Go back
103 records returned.

List of all events occurring in the personshorttitle of a given text

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
1895

A woman likely from Great-Holland in the county of Essex and mother of Anne Cate (Maidenhood). Sometime around 1623, this woman allegedly gives her daughter Cate the four familiars spirits, James, Prickeare, Robyn, and Sparrow, which she uses to torment and kill her neighbors. (38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38

Anonymous 345 Witch
261

A sixty five year old widow from Chich, St. Osyth in the county of Essex. Rose Hallybread first became a witch, or almost become one, when Goodwife Hagtree gave her an imp (she "fed it with oatmeale and suckled it on her body, for the space of a yeer and a halfe," before she lost it. She was later given another imp by Joyce Boanes (a small gray hawk named Tom Boy) which she used to kill Thomas Toakley's son and which (along with Susan Cook, Margaret Landish, and Joyce Boanes's imps) she used to torment Robert Turner's servant, giving him a made illness where he "barked like a Dog." Rose Hallybread dies in the goal in Chelmsford, circa July 17, 1645. However, Hallybread would not rest peacefully. She would be resurrected in print in 1690 in the largely fictional _The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches_. In this text, Rose Hallybread is accused of witchcraft that caused the torment of Mary Peak, John Peak, and the Children of Obadiah Peak of Preston; the evidence supporting this charge comes from Abraham Chad and Elin Shearcraft. Hallybread is also accused by Abraham Chad of making wax figures of the Children of Obadiah Peak, with one of the figures being put on a spit and the other stuck with pins. Finally, Hallybread is accused of keeping imps that appear in the form of mice. She is tried for witchcraft and burned at the stake.(33-34)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 33-34

Rose Hallybread Rose Hallybread Witch
262

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, an accused witch, and maybe a relative of Mary Cook, an accused witch who died in the goal at Chelmsford, 1645. Susan Cook allegedly had a familiar named Bess, and conspired with Rose Hallybread, Margaret Landish, and Joyce Boanes, to torment Robert Turner's servant, because" hee had refused to give unto her this Examinant, the said Susan Cocks, Margaret Landish and Joyce Boanes a few chips." With the help of thier familiars, they made him fall "sick, and oftentimes barked like a Dog: And this Examinant saith, that shee believeth that the said four Imps were the cause of his barking and sicknesse." In _The full Trualls, Examinations and Condemnations of Four Notorious Witches, At the Assizes held at Worchester on Tuesday the 4th of March_ she is accused of murdering Mary Peak a crime for which she is burned at the stake. (5)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 5

Susan Cock Susan Cock Witch
262

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, an accused witch, and maybe a relative of Mary Cook, an accused witch who died in the goal at Chelmsford, 1645. Susan Cook allegedly had a familiar named Bess, and conspired with Rose Hallybread, Margaret Landish, and Joyce Boanes, to torment Robert Turner's servant, because" hee had refused to give unto her this Examinant, the said Susan Cocks, Margaret Landish and Joyce Boanes a few chips." With the help of thier familiars, they made him fall "sick, and oftentimes barked like a Dog: And this Examinant saith, that shee believeth that the said four Imps were the cause of his barking and sicknesse." In _The full Trualls, Examinations and Condemnations of Four Notorious Witches, At the Assizes held at Worchester on Tuesday the 4th of March_ she is accused of murdering Mary Peak a crime for which she is burned at the stake. (5)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 5

Susan Cock Susan Cock Co-conspirator
263

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, Margaret Landish, aka Pegg the witch, Landish is accused of numerous acts of familiar magic and conspiracy to do harm. Landish, along with Rose Hallybread, Susan Cook, and Joyce Boanes allegedly used their familiars to torment Robert Turner's servant, because "hee had refused to give [them a few chips]. This servant "oftentimes crowed like a Cock, backed like a Dogge sung tunes, and groaned" it was Margaret Landish's imp which allegedly "made him groan in such an extraordinary manner." Landish also allegedly sent her familiar to John Spall's home, "where the said Imps killed tens or twelve [of his] Sheep." Margaret Landish sent her imp (without impish company) to kill "six or seven shoots or hogges" of the Thomans Mannock's hogs. Both Spall and Mannock, she punished, for lack of charity. Landish confessed to having a familiar, but claimed she entered into a malefic against he will only compact "eight or nine weekes" before her examination. It was done to her when she was "lying sicke by the fire side in her owne house, something came up to her body, and sucked on her privie parts, and much pained and tormented her." The thing which tormented her was an imp sent by Susan Cock. She denied all other charges. (3-4)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 3-4

Margaret Landish Margaret Landish Witch
266

A widow from Wivenhoe in the county of Essex Alice Dickson allegedly bewitched Thomas Mumford's son to death. She also allegedly discovered that Mary Johnson was responsible for the suffering and death of Elizabeth Otely's child. This act of murder administered through familiar magic: Johnson set her imp, a thing in the shape of a rat with no ears to attack Otely's child; and through contamination: Johnson gave the child an apple and a kiss which made it sicken and die. When Dixon accused Johnson to her face of causing this harm, she allegedly responded: "that if she did it, she did it, she could but receive punishment for it." Alice Dixon was hanged at Chelmsford July 17, 1645. (21-22)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 21-22

Alice Dixon Alice Dixon Witch
273

A woman from Manningtree in the county of Essex described as impoverished and having only one leg, Elizabeth Clarke is a implicated in witchcraft by a number large number of her neighbors, and is examined by Matthew Hopkins and watched by John Sterne. She is accused of bewitching John Rivet's wife, who was made sick and lame by a number of violent fits a suspicion backed up by a Suffolk cunning woman and Clarkes' malefic pedigree. She allegedly killed Robert Okes, a Clothiers childe of Dedham, William Cole's wife of Manningtree, and Thomas Turner. According to Matthew Hopkins, Clarke enjoyed six or seven years of tri-weekly "carnall copulation with the Devil six or seven yeares, who, "in shape of a proper Gentleman, with a laced band, having the whole proportion of a man, and would say to her, Besse I must lye with you, and shee did never deny him." She also allegedly kept five white imps and a number of familiars, including: a white thing, which is possibly Holt, Jarmara, Vinegar Tom, "a black Impe," and a "Polcat." Clarke herself only confesses to having two thinks come to her every night, a gray and a white thing, "and sucked upon the lower parts of her body." She allegedly confesses to sending an imp to kill cows belonging to Mr. Edwards, murdering Mr. Edward's hogs and to having sexual relations with the devil regularly. She also allegedly read from a book containing "no goodnesse" with Anne Leech, Elizabeth Gooding, and Anne West. Elizabeth Clarke was executed the 27. day of August 1645 at Chelmsford in Essex.(5-10)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 5-10

Elizabeth Clarke Elizabeth Clarke Witch
286

A woman from Great Clacton in the county of Essex and wife of Thomas Hare, Elizabeth Hare is supposed to have had a familiar spirit in the shape of a squirrel. Hare is accused by Mary Smith of providing her with two familiar spirits; Hare responds to this slander by raising her arms to the heaven, exclaiming that if this is so, that God should give her a sign. She begins to shake, quiver, and fall to the ground. She remains in this state. She appears to have been condemned to die as a witch, but reprieved. (23)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 23

Elizabeth Hare Elizabeth Hare Witch
287

A woman from Manningtree in the county of Essex and wife of Edward Goodwyn of Manningtree, a labourer, Elizabeth Gooding described as a "lewd woman" who keeps company with Elizabeth Clark, Anne Leech, and Anne West. Gooding who allegedly falls out with Robert Talyer after he refuses to give her a half a pound of cheese on credit. Although she returns with money enough to buy a whole pound of cheese, and does just that: one of Tailor's horses "was taken in a strange manner sick and lame." Despite being looked at by four Farriers the horse, "did violently beat himself to death," a crime attributed to Gooding (by Elizabeth Clark and Anne Leech. Goodling also allegedly sends her imps, along with Anne Leech's imps, to kill two horses of Mr. Bragge, and two cows of Mr. Edwards. She allegedly sends imps "to vex and torment Mary the wife of John Tayler of Mannyntree," after Mary Tayler refused her some beer. Elizabeth Gooding also allegedly read from a book with Anne Leech, Elizabeth Clarke and Anne West from a book containing "no goodnesse." She is indicted on charges of "murder and raising spirits," specifically, entertaining and feeding "'evill spirittes,' one in the form of a 'younge catt' and the other of a mouse, and one was called 'pease.'" She is accused of sending her imps bewitch John Edwards, making him have "very strange fire, extending the limbs, and rowling the eyes," and otherwise "destroy the child of the said Mr. Edwards" a crime for which she is indicted, found guilty, and executed as a witch at Chelmsford in 1645.(10- 11, 11-12, 12, 13, 16)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 10- 11, 11-12, 12, 13, 16

Elizabeth Gooding Elizabeth Gooding Witch
288

A woman from Maningtree in the county of Essex, daughter of Anne Leech and housekeeper of Elizabeth Clarke. Hellen Clarke confesses to keeping a familiar spirit named Elimanzer which she feeds with milk-pottage. Elimanzer demanded that Clarke deny Christ, promising if she did, that she should never want; Hellen agreed. s accused of being in a kabal of witches which includes Anne West, Rebecca West, Elizabeth Clarke, Anne Leech, and Elizabeth Gooding who fratenized, read from the Devil's book, and corrupted Rebecca West. Helen Clarke is also accused of bewitching Mary, the daughter of Edward and Mary Parsley; she speead this bewitchment simply by passing by the Parsely's door after she had a disagreement with Mary Parsely Sr. Passing by the Parsely's door, she was heard to mutter, "that Mary the daughter of the said Edward and Mary Parsley should rue for all, whereupon, presently the said Mary the daughter, fell sick, and died within six weeks after." She denied this charge, however it appears that Clarke was hanged at Manningtree, having been found guilty of this crime. (14, 17-18)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 14, 17-18

Hellen Clark Hellen Clark Witch
290

A widow from Thorpe-le-Soken in the county of Essex and mother of Judith Moone and an un-named daughter, Margaret Moone is described as a "be a woman of a very bad fame and suspected for a Witch." She is accused of keeping (up to) twelve familiars, some of which were named Jesus, Jockey, Sandy, Mris. Elizabeth, and Collyn, and using them to kill three of Stephen Cook's cows, one of Henry Robertson's pigs, one of Philip Daniels' horses, and three of Mr. Edwards' brews, and spoiling Philip Berriman's bread. She is also accused of two murders Mr. Edward's child and Joan Cornwall. Joan became sick as her father and mother did by virtue of a kind of malefic disease spread via a half a peck of apples; Moone was hanged for this crime. Moone did not seems to need to use a vector to transmit bewitchment, however; her presence alone was enough to cause a malefic infestation. Having been kicked out of a second home, that of Thomas Turner, who evicted her because Rawbood and his wife were willing to pay "ten shillings more for the said house," she appeared to curse the couple, saying that they should not have "medled with the house." Rawbood and his wife became lame and sick thereafter Mrs. Rawbood was, for instance, on Easter day, suddenly "so filled with Lice, that they might have been swept off her cloaths with a stick" they couple died. Moone could also fill a room with stink; while being watched all nigh one night she appears to have shit on the floor; her examiner, desirous to see a familiar, described it thusly: "a thing drop from under her coats (as they thought) in the likenesse of a Rat for bignesse and shape, but of a grayer colour; And presently there was such an extreame offensive stink in the Roome, that these Informants were scarce able to endure to stay in it." When she was asked "what it was that dropped from her, she bids them coop it up and catch it if they could." This would not be the only humiliation she would suffer; Moone's privy parts would be opened up by Francis Miller, who would find "three long teats or bigges in her secret parts. Moone was hanged as a witch in 1645 (25-32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 25-32

Margaret Moone Margaret Moone Witch
291

A woman from Alresford in the county of Essex and mother to one daughter. Mary Greenliefe has an "ill name" in her community and in 1615, she shared a home with Susan Sparrow, their adolescent daughters, and a spooky leveret (which sat menacingly by her front door). Mary Greenleife's daughter "cry out in a fearefull manner; Oh Mother, now it comes, it comes, oh helpe mother, it hurts me, it hurts me." Sparrow warned Greenliefe to wake her shrieking child up, lest the neighbors, who already though Greenleife has "an ill name already" thought she was "suckling [her] Impes upon it." Greenliefe snapped back "I will fee with them (meaning her said Impes,) that they shall suck my daughter one night, and thine another," a statement which made matters worse: the next night Sparrow's daughter cried out that "shee was nipped and pinched on her thigh" an attach made manifest by the large "black and blew spot" on her leg (which remained sore for a month). Sparrow also claimed to see a leveret which she suggested to Anthony Sharlock, the father of a child allegedly bewitched by Greenleife, that he have his greyhound hunt the leveret down. Sharlock's dog chase it away, and Goodman Merrill's dog ran at it, and soon languished and dyed. Greenliefe was searched by Elizabeth Hunt and Priscilla Brigs who claimed they found "bigges or teates in her secret parts," marks they believed were "teates sucked by her Impe." Greenleife claimed she did not know where or when she came to have those marks, "not unlesse she were born with them," denied ever letting any imp suck on "these teats," and admitted to only seeing a leveret once at her door. Mary Mary Greeneliffe is "delivered by proclamation, to appear at the next Gaol Delivery and to be of good behaviour."(19-21)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 19-21

Mary Greenliefe Mary Greenliefe Witch
292

A woman from Wivenhoe in the county of Essex, and wife of Nicholas Johnson, Mary Johnson is accused of killing Elizabeth Otley's two year old child and tormenting her, as well as killing Annaball Durrant's two year old child and tormenting her and her husband. Johnson allegedly took her familiar (an imp in the shape of a rat with no ears) from out of her pocket, shoved it through a hole in Otley's door, and told it to "go rock the Cradle, and do the businesse she sent it about, and return to her again." Johnson also took a hands on approach to this attack, arriving at Otely's door, presumably unseen by her, and giving this child an apple and a kiss the child soon thereafter sickened and died; its demise is pinned on Johnson. When Alice Dixon accused Johnson of this murder, she allegedly replied: "that if she did it, she did it, she could but receive punishment for it." Dixon builds be accusation against Johnson, at least in part as a counter-attack: Johnson suggested that "Alice Dixon did the mischief to [Elizabeth Otely's] child her self." Johnson is also accused of making Elizabeth Otley herself suffer from extreme pain, loss of appetite, and insomnia, presumably to weaken her enough, physically and psychologically, that she would believe Johnson's many claims of innocence. Otley, however, decided she was witched and unwitched herself through a long fist fight where she made Johnson's teeth bleed. Johnson declared herself innocent of the charges laid against her in these matters. The Otley family were not the only ones to suffer from Johnson's attacks however; the Durrant family would also soon find itself under attack while traveling Wivenhoe to Fingerhoe. Johnson allegedly approached Durrant and her daughter, told her it "was a pretty child; and stroaked it upon the face, and gave it a peece of bread and butter." The child ate her snack and soon thereafter "shricked and cried out" and continued suffering for just over a week before it died. Although the Annaball and Nicholas Durrant did not die, they both experienced suffering attributed to Joohnson; Annaball suffers a kind of labour-like pain for around eight months and a lameness and stiffness; Nicholas, imaging Johnsons imps are after him falls down and lies "in great extremity." Despite the elaborate nature of these accusations, she is indicted on other crimes. She is found not guilty of bewitching George Durrell, a sailor from Fingerhoe seaman. She is found guilty of the malefic murder of Elizabeth Occlam. In 1645 Mary Johnson was found guilty, and sentenced to be hung, but was reprieved.(21-22)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 21-22

Mary Johnson Mary Johnson Witch
293

A widow from Ramsey in the county of Essex and sister of Sara Barton, Marion Hocket is accused of supplying her sister with three familiars names Littleman, Pretty-man, and Dainty, and supplying Elizabeth Harvey with three red rodent-like familiars. Hockett was searched for witchmarks, but none were found on her. Her sister, from the goal in Harick suggested that Hocket had excised the marks to remove corporeal proof of her malfeasance and healed the wounds with plaisters. Hocket denied all the charges laid against her. She was executed as a witch in 1645. (30-33)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 30-33

Marian Hockett Marian Hockett Witch
294

A widow from St. Osyth in the county of Essex and formerly as servant to a John Bishop, of Much-Clacton in the County of Essex. Rebecca Jones confesses that sometime circa 1620, she had a handsome young man, a person she later came to believe was the devil, had come to her door, prick her wrist and carried a drop of blood away on his finger tip. Around three months later, as she traveled to St. Osyth to sell Bishop's butter, she met a man with great eyes who wore a ragged suit who "gave her three things like to Moules having foure feete apiece, but without tayles, and of a blacke colour," named Margaret, Amie, and Susan. The ragged man instructed her to nurse the said three things, untill he did desire them againe," to feed them milk, and to use them for acts of vengeance, and murder, including killing a pig, tormenting Mistris Darcy's child (of St Osyth) and killing Thomas Bumstead of St. Osyth (the crime she was hanged for) and well as his wife, Katherine (a crime she was found guilty of). Rebecca Jones indicted for having "committed for two murders vy incanton," and hanged as a witch in 1645 at Chelmsford. (36-38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 36-38

Rebecca Jones Rebecca Jones Witch
295

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex and the wife of William Boanes. Joyce Bones became a witch some thirteen years before her examination (circa 1632); her malefic compact was done to her two imps "came into the bed to her in the likenesse of Mouses," and "sucked on [her] body." From this point on, she began to attack her neighbors with these familiars, one of whom was named Jockey and one who was names Rug. Rug would be used to kill ten or twelve of Richard Welch's lambs, and later to kill a Calf, a Sheep and a Lamb which belonged to Thomas Clynch. She would also send Rug, along with the familiars of Margaret Landish, Susan Cock, and Rose Hallybreak, by making him bark like a dog, and eventually endeavoring to kill him. She would allegedly send one of her imps, a dun-colored mouse, along with Rebecca Jones's imp Margaret, to kill Thomas Bumstead. She is indicted on charges of feeding and entertaining Jockey and Rug. Bones is hanged as a witch in 1645.(35=37)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 35=37

Joyce Boanes Joyce Boanes Witch
296

A woman from Ramsey in the county of Essex who is accused of being a witch and is found to have three witch's marks, or Bigges. Harvey claims she was made a witch by Marion Hocket, who in around 1638-1639 had given her three reddish familiars, two small like mice, and one slightly larger, promising her that "if shee would receive them, shee should never want so long as she lived." Since receiving, her and Hocket had a falling out, and Harvey claimed to have wanted to send these familiars, Littleman, Pretttyman, and Daynty, back to their mistress, but was unable to. They tormented her, causing her to pained, and "much torn and troubled in her privy parts," as if these malicious imps "had pulled her in pieces." Harvey is indicted, tried, and found guilty on charges of having entertained, employed, and fed, "three evil spirits in the form 'of a red mousse.'" She is found guilty on these charges; however, Harvey is "reprieved after judgement and to remain to gaol until the next Gaol Delivery." (29-31, 32-33)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 29-31, 32-33

Elizabeth Harvey Elizabeth Harvey Witch
456

A woman from Much Holland (now Great Holland) in the county of Essex who confesses to having been a witch for some twenty two years. Sometime around 1623, her mother allegedly gave her four imps, James, Prickeare, Robyn, which are mice shaped and Sparrow which was named for its form. These familiar spirits allegedly instructed Cate to "deny God and Christ, which this Examinant did then assent unto," and after which she used them freely to maim and murder. Cate allegedly used these familiars to kill Robert Freeman, John Rawlins's daughter, John Tillet, George Parby's wife, and to kill Samuel Ray's wife and child. These murders avenge the apparent lack of Christian charity in Much Holland. Parby denyed to give this Examinant a pint of Milk. Moreover, they spoke to the critical importance of money to those who have so little. The Rays, mother and child, were killed over Mrs. Ray's refusal to pay back two shillings. Anne Cate was hanged as a witch in Chelmsford in 1645. (34-35)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 34-35

Anne Cate Anne Cate (Maidenhead) Witch
481

An eighty year old widow from Much-Holland in the county of Essex and a self confessed witch of twenty years. She may be the mother of Anne Cooper and grandmother of Sara Cooper. Joan Cooper allegedly kept three familiars: two mouse shaped familiars named Jack, and Prickeare, and a frog-shaped familiar aptly named Frog. Cooper confessed to the murder of Thomas Woodward's child, two of John Cartwright's children, and George Parby's wife. Joan Cooper "died about 10 a.m. on 7 May [1645] by divine visitation" while awaiting her trial.(38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38

Joan Cooper Joan Cooper Witch
825

A young man from Lawford in the county of Essex, son of Prudence Hart and Thomas Hart, John Hart is allegedly bewitched Rebecca West as an act of vengeance against his father.(15, 15-16)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 15, 15-16

John Start John Hart Victim
826

A man from Lawford in the county of Essex, husband to Prudence Hart and father to John Hart. Thomas Hart suffers from two tragedies which are blamed on Rebecca West and Anne West. Prudence suffers a sudden miscarriage on a Sunday as she walks home; Prudence later finds herself lamed by a mysterious thing which touches her in bed. Hart's son John is also allegedly killed by Rebecca West as an act of vengeance against Hart himself. It appears that the Hart family saw themselves as bitter enemies of Rebecca West and Anne West.(15, 15-16, 17, 18, 19)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 15, 15-16, 17, 18, 19

Thomas Hart Thomas Hart Accuser
928

A man whose sheep were allegdely killed by Joyce Boanes' imp(31)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31

John Spell John Spell Victim
1835

A woman from Ramsey in the county of Essex, described as the wife of Francis Stock, former Constable of Ramsey and witness for the state in the Essex Assize at Chelsmford, July 1645. Mrs. Stock (and two of her children) allegedly become victims in a vendetta between their family and the Hatting family after her husband, Francis Stock insults William Hatting's wife Sara Hatting. Mrs. Stock is haunted by a mysterious (apparition?) of a snake which she attempts to kill. She attempts to smash it with a spade, but the snake, is no where to be seen. Mrs. Stock soon becomes ill "with extraordinary fits, pains and burnings all over her body, and within one week dyed." The condition which took her life would also take the lives of two of her children. Mrs. Stock, before her death and Francis Stock, after it, blamed Sara Hatting for this malefic sickness and murder. (31-32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31-32

Stock Mrs. Stock Victim
1235

A man and tailor from Manningtree in the county of Essex whose wife (Mrs. Rivet) in late December, 1645, became "sicke, and lame, with such violent fits, that this Informant verily conceived her sicknesse was something more then meerly naturall." He husband sought the counsel of a cunning woman, one the wife of one Hovye at Hadleigh in Suffolke, who told him his wife was bewitched by two neighboring witches. Rivet deduced that Elizabeth Clarke was one the witches, based on the proximity of her home and the common knowledge that "Elizabeths mother and some other of her kinsfolke did suffer death for Witchcraft and murther."(5)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 5

John Rivet John RIvet Accuser
1235

A man and tailor from Manningtree in the county of Essex whose wife (Mrs. Rivet) in late December, 1645, became "sicke, and lame, with such violent fits, that this Informant verily conceived her sicknesse was something more then meerly naturall." He husband sought the counsel of a cunning woman, one the wife of one Hovye at Hadleigh in Suffolke, who told him his wife was bewitched by two neighboring witches. Rivet deduced that Elizabeth Clarke was one the witches, based on the proximity of her home and the common knowledge that "Elizabeths mother and some other of her kinsfolke did suffer death for Witchcraft and murther."(5)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 5

John Rivet John RIvet Witness
1237

A cunning woman who John RIvet consults regarding his wife's (Mrs. RIvet) violent fits. Anonymous 198 informs John Rivet that his wife has been bewitched by two of his neighbours.(5)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 198 Cunning-folk
1236

A woman from Maningtree in the county of Essex, and wife of John Rivet, in late December, 1645, Mrs. Rivet became "sicke, and lame, with such violent fits, that this Informant verily conceived her sicknesse was something more then meerly naturall." He husband sought the counsel of a cunning woman, one the wife of one Hovye at Hadleigh in Suffolke, who told him his wife was bewitched by two neighboring witches. Rivet deduced that Elizabeth Clarke was one the witches, based on the proximity of her home and the common knowledge that "Elizabeths mother and some other of her kinsfolke did suffer death for Witchcraft and murther."(5)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 5

Rivet Mrs. Rivet Victim
1451

A woman Hadleigh in the county of Suffolk, described as the "wife of one Hovye," who acts as a cunning-woman and consultant when Mrs Rivet grows ill in late December (1645) becoming "sicke, and lame, with such violent fits, that this Informant verily conceived her sicknesse was something more then meerly naturall." Mrs. Hovye tells John Rivet that his wife was "cursed by two women who were neere neighbours to this Informant, the one dwelling a little above his house, and the other beneath his house, this Informants house standing on the side of an Hill." Rivet deduced that Elizabeth Clarke was one the witches, based on the proximity of her home and the common knowledge that "Elizabeths mother and some other of her kinsfolke did suffer death for Witchcraft and murther."()

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645,

Hoyve Mrs. Hoyve Cunning-folk
1770

A woman from Lawford in the county of Essex, described as the wife of Thomas Hart and Mother to John Hart. Prudence Hart suffers from two tragedies which are blamed on Rebecca West and Anne West. Prudence suffers a sudden miscarriage on a Sunday as she walks home; Prudence later finds herself lamed by a mysterious thing which touches her in bed. Her son son John is also allegedly killed by Rebecca West as an act of vengeance against her husband Thomas Hart. It appears that the Hart family saw themselves as bitter enemies of Rebecca West and Anne West.(15, 15-16, 17, 18, 19)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 15, 15-16, 17, 18, 19

Prudence Hart Purdence Hart Accuser
1770

A woman from Lawford in the county of Essex, described as the wife of Thomas Hart and Mother to John Hart. Prudence Hart suffers from two tragedies which are blamed on Rebecca West and Anne West. Prudence suffers a sudden miscarriage on a Sunday as she walks home; Prudence later finds herself lamed by a mysterious thing which touches her in bed. Her son son John is also allegedly killed by Rebecca West as an act of vengeance against her husband Thomas Hart. It appears that the Hart family saw themselves as bitter enemies of Rebecca West and Anne West.(15, 15-16, 17, 18, 19)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 15, 15-16, 17, 18, 19

Prudence Hart Purdence Hart Victim
1771

A thirteen or fourteen year old young woman from Alresford in the county of Essex, described as the daughter of Susan Sparrow. The night after Mary Greenliefe's daughter cries out that she is under attack by one of her mother's familars, this adolescent is also allegedly attacked by one Mary Greenliefe's familiar spirits. She awoke much "affrighted, sweating, and shrieking in a terrible manner, complaining that shee was nipped and pinched on her thigh." Although this looked like a nightmare, the next morning, she had "a black and blew spot, as broad and long as her hand" on her thigh and complained on pain in her leg for the next month. (19)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 19

Sparrow Sparrow (Daughter) Victim
1772

A thirteen or fourteen year old young woman from Alresford in the county of Essex, described as the daughter of Mary Greenliefe. This adolescent is allegedly attacked by one of her mother Mary's familiar spirits, an attack which causes considerable fear for Greenlief and in the household where she lives with her mother Mary, Susan Sparrow, and Sparrow's daughter. (19)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 19

Greenliefe Greenliefe (Daughter) Victim
1573

A man who acts as a judge over several trials held in Essex in 1645.(Cover)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, Cover

Robert Robert, Earl of Warwick Examiner/Justice
1688

A woman from Great Clacton in the county of Essex and daughter of accused witch Anne Cooper and perhaps the granddaughter of Joan Cooper. Sara Cooper allegedly was offered an "Impe in the likenes of a gray Kite (a hawk)" named Tom Boy and another familiar in the shape of a Cat. Accepting these imps would have made Sara into a witch; she does not, however, appear to have been tried as one. (23)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 23

Sara Cooper Sara Cooper Witch
1736

A man from St. Osyth in the county of Essex and husband of Katherine. Thomas Bumstead is allegedly killed by Rebecca Jones, by virtue of her imp Margaret (and in conjunction with one of Joyce Boane's imps). Thomas Bumstead had beaten Jone's son after he had stolen and consumed some of his honey; this was Jone's retribution. Jones is hanged as a witch at Chemlsford in 1645 for this crime.(37-38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 37-38

Thomas Bumstead Thomas Bumstead Victim
1737

A man woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex and wife of Thomas Bumstead. Katherine Bumstead is allegedly killed by Rebecca Jones by virtue of her imp Aime shortly after Thomas died. He husband had allegedly beaten Jones' son after he had stolen and consumed some of his honey; this was Jone's retribution. Jones is indicted on this charge, but hanged for the murder of her husband. (37)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 37

Katherine Bumstead Katherine Bumstead Victim
1692

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex who allegedly gives Rose Hallybread an imp which she later loses. (33-34)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 33-34

Hagtreee Goodwife Hagtree Witch
1711

An boy from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, the son of Thomas Toakley, who is allegedly bewitched by Rose Hallybread. Hallybread pushed her familiar "into a cranny of the doore of the said Toakely's house, after which time the son of the said Thomas languished, and dyed, crying out of this Examinant, that shee was his death."(33, 34)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 33, 34

Toakley Toakley (Son) Victim
1712

A man from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, the servant of Robert Turner, and a demoniac. The servant of Robert Turner suffers from terrible and ongoing fits, and demonstrates inhuman strength, a condition allegedly caused by familiar spirits sent by Rose Hallybread, Susan Cock, Margaret Landish, and Joyce Boanes after Robert Turner "refused to give to this Examinant a sack full of chips." According to Joybe Boanes, it was her Imp that "made the said servant to barke like a Dog; the Imp of the said Rose Hallybread inforced him to sing sundry tunes in his great extremity of paines; the Imp of the said Susin Cock, compelled him to crow like a Cock; and the Imp of Margaret Landish made him groan in such an extraordinary manner. (33)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 33

Anonymous 331 Demoniac
1713

A woman from, Alresford in the county of Essex. Susan Sparrow lived with Mary Greenliefe and their adolescent daughters circa 1645. During this time, Sparrow was witness to a few strange incidents. She heard Mary Greenleife's daughter "cry out in a fearefull manner; Oh Mother, now it comes, it comes, oh helpe mother, it hurts me, it hurts me." Sparrow warned Greenliefe to wake her shrieking child up, lest the neighbors, who already though Greenleife has "an ill name already" thought she was "suckling [her] Impes upon it." Greenliefe snapped back "I will fee with them (meaning her said Impes,) that they shall suck my daughter one night, and thine another," a statement which made matters worse: the next night Sparrow's own daughter cried out that "shee was nipped and pinched on her thigh" an attach made manifest by the large "black and blew spot" on her leg (which remained sore for a month). Sparrow also claimed to see a leveret which she suggested to Anthony Sharlock, the father of a child allegedly bewitched by Greenleife, that he have his greyhound hunt the leveret down. Sharlock's dog chase it away, and Goodman Merrill's dog ran at it, and soon languished and dyed. Sparrow was careful not to claim it was a familiar, but simply to suggest that "shee wondered very much to see a Leveret, wilde by nature, to come so frequently and sit openly before the dore in such a familiar way."(19-20)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 19-20

Susan Sparrow Susan Sparrow Witness
1714

A two year old child of Elizabeth Otley from Wivenhoe in the county of Essex who is allegedly killed (according to Alice Dixon), by Mary Johnson. Johnson allegedly took her familiar (an imp in the shape of a rat with no ears) from out of her pocket, shoved it through a hole in Otley's door, and told it to "go rock the Cradle, and do the businesse she sent it about, and return to her again." Johnson also took a hands on approach to this attack, arriving at Otely's door, presumably unseen by her, and giving this child an apple and a kiss the day after, the "child was taken with very violent fits, and in the fits (although the Child was but two yeers old) yet this Informant could very hardly with all her strength hold it down in the Cradle, and so continued untill it died."(21-22)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 21-22

Otley Otley (Child) Victim
1714

A two year old child of Elizabeth Otley from Wivenhoe in the county of Essex who is allegedly killed (according to Alice Dixon), by Mary Johnson. Johnson allegedly took her familiar (an imp in the shape of a rat with no ears) from out of her pocket, shoved it through a hole in Otley's door, and told it to "go rock the Cradle, and do the businesse she sent it about, and return to her again." Johnson also took a hands on approach to this attack, arriving at Otely's door, presumably unseen by her, and giving this child an apple and a kiss the day after, the "child was taken with very violent fits, and in the fits (although the Child was but two yeers old) yet this Informant could very hardly with all her strength hold it down in the Cradle, and so continued untill it died."(21-22)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 21-22

Otley Otley (Child) Demoniac
1715

A woman from Wivenhoe in the county of Essex whose child is allegedly killed by Mary Johnson and who finds herself "taken with extreme pains in her body." According to Alice Dixon, herself an accused witch, Johnson, allegedly took her familiar (an imp in the shape of a rat with no ears) from out of her pocket, shoved it through a hole in Otley's door, and told it to "go rock the Cradle, and do the businesse she sent it about, and return to her again." Johnson also took a hands on approach to this attack, arriving at Otely's door, presumably unseen by her, and giving this child an apple and a kiss the day after, the "child was taken with very violent fits, and in the fits (although the Child was but two yeers old) yet this Informant could very hardly with all her strength hold it down in the Cradle, and so continued untill it died." Soon after Otley began to experience extreme pain, loss of appetite, and insomnia; Johnson visited her numerous times during this period, pleading her innocence. However, Otley would not rest until she had made Johnson bleed an act of countermagic which seems to have been adminiters by punching Johnson in the mouth Otley's health returned. (21-22)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 21-22

Elizabeth Otley Elizabeth Otley Accuser
1715

A woman from Wivenhoe in the county of Essex whose child is allegedly killed by Mary Johnson and who finds herself "taken with extreme pains in her body." According to Alice Dixon, herself an accused witch, Johnson, allegedly took her familiar (an imp in the shape of a rat with no ears) from out of her pocket, shoved it through a hole in Otley's door, and told it to "go rock the Cradle, and do the businesse she sent it about, and return to her again." Johnson also took a hands on approach to this attack, arriving at Otely's door, presumably unseen by her, and giving this child an apple and a kiss the day after, the "child was taken with very violent fits, and in the fits (although the Child was but two yeers old) yet this Informant could very hardly with all her strength hold it down in the Cradle, and so continued untill it died." Soon after Otley began to experience extreme pain, loss of appetite, and insomnia; Johnson visited her numerous times during this period, pleading her innocence. However, Otley would not rest until she had made Johnson bleed an act of countermagic which seems to have been adminiters by punching Johnson in the mouth Otley's health returned. (21-22)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 21-22

Elizabeth Otley Elizabeth Otley Victim
1716

A woman from Wivenhoe in the county of Essex and the wife of George Durrant. Durrant encountered Johnson one day while traveling Wivenhoe to Fingerhoe. Johnson approached Durrant and her daughter, told her it "was a pretty child; and stroaked it upon the face, and gave it a peece of bread and butter." Having eaten the snack, the child strangely "shricked and cried out." Mr. Dawber, a local surgeon, could "find no naturall cause of its lamenesse," and her daughter "continued for the space of eight dayes shricking and tearing it self, and then died." Annaball is herself is "taken with extreme pains in her body," torments which come every day of every few days and last seven or eight months. She describes the pain as "if she had been to be delivered of a child, but was not with child." She is also temporarily, but severely lamed; she recovers just in time to testify against Johnson, an act encouraged by her husband, when her too begins to suffer sweating and paninting "in great extremity," having cried out "It comes, it comes, Now goodwife Johnsons Impe is come, Now she hath my life. Durrant believes that Mary Johnson was the "cause of her childs death: And that she is now the cause of her husbands extremity." (24-25)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 24-25

Annaball Durrant Annaball Durrant Accuser
1716

A woman from Wivenhoe in the county of Essex and the wife of George Durrant. Durrant encountered Johnson one day while traveling Wivenhoe to Fingerhoe. Johnson approached Durrant and her daughter, told her it "was a pretty child; and stroaked it upon the face, and gave it a peece of bread and butter." Having eaten the snack, the child strangely "shricked and cried out." Mr. Dawber, a local surgeon, could "find no naturall cause of its lamenesse," and her daughter "continued for the space of eight dayes shricking and tearing it self, and then died." Annaball is herself is "taken with extreme pains in her body," torments which come every day of every few days and last seven or eight months. She describes the pain as "if she had been to be delivered of a child, but was not with child." She is also temporarily, but severely lamed; she recovers just in time to testify against Johnson, an act encouraged by her husband, when her too begins to suffer sweating and paninting "in great extremity," having cried out "It comes, it comes, Now goodwife Johnsons Impe is come, Now she hath my life. Durrant believes that Mary Johnson was the "cause of her childs death: And that she is now the cause of her husbands extremity." (24-25)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 24-25

Annaball Durrant Annaball Durrant Victim
1717

A two year old child from Wivenhoe in the county of Essex, daughter of Annaball and Goerge Durrant. This child was the unwitting victim of an act of instrumental magic (one of malefic contamination and poisoning) allegedly administered by Mary Johnson. The child had been walking with her mother from Wivenhoe to Fingerhoe when she was stopped by Johnson, who called her a pretty child, stroked her cheek, and gave her a piece of bread and butter to eat. and gave it a peece of bread and butter." Shortly after she ate the food, she "shricked and cried out." Her mother sought medical advice from a local surgeon named Mr. Dawber a Chirurgeon, but there appeared to be "no naturall cause [for her] lamenesse." The Durrant child would not survive for much longer: the last eight days of her life were spent in torment, described as "eight dayes shricking and tearing it self, and then died. Her mother and father were also allegedly bewitched, but appear to survive their ordeals. (24-25)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 24-25

Durrant Durrant (Child) Victim
1719

A surgeon from Wivenhow in the county of Essex who examines Annaball Durrant's two year old child after she had allegedly been bewitched by Mary Johnson. Although Dawber does not diagnose the little girl with bewitchment, he claims he "could find no naturall cause of its lamenesse." The child dies eight days later in torment. (24)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 24

Dawber Mr. Dawber Physician
1738

A child from Much-Holland (now Great Holland) in the county of Essex, and a child of Thomas Woodward who is allegedly killed by Joan Cooper, by virtue of her imp. (38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38

Woodward Woodward (Child) Victim
1739

A child from Much Holland (now Great Holland) in the county of Essex and one of John Cartwrights' child, this person, along with their sibling, is allegedly killed by Joan Cooper, by virtue of one of her imps. (38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38

Cartwright Cartwright (Child) Victim
1726

A girl from Thorpe-le-Saxon in the county of Essex, and daughter of Henry Cornwall, a man who testified against Margaret Moone. Joan Cornwall, like her parent, falls sick the day after he had been Margaret Moone's house and returned home with half a peck of Moone's apples. She was "taken sick with strange fits, and shrickings out." Although her father made a full recovery, and her mother partially recovered, Joan Cornwall "continued languishing for a moneth, and died." Moone is found guilty of the murder and hanged as a witch.(26)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 26

Joan Cornwall Joan Cornwall Victim
1727

A man from Thorpe-le-Soken in the county of Essex, a husband and the father of Joan Cornwall, Henry Cornwall acts as witness against Margaret Moone and, along with his wife and daughter, was her victim. Corwall had allegedly done some work for Margaret Moone, afterwards, she decided to buy a hook off of him, an item paid for with a half a peck of apples. Cornwall brought the apples home, ate one, and was sick "with an extreme shaking and pain in all parts of his body" for twelve weeks. Although his wife threw the apples away, sensing that they might be a contaminate from a known witch, she too became ill, as does their daughter. Although Henry appears to make a full recovery, his wife, who suffered as he did, only partially recovers, and his daughter, "languishing for a moneth, and died."(26)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 26

Henry Cornwall Henry Cornwall Victim
1727

A man from Thorpe-le-Soken in the county of Essex, a husband and the father of Joan Cornwall, Henry Cornwall acts as witness against Margaret Moone and, along with his wife and daughter, was her victim. Corwall had allegedly done some work for Margaret Moone, afterwards, she decided to buy a hook off of him, an item paid for with a half a peck of apples. Cornwall brought the apples home, ate one, and was sick "with an extreme shaking and pain in all parts of his body" for twelve weeks. Although his wife threw the apples away, sensing that they might be a contaminate from a known witch, she too became ill, as does their daughter. Although Henry appears to make a full recovery, his wife, who suffered as he did, only partially recovers, and his daughter, "languishing for a moneth, and died."(26)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 26

Henry Cornwall Henry Cornwall Accuser
1728

A woman from Thorpe-le-Soken in the county of Essex, wife of Henry and mother of Joan, Mrs. Cornwall and her family fall victim to a malefic contamination which enters her home and her body by way of a peck of apples her Henry traded Margaret Moone for a hook. Although Mrs. Cornwall recognized Moone as a "woman of a very bad fame and suspected for a Witch, and had formerly been questioned at an Assize for the same," and threw the apples away, she soon fell sick to a mysterious disease which consumed her and her husband for twelve weeks and which kills their daughter. Mrs. Cornwall never fully recovers. Moone is found guilty and executed for the death of her daughter. (26)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 26

Cornwall Mrs. Cornwall Accuser
1728

A woman from Thorpe-le-Soken in the county of Essex, wife of Henry and mother of Joan, Mrs. Cornwall and her family fall victim to a malefic contamination which enters her home and her body by way of a peck of apples her Henry traded Margaret Moone for a hook. Although Mrs. Cornwall recognized Moone as a "woman of a very bad fame and suspected for a Witch, and had formerly been questioned at an Assize for the same," and threw the apples away, she soon fell sick to a mysterious disease which consumed her and her husband for twelve weeks and which kills their daughter. Mrs. Cornwall never fully recovers. Moone is found guilty and executed for the death of her daughter. (26)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 26

Cornwall Mrs. Cornwall Victim
1729

A Man from Thorpe-le-Saxon in the county of Essex who, along with his wife, is bewitched after the move into a house from which Margaret Moone was evicted. Rawbood appears to have offered his landlord, Thomas Turners, ten shillings more than Moone was able to pay. Moone was not amused and warned that they should not have "medled with the house," a statement read as a curse. The couple began to sicken from the moment they moved into the house, and from that point on, they "did never thrive after." As with his wife, Rawbood was "alwayes lame of sick untill they died"(27)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 27

Rawbood Mr. Rawbood Victim
1731

A woman form Thorpe-le-Soken in the county of Essex and daughter of accused witch Margaret Moone. Like her sister Judith and her mother, this woman is searched as a witch; Francis Miller testified that she "biggs in [her] privy parts as the said Margaret" had, described as "long teats or bigges in her secret parts." (28-29)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 28-29

Moone Moone (Daughter) Witch
1732

A woman from Ramsey in the county of Essex, wife of William Hatting and mother of John Hatting, and described as a "scolder." She is accused of bewitching Francis Stock's wife, daughter, and child with "extraordinary fits, pains and burnings all over" until then they died, and tormenting his servant, causing him to suffer from a "pining and languishing condition, crying out often of the said Sarah, that she had bewitched him, and was the cause of his death, which soon after ensued." Having been accused of entertaining, employing, and feeding two mice familiars, Hating is searched as a witch. She is found to have "foure Teats, or Bigges in those parts, almost an inch long, and as bigge as," according to Bridget Reynolds, her "little finger." Sara was legally indicted and found guilty bewitching Lionel Jefferson who died within a month, and Thomas Greene who died within two month. Hating denied all charges against her. She was hanged as a witch in 1645.(30-33)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 30-33

Sarah Hatting Sara Hatting Witch
1734

A woman from Harwich in the county of Essex, sister of Marian Hockett, Sarah Barton alledges that her sister gave her three familiars named Little-man, Pretty-man, and Dainty. Barton, herself accused of witchcraft, and held in the Harwich gaol, claims that her sister, Marion, has sliced off her witch's marks and healed herself pilasters, to conceal the open wounds. (32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 32

Sara Barton Sara Barton Witch
1734

A woman from Harwich in the county of Essex, sister of Marian Hockett, Sarah Barton alledges that her sister gave her three familiars named Little-man, Pretty-man, and Dainty. Barton, herself accused of witchcraft, and held in the Harwich gaol, claims that her sister, Marion, has sliced off her witch's marks and healed herself pilasters, to conceal the open wounds. (32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 32

Sara Barton Sara Barton Accuser
1740

A child from Much-Holland (now Great Holland) in the county of Essex, and a child of Thomas Woodward who is allegedly killed by Joan Cooper, by virtue of her imp. (38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38

Cartwright Cartwright (Child 2) Victim
1741

A woman from Much Holland (now Great Holland) in the county of Essex whose refusal to give Anne Cate milk allegedly cost her child's life. Mrs. Parby is herself allegedly killed by Joan Cooper, by virtue of her imp. (38, 39)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38, 39

Parby Mrs. Parby Victim
1742

A man from Much Holland (now Great Holland) in the county of Essex whose wife is allegedly killed Anne Cooper by virtue of her imp, and whose child is allegedly killed by Anne Cate by hers.(38-39)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38-39

George Parby George Parby Victim
1743

A child from Much Holland (now Great Holland) in the county of Essex, the child of George Parby and his wife, who is whose child is allegedly killed by Anne Cate by virtue of her familiar. This child's mother is also killed by Joan Cooper, a murder allegedly to spurred by Mrs. Parby's refusal to give Cooper milk. (38-39)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38-39

Parby Parby (Child) Victim
1744

A man from Little Clacton in the county of Essex and the first victim of Anne Cate's supposed familiar magic. Cate allegedly sent one of her three mice shaped imps to "nip the knee of one Robert Freeman" laming him, and causing him die, presumably from a kind of malefic metastasis, within the year. (38-39)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38-39

Robert Freeman Robert Freeman Victim
1745

A girl from Much Holland (now Great Holland) in the county of Essex and the daughter of a local butcher John Rawlins. This child is allegedly bewitched killed by one of Anne Cate's mouse shaped familiars, Prickeare, and dies a short time later. Anne Cate is found guilty of this crime. (38-39)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38-39

Susan Rawlins Susan Rawlins Victim
1746

A man from Much Holland (now Great Holland) in the county of Essex, John Tillet is allegedly killed by Anne Cate's mouse shaped familiar, Prickeare.(38, 39)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38, 39

John Tillet John Tillet Victim
1748

A child from Much Holland (now Great Holland) in the county of Essex and daughter of Samuel Ray and his wife. This person is allegedly killed by Anne Cate's familiar Sparrow. Her death may have come about because her mother had fought with Anne Cate over a contested loan of two shillings. (38, 39)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38, 39

Ray Ray (Daughter) Victim
1750

A woman from Manningtree in the county of Essex, daughter of Mary and Edward Parsely, and quite possibly referred to as Anne. Mary Parsley very suddenly sickens and dies. Her death is blamed on a falling out between her mother Mary and Hellen Clarke, after which Hellen, passing by the Parsley's door, allegedly muttered "that Mary the daughter of the said Edward and Mary Parsley should rue for all, whereupon, presently the said Mary the daughter, fell sick, and died within six weeks after." It appears that Hellen Clarke was executed for this crime; she was hanged in Manningtree in 1645 on charges of murder.(14)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 14

Mary Parsely Mary Parsely Victim
1751

A woman from Manningtree in the county of Essex, who allegedly bewitched Anne Wolvett, the daughter of Henry Woolvett, a mason in Manningtree. She appears to have been hanged for this crime. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341086)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341086

Sarah Bright Sarah Bright Witch
1764

A man from Manningtree in the county of Essex, whose horse is allegedly killed by Elizabeth Clarke or by Elizabeth Gooding. (6,7, 10-11)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 6,7, 10-11

Robert Tayler Robert Tayler Victim
1765

A man from Lawford in the county of Essex, who is allegedly killed by Elizabeth Clarke; he appears to have died within a week of being bewitched (or circe March 18, 1645).(8-9)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 8-9

Robert Okes Robert Okes Victim
1766

A child from Dedham in the county of Essex, described as the child of a clothier who is allegedly bewitched by Elizabeth Clarke. The child dies within a week of being bewitched (or March 18, 1645). (8-9)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 8-9

Anonymous 332 Victim
1767

A woman from Manningtree in the county of Essex, described as the wife of William Cole. Mrs. Cole is allegedly bewitched to death by Elizabeth Clarke, presumably through an act of familiar magic. Cole died of a "pining and languishing disease" shortly before March 26, 1645. (8-9)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 8-9

Cole Mrs. Cole Victim
1768

A man from Manningtree in the county of Essex, whose Hoy (a small sloop-rigged coasting ship) capsized in a storm, killing Turner and sinking the vessel; his death is blamed on Elizabeth Clarke. (9)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 9

Thomas Turner Thomas Turner Victim
1769

A father from Manningtree in the county of Essex, described as a beef or dairy farmer who turns state informant against Anne Leech. Edwards accuses Anne Leech of bewitching two of his cattle to death after they die suddenly and no natural cause can be found. One of Edward's children, one who is nursed by Goodwife Wyles, "was taken sick, and had very strange fire, extending the limbs, and rowling the eyes, and within two dayes after dyed. Edward's blames Anne Leech and the Elizabeth Gooding, for this child's death.(11-13)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 11-13

Richard Edwards Richard Edwards Accuser
1769

A father from Manningtree in the county of Essex, described as a beef or dairy farmer who turns state informant against Anne Leech. Edwards accuses Anne Leech of bewitching two of his cattle to death after they die suddenly and no natural cause can be found. One of Edward's children, one who is nursed by Goodwife Wyles, "was taken sick, and had very strange fire, extending the limbs, and rowling the eyes, and within two dayes after dyed. Edward's blames Anne Leech and the Elizabeth Gooding, for this child's death.(11-13)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 11-13

Richard Edwards Richard Edwards Victim
1773

A man from Clacton in the county of Essex, whose horse is allegedly cursed to death by Anne Cooper.(22-23)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 22-23

William Cottingam William Cottingam Victim
1802

A man from Thorpe-le-Soken in the county of Essex, whose three cows are allegedly killed by Margaret Moone.(26)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 26

Stephen Cooker Stephen Cooker Victim
1803

A man from Thorpe-le-Soken in the county of Essex, whose cow and sow are allegedly bewitched to death by Margaret Moone.(27)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 27

Henry Robinson Henry Robinson Victim
1804

A woman from Manningtree in the county of Essex, described as a Manningtree rogue, who watches Elizabeth Clarke as a witch, and testifies that Clarke "smacked with her mouth, and beckned with her hand, and instantly there appeared a white thing about the bignesse of a Cat." Milles then confirms that Clarke was implicated in the murder of Robert Okes, a Clothiers child, and William Cole of Manningtree aforesaid in handling, who dyed not long since of a pining and languishing disease. She also searched Margaret Moone as a witch. She finds "three long teats or bigges in her secret parts, which seemed to have been lately sucked." She concludes that "they were not like Pyles, for this Informant knows well what they are, having been troubled with them her self." She likewise searches her daughters and finds like marks on them. She claims to have born witness to Margaret Moone's attempt to conjure her familiars (from out of a hole in the wall) with beer and bread. (8-9, 28, 28-29)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 8-9, 28, 28-29

Francis Milles Francis Milles Accuser
1804

A woman from Manningtree in the county of Essex, described as a Manningtree rogue, who watches Elizabeth Clarke as a witch, and testifies that Clarke "smacked with her mouth, and beckned with her hand, and instantly there appeared a white thing about the bignesse of a Cat." Milles then confirms that Clarke was implicated in the murder of Robert Okes, a Clothiers child, and William Cole of Manningtree aforesaid in handling, who dyed not long since of a pining and languishing disease. She also searched Margaret Moone as a witch. She finds "three long teats or bigges in her secret parts, which seemed to have been lately sucked." She concludes that "they were not like Pyles, for this Informant knows well what they are, having been troubled with them her self." She likewise searches her daughters and finds like marks on them. She claims to have born witness to Margaret Moone's attempt to conjure her familiars (from out of a hole in the wall) with beer and bread. (8-9, 28, 28-29)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 8-9, 28, 28-29

Francis Milles Francis Milles Witch-Searcher
1805

A man from Thorpe-le-Soken in the county of Essex, whose batch of bread is bewitched by Margaret Moone. (26)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 26

Phillip Berriman Philip Berriman Victim
1806

A man from Thorpe-le-Soken in the county of Essex, whose horse is allegedly bewitched by Margaret Moone; it falls down and breaks its neck while pulling his wagon down hill. (26)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 26

Philip Daniels Philip Daniels Victim
1807

A woman from Manningtree in the county of Essex, described as one of the "Manningtree Rouges" Mary Philips act as a witch-searcher, testifying that she saw witches marks on Margaret Moone, her daughter Judith and her other daughter, Sarah Hating, Elizabeth Harvie, and Marian Hocket. Philips is also allegedly hit my a mysterious blow as she crosses a foot bridge; she lands in the water up to her neck, persumably the strike was meant to drown her (perhaps to keep her from searching women). (28-28, 30)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 28-28, 30

Mary Philips Mary Philips Victim
1807

A woman from Manningtree in the county of Essex, described as one of the "Manningtree Rouges" Mary Philips act as a witch-searcher, testifying that she saw witches marks on Margaret Moone, her daughter Judith and her other daughter, Sarah Hating, Elizabeth Harvie, and Marian Hocket. Philips is also allegedly hit my a mysterious blow as she crosses a foot bridge; she lands in the water up to her neck, persumably the strike was meant to drown her (perhaps to keep her from searching women). (28-28, 30)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 28-28, 30

Mary Philips Mary Philips Witch-Searcher
1834

A woman from Ramsey in the county of Essex, described as a midwife, and wife of Edward Reynolds. Bridget Reynolds searched Sara Hatting, Marion Hocket, and Elizabeth Harvey as witches. She found "foure Teats, or Bigges in those parts, almost an inch long, and as bigge as this Informants little fingers" in Hatting's genitals. She found "three such Bigges, and about the said scantling," on Elizabeth Harvey. Reynolds did not find any marks in Marian Hocket that were not "found in the same parts not like other honest women." Reynolds later testified against Sara Hatting, claiming that she "did enterteine, employ and feede" teo evil spirits in the form "of a mowsse," and that Elizabeth Harvey "did enterteine, employ and feede" three evil spirits in the form "of a red mousse."(30)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 30

Bridget Reynolds Bridget Reynolds Witch-Searcher
1834

A woman from Ramsey in the county of Essex, described as a midwife, and wife of Edward Reynolds. Bridget Reynolds searched Sara Hatting, Marion Hocket, and Elizabeth Harvey as witches. She found "foure Teats, or Bigges in those parts, almost an inch long, and as bigge as this Informants little fingers" in Hatting's genitals. She found "three such Bigges, and about the said scantling," on Elizabeth Harvey. Reynolds did not find any marks in Marian Hocket that were not "found in the same parts not like other honest women." Reynolds later testified against Sara Hatting, claiming that she "did enterteine, employ and feede" teo evil spirits in the form "of a mowsse," and that Elizabeth Harvey "did enterteine, employ and feede" three evil spirits in the form "of a red mousse."(30)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 30

Bridget Reynolds Bridget Reynolds Midwife
1836

A man from and former Constable of Ramsey in the county of Essex, described as the husband to Mrs. Stock and father to at least two children, and witness for the state in the Essex Assize at Chelsmford, July 1645. Stock would testify three time at the Assize, first testifying that Elizabeth Harvey confessed to them she had been made a witch by Marion Hocket; a transmutation which was painful to her. He also spoke about how his wife and children would allegedly become victims in a vendetta between their family and the Hatting family. He allegedly "impressed William Hating, husband to the aforesaid Sarah Hating for a scolder, whereupon the said William threatened this Informant very much." His wife was soon bothered by a mysterious snake, and then becomes ill "with extraordinary fits, pains and burnings all over her body, and within one week dyed." She blamed Sara Hatting for her death. The condition which took her life would also take the lives of two of his children. Stock finally testified that he had heard from her sister, Sara Barton, that Marion Hocket had cut off her witch's marks to avoid detection. (31)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31

Francis Stock Francis Stock Witness
1836

A man from and former Constable of Ramsey in the county of Essex, described as the husband to Mrs. Stock and father to at least two children, and witness for the state in the Essex Assize at Chelsmford, July 1645. Stock would testify three time at the Assize, first testifying that Elizabeth Harvey confessed to them she had been made a witch by Marion Hocket; a transmutation which was painful to her. He also spoke about how his wife and children would allegedly become victims in a vendetta between their family and the Hatting family. He allegedly "impressed William Hating, husband to the aforesaid Sarah Hating for a scolder, whereupon the said William threatened this Informant very much." His wife was soon bothered by a mysterious snake, and then becomes ill "with extraordinary fits, pains and burnings all over her body, and within one week dyed." She blamed Sara Hatting for her death. The condition which took her life would also take the lives of two of his children. Stock finally testified that he had heard from her sister, Sara Barton, that Marion Hocket had cut off her witch's marks to avoid detection. (31)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31

Francis Stock Francis Stock Accuser
1836

A man from and former Constable of Ramsey in the county of Essex, described as the husband to Mrs. Stock and father to at least two children, and witness for the state in the Essex Assize at Chelsmford, July 1645. Stock would testify three time at the Assize, first testifying that Elizabeth Harvey confessed to them she had been made a witch by Marion Hocket; a transmutation which was painful to her. He also spoke about how his wife and children would allegedly become victims in a vendetta between their family and the Hatting family. He allegedly "impressed William Hating, husband to the aforesaid Sarah Hating for a scolder, whereupon the said William threatened this Informant very much." His wife was soon bothered by a mysterious snake, and then becomes ill "with extraordinary fits, pains and burnings all over her body, and within one week dyed." She blamed Sara Hatting for her death. The condition which took her life would also take the lives of two of his children. Stock finally testified that he had heard from her sister, Sara Barton, that Marion Hocket had cut off her witch's marks to avoid detection. (31)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31

Francis Stock Francis Stock Relative of Victim
1837

A girl or young woman from Ramsey in the county of Essex, described as the child of Francis Stock and Mrs. Stock. This person is allegedly bewitched the death by Sara Hatting. Like her mother and sibling, this child "was taken sick with extraordinary fits, pains and burnings all over her body" and dies within ten days of a verbal altercation between her father and William Hatting, Sara Hatting's husband. (31-32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31-32

Stock Stock (Daughter) Victim
1838

A child from Ramsey in the county of Essex, described as the child of Francis Stock and Mrs. Stock. This person is allegedly bewitched the death by Sara Hatting. Like her/his mother and sibling, this child "was taken sick with extraordinary fits, pains and burnings all over her body" and dies within ten days of a verbal altercation between her father and William Hatting, Sara Hatting's husband. (31-32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31-32

Stock Stock (Child) Victim
1839

A man from Ramsey in the county of Essex, described as a servant to Francis Stock. This man allegedly gets into fisticuffs with John Hatting, son of accused witch, Sara Hatting. The day after this altercation "hee was taken sick, and so continued in a pining and languishing condition, crying out often of the said Sarah, that she had bewitched him, and was the cause of his death, which soon after ensued."(31-32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31-32

Anonymous 336 Victim
1840

A man from Ramsey in the county of Essex, described as the husband of Sara Hatting, father to John Hatting, and a local tailor. William Hatting gets into a verbal altercation where he "threatened [Francis Stock] very much," after Stock calls his wife Sara "a scolder." Presumably Stock tells his wife this because three members of Stock's family soon after sicken and die. Sara is accused of taking malefic revenge on them. This would not be the last time the Hattings were at war with the Stock's however. About nine months after the above deaths, Hatting's son John would be beaten by Stock's servant after those two men had a disagreement. The servant would die, and Hatting's wife would again be blamed. (31-32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31-32

William Hatting William Hatting Co-conspirator
1841

A boy or young man from Ramsey in the county of Essex, described as one of the sons of accused witch Sara Hatting and her husband William Hatting. John Hatting allegedly uses "ill language" at Francis Stock's servant, Anonymous 336. The man servant, in returns, administers a beating to John Hatting, but finds himself sick the next day, and "in a pining and languishing condition," often accused John's mother, Sara, or being the cause of his plight and bringing on his imminent death. (31, 32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31, 32

John Hatting John Hatting Co-conspirator
1841

A boy or young man from Ramsey in the county of Essex, described as one of the sons of accused witch Sara Hatting and her husband William Hatting. John Hatting allegedly uses "ill language" at Francis Stock's servant, Anonymous 336. The man servant, in returns, administers a beating to John Hatting, but finds himself sick the next day, and "in a pining and languishing condition," often accused John's mother, Sara, or being the cause of his plight and bringing on his imminent death. (31, 32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31, 32

John Hatting John Hatting Victim
1849

A man from St. Osyth in the county of Essex who owns or works on a farm called Cocket-wick whose lambs, numbering almost a dozen, are allegedly killed by Joyvce Boane's familiars. (34)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 34

Richard Welch Richard Welch Victim
1850

A man from St. Osyth in the county of Essex whose calf, a sheep and a lamb are allegedly killed by Joyce Boane's familiars, at her behest.(34)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 34

Thomas Clynch Thomas Clynch Victim
1887

A man from Little-Clacton in the county of Essex whose sow is allegedly killed by one of Rebecca Jones' familiars (circa 1620).(36, 37)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 36, 37

Benjamin Howes Benjamin Howes Victim
1888

A young person from St. Osyth in the county of Essex and a child of Mistress Darcy. This person is allegedly tormented by Rebecca Jones' familiar, Margaret. The torment presumably ended when Jones recalled Margaret. (36, 37-38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 36, 37-38

Darcy Darcy (Child) Victim
1897

A man from Manningtree in the county of Essex, described as "very honest" and unwilling to "speake an untruth," and maybe a glover. This man, whose testimony is presented at court second hand by Sir Thomas Bowes, Knight, claims to have encountered four of Anne West's familiar spirits one morning at four AM, outside her home. He launches off on a prolonged and intensive attempt to kill them; braining one, strangling one, attempting to drown one, only to discover it had disappeared. This man accuses West of sending these spirit to torment him, a crime she denies, by allegedly suggesting that they were scouts, sent out on another mission. This anecdotal evidence is the last narrative in _A True and Exact Relation of the Severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, Arraigned and Executed in the County of Essex_, suggesting its importance in the whole narrative. (39-40)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 39-40

Anonymous 346 Victim
1897

A man from Manningtree in the county of Essex, described as "very honest" and unwilling to "speake an untruth," and maybe a glover. This man, whose testimony is presented at court second hand by Sir Thomas Bowes, Knight, claims to have encountered four of Anne West's familiar spirits one morning at four AM, outside her home. He launches off on a prolonged and intensive attempt to kill them; braining one, strangling one, attempting to drown one, only to discover it had disappeared. This man accuses West of sending these spirit to torment him, a crime she denies, by allegedly suggesting that they were scouts, sent out on another mission. This anecdotal evidence is the last narrative in _A True and Exact Relation of the Severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, Arraigned and Executed in the County of Essex_, suggesting its importance in the whole narrative. (39-40)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 39-40

Anonymous 346 Accuser