was said to "languish afterwards by the space of a yeare, or thereaboutes, and dyed." Device was convinced that Southerns had caused the girl's death.(C-Cv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C-Cv

Baldwin Baldwin (Daughter) Victim
274

A woman from Mosse-End in the County of Lancaster, known to be the wife of Christopher Bulcocke and the mother John Bulcocke. Jane and her son John were jointly charged with bewitching Jennet Deane so that she wasted, consumed and became mad; she was acquitted at their trial.James Device alleged in his deposition that Jane was present for a meeting of witches at Elizabeth Southerns' home, and at a feast of witches at Malking Tower; Device and his mother Elizabeth Device also alleged that Jane confessed to giving consent at Malking Tower to join together with the other witches present to bewitch Leonard Lister to death. Jane denied attending at Malking Tower, and pleaded not guilty of Deane's bewitchment. (C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Jane Bulcock Jane Bulcock Relative of Witch
274

A woman from Mosse-End in the County of Lancaster, known to be the wife of Christopher Bulcocke and the mother John Bulcocke. Jane and her son John were jointly charged with bewitching Jennet Deane so that she wasted, consumed and became mad; she was acquitted at their trial.James Device alleged in his deposition that Jane was present for a meeting of witches at Elizabeth Southerns' home, and at a feast of witches at Malking Tower; Device and his mother Elizabeth Device also alleged that Jane confessed to giving consent at Malking Tower to join together with the other witches present to bewitch Leonard Lister to death. Jane denied attending at Malking Tower, and pleaded not guilty of Deane's bewitchment. (C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Jane Bulcock Jane Bulcock Witch
378

A man from the Carre (Carr Hall) in the County of Lancaster, known to be a gentleman and the the husband of Anne Townley. Henry Townley accused James Device of bewitching Anne to death, and gave deposition against him at the Lancaster Assizes.(H2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, H2

Henry Towneley Henry Townley Witness
383

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be the husband of Anne Redferne and the son-in-law of Anne Whittle, alias Chattox. According to Anne Whittle, he talked her out of bewitching Robert Nutter to death when Nutter's grandmother Elizabeth approached her about it, earning Widow Lomeshawe's wrath; Redferne gave Lomeshawe a capon for staying her hand against him. Elizabeth Southerns claimed to have seen Anne Whittle and Anne Redferne making clay images of Robert, Christopher and Marie Nutter at Redferne's home. When Robert Nutter claimed that Redferne's wife and mother-in-law had bewitched him and threatened to have his father put him Redferne out of his house, Redferne's response was a mild "when you come back againe you will be in a better minde."(D3-D4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, D3-D4

Thomas Redferne Thomas Redferne Relative of Witch
384

A man from Green-head in Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be minor gentry the father of Robert Nutter, John Nutter and Margaret Crooke, father-in-law of Marie Nutter, and the son of Elizabeth and old Robert Nutter. Anne Redferne was charged with and convinced of bewitching him to death; he died around 1594. Elizabeth Southerns alleged that she saw Anne Whittle and Anne Redferne making clay images of Christopher, Robert and Marie Nutter at Thomas Redferne's home. Margaret Crooke claimed that Christopher died the year after his son Robert, and that he said numerous times in his illness that he was bewitched. (E-Ev)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E-Ev

Christopher Nutter Christopher Nutter Relative of Witch
384

A man from Green-head in Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be minor gentry the father of Robert Nutter, John Nutter and Margaret Crooke, father-in-law of Marie Nutter, and the son of Elizabeth and old Robert Nutter. Anne Redferne was charged with and convinced of bewitching him to death; he died around 1594. Elizabeth Southerns alleged that she saw Anne Whittle and Anne Redferne making clay images of Christopher, Robert and Marie Nutter at Thomas Redferne's home. Margaret Crooke claimed that Christopher died the year after his son Robert, and that he said numerous times in his illness that he was bewitched. (E-Ev)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E-Ev

Christopher Nutter Christopher Nutter Victim
384

A man from Green-head in Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be minor gentry the father of Robert Nutter, John Nutter and Margaret Crooke, father-in-law of Marie Nutter, and the son of Elizabeth and old Robert Nutter. Anne Redferne was charged with and convinced of bewitching him to death; he died around 1594. Elizabeth Southerns alleged that she saw Anne Whittle and Anne Redferne making clay images of Christopher, Robert and Marie Nutter at Thomas Redferne's home. Margaret Crooke claimed that Christopher died the year after his son Robert, and that he said numerous times in his illness that he was bewitched. (E-Ev)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E-Ev

Christopher Nutter Christopher Nutter Relative of Victim
404

A woman from Gisborn in the County of York, known to be the wife of William Preston. Jennet Preston was tried and executed for the murder of Master Thomas Lister at the York Assizes. The trial occurred after Preston was accused of attending Elizabeth Device's Good Friday feast at Malking Tower for the purpose of recruiting help to murder Lister, who had tried to have her put away at the last York Assizes on charges of killing a child. According to James Device, she had a familiar in the shape of a white foal with a black spot on its forehead. Device also claimed that she had agreed to host the next Good Friday meeting. Lister is said to have cried out that she stood over him during his sickness, and to have cried that she was lying atop him on his death bed. Lister's body allegedly bled anew in her presence. Jennet Device identified her as missing from the witches imprisoned for their participation in the Good Friday feast, and her husband William, attending the trial as an observer, recognized her description and left, allegedly convinced of her guilt. Yet, she and her family insisted on her innocence to the end, and that she was the victim of malicious prosecution.(C2v-C3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2v-C3v

Jennet Preston Jennet Preston Witch
1039

A woman from Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the daughter of Anthony Nutter, whom Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, allegedly bewitched to death. Alison Device claimed that, while visiting Anthony Nutter's home, she and Anne Nutter laughed at Anne Whittle, who was also visiting. Whittle told the two of them "I will be meet with the one of you," and the next day Anne Nutter fell sick. She died three weeks later.(E3v-E4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E3v-E4

Anne Nutter Anne Nutter Victim
429

A man from Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be a father. According to James Device, Bullock went to Elizabeth Southerns' home and accused her granddaughter Alison Device of bewitching his child. Alison allegedly "fell downe on her knees, & asked the said Bullocke forgiuenes, and confessed to him, that she had bewitched the said child, as this Examinate heard his said sister confesse vnto him this Examinate."(C2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2

Henry Bullocke Henry Bullocke Relative of Victim
907

A man from Halifax in the County of York, known to be travelling pedlar and the father of Abraham Law, who was allegedly bewitched to be lamed, wasted and consumed by Alison Device. He was seen in court to be "deformed by her Witch-craft, and transformed beyond the course of Nature." Device confessed to bewitching him, alleging that she set her familiar on him when he refused to sell her pins; her familiar caused Law to fall down lame in the road. Law gave deposition against Device, alleging that she became angry with him when he refused to give, not sell, her pins, and he fell when he walked away from her. He made it into a nearby alehouse, and lay there in great pain and unable to stir. While lying stricken he "saw a great Black-Dogge stand by him, with very fearefull firie eyes, great teeth, and a terrible countenance, looking him in the face; whereat he was very sore afraid: and immediately after came in the said Alizon Deuice, who staid not long there, but looked on him, and went away." He was tormented continually by her thereafter, rendering him unable to continue his travels. His son, Abraham Law, also gave deposition, claiming that he went to his father in Coine and found Law speechless and lamed on his left side with the exception of his eye. Abraham said that once Law recovered his speech, he complained of being pricked, and that it had started when Alison Device offered to buy pins from him but had no money to pay; Law gave her the pins anyway. Law also complained to him that Device lay upon him and troubled him along with an old woman Law did not know. Device confessed and begged forgiveness, which Law gave readily.(R2v-R3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, R2v-R3

John Law John Law Victim
961

A man from the County of York, known to be a knight, a Baron of His Majesties' Court of Exchequer and a Justice of Assize for Oyer and Terminer. Sir James Altham heard the examination of Jennet Preston on July 27, 1612 along with Sir Edward Bromley.(Title Page)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Title Page

James Altham James Altham Examiner/Justice
962

A man from the County of York, known to be a knight, a Baron of His Majesties' Court of Exchequer and a Justice of Assize for Oyer and Terminer. Sir Edward Bromley heard the examination of Jennet Preston on July 27, 1612 along with Sir James Altham. Knighted in 1610, he rode the northern circuit as a Justice of the Assize from 1610-1618. He is known to have been influenced by Sir Edward Coke, as he was among those "whom Sir Edward Coke led in refusing to sit or to take the oath as commissioners."(Title Page)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Title Page

Edward Bromley Edward Bromley Examiner/Justice
963

A man from Weethead within the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be a miller and a father, whose daughter was allegedly bewitched to death by Elizabeth Southerns. According to Southerns' confession, her daughter, Elizabeth Device, had helped out Richard Baldwin's family with running the mill, and Device asked Southerns to go to his home to ask him to give her something in payment. Southerns, accompanied by her granddaughter Alison Device (Southerns was blind due to advanced age), was thrown out by Baldwin, who said "get out of my ground Whores and Witches, I will burne the one of you, and hang the other." Southerns instructed her familiar Tibb to "Reuenge thee eyther of him, or his" on the way home. Device gave deposition alleging that Southerns had a falling out with Baldwin, and once asked her to lead Southerns to Baldwin's home late at night; the next day, Device heard that Baldwin's daughter was sick. The child languished for a year before finally dying; Device was convinced that Southerns bewitched her to death.(B2v-B3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B2v-B3v

Richard Baldwyns Richard Baldwin Relative of Victim
969

A man from the Bull-Hole in Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be minor gentry and the son of Christopher Nutter, brother to Robert Nutter and Margaret Crooke, grandson of Elizabeth Nutter and Robert Nutter the older, and father to a son. He is also the neighbour of Anne Whittle, alias Chattox. According to Alison Device, John Nutter once asked her grandmother Elizabeth Southerns to cure a sick cow, which Southerns agreed to do. Device also told of an encounter Nutter had with Anne Whittle's daughter Elizabeth. Whittle's daughter went to Nutter to beg a dish of milk and brought the milk to Whittle. While Whittle was churning it, Nutter's son came up to her and, disliking what she was doing, knocked over the can with the milk. The next day, Nutter's cow was found to be sick; it languished three or four days before dying.(C-Cv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C-Cv

John Nutter John Nutter Relative of Witch
969

A man from the Bull-Hole in Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be minor gentry and the son of Christopher Nutter, brother to Robert Nutter and Margaret Crooke, grandson of Elizabeth Nutter and Robert Nutter the older, and father to a son. He is also the neighbour of Anne Whittle, alias Chattox. According to Alison Device, John Nutter once asked her grandmother Elizabeth Southerns to cure a sick cow, which Southerns agreed to do. Device also told of an encounter Nutter had with Anne Whittle's daughter Elizabeth. Whittle's daughter went to Nutter to beg a dish of milk and brought the milk to Whittle. While Whittle was churning it, Nutter's son came up to her and, disliking what she was doing, knocked over the can with the milk. The next day, Nutter's cow was found to be sick; it languished three or four days before dying.(C-Cv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C-Cv

John Nutter John Nutter Victim
969

A man from the Bull-Hole in Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be minor gentry and the son of Christopher Nutter, brother to Robert Nutter and Margaret Crooke, grandson of Elizabeth Nutter and Robert Nutter the older, and father to a son. He is also the neighbour of Anne Whittle, alias Chattox. According to Alison Device, John Nutter once asked her grandmother Elizabeth Southerns to cure a sick cow, which Southerns agreed to do. Device also told of an encounter Nutter had with Anne Whittle's daughter Elizabeth. Whittle's daughter went to Nutter to beg a dish of milk and brought the milk to Whittle. While Whittle was churning it, Nutter's son came up to her and, disliking what she was doing, knocked over the can with the milk. The next day, Nutter's cow was found to be sick; it languished three or four days before dying.(C-Cv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C-Cv

John Nutter John Nutter Relative of Victim
971

A child from Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be the child of Henry Bullocke, who was allegedly bewitched by Alison Device. According to James Device's deposition, when Bullocke accused Alison of the bewitchment, Device confessed and begged forgiveness. (C2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2

Bullocke Bullocke (child) Victim
973

A man from the County of Lancaster, known to be a Justice of the Peace for the County of Lancaster, who presided over the examinations and trials of Elizabeth Southerns, Alison Device, James Device, Elizabeth Device, Anne Whittle, Jennet Device, Jennet Preston and Anne Robinson.(B2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B2

Roger Nowell Roger Nowell Examiner/Justice
974

A woman from Windle in the County of Lancaster, who was tried for witchcraft at the Lancaster Assizes and pronounced guilty. Peter Chaddock gave deposition alleging that Isabel Robey was displeased with his choice of wife, and that he had "called the said Isabel Witch, and said that hee did not care for her." Two days later, he was afflicted with a pain in his bones, but mended not long after. Four years after that, his wife argued with Isabelle, and he was afflicted with a pain in his neck for five days, was intensely thirsty, and felt hot throughout his body. He claimed that he only mended when James the Glover brought him a drink and prayed for him. The pain in his bones reoccured the year before the trial, and he was convinced Robey was behind it. Jane Wilkinson claimed that Robey once asked her for milk, but she would not give any, and when she next met Robey, she was afraid of her, and became sick and so pained she could not stand. The next day, Wilkinson was pinched suddenly on her thigh while on the road to Warrington, and became so sick she had to ride home but soon mended. Margaret Lyon gave deposition alleging that Robey once told her Peter Chaddock would not mend until he asked her for forgiveness, but that he never would. Lyon also claimed that Chaddock's wife told her that Chaddock was satisfied that Robey was no witch, but also said that she thought he would not mend until he asked for forgiveness, but that he was fearful because Robey had done him much hurt. Margaret Parre alleged that Robey once told her she had bewitched both Chaddock and Wilkinson, and threatened her too.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Isabel Robey Isabel Robey Witch
975

A woman from the County of Lancaster, who was tried for witchcraft at the Lancaster Assizes and found to be not guilty.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Elizabeth Astley Elizabeth Astley Witch
976

A man from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, who was tried for witchcraft at the Lancaster Assizes and found to be not guilty.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

John Ramesden John Ramesden Witch
977

A woman from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, who was tried for witchcraft at the Lancaster Assizes and found to be not guilty.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Alice Grey Alice Grey Witch
978

A woman from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, who was tried for witchcraft at the Lancaster Assizes and found to be not guilty.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Isabell Sidegraves Isabell Sidegraves Witch
979

A man from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, who was tried for witchcraft at the Lancaster Assizes and found to be not guilty.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Lawrence Hayes Lawrence Hayes Witch
980

A man from Pendle in the County of Lancaster, whom Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, allegedly bewitched to death. According to Alison Device, Whittle had a falling-out with Hugh Moore when he accused her of bewitching his cattle, for which she "did curse and worry the said Moore, and said she would be Reuenged." Moore became sick not long after. He languished for half a year before dying.(E4-E4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E4-E4v

Hugh Moore Hugh Moore Accuser
980

A man from Pendle in the County of Lancaster, whom Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, allegedly bewitched to death. According to Alison Device, Whittle had a falling-out with Hugh Moore when he accused her of bewitching his cattle, for which she "did curse and worry the said Moore, and said she would be Reuenged." Moore became sick not long after. He languished for half a year before dying.(E4-E4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E4-E4v

Hugh Moore Hugh Moore Victim
981

A child from the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be nine years old and the granddaughter of Elizabeth Southerns, daughter of Elizabeth Device and John Device, sister of James Device and Alison Device and niece of Christopher Howgate. Jennet Device was the star witness in the witchcraft trials at Lancaster Assizes, and gave deposition against her entire family and several others, most notably Jennet Preston, whom Device picked out from the crowd at the trial. Her mother, Elizabeth Device, "outragiously cursing, cryed out against the child in such fearefull manner" at the trial for giving witness against her. Device provided a list of names of witches who attended a dinner at Elizabeth's home of Malking Tower, the names and shapes of familiars, and what she had overheard about who had bewitched to death whom. Device also recited two prayers she said Elizabeth had taught her, one to cure the bewitched and one to get drink. Twenty years later, in 1634, Jennet was herself accused of witchcraft. Two witches' marks were allegedly found, and she was convicted of bewitching Isabel Nutter to death; the charges were discredited, but she languished nevertheless in Lancaster Castle until August 1636.(F2-F3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, F2-F3

Jennet Device Jennet Device Witness
981

A child from the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be nine years old and the granddaughter of Elizabeth Southerns, daughter of Elizabeth Device and John Device, sister of James Device and Alison Device and niece of Christopher Howgate. Jennet Device was the star witness in the witchcraft trials at Lancaster Assizes, and gave deposition against her entire family and several others, most notably Jennet Preston, whom Device picked out from the crowd at the trial. Her mother, Elizabeth Device, "outragiously cursing, cryed out against the child in such fearefull manner" at the trial for giving witness against her. Device provided a list of names of witches who attended a dinner at Elizabeth's home of Malking Tower, the names and shapes of familiars, and what she had overheard about who had bewitched to death whom. Device also recited two prayers she said Elizabeth had taught her, one to cure the bewitched and one to get drink. Twenty years later, in 1634, Jennet was herself accused of witchcraft. Two witches' marks were allegedly found, and she was convicted of bewitching Isabel Nutter to death; the charges were discredited, but she languished nevertheless in Lancaster Castle until August 1636.(F2-F3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, F2-F3

Jennet Device Jennet Device Accuser
981

A child from the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be nine years old and the granddaughter of Elizabeth Southerns, daughter of Elizabeth Device and John Device, sister of James Device and Alison Device and niece of Christopher Howgate. Jennet Device was the star witness in the witchcraft trials at Lancaster Assizes, and gave deposition against her entire family and several others, most notably Jennet Preston, whom Device picked out from the crowd at the trial. Her mother, Elizabeth Device, "outragiously cursing, cryed out against the child in such fearefull manner" at the trial for giving witness against her. Device provided a list of names of witches who attended a dinner at Elizabeth's home of Malking Tower, the names and shapes of familiars, and what she had overheard about who had bewitched to death whom. Device also recited two prayers she said Elizabeth had taught her, one to cure the bewitched and one to get drink. Twenty years later, in 1634, Jennet was herself accused of witchcraft. Two witches' marks were allegedly found, and she was convicted of bewitching Isabel Nutter to death; the charges were discredited, but she languished nevertheless in Lancaster Castle until August 1636.(F2-F3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, F2-F3

Jennet Device Jennet Device Relative of Witch
982

A man from Rough-Lee in the County of Lancaster, who was allegedly bewitched to death by Elizabeth Device, Alice Nutter and Elizabeth Southerns. According to James Device, Mytton had refused to give Southerns a penny, for which she sought his death.(F3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, F3v

Henry Mytton Henry Mytton Victim
983

A man from Westby in the County of Lancaster, known to be a neighbour of Jennet Preston, who was allegedly bewitched to death; Preston was executed for her involvement in his death. According to Elizabeth Device and James Device, the attendees of Elizabeth's dinner at Malking Tower discussed Lister and agreed to assist Preston in killing him. James claimed that Preston said that Lister had "borne malice vnto her, and had thought to haue put her away at the last Assises at Yorke, but could not and this Examinate heard the said woman say, That her power was not strong ynough to doe it her selfe, being now lesse then before time it had beene." Elizabeth confessed to involvement in Lister's death. Anne Robinson gave deposition claiming that, on his deathbed, Lister "cried out vnto them that stood about him; that Iennet Preston was in the house, looke where shee is, take hold of her: for Gods sake shut the doores, and take her, shee cannot escape away. Looke about for her, and lay hold on her, for shee is in the house: and so cryed very often in his great paines, to them that came to visit him during his sicknesse." His body is said to have bled fresh blood in Preston's presence.(C2v-C3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2v-C3

Thomas Lister Master Thomas Lister Victim
987

A man from Samlesbury in the county of Lancashire, known to be a yeoman, who gave deposition in the trial of Jane Southworth. He said that Sir John Southworth, cousin to Jane Southworth's husband John, shunned Jane, and would say that he disliked her. However, Alker doubted she would bewitch him.(M)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, M

William Alker William Alker Witness
988

A man from Samlesbury in the county of Lancashire, known to be the cousin of Sir John Southworth and husband of Jane Southworth, an accused witch. According to John Singleton, Sir John said that "he was sorry for her husband, that was his kinsman, for he thought she would kill him." (L4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, L4v

John Southworth John Southworth Relative of Witch
989

A man from Salmesbury in the county of Lancashire, known to be a Jesuit and a seminary priest, who also goes by the alias Christopher Southworth. He was accused and found guilty of instructing Grace Sowerbuts to accuse Jane Southworth, her grandmother Jennet Bierly, and aunt Ellen Bierly of bewitching her and attending meeting of witches in which they ate strange meat and allowed four things like men to abuse their bodies and Grace's. He is also said to have coached Grace into accusing Jennet and Ellen of driving a nail into the navel of Thomas Walshman's child to suck from the hole, and, after the child died, stealing it from the churchyard to cannibalizing it and render the fat from its bones. He was convicted on the strength of Grace's retraction of her accusations and confession of Thompson's involvement. According to Grace, "one Master Thompson, which she taketh to be Master Christopher Southworth, to whom shee was sent to learne her prayers, did perswade, counsell, and aduise her, to deale as formerly hath beene said against her said Grand-mother, Aunt, and Southworths wife." Jane Southworth said "shee saw Master Thompson, alias Southworth, the Priest, a month or sixe weekes before she was committed to the Gaole; and had conference with him in a place called Barne-hey-lane, where and when shee challenged him for slandering her to bee a Witch." (K3-K3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K3-K3v

Thompson Master Thompson Preacher/Minister
989

A man from Salmesbury in the county of Lancashire, known to be a Jesuit and a seminary priest, who also goes by the alias Christopher Southworth. He was accused and found guilty of instructing Grace Sowerbuts to accuse Jane Southworth, her grandmother Jennet Bierly, and aunt Ellen Bierly of bewitching her and attending meeting of witches in which they ate strange meat and allowed four things like men to abuse their bodies and Grace's. He is also said to have coached Grace into accusing Jennet and Ellen of driving a nail into the navel of Thomas Walshman's child to suck from the hole, and, after the child died, stealing it from the churchyard to cannibalizing it and render the fat from its bones. He was convicted on the strength of Grace's retraction of her accusations and confession of Thompson's involvement. According to Grace, "one Master Thompson, which she taketh to be Master Christopher Southworth, to whom shee was sent to learne her prayers, did perswade, counsell, and aduise her, to deale as formerly hath beene said against her said Grand-mother, Aunt, and Southworths wife." Jane Southworth said "shee saw Master Thompson, alias Southworth, the Priest, a month or sixe weekes before she was committed to the Gaole; and had conference with him in a place called Barne-hey-lane, where and when shee challenged him for slandering her to bee a Witch." (K3-K3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K3-K3v

Thompson Master Thompson Accuser
990

A man from Halifax in the County of York, known to be a clothier (tailor) and the son of John Law. He accompanied his father to the Lancaster Assizes to give deposition against Alison Device, who was charged with bewitching John Law. Abraham claimed that he went to his father in Coine after receiving a letter from him, and found John speechless and lamed on his left side with the exception of his eye. Abraham said that once John recovered his speech, he complained of being pricked, and that it had started when Alison Device offered to buy pins from him but had no money to pay; John gave her the pins anyway. John also complained to him that Device lay upon him and troubled him along with an old woman he did not know.(R3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, R3

Abraham Law Abraham Law Relative of Victim
990

A man from Halifax in the County of York, known to be a clothier (tailor) and the son of John Law. He accompanied his father to the Lancaster Assizes to give deposition against Alison Device, who was charged with bewitching John Law. Abraham claimed that he went to his father in Coine after receiving a letter from him, and found John speechless and lamed on his left side with the exception of his eye. Abraham said that once John recovered his speech, he complained of being pricked, and that it had started when Alison Device offered to buy pins from him but had no money to pay; John gave her the pins anyway. John also complained to him that Device lay upon him and troubled him along with an old woman he did not know.(R3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, R3

Abraham Law Abraham Law Witness
991

A woman from Paddiham in the county of Lancashire, known to be a mother, who was allegedly bewitched to death along with her daughter by Margaret Pearson. Anne Whittle gave the deposition accusing Pearson of causing the Childers' deaths.(S4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, S4v

Childer Mrs. Childer Relative of Victim
991

A woman from Paddiham in the county of Lancashire, known to be a mother, who was allegedly bewitched to death along with her daughter by Margaret Pearson. Anne Whittle gave the deposition accusing Pearson of causing the Childers' deaths.(S4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, S4v

Childer Mrs. Childer Victim
992

A girl from Paddiham in the county of Lancashire, who was allegedly bewitched to death along with her mother Mrs. Childer by Margaret Pearson. Anne Whittle gave the deposition accusing Pearson of causing the Childers' deaths.(S4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, S4v

Childer Childer (Daughter) Relative of Victim
992

A girl from Paddiham in the county of Lancashire, who was allegedly bewitched to death along with her mother Mrs. Childer by Margaret Pearson. Anne Whittle gave the deposition accusing Pearson of causing the Childers' deaths.(S4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, S4v

Childer Childer (Daughter) Victim
993

A man from Windle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the husband of Mrs. Chaddock, who claimed to be bewitched by Isabel Robey. According to Chaddock, he had a falling out with Robey as she "was not pleased that hee should marrie his now wife: whereupon this Examinate called the said Isabel Witch, and said that hee did not care for her." He alleged that two days later, he was afflicted with a pain in his bones, but mended not long after. Four years after that, his wife argued with Isabelle, and he was afflicted with a pain in his neck for five days, was intensely thirsty, and felt hot throughout his body. He claimed that he only mended when James the Glover brought him a drink and prayed for him. The pain in his bones reoccured the year before the trial, and he was convinced Robey was behind it. (T3-T3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, T3-T3v

Peter Chaddock Peter Chaddock Accuser
993

A man from Windle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the husband of Mrs. Chaddock, who claimed to be bewitched by Isabel Robey. According to Chaddock, he had a falling out with Robey as she "was not pleased that hee should marrie his now wife: whereupon this Examinate called the said Isabel Witch, and said that hee did not care for her." He alleged that two days later, he was afflicted with a pain in his bones, but mended not long after. Four years after that, his wife argued with Isabelle, and he was afflicted with a pain in his neck for five days, was intensely thirsty, and felt hot throughout his body. He claimed that he only mended when James the Glover brought him a drink and prayed for him. The pain in his bones reoccured the year before the trial, and he was convinced Robey was behind it. (T3-T3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, T3-T3v

Peter Chaddock Peter Chaddock Victim
994

A woman from Windle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the wife of Peter Chaddock. According to Peter Chaddock, he had a falling out with Robey as she "was not pleased that hee should marrie his now wife: whereupon this Examinate called the said Isabel Witch, and said that hee did not care for her." Four years later, Mrs. Chaddock argued with Robey at Chaddock's home, which Peter claimed caused Robey to bewitch him with with a pain in his neck, intense thirst and a feeling of heat throughout his body for five days. Margaret Lyon claimed to have had a conversation with Mrs. Chaddock in which Chaddock said, regarding Robey, "I thinke that my Husband will neuer mend vntill hee haue asked her forgiuenesse, choose him whether hee will bee angrie or pleased, for this is my opinion: to which he answered, when he did need to aske her forgiuenesse, he would, but hee thought hee did not need, for any thing hee knew."(T3-T3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, T3-T3v

Chaddock Mrs. Chaddock Relative of Victim
995

A woman from Windle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the wife of Francis Wilkinson, who accused Isabel Robey of bewitching her. According to Wilkinson, Robey asked her milk and she refused to give any; Wilkinson became afraid of Robey and was sick shortly thereafter, accompanied by such pain that she could not stand. The next day, Wilkinson travelled to Warrington, and on the road felt a sudden pinch on her thigh, after which she was so sick she had to return home on horseback. She soon mended, however. According to Margaret Parre, Robey confessed to her that she had bewitched Wilkinson.(T4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, T4

Jane Wilkinson Jane Wilkinson Accuser
995

A woman from Windle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the wife of Francis Wilkinson, who accused Isabel Robey of bewitching her. According to Wilkinson, Robey asked her milk and she refused to give any; Wilkinson became afraid of Robey and was sick shortly thereafter, accompanied by such pain that she could not stand. The next day, Wilkinson travelled to Warrington, and on the road felt a sudden pinch on her thigh, after which she was so sick she had to return home on horseback. She soon mended, however. According to Margaret Parre, Robey confessed to her that she had bewitched Wilkinson.(T4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, T4

Jane Wilkinson Jane Wilkinson Victim
1043

A man from Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the father of Anne Nutter. Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, confessed to using her familiar Fancie to bewitch his cow to death for preferring Elizabeth Southerns to her. Alison Device claimed that Whittle also bewitched his daughter Anne do death for laughing at her.(E2v-E3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2v-E3

Anthony Nutter Anthony Nutter Relative of Victim
1043

A man from Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the father of Anne Nutter. Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, confessed to using her familiar Fancie to bewitch his cow to death for preferring Elizabeth Southerns to her. Alison Device claimed that Whittle also bewitched his daughter Anne do death for laughing at her.(E2v-E3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2v-E3

Anthony Nutter Anthony Nutter Victim
1049

A man from Salmesbury in the county of Lancashire, known to be the husband of Ellen Bierley and uncle of Grace Sowerbutts. Grace accused Ellen of bewitching her along with three other women; she claimed that once they dragged her on top of a hay-mow in Henry Bierly's barn.(K4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K4v

Henry Bierley Henry Bierley Relative of Victim
1049

A man from Salmesbury in the county of Lancashire, known to be the husband of Ellen Bierley and uncle of Grace Sowerbutts. Grace accused Ellen of bewitching her along with three other women; she claimed that once they dragged her on top of a hay-mow in Henry Bierly's barn.(K4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K4v

Henry Bierley Henry Bierley Relative of Witch
1056

A man from Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the husband of Mrs. Robinson and brother of John Robinson, who accused Anne Whittle and Anne Redferne of witchcraft, and was allegedly bewitched to death by Elizabeth Device. According to Robinson, his wife had hired Whittle to card wool six years before, and that the drink from which Whittle drew during the carding not only spoiled, but that any drink he brought into the house spoiled for eight or nine weeks after. He claimed that "the said Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, and Anne Redferne her said Daughter, are commonly reputed and reported to bee Witches," and that Robert Nutter the younger said that Whittle and Redferne had bewitched him, causing his sickness. Device confessed to bewitching Robinson to death; Jennet Device claimed to have heard her mother Elizabeth Device call for her familiar Ball to kill Robinson.(Ev-E2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Ev-E2v

James Robinson James Robinson Accuser
1056

A man from Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the husband of Mrs. Robinson and brother of John Robinson, who accused Anne Whittle and Anne Redferne of witchcraft, and was allegedly bewitched to death by Elizabeth Device. According to Robinson, his wife had hired Whittle to card wool six years before, and that the drink from which Whittle drew during the carding not only spoiled, but that any drink he brought into the house spoiled for eight or nine weeks after. He claimed that "the said Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, and Anne Redferne her said Daughter, are commonly reputed and reported to bee Witches," and that Robert Nutter the younger said that Whittle and Redferne had bewitched him, causing his sickness. Device confessed to bewitching Robinson to death; Jennet Device claimed to have heard her mother Elizabeth Device call for her familiar Ball to kill Robinson.(Ev-E2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Ev-E2v

James Robinson James Robinson Witness
1056

A man from Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the husband of Mrs. Robinson and brother of John Robinson, who accused Anne Whittle and Anne Redferne of witchcraft, and was allegedly bewitched to death by Elizabeth Device. According to Robinson, his wife had hired Whittle to card wool six years before, and that the drink from which Whittle drew during the carding not only spoiled, but that any drink he brought into the house spoiled for eight or nine weeks after. He claimed that "the said Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, and Anne Redferne her said Daughter, are commonly reputed and reported to bee Witches," and that Robert Nutter the younger said that Whittle and Redferne had bewitched him, causing his sickness. Device confessed to bewitching Robinson to death; Jennet Device claimed to have heard her mother Elizabeth Device call for her familiar Ball to kill Robinson.(Ev-E2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Ev-E2v

James Robinson James Robinson Victim
1061

A man from Higham in the county of Lancashire, known to a gentleman, the husband of Mrs. Moore and father of John Moore. Anne Whittle confessed to having amended some drink belonging to Moore which had been forespoken; she claimed that Mrs. Moore had sent for her to do it. Alison Device alleged that Whittle was suspected of having bewitched the drink herself, and that Whittle had also caused Moore's son to become sick for half a year and finally die. Device claimed to have seen Whittle sitting in her garden with a clay image of Moore's child.(E2v-E3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2v-E3

John Moore John Moore Relative of Victim
1061

A man from Higham in the county of Lancashire, known to a gentleman, the husband of Mrs. Moore and father of John Moore. Anne Whittle confessed to having amended some drink belonging to Moore which had been forespoken; she claimed that Mrs. Moore had sent for her to do it. Alison Device alleged that Whittle was suspected of having bewitched the drink herself, and that Whittle had also caused Moore's son to become sick for half a year and finally die. Device claimed to have seen Whittle sitting in her garden with a clay image of Moore's child.(E2v-E3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2v-E3

John Moore John Moore Victim
1062

A child from Higham in the county of Lancashire, known to be the son of John Moore and Mrs. Moore. Alison Device alleged that Whittle caused John Moore Jr. to become sick for half a year and finally die. Device claimed to have seen Whittle sitting in her garden with a clay image of him.(E4-E4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E4-E4v

John Moore John Moore Jr. Relative of Victim
1062

A child from Higham in the county of Lancashire, known to be the son of John Moore and Mrs. Moore. Alison Device alleged that Whittle caused John Moore Jr. to become sick for half a year and finally die. Device claimed to have seen Whittle sitting in her garden with a clay image of him.(E4-E4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E4-E4v

John Moore John Moore Jr. Victim
1063

A man from Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the brother of James Robinson, who was allegedly bewitched to death by Elizabeth Device. Device confessed to having made a clay image of Robinson at her familiar Ball's direction; she said she dried it by the fire and crumbled it over the course of the next week, and that he died not long after. She claimed that Robinson had "chidden and becalled this Examinate, for hauing a Bastard child with one Seller." Elizabeth's daughter, Jennet Device, claimed that Elizabeth asked Ball to help her kill Robinson. Elizabeth's son, James Device, also claimed that she had made a clay image of Robinson. James also claimed to have stolen a wether (a castrated goat or sheep) from Robinson.(F3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, F3v

John Robinson John Robinson Relative of Victim
1063

A man from Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the brother of James Robinson, who was allegedly bewitched to death by Elizabeth Device. Device confessed to having made a clay image of Robinson at her familiar Ball's direction; she said she dried it by the fire and crumbled it over the course of the next week, and that he died not long after. She claimed that Robinson had "chidden and becalled this Examinate, for hauing a Bastard child with one Seller." Elizabeth's daughter, Jennet Device, claimed that Elizabeth asked Ball to help her kill Robinson. Elizabeth's son, James Device, also claimed that she had made a clay image of Robinson. James also claimed to have stolen a wether (a castrated goat or sheep) from Robinson.(F3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, F3v

John Robinson John Robinson Victim
1064

A man from Salmesbury in the county of Lancashire, known to be a servant, formerly in the service of Sir John Southworth. Singleton gave deposition against Jane Southworth, the wife of Sir John's cousin. He claimed to have often heard Sir John say that Jane was "an euill woman, and a Witch: and he said that he was sorry for her husband, that was his kinsman, for he thought she would kill him." Sir John disliked her so intensely he avoided her and even passing by her house.(L4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, L4v

John Singleton John Singleton Witness
1088

A woman from Green-head in Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the wife of Robert Nutter the younger. According to Elizabeth Southerns, she saw Anne Whittle and Anne Redfearne making clay images, including ones of Marie Nutter and of her husband Robert.(E-Ev)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E-Ev

Marie Nutter Marie Nutter Relative of Victim
1088

A woman from Green-head in Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the wife of Robert Nutter the younger. According to Elizabeth Southerns, she saw Anne Whittle and Anne Redfearne making clay images, including ones of Marie Nutter and of her husband Robert.(E-Ev)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E-Ev

Marie Nutter Marie Nutter Victim
1107

A woman from Higham in the county of Lancashire, known to be the wife of John Moore and mother of John Moore Jr. Anne Whittle claimed that Mrs. Moore sent for her to amended some drink which had been forespoken. Alison Device alleged that Whittle was suspected of having bewitched the drink herself, and that Whittle had also caused Moore's son to become sick for half a year and finally die. Device claimed to have seen Whittle sitting in her garden with a clay image of Moore's child.(E2v-E3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2v-E3

Moore Mrs. Moore Relative of Victim
1107

A woman from Higham in the county of Lancashire, known to be the wife of John Moore and mother of John Moore Jr. Anne Whittle claimed that Mrs. Moore sent for her to amended some drink which had been forespoken. Alison Device alleged that Whittle was suspected of having bewitched the drink herself, and that Whittle had also caused Moore's son to become sick for half a year and finally die. Device claimed to have seen Whittle sitting in her garden with a clay image of Moore's child.(E2v-E3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2v-E3

Moore Mrs. Moore Victim
1112

A man from Green-head in Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be minor gentry and the husband of Marie Nutter, son of Christopher Nutter, grandson of Robert Nutter the older and Elizabeth Nutter, brother of John Nutter and half-brother to Margaret Crooke; he is said to have been bewitched to death by Anne Whittle and Anne Redferne. Whittle alleged in her confession that Nutter had desired her daughter, Anne Redferne, but that Redferne had refused his advances. He left in a rage, saying that "if euer the Ground came to him, shee should neuer dwell vpon his Land." When Whittle heard this, she called her familiar Fancie to her, and bid Fancie to revenge her of Nutter; three months later, he died. Whittle added that Nutter's grandmother Elizabeth had gathered together Whittle, Widow Loomshaw and Jane Boothman to request their help in killing Nutter so that the land would go to the women instead. Whittle was persuaded not to participate at that time by her son-in-law Thomas Redferne, but she thought that "the sayd Loomeshaws wife, and lane Boothman, did what they could to kill the sayd Robert Nutter, as well as this Examinate did." Elizabeth Southerns claimed to have seen Whittle and Anne Redferne making clay images of Nutter, his wife Marie and father Christopher. James Robinson gave deposition that Nutter had often complained that Whittle and Redferne were the cause of his illness and had threatened Thomas Redferne with eviction. Margaret Crooke claimed that Nutter was sick within two weeks of falling out with Anne Redferne and blamed her for his illness. John Nutter claimed that Nutter insisted he would have Whittle and Redferne imprisoned for bewitching him, but that their father Christopher told him "Thou art a foolish Ladde, it is not so, it is thy miscarriage. "(B4-B4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4-B4v

Robert Nutter Robert Nutter Victim
1112

A man from Green-head in Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be minor gentry and the husband of Marie Nutter, son of Christopher Nutter, grandson of Robert Nutter the older and Elizabeth Nutter, brother of John Nutter and half-brother to Margaret Crooke; he is said to have been bewitched to death by Anne Whittle and Anne Redferne. Whittle alleged in her confession that Nutter had desired her daughter, Anne Redferne, but that Redferne had refused his advances. He left in a rage, saying that "if euer the Ground came to him, shee should neuer dwell vpon his Land." When Whittle heard this, she called her familiar Fancie to her, and bid Fancie to revenge her of Nutter; three months later, he died. Whittle added that Nutter's grandmother Elizabeth had gathered together Whittle, Widow Loomshaw and Jane Boothman to request their help in killing Nutter so that the land would go to the women instead. Whittle was persuaded not to participate at that time by her son-in-law Thomas Redferne, but she thought that "the sayd Loomeshaws wife, and lane Boothman, did what they could to kill the sayd Robert Nutter, as well as this Examinate did." Elizabeth Southerns claimed to have seen Whittle and Anne Redferne making clay images of Nutter, his wife Marie and father Christopher. James Robinson gave deposition that Nutter had often complained that Whittle and Redferne were the cause of his illness and had threatened Thomas Redferne with eviction. Margaret Crooke claimed that Nutter was sick within two weeks of falling out with Anne Redferne and blamed her for his illness. John Nutter claimed that Nutter insisted he would have Whittle and Redferne imprisoned for bewitching him, but that their father Christopher told him "Thou art a foolish Ladde, it is not so, it is thy miscarriage. "(B4-B4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4-B4v

Robert Nutter Robert Nutter Relative of Witch
1112

A man from Green-head in Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be minor gentry and the husband of Marie Nutter, son of Christopher Nutter, grandson of Robert Nutter the older and Elizabeth Nutter, brother of John Nutter and half-brother to Margaret Crooke; he is said to have been bewitched to death by Anne Whittle and Anne Redferne. Whittle alleged in her confession that Nutter had desired her daughter, Anne Redferne, but that Redferne had refused his advances. He left in a rage, saying that "if euer the Ground came to him, shee should neuer dwell vpon his Land." When Whittle heard this, she called her familiar Fancie to her, and bid Fancie to revenge her of Nutter; three months later, he died. Whittle added that Nutter's grandmother Elizabeth had gathered together Whittle, Widow Loomshaw and Jane Boothman to request their help in killing Nutter so that the land would go to the women instead. Whittle was persuaded not to participate at that time by her son-in-law Thomas Redferne, but she thought that "the sayd Loomeshaws wife, and lane Boothman, did what they could to kill the sayd Robert Nutter, as well as this Examinate did." Elizabeth Southerns claimed to have seen Whittle and Anne Redferne making clay images of Nutter, his wife Marie and father Christopher. James Robinson gave deposition that Nutter had often complained that Whittle and Redferne were the cause of his illness and had threatened Thomas Redferne with eviction. Margaret Crooke claimed that Nutter was sick within two weeks of falling out with Anne Redferne and blamed her for his illness. John Nutter claimed that Nutter insisted he would have Whittle and Redferne imprisoned for bewitching him, but that their father Christopher told him "Thou art a foolish Ladde, it is not so, it is thy miscarriage. "(B4-B4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4-B4v

Robert Nutter Robert Nutter Relative of Victim
1113

A man from Salmsbury in the county of Lancashire, known to be a yeoman, the son of Hugh Walshman, a husband, and the father of an infant. Grace Sowerbutts accused her grandmother Jennet Bierley and aunt Ellen Bierley of taking his child from his home in the night to drive a nail into its navel and suck from the hole, causing it to become sick and die; Grace also accused them of cannibalizing the child's body and rendering the fat from its bones. Walshman gave deposition saying that he did have a child who had become sick and died at about one year of age, but that he did not know the cause. He added that Grace had recently been found in his father's barn under the hay, and that she had stayed in his home for the next day lying speechless as if dead. Grace later retracted her accusations.(Lv-L2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Lv-L2v

Thomas Walshman Thomas Walshman Witness
1113

A man from Salmsbury in the county of Lancashire, known to be a yeoman, the son of Hugh Walshman, a husband, and the father of an infant. Grace Sowerbutts accused her grandmother Jennet Bierley and aunt Ellen Bierley of taking his child from his home in the night to drive a nail into its navel and suck from the hole, causing it to become sick and die; Grace also accused them of cannibalizing the child's body and rendering the fat from its bones. Walshman gave deposition saying that he did have a child who had become sick and died at about one year of age, but that he did not know the cause. He added that Grace had recently been found in his father's barn under the hay, and that she had stayed in his home for the next day lying speechless as if dead. Grace later retracted her accusations.(Lv-L2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Lv-L2v

Thomas Walshman Thomas Walshman Relative of Victim
1264

A man from Lancaster in the County of Lancashire, known to be a Justice of Peace for the County of Lancashire. Nicholas Bannister heard the examinations and confessions of James Device, Elizabeth Device and Jennet Device on April 27, 1612.(C2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2

Nicholas Bannister Nicholas Bannister Examiner/Justice
2165

A man from Salmesbury in the county of Lancashire, known to be a knight and the deceased cousin of John Southworth. According to John Singleton, Sir John long suspected his cousin John's wife Jane of witchcraft, and thought her "an euill woman, and a Witch." He said that "ought an euill woman, and a Witch: and he said that he was sorry for her husband, that was his kinsman, for he thought she would kill him." Both Singleton and William Alker alleged that Sir John avoided Jane. (L4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, L4v

John Southworth Sir John Southworth Relative of Witch
2166

A child from Salmsbury in the county of Lancashire, known to be the infant child of Thomas Welshman and grandchild of Hugh Walshman. Grace Sowerbutts accused her grandmother Jennet Bierley and aunt Ellen Bierley of taking this child from its parents' bed in the night to drive a nail into its navel and suck from the hole through a pen. They then returned the infant to the bed. It became sick and died not long after. Grace also accused her grandmother and aunt of stealing the child's body from the church-yard; she claimed they cannibalized the child's body and rendering the fat from its bones to rub on themselves so the could change shape. Thomas Walshman gave deposition saying that he did have a child who had become sick and died at about one year of age, but that he did not know the cause. Grace later retracted her accusations.(Lv-L2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Lv-L2v

Walshman Walshman (child) Victim
2167

A man from Salmsbury in the county of Lancashire, known to be a yeoman, the father of Thomas Walshman and grandfather to Thomas' infant child. Grace Sowerbuts was found in his barn under the hay; she claimed to have been put there by a black dog that robbed her of her speech and senses. She stayed in Walshman's home (or, according to Thomas Walshman, in his home) until her parents came to fetch her.(K4v-L)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K4v-L

Hugh Walshman Hugh Walshman Relative of Victim
2167

A man from Salmsbury in the county of Lancashire, known to be a yeoman, the father of Thomas Walshman and grandfather to Thomas' infant child. Grace Sowerbuts was found in his barn under the hay; she claimed to have been put there by a black dog that robbed her of her speech and senses. She stayed in Walshman's home (or, according to Thomas Walshman, in his home) until her parents came to fetch her.(K4v-L)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K4v-L

Hugh Walshman Hugh Walshman Witness
2169

A man from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, known to be the Mayor of Lancaster. William Sandes was present at the examinations and confessions of Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, and James Device. (B4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4

William Sandes William Sandes Examiner/Justice
2170

A man from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, known to be a Justice of the Peace for the County of Lancashire. James Anderton was present at the examinations and confessions of Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, and James Device. (B4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4

James Anderton James Anderton Examiner/Justice
2171

A man from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, known to be the Coroner for the County of Lancashire. Thomas Cowell was present at the examinations and confessions of Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, and James Device. (B4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4

Thomas Cowell Thomas Cowell Examiner/Justice
2172

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, known to be minor gentry and the wife to old Robert Nutter, the mother of Christopher Nutter and the grandmother to young Robert Nutter and John Nutter. According to Anne Whittle, Elizabeth Nutter approached Whittle, Widow Lomeshaw and Jane Booth to request their assistance in killing her grandson Robert, so that the land would go to the women.(D4-D5)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, D4-D5

Elizabeth Nutter Elizabeth Nutter Relative of Victim
2172

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, known to be minor gentry and the wife to old Robert Nutter, the mother of Christopher Nutter and the grandmother to young Robert Nutter and John Nutter. According to Anne Whittle, Elizabeth Nutter approached Whittle, Widow Lomeshaw and Jane Booth to request their assistance in killing her grandson Robert, so that the land would go to the women.(D4-D5)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, D4-D5

Elizabeth Nutter Elizabeth Nutter Witch
2173

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancaster. According to Anne Whittle, Boothman, Whittle and Widow Lomeshaw were approached by Elizabeth Nutter to assist her in killing her grandson Robert Nutter so that the land would go to the women. Boothman agreed to help, and is said to have done what she could to kill him. She died sometime between Robert Nutter's demise and the witch trials at Lancaster Assizes.(D4-D5)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, D4-D5

Jane Boothman Jane Boothman Witch
2174

A man from the Forest of Pendle, known to be the husband of Elizabeth Device, the father of James, Jennet and Alison Device, and the son-in-law of Elizabeth Southerns. According to his daughter Alison, John Device was afraid of Anne Whittle, and made a deal to pay her a measure of meal every year in exchange for the safety of his family. John allegedly said on his deathbed that Whittle bewitched him to death for missing a payment.(E4-E4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E4-E4v

John Device John Device Relative of Witch
2174

A man from the Forest of Pendle, known to be the husband of Elizabeth Device, the father of James, Jennet and Alison Device, and the son-in-law of Elizabeth Southerns. According to his daughter Alison, John Device was afraid of Anne Whittle, and made a deal to pay her a measure of meal every year in exchange for the safety of his family. John allegedly said on his deathbed that Whittle bewitched him to death for missing a payment.(E4-E4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E4-E4v

John Device John Device Victim
2175

A man from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, who was allegedly bewitched to death by James Device. Device was charged with and tried for Duckworth's murder. During his examination, Device claimed that John Duckworth had promised him an old shirt, but when Device came to get it two weeks later, Duckworth denied it to him. As Device had touched Duckworth during this encounter, his familiar Dandy said he had power over him, and Device urged Dandy to kill Duckworth. Within a week, Duckworth died.(Hv-H2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Hv-H2

John Duckworth John Duckworth Victim
2176

A man from Gould-Shey-Booth (Goodshaw) in the County of Lancaster, whom James Device is accused of bewitching to death. Jennet Device claimed that she heard James, her brother, call his familiar Dandy and tell him to kill John Hargraves. James pleaded not guilty.(H4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, H4v

John Hargraves John Hargraves Victim
2178

A woman from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster. Grace Sowerbutts accused Old Doewife of bewitching her, along with Ellen Bierley, Jennet Bierley and Jane Southworth.(K4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K4v

Doewife Old Doewife Witch
2179

A man from Lancaster in the County of Lancashire, known to be a Justice of the Peace for the County of Lancashire. Robert Holden heard the examinations of John Singleton, Willam Alker and Henry Hargreaves.(L4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, L4v

Robert Holden Robert Holden Examiner/Justice
2180

A man from Lancaster in the County of Lancashire, known to be a Justice of the Peace for Lancaster. He re-examined Grace Sowerbutts, Jennet Bierley, Ellen Bierley and Jane Southworth on August 19, 1612 at the direction of Justice of the Assizes Sir Edward Bromley.(M4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, M4v

William Leigh William Leigh Examiner/Justice
2181

A man from Lancaster in the County of Lancashire, known to be a Justice of the Peace for Lancaster. He re-examined Grace Sowerbutts, Jennet Bierley, Ellen Bierley and Jane Southworth on August 19, 1612 at the direction of Justice of the Assizes Sir Edward Bromley.(M4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, M4v

Edward Chisnal Edward Chisnal Examiner/Justice
2182

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, known to be the daughter of Christopher Nutter, sister to Robert Nutter and John Nutter, and granddaughter of Elizabeth Nutter and old Robert Nutter. Crooke gave deposition alleging that Anne Redferne was responsible for the deaths of Robert and Christopher.(O-Ov)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, O-Ov

Margaret Crooke Margaret Crooke Witness
2182

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, known to be the daughter of Christopher Nutter, sister to Robert Nutter and John Nutter, and granddaughter of Elizabeth Nutter and old Robert Nutter. Crooke gave deposition alleging that Anne Redferne was responsible for the deaths of Robert and Christopher.(O-Ov)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, O-Ov

Margaret Crooke Margaret Crooke Accuser
2182

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, known to be the daughter of Christopher Nutter, sister to Robert Nutter and John Nutter, and granddaughter of Elizabeth Nutter and old Robert Nutter. Crooke gave deposition alleging that Anne Redferne was responsible for the deaths of Robert and Christopher.(O-Ov)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, O-Ov

Margaret Crooke Margaret Crooke Relative of Witch
2182

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, known to be the daughter of Christopher Nutter, sister to Robert Nutter and John Nutter, and granddaughter of Elizabeth Nutter and old Robert Nutter. Crooke gave deposition alleging that Anne Redferne was responsible for the deaths of Robert and Christopher.(O-Ov)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, O-Ov

Margaret Crooke Margaret Crooke Relative of Victim
2183

A woman from Thurniholme (Thurnham) in the County of Lancashire, known to be the wife of Chrisopher Hargraves, who allegedly attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. (G3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G3v

Elizabeth Hargraves Elizabeth Hargraves Witch
2183

A woman from Thurniholme (Thurnham) in the County of Lancashire, known to be the wife of Chrisopher Hargraves, who allegedly attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. (G3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G3v

Elizabeth Hargraves Elizabeth Hargraves Relative of Witch
2184

A man from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, known to be the husband of Elizabeth Howgate, son of Elizabeth Southerns, brother of Elizabeth Device and uncle of James, Jennet and Alison Device, who allegedly attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. (G3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G3v

Christopher Howgate Christopher Howgate Relative of Witch
2184

A man from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, known to be the husband of Elizabeth Howgate, son of Elizabeth Southerns, brother of Elizabeth Device and uncle of James, Jennet and Alison Device, who allegedly attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. (G3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G3v

Christopher Howgate Christopher Howgate Witch
2185

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, known to be the wife of Christopher Howgate, who allegedly attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. (G3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G3v

Elizabeth Howgate Elizabeth Howgate Relative of Witch
2185

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, known to be the wife of Christopher Howgate, who allegedly attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. (G3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G3v

Elizabeth Howgate Elizabeth Howgate Witch
2186

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, who allegedly attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. (Rv-R2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Rv-R2

Jennet Hargraves Jennet Hargraves Witch
2187

A man from Thurniholme (Thurnham) in the County of Lancashire, known to be the husband of Elizabeth Hargraves, who allegedly attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. (G3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G3v

Christopher Hargraves Christopher Hargraves Witch
2187

A man from Thurniholme (Thurnham) in the County of Lancashire, known to be the husband of Elizabeth Hargraves, who allegedly attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. (G3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G3v

Christopher Hargraves Christopher Hargraves Relative of Witch
2188

A woman from Padiham in the County of Lancashire, who allegedly attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. (Rv-R2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Rv-R2

Grace Hay Grace Hay Witch
2190

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, an apparition of whom John Law allegedly saw tormenting him with Alison Device. Law was lamed, rendered speechless and suffered a sensation of being pricked after refusing to sell Alison Device some pins. He did not recognize Anonymous 427, simply describing her to his son Abraham Law as an old woman.(S-Sv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, S-Sv

Anonymous 427 Witch
2191

A man from Paddiham in the County of Lancashire, known to be the owner of a stable. Margaret Pearson stood trial for bewitching his horse and goods.(S2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, S2

Dodgeson Dodgeson Victim
2192

A woman from Paddiham in the County of Lancashire, known to be the wife of James Booth and the mother of Margerie Booth. She gave deposition alleging that she found a thing like a toad sitting in the fire of Margaret Pearson's home after Pearson's imprisonment. (T)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, T

Jennet Booth Jennet Booth Witness
2193

A man from Windle in the County of Lancashire, known to be a Justice of the Peace for the County of Lancashire. Sir Thomas Gerrard examined Peter Chaddock, Jane Wikinson, Margaret Lyon and Margaret Parre on July 12, 1612 in relation to the witchcraft charges against Isabel Robey.(T3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, T3

Thomas Gerrard Sir Thomas Gerrard Examiner/Justice
2194

A woman from Windle in the County of Lancashire, known to be the wife of Thomas Lyon the younger. She alleged to have spoken to both Mrs. Chaddock and Isabel Robey about Peter Chaddock, and reported that both agreed that Peter would never mend until he asked Robey's forgiveness, but that he never would.(T4-T4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, T4-T4v

Margaret Lyon Margaret Lyon Witness
2195

A woman from Windle in the County of Lancashire, known to be the wife of Hugh Parre, who gave deposition alleging that Isabel Robey had admitted to bewitching both Peter Chaddock and Jane Wilkinson to her.(V)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, V

Margaret Parre Margaret Parre Witness
2196

A woman from Westby in Craven in the County of York. Anne Robinson allegedly heard Master Thomas Lister cry out in his illness "Iennet Preston was in the house, looke where shee is, take hold of her: for Gods sake shut the doores, and take her, shee cannot escape away. Looke about for her, and lay hold on her, for shee is in the house[.]" On his deathbed, she claims to have heard him say "Iennet Preston lyes heauie vpon me, Prestons wife lyes heauie vpon me; helpe me, helpe me."(Y2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Y2v

Anne Robinson Anne Robinson Witness
2197

A man from Goldshey-booth (Goodshaw) in the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be a yeoman. Henry Hargreives took James Device to Gisburne Parish to see if Jennet Preston was the same woman who had appealed to the Good Friday gathering at Malking Tower for assistance in killing Master Thomas Lister. This visit confirmed Preston to be that woman. Hargreives also gave deposition alleging that Anne Whittle told him that Jennet Preston was that woman.(Y3v-Y4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Y3v-Y4

Henry Hargreives Henry Hargreives Witness