Go back

Assertions for a specific being.

Name Description Original Text
Apparition 5An apparition which allegedly appears to Richard Dugdale while he is resting from the fields in his bedchamber, on a morning he was feeling "some heaviness," and took a drink. At first, Richard Dugdale mistakes this apparition for a fellow servant, Hindle, who is a "hard-favoured man," whose hair had been clut very close to his ears. This apparition is also described as a "Black Man." The apparition presses down upon Richard Dugdale's chest, and turns into a naked child, which then turns into a "Filmert, and went away with a shrill shriek." It is believed that these Apparitions danced before Richard Dugdale as well, before disappearing in a flame of fire.The day afterwards, he says, he went to make Hay, and found himself dogged with some heaviness, that he could not work, or stoop; from thence, he went to a Well about a Fields breadth from the Hall aforesaid, and saw a Gallon, or Pale, standing at the Well, and that he laid himself down to drink at the Well, and as he was drinking, there came up to him, a Neighbourwoman of good Repute, and advised him not to drink so much Water, but rather go up to the said Hall, and get drink, and told him that so much Water was enough to ruin him; and says that he took her advice, and went up to the said Hall, and getting some Drink from the Cook-Maid, he went up into his Chamber, and after sometime being laid down upon the Bed, the Chamber-Door opened of it self, as he thought, and there appeared unto him something like a smoke, or mist, which presently vanished, and afterwards there came partly a fear upon him. Immediately after he thought there came unto him the likeness of a Hard-favoured Man, which at that time he thought had been on Hindle, a Fellow Servant, whose Hair seemed to be clipped close to his Ears, and lay very heavy upon his Breast, insomuch that he asked him what he would do with him, which suddenly after speaking, he thought the vision turned into the likness of a naked Child; he says he thought that he got hold of the naked Child by the Knee, and that the Child turned into the likeness of a Filmert, and went away with a shrill scriek: all this was done when he was awake, as he is now to his thinking.

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 62-63