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List of all events occurring in the personshorttitle of a given text

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
99

Elizabeth Weed is a widow from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon. She was examined before Justices Robert Bernard and Nicholas Pedley for witchcraft. In her confession, Weed alleged that 21 years before, three spirits appeared to her in the shape of a young man and two puppies, and that the spirit in the shape of a young man asked her to renounce God and Christ. She signed a covenant in blood taken from her armpit giving her soul in exchange for the spirits' assistance for 21 years; the spot developed a large lump. The 21 years was almost at an end at the time of her examination. The man-shaped spirit's purpose was said to be to have carnal relations with her as often as she liked. She named the white puppy Lilly, and the black puppy Priscill, which sucked teats on her body. Lilly' s purpose was said to be to hurt men, women and children, while Priscill was for the hurting of cattle. Weed alleged that she used Lilly to kill Henry Bedell's child, though she did not recall why; she also said that she had used Priscill to kill two horses belonging to Edward Musgraves, one horse belonging to John Musgraves, one cow belonging to William Musgraves, and another cow belonging to Thomas Thorps. At the end of her confession, Weed indicated a desire to rid herself of the burden of the spirits and her pleasure at Mr. Poole's preaching. In addition, Francis Moore alleged in her possession that Weed had bid her to renounce God and gave her a white cat named Tiffy, which would harm anyone she chose to curse.(1-2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 1-2

Elizabeth Weed Elizabeth Weed Witch
100

A man from Molesworth in the county of Cambridgeshire, known to be a farm labourer, who allegedly signed a covenant with three spirits and agreed to worship them after he lost a purse containing 7 s. The first spirit appeared to him while he was swearing, cursing and raging at the loss and offered its assistance in retrieving the purse if he forsook God and Christ and agreed to worship it instead. In appearance, it was "blacke and shaggy, and having pawes like a Beare, but in bulk not fully so big as a Coney," and was later joined by two other spirits "one like a white Cat, the other like a grey Coney." The bear spirit pricked his head for blood and had him sign a covenant. All three sucked of his body where marks were found. Winnick claimed that he never set the spirits on anyone, except for a maid-servant of Mr. Say's to convince her to steal food for him from her master's house.(3-4)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 3-4

John Winnick John Winnick Witch
108

A woman from Molesworth in the county of Huntingdon, known to be the wife of labourer William Shepherd, who claimed that a spirit like a rat, but smaller and iron grey in colour, appeared to her at her home one day when she was "swearing and cursing about the discords of her children." She claimed that this spirit had bid her to go with it, but she sent it away. Not long after, she went into the field, swearing, cursing and blaspheming once again, and the same spirit came to her with three more spirits also like rats, demanding that she renounce God and Christ to worship them instead and promising happiness in exchange. She agreed, and they told her they must have her body and soul when she died, and blood from her while she lived, which she also consented to. The spirits sucked "upon and about her hippes, and they have used very often to come to her since." She claimed that she never set them on any creature, but that they had tormented her that afternoon. When asked whether she had enjoyed any happiness as a result of her agreement, she said she had not, and that she intended to cease her habit of cursing and swearing.(9-10)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 9-10

Ellen Shepheard Ellen Shepherd Witch
107

A woman from Keyston in the County of Huntingdon, known to be a widow, who denied the witchcraft accusations leveled against her and claimed that she was a victim herself. She allegedly had a spirit appear to her over five weeks, making a roaring and puffing. She claimed that she found the bottom of her belly to be sore after the spirit came to her last, and that she had never willingly invoked or employed it. She was accused of striking or sending a spirit to harm Goodwife Darnell's child Katherine, and of spoiling Darnell's furmity; Chandler denied both. She claimed that Goodwife Darnell had turned Chandler into a duck for a time two years before, and that the roaring thing has started to torment her six month later. She was also accused of having two imps named Beelzebub and Truillibub, which she also denied, adding that Beelzebub was the name she had given her log and that Truillibub was a stick.(7-8)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 7-8

Elizabeth Chandler Elizabeth Chandler Victim
107

A woman from Keyston in the County of Huntingdon, known to be a widow, who denied the witchcraft accusations leveled against her and claimed that she was a victim herself. She allegedly had a spirit appear to her over five weeks, making a roaring and puffing. She claimed that she found the bottom of her belly to be sore after the spirit came to her last, and that she had never willingly invoked or employed it. She was accused of striking or sending a spirit to harm Goodwife Darnell's child Katherine, and of spoiling Darnell's furmity; Chandler denied both. She claimed that Goodwife Darnell had turned Chandler into a duck for a time two years before, and that the roaring thing has started to torment her six month later. She was also accused of having two imps named Beelzebub and Truillibub, which she also denied, adding that Beelzebub was the name she had given her log and that Truillibub was a stick.(7-8)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 7-8

Elizabeth Chandler Elizabeth Chandler Witch
109

A woman from Bythorn in the County of Huntingdon, known to be a widow who allegedly confessed to have been a witch for 30 years before Thomas Becke and Joseph Coysh from some thirty years; she is said to have two mouse-spirits named Tib and Fone which hurt men and cattle respectively. According to Becke and Coysh, she confessed that a brown spirit somewhat larger than a mouse had appeared to her and nipped her while she slept. The spirit then demanded her soul; she prayed to God and it left. Five or six days later, the same mouse-spirit came to her again, this time in the company of another mouse-spirit, and demanded that she permit them to suck her blood. She accepted, and three days later forsook God and Christ and agreed to allow them to take her soul when she died. They would visit her daily thereafter to suck on her body.(10-11)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 10-11

Anne Desborough Anne Desborough Witch
110

A man from Bythorn in the County of Huntingdon, known to be a Yeoman, who claimed to have heard Anne Desborough freely confess that a brown spirit somewhat larger than a mouse had appeared to her 30 years before and nipped her on the breast while she slept. The spirit then demanded her soul; she prayed to God and it left. Five or six days later, the same mouse-spirit came to her again, this time in the company of another mouse-spirit, and demanded that she permit them to suck her blood. She accepted, and three days later forsook God and Christ and agreed to allow them to take her soul when she died. Becke also heard her say that she had named the mouse which promised to hurt men Tib, and the one that promised to hurt cattle Jone. They would visit her daily thereafter to suck on her body.(10-11)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 10-11

Thomas Becke Thomas Becke Witness
653

A man from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, whom Elizabeth Weed allegedly attempted to kill by setting her familiar Lilly on him. Lilly went to him, but returned saying that he did not have the power to do so. Three days later, Weed succeeded in having Lilly kill Bedell's child instead.(2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 2

Henry Bedell Henry Bedell Victim
653

A man from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, whom Elizabeth Weed allegedly attempted to kill by setting her familiar Lilly on him. Lilly went to him, but returned saying that he did not have the power to do so. Three days later, Weed succeeded in having Lilly kill Bedell's child instead.(2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 2

Henry Bedell Henry Bedell Relative of Victim
654

A child from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon of unknown gender, known to be the child of Henry Bedell. Elizabeth Weed alleged that she had her familiar Lilly kill this child three days after Lilly was unable to kill Henry Bedell.(2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 2

Bedell Bedell (Child) Victim
655

A man from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, whom Elizabeth Weed allegedly tried to kill by setting her familiar Lilly on him. Lilly claimed he was unable to harm Musgrave: he lacked the power to do so. Weed sent her familiar Priscill to kill his two horses instead.(2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 2

Edward Musgrave Edward Musgrave Victim
656

A man from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, whose horse was allegedly killed by Elizabeth Weed's familiar Priscill.(2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 2

John Musgrave John Musgrave Victim
657

A man from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, whose cow was allegedly killed by Elizabeth Weed's familiar Priscill.(2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 2

William Musgrave William Musgrave Victim
658

A man from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, whose cow was allegedly killed by Elizabeth Weed's familiar Priscill.(2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 2

Thomas Thorpe Thomas Thorpe Victim
659

A woman from Molesworth in the county of Huntingdon, known to be a maidservant in the employ of Mr. Say, whom John Winnick allegedly set his bear spirit on in order to intimidate her into stealing food from her Master for him.(4)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 4

Anonymous 88 Victim
660

A man from Molesworth in the county of Huntingdon, whose maid (Anonymous 88) allegedly stole food from him at the behest of John Winnick's bear-spirit.(4)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 4

Say Mr. Say Victim
661

A woman from Catworth in County of Huntingdon, who allegedly gave Frances Moore a familiar spirit named Pretty and instructed her to keep it her whole life. Simon told Moore that if Moore cursed cattle and set Pretty on them, they would die.(5)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 5

Margaret Simon Margaret Simon Witch
662

A man from Catworth in County of Huntingdon, who was allegedly bewitched to death by France Moore's familiar Tiffy after he threatened to hang Moore's children for trying to stead some bread. He fell sick and lay in great pain for seven or eight days before dying. Moore claimed she could not remember what precisely she had asked Tiffy to do to him.(5)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 5

William Foster William Foster (2) Victim
663

A man from Catworth in County of Huntingdon, whose cow was allegedly killed by Frances Moore's familiar Pretty two or three days after it got into Moore's field and ate her corn.(5-6)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 5-6

Peter Browne Peter Browne Victim
664

A man from Catworth in County of Huntingdon, whose cow was allegedly caused to swell and die by Frances Moore's familiar Pretty after it got into Moore's field and ate her grain.(5)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 5

Edward Hull Edward Hull Victim
665

A man from the County of Huntingdon, known to be a Justice of the Peace. He examined Elizabeth Weed, Francis Moore, Elizabeth Chandler and Ellen Shepherd on charges of witchcraft, and took information from Thomas Becke.(1)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 1

Nicholas Pedley Nicholas Pedley Examiner/Justice
666

A man from Hatfield in the county of Hertfordshire, known to be a minister, who gave sermons at the Elizabeth Weed attended. Weed alleged that he and his sermons were influential both to her regular attendance at the church and her desire to be rid of her "unhappy burden." (2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 2

Richard Poole Richard Poole Preacher/Minister
667

A man from the County of Huntingdon, known to be a Justice of the Peace. He examined Elizabeth Weed, John Winnick, Peter Slater, Elizabeth Chandler and Ellen Shepherd on charges of witchcraft, and took information from William Searle and Mary Darnell.(1)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 1

Robert Bernard Robert Bernard Examiner/Justice
668

A man from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, who alleged that Francis Moore had killed his wife with a curse 21 years before, in 1625. Slater reported that his wife had a falling out with Moore shortly before giving birth, and that she had died a week after the birth. When Slater heard that Moore was in custody on charges of witchcraft, he went to her and asked her directly if she had caused his wife's death; he claimed that she had admitted to cursing her.(6)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 6

Peter Slater Peter Slater Relative of Victim
668

A man from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, who alleged that Francis Moore had killed his wife with a curse 21 years before, in 1625. Slater reported that his wife had a falling out with Moore shortly before giving birth, and that she had died a week after the birth. When Slater heard that Moore was in custody on charges of witchcraft, he went to her and asked her directly if she had caused his wife's death; he claimed that she had admitted to cursing her.(6)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 6

Peter Slater Peter Slater Accuser
669

A man from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, known to be a Yeoman, who alleged that he heard Frances Moore confess to being a witch and causing much harm. Searle claimed that Moore had sent her familiar Pretty to kill his chickens after he refused to give her bread, and that she had killed one of his hogs in revenge after his servants set a dog on one of hers.(7)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 7

William Searle William Searle Victim
669

A man from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, known to be a Yeoman, who alleged that he heard Frances Moore confess to being a witch and causing much harm. Searle claimed that Moore had sent her familiar Pretty to kill his chickens after he refused to give her bread, and that she had killed one of his hogs in revenge after his servants set a dog on one of hers.(7)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 7

William Searle William Searle Accuser
670

A girl from Keyston in the County of Huntingdon, known to be nine years old and the daughter of Mary Darnell and William Darnell, who was allegedly bewitched to death by Elizabeth Chandler. Katherine's mother claimed that Chandler had boxed Katherine's ear after their children had a falling out, and that the Katherine became sick soon thereafter. Katherine lay ill for three weeks before dying, complaining of pain in her ear and shrieking that Chandler had appeared to her and would kill her. Chandler denied striking Katherine, or having set a spirit on her.(8)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 8

Katherine Darnell Katherine Darnell Victim
670

A girl from Keyston in the County of Huntingdon, known to be nine years old and the daughter of Mary Darnell and William Darnell, who was allegedly bewitched to death by Elizabeth Chandler. Katherine's mother claimed that Chandler had boxed Katherine's ear after their children had a falling out, and that the Katherine became sick soon thereafter. Katherine lay ill for three weeks before dying, complaining of pain in her ear and shrieking that Chandler had appeared to her and would kill her. Chandler denied striking Katherine, or having set a spirit on her.(8)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 8

Katherine Darnell Katherine Darnell Relative of Witch
670

A girl from Keyston in the County of Huntingdon, known to be nine years old and the daughter of Mary Darnell and William Darnell, who was allegedly bewitched to death by Elizabeth Chandler. Katherine's mother claimed that Chandler had boxed Katherine's ear after their children had a falling out, and that the Katherine became sick soon thereafter. Katherine lay ill for three weeks before dying, complaining of pain in her ear and shrieking that Chandler had appeared to her and would kill her. Chandler denied striking Katherine, or having set a spirit on her.(8)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 8

Katherine Darnell Katherine Darnell Relative of Victim
671

A woman from Keyston in the County of Huntingdon, known to be the wife of blacksmith William Darnell and the mother of Katherine Darnell, who alleged that Elizabeth Chandler had bewitched Katherine to death after their children had a falling out. Darnell claims that Katherine told her Chandler had boxed her ear, which troubled her until her death three weeks later. Furthermore, Katherine was said to have shrieked often that Chandler had come to her and would kill her. Darnell also alleged that, a year later, she had pulled a pot of furmity off the fire only to have it continue boiling for an hour and run over the side no matter what she did, and that Lewis Carmell had told her that Chandler confessed to causing her familiar Beelzebub to spoil it. Chandler alleged that she had no part in Katherine's death or the furmity, and that, on the contrary, Darnell had bewitched Chandler by turning her into a duck for a time and causing a roaring spirit to come to her in the night.(8)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 8

Mary Darnell Mary Darnell Witch
671

A woman from Keyston in the County of Huntingdon, known to be the wife of blacksmith William Darnell and the mother of Katherine Darnell, who alleged that Elizabeth Chandler had bewitched Katherine to death after their children had a falling out. Darnell claims that Katherine told her Chandler had boxed her ear, which troubled her until her death three weeks later. Furthermore, Katherine was said to have shrieked often that Chandler had come to her and would kill her. Darnell also alleged that, a year later, she had pulled a pot of furmity off the fire only to have it continue boiling for an hour and run over the side no matter what she did, and that Lewis Carmell had told her that Chandler confessed to causing her familiar Beelzebub to spoil it. Chandler alleged that she had no part in Katherine's death or the furmity, and that, on the contrary, Darnell had bewitched Chandler by turning her into a duck for a time and causing a roaring spirit to come to her in the night.(8)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 8

Mary Darnell Mary Darnell Accuser
671

A woman from Keyston in the County of Huntingdon, known to be the wife of blacksmith William Darnell and the mother of Katherine Darnell, who alleged that Elizabeth Chandler had bewitched Katherine to death after their children had a falling out. Darnell claims that Katherine told her Chandler had boxed her ear, which troubled her until her death three weeks later. Furthermore, Katherine was said to have shrieked often that Chandler had come to her and would kill her. Darnell also alleged that, a year later, she had pulled a pot of furmity off the fire only to have it continue boiling for an hour and run over the side no matter what she did, and that Lewis Carmell had told her that Chandler confessed to causing her familiar Beelzebub to spoil it. Chandler alleged that she had no part in Katherine's death or the furmity, and that, on the contrary, Darnell had bewitched Chandler by turning her into a duck for a time and causing a roaring spirit to come to her in the night.(8)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 8

Mary Darnell Mary Darnell Victim
674

A man from Raunds in the County of Northampton, known to be a tailor, who alleged that met a man on the road to Keyston claiming to be coming from his uncle's home in Artlebrow. When Browne questioned the man, he recognized him as John Clarke of Keyston. Clarke said he was hurrying home because his parents had been accused of being witches, and he had too. Browne said that he, too, had been accused, and that the searchers had claimed to find marks on his body. Clarke berated him for lacking the wits to cut off his marks, as he had done three days before he was searched. After some further conversation, Clarke said that Browne couldn't be a witch because he had not seen him at any meetings; Brown responded that he met in different places, and they parted.(13-14)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 13-14

John Browne John Browne Witness
676

A man from the County of Huntington, known to be a Justice of the Peace. Osborn examined Joan Wallis when she was accused of witchcraft.(12)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 12

Robert Osborn Robert Osborn Examiner/Justice
680

A man from Keyston in the county of Cambridgeshire, whom John Browne claims confessed to being a witch when they met on the road to Keyston. According to Browne, Clarke was in a hurry, and said that he and his parents had been accused of being witches. Browne said that he, too, had been accused, and that the searchers had claimed to find marks on his body. Clarke berated him for lacking the wits to cut off his marks, as he had done three days before he was searched. Browne alleged that after some further conversation, Clarke said that Browne couldn't be a witch because he had not seen him at any meetings; Brown responded that he met in different places, and they parted. Clarke denied the confession; in his account, he says that while he did overtake a man and three women on the road, he never said anything about being a witch, cutting off any marks, attending any meetings, or making any kind of compact with the Devil.(13)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 13

John Clarke John Clarke Jr. Witch
680

A man from Keyston in the county of Cambridgeshire, whom John Browne claims confessed to being a witch when they met on the road to Keyston. According to Browne, Clarke was in a hurry, and said that he and his parents had been accused of being witches. Browne said that he, too, had been accused, and that the searchers had claimed to find marks on his body. Clarke berated him for lacking the wits to cut off his marks, as he had done three days before he was searched. Browne alleged that after some further conversation, Clarke said that Browne couldn't be a witch because he had not seen him at any meetings; Brown responded that he met in different places, and they parted. Clarke denied the confession; in his account, he says that while he did overtake a man and three women on the road, he never said anything about being a witch, cutting off any marks, attending any meetings, or making any kind of compact with the Devil.(13)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 13

John Clarke John Clarke Jr. Victim
679

A man from the County of Huntingdon, known to be a Justice of the Peace, who took information from John Browne alleging that John Clarke Jr. had admitted to being a witch and cutting off his marks, and examined Clarke for witchcraft.(13)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 13

John Castell John Castell Examiner/Justice
1046

A woman from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, who alleged that she received a familiar in the form of a little black puppy from Margaret Simson, and a familiar in the form of a white cat from Elizabeth Weed; Weed is said to have also enticed Moore into renouncing God and affirming it in blood in exchange for the white cat's services. Moore said that Simson had named the dog Pretty, and told her he would kill any cattle she cursed. Weed named the cat Tiffy and said that Tiffy would kill any person Moore cursed. Moore allowed Tiffy to lick her blood from her pricked finger when she denied God. She set Tiffy on William Foster for threatening to hang two of Moore's children when they tried to take bread; he lay sick and in pain for seven or eight days before dying. She also set Pretty onto a cow belonging to Edward Hull and another cow belonging to Peter Brown when their animals got into her field and ate her crop. Moore claimed that she had killed both familiars the year before, but that they were haunting her; when she was apprehended for witchcraft, they were said to have "crept under her cloathes, and tortured her so that she could not speake, to confesse freely." Peter Slater claimed that Moore confessed to having killing Slater's wife with a curse 21 years before; he had visited her in prison specifically to ask whether she had done so. William Searle claimed to have heard her confess to being a witch, that she had set Pretty on his chickens after he refused her bread, and that she had killed one of his hogs in revenge for some of his servants setting a dog on hers.(5-6)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 5-6

Frances Moore Frances Moore Witch
1058

A woman from Keyston in the County of Huntingdon, known to be a spinster, who alleged that six weeks before a spirit appeared to her in the shape of a man wearing black clothes while she was making her bed. When she greeted him, he introduced himself as Blackeman and asked if she was poor, which she said he was. At this, he told her he would send her Grissell and Greedigut; she noticed then that he had ugly feet and became afraid as he seemed to be tall, then less, and then vanished altogether. When asked whether she had ever lay with Blackeman, she claimed that "shee would not suffer him." Three or four days later, he reappeared with two spirits in the shape of large dogs with horsehair bridles, who introduced themselves as Grissell and Greediguts, and said that Blackeman had bid them to do whatever she asked of them. She replied that she lacked nothing, but when they asked her for food she said she had none to give them, and they left. Willis claimed that the three returned to her many times after, bringing two or three shillings each time. Edward Wingfield alleged that Willis told him and John Guylet somewhat differently; he said that Blackeman first came to her a year before, sometimes appearing as an old man, that Grissell and Greediguts came in several shapes but most commonly as hounds with bristles on their backs, that Blackeman had use of her body as often as three times a week, and that the other two sucked of her body where marks had been found rather than her breasts where she had requested. He added that Grissell and Greediguts once pulled a man from his horse and robbed him to bring Willis money.(12-13)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 12-13

Jane Willis Jane Willis Witch
1060

A man from Keyston in the County of Huntingdon, who claims that Joan Wallis confessed her spirits to him and John Guylet over dinner. According to Wingfield, Wallis had three spirits, one in the form of an old man in black who called himself Blackeman, and two that came in several shapes but mostly as hounds with bristles on their backs called Grissel and Greedigut. Wingfield alleged that Blackeman had the use of Wallis' body as often as three times a week, and that Grissell and Greedigut would suck from her where marks had been found rather than from her breasts as she had asked. Grissell and Greedigut apparently brought her money sometimes, two or three shillings at a time, and once pulled a man from his horse to rob him. Wallis denied sending the spirits out to do harm, allegedly claiming that Blackeman was the one who sent the other two out. Wingfield added that Wallis seemed to forget Grissell and Greedigut's names.(13-14)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 13-14

Edw. Ma. Wingfeild Edward Wingfield Witness
1098

A man from Bythorn in the County of Huntingdon, known to be a Minister, who claimed to have heard Anne Desborough confess that a brown spirit somewhat larger than a mouse had appeared to her 30 years before and nipped her to awaken her out of a dream. The spirit then demanded her soul; she prayed to God and it left. Five or six days later, the same mouse-spirit came to her again, this time in the company of another mouse-spirit, and demanded that she permit them to suck her blood. She accepted, forsook God and Christ and agreed to allow them to take her soul when she died. She named the mouse which promised to hurt men Tib, and the one that promised to hurt cattle Jone. They would visit her daily thereafter to suck on her body.(11-12)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 11-12

Joseph Coysh Joseph Coysh Preacher/Minister
1098

A man from Bythorn in the County of Huntingdon, known to be a Minister, who claimed to have heard Anne Desborough confess that a brown spirit somewhat larger than a mouse had appeared to her 30 years before and nipped her to awaken her out of a dream. The spirit then demanded her soul; she prayed to God and it left. Five or six days later, the same mouse-spirit came to her again, this time in the company of another mouse-spirit, and demanded that she permit them to suck her blood. She accepted, forsook God and Christ and agreed to allow them to take her soul when she died. She named the mouse which promised to hurt men Tib, and the one that promised to hurt cattle Jone. They would visit her daily thereafter to suck on her body.(11-12)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 11-12

Joseph Coysh Joseph Coysh Witness