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List of all events occurring in the personshorttitle of a given text

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
98

A man from Salisbury in the county of Wiltshire and Richard Goddard's son in law. Thomas Mason consults Anne Bodenham (via Anne Styles) three times for his own needs. He fist consults Bodenham to find three pieces of lost gold, a request he had posed twice before to Bodenham via a young male servant, and a request which cost him seven shillings and didn't help him find the gold. He then asks if "Master Rawley did intend him any mischief, for winning his money from him at play," a request which costs him two shillings but comes with a paper charm which will prevent people from meddling with him, if he wears it around his neck. He also inquires about how to move forward with a law suit he has against Richard Goddard, a request which costs him three shillings. Bodenham advises him to "demand fifteen hundred pound, and one hundred and fifty pound per annum of Master Goddard, and if he denyed it, he should prosecute the Law against him." Mason teams with Mistress Roswell to perpetuate the fuel inquiries about Anne and Sarah Goddard's intent to poison Mistress Goddard; they also pay for her escape from Salisbury, Roswell buying her clothing giving nine shillings and Mason giving her twelve pence. It seems likely that Mason fueled the paranoia about the poisoning to cause strife in the family.(4-5)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 4-5

Thomas Mason Thomas Mason Witness
98

A man from Salisbury in the county of Wiltshire and Richard Goddard's son in law. Thomas Mason consults Anne Bodenham (via Anne Styles) three times for his own needs. He fist consults Bodenham to find three pieces of lost gold, a request he had posed twice before to Bodenham via a young male servant, and a request which cost him seven shillings and didn't help him find the gold. He then asks if "Master Rawley did intend him any mischief, for winning his money from him at play," a request which costs him two shillings but comes with a paper charm which will prevent people from meddling with him, if he wears it around his neck. He also inquires about how to move forward with a law suit he has against Richard Goddard, a request which costs him three shillings. Bodenham advises him to "demand fifteen hundred pound, and one hundred and fifty pound per annum of Master Goddard, and if he denyed it, he should prosecute the Law against him." Mason teams with Mistress Roswell to perpetuate the fuel inquiries about Anne and Sarah Goddard's intent to poison Mistress Goddard; they also pay for her escape from Salisbury, Roswell buying her clothing giving nine shillings and Mason giving her twelve pence. It seems likely that Mason fueled the paranoia about the poisoning to cause strife in the family.(4-5)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 4-5

Thomas Mason Thomas Mason Co-conspirator
96

A woman from Salisbury in the county of Wiltshire, who is either Richard Goddard's daughter in law, or his daughter, and step daughter to his wife, Mistress Goddard. Sara allegedly borrowed money from her mother (in law), Mrs. Goddard, which turned stained black in her pocket, a quasi-magical sign of Sara's ill intent. Mrs Goddard began to suspect that Sara, and her sister Anne, had intended to poison her, a suspicion supported by Mistress Roswell who, along with Goddard herself, sent Anne Styles to visit Anne Bodenham numerous times to get details about this supposed crime. The mode of murder was to be poison, which Bodenham said was hidden under Sarah's bed, then moved to "white Pot set upon the Dresser in the Kitchin" and added to Mistress Goodard's Sage Ale. Styles' suggested there was something odd floating in the Ale. Eventually Sarah and her sister Anne discovered that they were accused off plotting to poison their mother, and " being much moved at it, and to vindicate themselves, that no such aspersion might lie on them (in regard it was also reported, that they should buy one Ounce and halfe of poyson that cost 6 d. at an Apothecaries)" traveled around Salisbury, discovering that Styles had bought the poison herself. Styles was fired and they threatened to press charges against her for slander and attempted murder.(3-9)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 3-9

Sarah Goddard Sarah Goddard Accuser
181

A woman who had acted as Dr. Lamb's domestic servant in London circa 1622?, a role for which she earned the moniker "Dr. Lamb's darling," and the place where she claims to have first learned the mystical arts and gained Dr. Lambe's book. In the 1650s, she is in Fisherton Anger, a suburb of Salisbury in the county of Wiltshire, and the wife of Edward Bodenham. Here she evidently worked as a teacher, was seen as a papist, a gossip, cunning woman and a wisewoman, willing to "undertake to cure almost any diseases, which she did for the most part by charms and spels, but sometimes used physical ingredients, to cover her abominable practices." Her bread and butter came from "procur[ing] things that were lost, and to restore [stolen] goods. Bodenham practices image, familiar, and word magic. She claims she can control demons, but uses image magic, and basic psychological manipulation, to do her work. She evidently makes the strategic mistake of trying to recruit Anne Styles, a young servant girl with whom she had a number of encounters. In one account, she gave her soul to the Devil "sealed in a bloody scroule," and under his instruction, seduced the maid Anne Styles into also signing over her soul. Mistress Bodenham uses a looking glass to conjure. Anne Styles comes to her afterwards, and says to Mistress Bodenham that "she would flye" to London, which Mistress Bodenham agrees too. Mistress Bodenham also travels to Stockbridge when Anne Styles is there, immediately alleviating Anne Styles' torments caused by the Devil. Mistress Bodenham tries to convince the Gentleman to let her impart "all her art," to him, which he refuses. Bodenham allegedly helps Richard Goddard's lost spoon, helps find three pieces of Thomas Mason's lost gold, helps determine if Elizabeth Rosewel's sister and daughter in law, Sarah Goddard, was trying to poison her, makes a charm protect Master Mason from Master Rawley's mischief and foretells if Mason would win a law suit against Richard Goodard, predicts who Mistriss Rosewel would marry, sends Styles again to Bodenham who have her visit a local apothecary to buy Arsenic to burn as a bit of counter magic to protect Mistress Goddard and provides poison to use against Mistriss Sarah and Mistriss Anne Goddard. Her final mistake is offering Anne Styles, who had been discovered to be the person who bought the arsenic meant to be used against Mistress Goddard, and thus, an attempted murderer, an apprenticeship. Styles soon acted like a woman possessed and shortly thereafter, Anne Bodenham was arrested. She was sentanced to be hanged as a witch. She is executed on March 19, 1653, after she boasts "she knew full well, She should be a great Lady in hel," and refuses to repent. During her execution, "she did nought but curse and sware," as she went to the gallows drunk. When she was allowed to go up the ladder, she attempted to throw herself off the platform. When asked to forgive her executioner, she replied, "Forgive thee? A pox on thee, turn me off; which were the last words she spake."(1)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 1

Anne Bodenham Anne Bodenham Magician
181

A woman who had acted as Dr. Lamb's domestic servant in London circa 1622?, a role for which she earned the moniker "Dr. Lamb's darling," and the place where she claims to have first learned the mystical arts and gained Dr. Lambe's book. In the 1650s, she is in Fisherton Anger, a suburb of Salisbury in the county of Wiltshire, and the wife of Edward Bodenham. Here she evidently worked as a teacher, was seen as a papist, a gossip, cunning woman and a wisewoman, willing to "undertake to cure almost any diseases, which she did for the most part by charms and spels, but sometimes used physical ingredients, to cover her abominable practices." Her bread and butter came from "procur[ing] things that were lost, and to restore [stolen] goods. Bodenham practices image, familiar, and word magic. She claims she can control demons, but uses image magic, and basic psychological manipulation, to do her work. She evidently makes the strategic mistake of trying to recruit Anne Styles, a young servant girl with whom she had a number of encounters. In one account, she gave her soul to the Devil "sealed in a bloody scroule," and under his instruction, seduced the maid Anne Styles into also signing over her soul. Mistress Bodenham uses a looking glass to conjure. Anne Styles comes to her afterwards, and says to Mistress Bodenham that "she would flye" to London, which Mistress Bodenham agrees too. Mistress Bodenham also travels to Stockbridge when Anne Styles is there, immediately alleviating Anne Styles' torments caused by the Devil. Mistress Bodenham tries to convince the Gentleman to let her impart "all her art," to him, which he refuses. Bodenham allegedly helps Richard Goddard's lost spoon, helps find three pieces of Thomas Mason's lost gold, helps determine if Elizabeth Rosewel's sister and daughter in law, Sarah Goddard, was trying to poison her, makes a charm protect Master Mason from Master Rawley's mischief and foretells if Mason would win a law suit against Richard Goodard, predicts who Mistriss Rosewel would marry, sends Styles again to Bodenham who have her visit a local apothecary to buy Arsenic to burn as a bit of counter magic to protect Mistress Goddard and provides poison to use against Mistriss Sarah and Mistriss Anne Goddard. Her final mistake is offering Anne Styles, who had been discovered to be the person who bought the arsenic meant to be used against Mistress Goddard, and thus, an attempted murderer, an apprenticeship. Styles soon acted like a woman possessed and shortly thereafter, Anne Bodenham was arrested. She was sentanced to be hanged as a witch. She is executed on March 19, 1653, after she boasts "she knew full well, She should be a great Lady in hel," and refuses to repent. During her execution, "she did nought but curse and sware," as she went to the gallows drunk. When she was allowed to go up the ladder, she attempted to throw herself off the platform. When asked to forgive her executioner, she replied, "Forgive thee? A pox on thee, turn me off; which were the last words she spake."(1)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 1

Anne Bodenham Anne Bodenham Witch
406

A man who apprehends Anne Styles when he hears that she wants to poison his mother-in-law.(12-13)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 12-13

Chandler Mr. Chandler Witness
407

A man witnesses Anne Style's confession and trance.(13)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 13

William Atwood William Atwood Witness
761

A woman from Salisbury in the county of Wilshire, described as a servant who visits Anne Bodenham numerous times acting a a go-between for Richard Goddard's family and Anne Bodenham. However, after Styles' purchase of arsenic (purportedly to be used as countermagic, but read as the poison to be used by Sara and Anne Goodard against their mother) is discovered, Styles is considered a criminal, an attempted murderer, who flees to London. Before she goes, she allegedly becomes Anne Bodenham's apprentice when she is seduced by the old witch into giving the Devil her soul "seald with her blood," in exchange for "wisdome and true grace" and "wealth and ease," found by using a looking glass. After having signed over her soul, Anne Styles is repentant "as she understood That she must loose the joyes of heaven." In one account, with Mistress Bodenham's understanding, Anne Styles flees to London, only to be taken at Stockbridge by the Devil and "cast to and froe," in front of a great number of witnesses. A Gentleman prays for Anne Stiles for four days, during which she is tormented by the Devil in the shape of a snake. She confesses to her contract with the Devil, and to the nature of Mistress Rodnam. When Mistress Rodnam comes to Stockbridge, Anne Stiles can finally sleep and when "she walkt againe, She praised God she felt no paine." Another account explains that all of this confession comes out when Mr. Chandler (son in law to Mris. Goddard) caught up with the Styles and who, in "a great trembling and shaking," was carried "between Sutton and Stockbridge," where she "did confesse and acknowledge all the transactions and passages between the Witch and her." The next night, at an Inn in Stockbridge, Styles had her first fit. These fits, fits which made her into a penitent victim of witchcraft, rather than an attempted murder, would continue for the three weeks Styles was in prison in Salisbury. She had "such strange fits that drew both pity and admiration from the beholders" they came "as frequent as violent," lasting thirty to sixty minutes, with only a fifteen minute respite, and while she was in them, she exhibited such strength that "six men, sometimes more could not keep her." While in her fits, she would be "miserably groaning and skrieking, being deprived of her speech and sight, and many times she grinded her teeth, and sweat in her fits continually, constantly in motion, seeking to tear her self." She could hear but not speak, and might sit "in a very senselesse idle manner" or be found "lying foaming, raving, groaning, skrieking, trembling in an unheard of manner." Styles represented herself as a ever penitent sinner who cried out "Oh very damnable, very wretched; this hand of mine writ my name in the Devils book, this finger of mine was pricked, here is yet the hole that was made, and with my blood I wrote my own Damnation, and have cut my self off from Heaven and Eternall life," who is more than willing to be saved. She participates in the normal tests demoniacs do, reacting to Bodenham, with out knowing she was there. Styles temporarily recovers from her fits, "but began to relapse into her former fits, and was tormented as formerly" the night before Bodenham's execution, as if to once more protest her innocence. After Bodenham's execution, Style's made a final assertion of her new godly self: "I am this day to go away home, I hope now to begin a holy life."(7-8, 15-16)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 7-8, 15-16

Anne Styles Anne Styles Witch
761

A woman from Salisbury in the county of Wilshire, described as a servant who visits Anne Bodenham numerous times acting a a go-between for Richard Goddard's family and Anne Bodenham. However, after Styles' purchase of arsenic (purportedly to be used as countermagic, but read as the poison to be used by Sara and Anne Goodard against their mother) is discovered, Styles is considered a criminal, an attempted murderer, who flees to London. Before she goes, she allegedly becomes Anne Bodenham's apprentice when she is seduced by the old witch into giving the Devil her soul "seald with her blood," in exchange for "wisdome and true grace" and "wealth and ease," found by using a looking glass. After having signed over her soul, Anne Styles is repentant "as she understood That she must loose the joyes of heaven." In one account, with Mistress Bodenham's understanding, Anne Styles flees to London, only to be taken at Stockbridge by the Devil and "cast to and froe," in front of a great number of witnesses. A Gentleman prays for Anne Stiles for four days, during which she is tormented by the Devil in the shape of a snake. She confesses to her contract with the Devil, and to the nature of Mistress Rodnam. When Mistress Rodnam comes to Stockbridge, Anne Stiles can finally sleep and when "she walkt againe, She praised God she felt no paine." Another account explains that all of this confession comes out when Mr. Chandler (son in law to Mris. Goddard) caught up with the Styles and who, in "a great trembling and shaking," was carried "between Sutton and Stockbridge," where she "did confesse and acknowledge all the transactions and passages between the Witch and her." The next night, at an Inn in Stockbridge, Styles had her first fit. These fits, fits which made her into a penitent victim of witchcraft, rather than an attempted murder, would continue for the three weeks Styles was in prison in Salisbury. She had "such strange fits that drew both pity and admiration from the beholders" they came "as frequent as violent," lasting thirty to sixty minutes, with only a fifteen minute respite, and while she was in them, she exhibited such strength that "six men, sometimes more could not keep her." While in her fits, she would be "miserably groaning and skrieking, being deprived of her speech and sight, and many times she grinded her teeth, and sweat in her fits continually, constantly in motion, seeking to tear her self." She could hear but not speak, and might sit "in a very senselesse idle manner" or be found "lying foaming, raving, groaning, skrieking, trembling in an unheard of manner." Styles represented herself as a ever penitent sinner who cried out "Oh very damnable, very wretched; this hand of mine writ my name in the Devils book, this finger of mine was pricked, here is yet the hole that was made, and with my blood I wrote my own Damnation, and have cut my self off from Heaven and Eternall life," who is more than willing to be saved. She participates in the normal tests demoniacs do, reacting to Bodenham, with out knowing she was there. Styles temporarily recovers from her fits, "but began to relapse into her former fits, and was tormented as formerly" the night before Bodenham's execution, as if to once more protest her innocence. After Bodenham's execution, Style's made a final assertion of her new godly self: "I am this day to go away home, I hope now to begin a holy life."(7-8, 15-16)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 7-8, 15-16

Anne Styles Anne Styles Victim
761

A woman from Salisbury in the county of Wilshire, described as a servant who visits Anne Bodenham numerous times acting a a go-between for Richard Goddard's family and Anne Bodenham. However, after Styles' purchase of arsenic (purportedly to be used as countermagic, but read as the poison to be used by Sara and Anne Goodard against their mother) is discovered, Styles is considered a criminal, an attempted murderer, who flees to London. Before she goes, she allegedly becomes Anne Bodenham's apprentice when she is seduced by the old witch into giving the Devil her soul "seald with her blood," in exchange for "wisdome and true grace" and "wealth and ease," found by using a looking glass. After having signed over her soul, Anne Styles is repentant "as she understood That she must loose the joyes of heaven." In one account, with Mistress Bodenham's understanding, Anne Styles flees to London, only to be taken at Stockbridge by the Devil and "cast to and froe," in front of a great number of witnesses. A Gentleman prays for Anne Stiles for four days, during which she is tormented by the Devil in the shape of a snake. She confesses to her contract with the Devil, and to the nature of Mistress Rodnam. When Mistress Rodnam comes to Stockbridge, Anne Stiles can finally sleep and when "she walkt againe, She praised God she felt no paine." Another account explains that all of this confession comes out when Mr. Chandler (son in law to Mris. Goddard) caught up with the Styles and who, in "a great trembling and shaking," was carried "between Sutton and Stockbridge," where she "did confesse and acknowledge all the transactions and passages between the Witch and her." The next night, at an Inn in Stockbridge, Styles had her first fit. These fits, fits which made her into a penitent victim of witchcraft, rather than an attempted murder, would continue for the three weeks Styles was in prison in Salisbury. She had "such strange fits that drew both pity and admiration from the beholders" they came "as frequent as violent," lasting thirty to sixty minutes, with only a fifteen minute respite, and while she was in them, she exhibited such strength that "six men, sometimes more could not keep her." While in her fits, she would be "miserably groaning and skrieking, being deprived of her speech and sight, and many times she grinded her teeth, and sweat in her fits continually, constantly in motion, seeking to tear her self." She could hear but not speak, and might sit "in a very senselesse idle manner" or be found "lying foaming, raving, groaning, skrieking, trembling in an unheard of manner." Styles represented herself as a ever penitent sinner who cried out "Oh very damnable, very wretched; this hand of mine writ my name in the Devils book, this finger of mine was pricked, here is yet the hole that was made, and with my blood I wrote my own Damnation, and have cut my self off from Heaven and Eternall life," who is more than willing to be saved. She participates in the normal tests demoniacs do, reacting to Bodenham, with out knowing she was there. Styles temporarily recovers from her fits, "but began to relapse into her former fits, and was tormented as formerly" the night before Bodenham's execution, as if to once more protest her innocence. After Bodenham's execution, Style's made a final assertion of her new godly self: "I am this day to go away home, I hope now to begin a holy life."(7-8, 15-16)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 7-8, 15-16

Anne Styles Anne Styles Demoniac
762

A woman from Salisbury in the county of Wiltshire, who is either Richard Goddard's daughter in law, or his daughter, and step daughter to his wife, Mistress Goddard. Mrs Goddard began to suspect that Anne and her sister Sarah, had intended to poison her, a suspicion supported by Mistress Roswell who, along with Goddard herself, sent Anne Styles to visit Anne Bodenham numerous times to get details about this supposed crime. The mode of murder was to be poison, which Bodenham said was hidden under Sarah's bed, then moved to "white Pot set upon the Dresser in the Kitchin" and added to Mistress Goodard's Sage Ale. Styles' suggested there was something odd floating in the Ale. Eventually Anne and her sister Sarah discovered that they were accused off plotting to poison their mother, and " being much moved at it, and to vindicate themselves, that no such aspersion might lie on them (in regard it was also reported, that they should buy one Ounce and halfe of poyson that cost 6 d. at an Apothecaries)" traveled around Salisbury, discovering that Styles had bought the poison herself. Styles was fired and they threatened to press charges against her for slander and attempted murder.(3-9)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 3-9

Anne Goddard Anne Goddard Accuser
766

A man from Salisbury, in the county of Wiltshire, and member of the local gentry, the loss of one of Richard Goddard's silver spoons is the first event in a long line of accusations in witchcraft which in turn tie his servant, Anne Styles to the local cunning-woman/ witch/ wizard, Anne Bodenham. (1-2)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 1-2

Richard Goddard Richard Goddard Witness
767

One of a jury of five women, including Alice Cleverly and Grace Stockes, who discover witch's marks on Anne Bodenham's shoulder and in "her secret place." She is called to rexamine the mark again at Bodenham's trial, where she confesses it did not look newly sucked.(28-29)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 28-29

Molier Damely Molier Damely Witch-Searcher
768

A woman from London, described as one of a jury of five women, including Grace Stockes and Melier Damer, who discover witch's marks on Anne Bodenham's shoulder and in "her secret place." She is called to reexamine the mark again at Bodenham's trial, where she confesses it did not look newly sucked.(28-29)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 28-29

Alice Cleverly Alice Cleverly Witch-Searcher
769

One of a jury of five women, including Alice Cleverly and Melier Damer, who discover witch's marks on Anne Bodenham's shoulder and in "her secret place." She is called to reexamine the mark again at Bodenham's trial, where she confesses it did not look newly sucked.(28-29)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 28-29

Grace Stokes Grace Stokes Witch-Searcher
772

A woman who sends Anne Styles to see Anne Bodenham because she wants to know if she's going to be poisoned.(6)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 6

Elizabeth Rosewell Elizabeth Rosewell Witness
811

A man from Salisbury? and a member of the local gentry in the county of Wiltshire and the Justice of Peace for Wiltshire, who first examines and imprisons Anne Styles "on suspicion of the poyson pretended to be provided for" Mistress Goddard (Styles had first bough the white arsenic at the best of Anne Bodenham to burn as preventative magic; the same arsenic was later believed to have been meant to use against Mistress Goddard). Edward Tucker later writes to Edmund Bower to beseech him to come to the Salisbury Assize to examine Anne Styles who, after a brief reprieve, was "troubled as formerly."(15)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 15

Edward Tucker Edward Tucker Examiner/Justice
1186

One of a jury of five women, including Melier Damer, Alice Cleverly, and Grace Stockes, who discover witch's marks on Anne Bodenham's shoulder and in "her secret place." She is called to reexamine the mark again at Bodenham's trial, where she confesses it did not look newly sucked.(28-29)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 28-29

Anonymous 174 Witch-Searcher
1187

One of a jury of five women, including Melier Damer, Alice Cleverly, and Grace Stockes, who discover witch's marks on Anne Bodenham's shoulder and in "her secret place." She is called to reexamine the mark again at Bodenham's trial, where she confesses it did not look newly sucked.(28-29)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 28-29

Anonymous 175 Witch-Searcher
1199

An Apothecary from Salisbury, who sells Anne Styles white arsenic, purportedly to give to Anne Bodenham (who claims she will do counter-magic with it).(5-6)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 5-6

Anonymous 181 Apothecary
1229

A man from Romsey in Hampshire whom Anne Bodenham identifies as a a witch. According to Bodenham, Withers could do the most tricks of any one she knew. He is also the man who, according to Bodenham, has her "Red Book" (a malefic ledger where all of the witches in the region allegedly wrote their names). (26, 34-35)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 26, 34-35

Withers Mr. Withers Witch