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Assertions for a specific being.

Name Description Original Text
Anonymous 232An evil spirit from London, believed to be sent by Elizabeth Jackson to torment Elizabeth Burges, a witness who came forth at the trial of Mary Glover, a young girl believed to be bewitched by Elizabeth Jackson. The spirit was sent to torment Elizabeth Burges, after she aided Mary Glover "against this old woman." One day, when Elizabeth Bruges was eating prunes, she was "suddenly so taken, that she was not able to swallow one down," and fell to vomiting for some three weeks whenever presented with meat. The old woman came to visit Elizabeth Burges once and cursed her, saying, "Thou shortly, shalt have in thee an evill spirit too." The next night, Anonymous 232 visits Elizabeth Burges as a vision, "in likenes of a fox." It returns a second night "in likenes of an ougly black man, with a bounch of keyes in his hand, intysing her to go with him, and those keyes would bring her gould enough." Elizabeth Burges still refuses, and so Anonymous 232 visits her a third night "in the likenes of a mouse," which allegedly "troubled her more then any of the former." By praying with her master and mistress, Elizabeth Burges was delivered from the spirit, however. The .9. evidence was this, that one Elizabeth Burges, who had once witnessed a word, on Mary Glovers behalfe, against this old woman, and had ben therefore threatned by her, to be pulled downe, coming one [Fol. 34v] day (with certaine prunes in her mouth which she was eatinge) to the said ould woman, was suddenly so taken, that she was not able to swallow one downe, but also fell on vomiting; which contynued for 3 weeks afterward, upon all sustenance of meat receaved. Among other times it happened, that once this old woman came by, and seeing the same Elizabeth Burges so doing, wished that she might cast up her heart, gutts and all, adding thees wordes, Thou shortly, shalt have in thee an evill spirit too. This Elizabeth Burges, the next night following, was troubled with a Vision, in likenes of a fox; the second night, in likenes of an ougly black man, with a bounch of keyes in his hand, intysing her to go with him, and those keyes would bring her to gould enough; the third night it came in the likenes of a mouse, which troubled her more then any of the former: but by faithfull praier, assisted therein by her Master and Mistress, through the mercy and goodnes [Fol. 35r] of God, she was delivered from them all. Yea this Elizabeth Burges standing now to geve this evidence to the Jury, being faced by the witch, standingi n the Docke, and bidden to speake out (with adding thses words thow wilt be sicke, and cast againe anon) had at that isntant, her speech taken from her, her mouth drawen to a side, and so remayned for a space, unable to speake: but after that, with much contension of spirit, she had recoverd speech, and geven in this evidence, it behoved her to be led into a Chamber, where was very evill, as the witch had threatened; and after that, was led home weake, faynte and Casting, benummed in all her body, hardly able to stand, and never yet to this day recovered her perfect libertie againe.

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 34r - Fol. 35r