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111 records returned.

List of all assertions around a specific beingtype

ID Short Description & Text Name Being Type
3

One of three spirits allegedly kept by Ellen Smith of Maldon. Smiths son claimed that his mother kept the spirits, named Willet, Great Dicke, and Little Dicke, in a wool pack, wicker bottle, and leather bottle respectively. When Smiths house was searched authorities found the bottles and pack, but the spirits had vanished away. (8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 8

Greate Dicke
Spirit
4

One of three spirits allegedly kept by Ellen Smith of Maldon. Smiths son claimed that his mother kept the spirits, named Willet, Great Dicke, and Little Dicke, in a wool pack, wicker bottle, and leather bottle respectively. When Smiths house was searched authorities found the bottles and pack, but the spirits had vanished away. (9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 9

Little Dicke
Spirit
5

One of three spirits allegedly kept by Ellen Smith of Maldon. Smiths son claimed that his mother kept the spirits, named Willet, Great Dicke, and Little Dicke, in a wool pack, wicker bottle, and leather bottle respectively. When Smiths house was searched authorities found the bottles and pack, but the spirits had vanished away. (13)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 13

Willet
Spirit
26

One of three familiar spirits from Raunds in Northampton, alleged to belong to Arthur BIll. Their shape, use and the conditions of their upkeep are unknown; Bill is said to have given this one the name Grissill. (C4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C4

Grissill
Spirit
27

A familiar from Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to appear in the shape of a brown dog and to belong to Elizabeth Device. According to Device's confession, Ball bid her to make a clay image of John Robinson, dry it by the fire and crumble it slowly over the course of a week after he harassed her for having a bastard child. She did so, and Robinson died within a week of the image being crumbled away; James Device, Elizabeth's son, echoed this account in his own deposition. Elizabeth's daughter Jennet Device alleged that Elizabeth also had Ball kill James Robinson and Henry Mytton. (F4-F4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, F4-F4v

Ball
Spirit
28

A spirit or familiar from Goadby in the County of Leicestershire, described as a fairy and known to appear as a woman. Joan Willimott named it Pretty and alleged in her examination that William Berry gave her this spirit by blowing into her mouth, and that Berry urged her to give Pretty her soul. Pretty is said to come to Willimott weekly, and would "tell her of diuers persons that were stricken and forespoken," which Willimott would then seek to help through prayers. Pretty appeared in an ugly form the Friday before Willimott's examination, to tell Willimott that a woman at Deeping had given her soul to the Devil; Pretty then requested a piece of Willimott's girdle. Willimott claimed that she had only sent Pretty out once, to check on Francis Lord Rosse's well-being, and that Pretty had reported he was improving. (E2v-E3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E2v-E3

Pretty
Spirit
29

A familiar from Stathorne in the County of Leicestershire, allegedly belonging to Ellen Greene; this spirit appeared in the form of a kitlin, or kitten. Ellen Greene claimed to have received this spirit, and one other in the form of a mole, from Joan Willimott, and that Willimott had named it Pusse. Pusse would sit on her right shoulder and suck from her neck beneath her ear. Greene sent Pusse to bewitch several people to death, including the Baker for the town of Goadby (Anonymous 65), a husbandman named Willison, Mrs. Patchett and the Patchett's child. In exchange for Pusse's services, Greene gave her soul to the Devil and let Pusse suck from her at the change and full of the moon. (Fv-F2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv-F2

Pusse
Spirit
31

A familiar from Belvoir in the County of Leicestershire, known to take the shape of a white rat, allegedly belonging to Phillip Flower. Flower alleged during her examination that this spirit would suck from her left breast, and had been doing so for three or four years. She added that "when it came first vnto her, shee gaue her Soule to it, and it promised to doe her good, and cause Thomas Simpson to loue her, if shee would suffer it to sucke her, which shee agreed vnto." At the time of the examination, it had last sucked on the night of February 23, 1618. (F4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F4v

Anonymous 123
Spirit
35

The spirit of a man in St. James's in London, who used to carry "stockins and such ware about to sell," whose servant murdered him "for the money" before running away and becoming a soldier. The spirit appears to this servant (Anonymous 403) as a "headless Man," and stood by his Bed, saying, "Wilt thou yet confess?" Eventually, the spirit turns into a "bed-fellow" for the servant, still saying "Wilt thou yet confess?" When the servant confesses, he is sent to Hispaniola. (57)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 57

Anonymous 162
Spirit
62

A spirit that haunts Andrew Mackie's house by throwing stones, destroying property, and hurting people (5)

Appears in:
Telfair, Alexander. A True Relation of an Apparition Expressions and Actings of a Spirit. Edinburgh: 1696, 5

Anonymous 3
Spirit
63

A familiar spirit from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, which appears in the form of a white puppy, and known to belong to Elizabeth Weed. Lilly's function is to cause harm to people whenever Weed desires it; in this capacity Lilly was sent to kill Henry Bedell, but was unable to due to lack of power. Lilly succeeded, however, in killing Bedell's child. Weed also set Lilly on Edward Musgraves, but Lilly was unable to kill him. (1)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 1

Lilly
Spirit
66

One of four spirits, or devils, that appeared to Margaret Flower "at eleauen or twelue a clocke at midnight" while she was imprisoned in Lincoln Gaol. She recognized this spirit as Little Robin. The purpose of the devils' visit is unclear, but Flower states that "shee neuer mistrusted them." (G)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, G

Little Robin
Spirit
67

A spirit or familiar from Tardebigge and Henlipp in the county of Worcestershire and known to belong to Dr. John Lamb. Dr. Lamb is said to have kept Benias trapped in his crystal ball, the source of his predictions, along with three other unknown spirits. Benias was chief amongst them, and Dr. Lamb summoned him with declarations of adoration. (5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 5-6

Benias
Spirit
68

A familiar spirit from Molesworth in the County of Huntingdon, which appeared in the form of "a Spirit, blacke and shaggy, and having pawes like a Beare, but in bulk not fully so big as a Coney," and known to belong to John Winnick. Anonymous 130 first appeared to Winnick when he was cursing the loss of his purse, which contained 7 shillings, and offered its assistance in exchange for Winnick's soul and worship. It produced the purse the next day, in the company of two other spirits (Anonymous 131 and Anonymous 132), whom it demanded Winnick also worship. Anonymous 130 had Winnick sign a compact with blood it extracted from Winnick's head; thereafter it would suck from marks on Winnick's body along with its two fellow spirits. This spirit's function was to ensure that Winnick never wanted for food, and in that capacity intimidated Anonymous 88 into stealing food from her master's house at Winnick's behest. (3-4)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 3-4

Anonymous 130
Spirit
74

Satan in Bewdley in the county of Worcestershire, who allegedly causes an illness and pain in Mr. Hopkins, "as he thought with the Spleen." Mr. Hopkins experiences no melancholy with his illness, and claims is he is "possest" or "bewitcht." He continues in pain for some time, and "before he dyed, a piece of Wood came down into the rectum intestinum," which had to be pulled out using fingers. His wife attested that the piece of wood was "the length of ones finger," and she was sure "he never swallowed any such thing." It is concluded that Satan is responsible for Mr. Hopkin's pain and bewitchment. (60)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 60

Satan
Spirit
77

A familiar from the Forest of Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be a shapeshifter and to belong to Elizabeth Southerns, alias Dembdike. Tibb first appeared to Southerns as she came home from begging, in the form of a boy with a coat half brown, half black. He requested her soul, said she could have anything she asked for in return, and introduced himself. She gave him her soul, but did not ask anything of him for five or six years though he would appear regularly to ask what she would have of him. At the end of six years, Tibb appeared while she was dozing in the sun with a child on her lap; he appeared in the shape of a brown dog and forced her to her knees to get blood from under her left arm. She sent him away by invoking Jesus' name, but was left mad for eight weeks after. Southerns claimed to have set Tibb to take revenge from Richard Baldwyn or his family, after he drove her out of his house calling her and her granddaughter Alison Device whore and witches and threatening them with burning and hanging; she had been there to collect payment for some work her daughter Elizabeth Device had done for him at his mill. Anne Whittle claimed that Tibb sometimes appeared in the shape of a spotted bitch, and that he once provided a feast for her and Southerns with her familiar Fancie. Southerns said that she and Tibb, who was in the shape of a black cat at the time, had witnessed Whittle and Anne Redferne making clay images of Robert, Marie and Christopher Nutter, but that Tibb knocked her into a ditch to prevent her from joining them and vanished. When she headed home, he reappeared in the shape of a hare. (B2v-B3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B2v-B3

Tibb
Spirit
78

A familiar from Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to appear most often in the shape of a man, and sometimes in the shape of a bear, and to belong to Anne Whittle, alias Chattox. Tibb first appeared to Whittle when she was a guest of Elizabeth Southerns' where he provided a feast along with Southerns' familiar Tibb. At that feast, Southerns convinced Whittle to become a witch and accept Fancie as her familiar; at first, she would only let him suck from her. Fancie would appear to her regularly for the next four years, requesting her soul; at the end of those four years, she agreed. In exchange, he told her "Thou shalt want nothing; and be reuenged of whom thou list," and commanded her to call him by the name of Fancie whenever she wanted something. She set him on Robert Nutter for making advances on her daughter Anne Redferne and threatening her with eviction when she refused him; Nutter was ill for about three months before finally dying. She also sent Fancie to kill Anthony Nutter's cow for favouring Elizabeth Southerns. (B4-B4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4-B4v

Fancie
Spirit
79

A familiar from the Forest of Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to appear in the shape of a brown dog and to belong to James Device. According to Device, Dandy first appeared to him by Pendle's new church and requested his soul in exchange for being revenged of anyone he wanted. Device replied "his Soule was not his to giue, but was his Sauiour Iesus Christs, but as much as was in him this Examinate to giue, he was contented he should haue it." Two or three days later, he argued with Anne Townley when she accused him and his mother of stealing from her, and she hit him between the shoulders; two days later, Dandy came to him and instructed him to make a clay image of Townley, and said that with Dandy's help, he could kill or destroy her. Device did as he was instructed and crumbled the image a bit each day for a week. Two days after the image was gone, Townley died. Device also set Dandy on John Duckworth after Duckworth promised him an old shirt and later denied it to him; Duckworth was dead within a week after. James' sister Jennet Device claimed that Dandy appeared in the shape of a black dog and killed Townley for him. Jennet also alleged that Dandy had killed John Hargreaves and Blaze Hargreaves for James. James claimed that he last saw Dandy the Tuesday before his apprehension, and Dandy departed with a cry and a flash of fire when James would not give him his whole soul. (H3-H4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, H3-H4

Dandy
Spirit
84

A spirit or familiar from Stradbrook in the county of Suffolk, known to appear in the shape of a cat or a thick dark substance a foot in height shaped like a sugar loaf, and to belong to Doll Barthram. This spirit answers to the name of Gyles. Barthram sends Gyles to torment Joan Jorden after her toad sprits fail, and he comes into her chamber through the chimney in the night to scrape and knock at the walls and shuffle through the rushes. He also clapped her on the cheeks to awaken her, kissed her several times while slavering on her, and sat on her breast to press her so she could not speak. At other times he held her hands so she could not stir, and her voice so she could not speak. He "spake and vttered many thinges," as witnessed by Symon Fox and numerous others. In answer to the questions put to him, he claimed to have come for Joan's life, to be a boy, to have belonged to Doll Barthram for as long as 20 years, and that Barthram gave him her life and her soul. He also said that he, along with fellow familiars Tom and J., hanged Caver's wife at Barthram's command, but only after he failed to drown her by leading her into a flooded ditch. Gyles also told of how he, also by Barthram's command, killed a child, in the womb of the mother, by nipping out the braines; and that hee entred into another partie and killed him, by tearing his heart in peeces." Shortly thereafter, the woman's pregnancy ended in a stillbirth, and the man died strangely. In addition to killing Jordan, Gyles was also charged with tearing John Sheereman to pieces, and with killing Symon Fox, and his wife, children and cattle. (93-96)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 93-96

Gyles
Spirit
86

A spirit conjured by John Walsh through the use of a book, two wax candles, and a cross of virgin wax. Walsh would ask the spirit to steal items for him, which it would do. (3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination of John Walsh before Master Thomas Williams. London: 1566, 3

Anonymous 121
Spirit
92

A grey devil described as of a "stout thick squat stature" who appears and tells Margaret Gurr that if she does not soon hang herself with clothes lines, she must thrust knitting needles in her ears as a means of killing herself. Four days later, as she lies down in her bed, the grey devil reclines beside her, and begins painfully gripping her hands and wrists, immobilizing her, as he pretends to rest (snoring all the while). She cannot escape his grasp. Finally, God grants her the strength to wriggle free and the horrible imp or devil vanishes out of her sight and she is able to get some peace. Later, this same devil and his accomplice, a black devil, carry Margaret Gurr through the air when she fetches water. The Devil may also be responsible for property damage at the household of Margaret Gurr's master, Christopher Elderidge. When Margaret Gurr prays, however, she is no longer subject to the temptation of the grey devil. Dr. Skinner eventually casts out the grey devil from Margaret Gurr's body, so that the grey devil visits her no more. (1)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 1

Anonymous 15
Spirit
93

A black devil of little stature and short, who appears to Margaret Gurr, enters her, and speaks in her. He crouches inside her, wishing sad wishes with the most ugly shrieking noises, and roaring out curses. The black devil instructs Gurr to curse and swear as I do and wish such wishes as I do and tells her that if she does, she should again be well. He and his accomplice, a grey devil, carry Margaret Gurr through the air. When Margaret Gurr prays, she is released from these temptations, and the black devil may be responsible for property destruction of the household of Margaret Gurr's master, Christopher Elderidge. The devil is cast out of Margaret Gurr by Dr. Skinner, and afterward bothers her no more. (1)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 1

Anonymous 16
Spirit
95

A spirit William Whycherly calls upon using a crystal. Scarlot has a "knowledge of thyngs stolen," and is used by Whycherly to restore people to their lost goods. ()

Appears in:
Smith, Thomas. An Examination taken by Sir Thomas Smith of Conjurer, and his Comlice at 1549. Unknown: 1559,

Scariot
Spirit
96

An "orientalle or spetentrialle spirit" that William Whycherly attempts to conjure using "a circle called Circulus Salaomonia at a place called Pembsam in Sussex." Robert Bayly, John Anderson, John Hickely, and Thomas Goslyng also attempt to conjure Baro using a "sworde, ring, and hallywater," but they, along with Whycherly, are unsuccessful. ()

Appears in:
Smith, Thomas. An Examination taken by Sir Thomas Smith of Conjurer, and his Comlice at 1549. Unknown: 1559,

Baro
Spirit
97

A spirit that William Whycherly attempts to conjure "at Yarmouth in the great circule, with the sword and ring consecreated," but is unsuccessful because he "was so sore afraide that he ran away before the spirit called Ambrose Waterduke could appeare." ()

Appears in:
Smith, Thomas. An Examination taken by Sir Thomas Smith of Conjurer, and his Comlice at 1549. Unknown: 1559,

Ambrose Waterduke
Spirit
102

One of two spirits that possess the young Maid from Arpington (Anonymous 32) in the county of Kent, causing her to suffer from tormenting fits. The two spirits (Anonymous 18 and Anonymous 88) speak from within the Maid and chant, "Weaker and weaker, weaker and weaker," as well as cause her to "bark like a little Dogg twice together." However, Anonymous 18 is exorcised from the Maid after Doctor Boreman prays for her, with the spirit emerging from her mouth in the form of a serpent. This serpent wrapped itself around the doctor's neck, but immediately vanished after it was plucked off by a "standers by." (Anonymous 449) The maid is still possessed by another spirit (Anonymous 88) after this dispossession, however. (3-5)

Appears in:
Hopper, Mrs. Strange News from Arpington near Bexly in Kent being a True Narrative of a Young Maid who was Possest with Several Devils or Evil Spirits. London: 1679, 3-5

Anonymous 18
Spirit
119

A spirit that is allegedly given to Alice Newman by Ursley Kempe. Newman keeps Anonymous 177 in an earthen pot, "which she carried away with her vnder her aperne," and also sends it to plague John Johnson and his wife (Mrs. Johnson) to death. (10-11)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, 10-11

Anonymous 177
Spirit
140

A spirit or familiar known to appears in the form of a white mouse, which allegedly came to inhabit Gamaliel Greete due to his habit of swearing. According to Joan Willimott, if Greete "did looke vpon any thing with an intent to hurt, it should be hurt" while the mouse was inside him. Willimott claimed to know this from her familiar, Pretty. (E4v-F)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E4v-F

Anonymous 149
Spirit
142

A spirit or familiar known to appear in the form of a rat, and allegedly kept by Joan Flower. According to Joan Willimott, Anonymous 150 appears with another spirit, Anonymous 151, which appears in the form of an owl. These two spirits are said to suck from beneath Flower's right ear, and to have told Flower that she "should neyter be hanged nor burnt" for witchcraft, which proved true as Flower died before her trial. (E4v-F)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E4v-F

Anonymous 150
Spirit
143

One of two spirits allegedly kept by Johane Harrison. Johane stated that she had two spirits attending "on her, one for men, another for cattell." These spirits are used to aid Johane in her witchcraft, in addition to the instrumental magic she performs with a needle and parchment. (19)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 19

Anonymous 204
Spirit
144

One of two spirits allegedly kept by Johane Harrison. Johane stated that she had two spirits attending "on her, one for men, another for cattell." These spirits are used to aid Johane in her witchcraft, in addition to the instrumental magic she performs with a needle and parchment. (19)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 19

Anonymous 203
Spirit
145

Imps or devils that appears in various forms, including a toad, a frog and a mouse. It is believed to torment the demoniac, Jane Stretton, who suffers from violent fits. The witnessing of such imps is believed to be proof of the involvement of witchcraft "and such Diabolical means," with her fits, which last some nine months, although the visitation of imps and devils never ceases for Jane Stretton. These imps may have been sent by Anonymous 322, the wife of a cunning man who was insulted by Jane Stretton's father. (8)

Appears in:
Y., M.. The Hartford-shire Wonder. London: 1669, 8

Anonymous 24
Spirit
147

A familiar spirit from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, which appears in the form of a black puppy, and known to belong to Elizabeth Weed. Priscill's function is to cause harm to cattle whenever Weed desires it; in this capacity Priscill killed two horses belonging to Edward Musgrave, one horse belonging to John Musgrave, one cow belonging to William Musgraves, and one cow belonging to Thomas Thorpe. (1)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 1

Priscill
Spirit
148

A familiar spirit from Molesworth in the County of Huntingdon, which appeared in the form of a white cat, and known to belong to John Winnick. Anonymous 131 allegedly first appeared to Winnick in the company of Anonymous 130 and Anonymous 132 after Anonymous 130 returned Winnick's purse. After Winnick agreed to worship all three spirits and signed away his soul in blood, the spirits would suck from marks on Winnick's body. This spirit's function was to hurt animals at Winnick's behest, but Winnick claimed he never took advantage of its services. (3-4)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 3-4

Anonymous 131
Spirit
149

A familiar spirit from Molesworth in the County of Huntingdon, which appeared in the form of a grey coney (a rabbit or hare), and known to belong to John Winnick. Anonymous 132 first appeared to Winnick in the company of Anonymous 130 and Anonymous 131 after Anonymous 130 returned Winnick's purse. After Winnick agreed to worship all three spirits and signed away his soul in blood, the spirits would suck from marks on Winnick's body. This spirit's function was to hurt people at Winnick's behest, but Winnick claimed he never took advantage of its services. (3-4)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 3-4

Anonymous 132
Spirit
155

A spirit or familiar from Milton in the county of Bedford, known to take the form of a beetle and thought to belong to Mary Sutton and Mother Sutton. When an old servant of Master Enger's (Anonymous 89) was heard talking of the Suttons' misdeeds, "a Betle came, and stroke the same fellow on the breast: and hee presently fell into a trance as he was guiding the Plough." His fellow servants were unable to help him; after a time he recovered on his own and headed home to report the incident to Master Enger. (B2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, B2v

Anonymous 155
Spirit
156

A spirit or familiar from Milton in the county of Bedford, known to belong to Mother Sutton and Mary Sutton. After sucking on the Suttons' teats along with fellow familiar Jude, Dicke was charged with striking down Master Enger's young son. The child was soon "put to such bitter and insupportable misery, as by his life his torments were augmented, and by his death they were abridged." (Cv)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, Cv

Dicke
Spirit
157

A spirit or familiar from Milton in the county of Bedford, known to belong to Mother Sutton and Mary Sutton. After sucking on the Suttons' teats along with fellow familiar Dicke, Jude was charged with striking down Master Enger's young son. The child was soon "put to such bitter and insupportable misery, as by his life his torments were augmented, and by his death they were abridged." (Cv)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, Cv

Jude
Spirit
159

A spirit from Molesworth in the County of Huntingdon, known to appear like a small iron-grey rat, which allegedly appeared to Ellen Shepherd at her home one day when she was "swearing and cursing about the discords of her children." She claimed that this spirit had bid her to go with it, but she sent it away. Not long after, she went into the field, swearing, cursing and blaspheming once again, and the same spirit came to her with three more spirits also like rats, demanding that she renounce God and Christ to worship them instead and promising happiness in exchange. She agreed, and they told her they must have her body and soul when she died, and blood from her while she lived, which she also consented to. The spirits sucked "upon and about her hippes, and they have used very often to come to her since." She claimed that she never set them on any creature, but that they had tormented her that afternoon. (9-10)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 9-10

Anonymous 133
Spirit
161

One of four spirits from Molesworth in the County of Huntingdon, known to appear like a small iron-grey rat, which allegedly came to Ellen Shepherd in the company of Anonymous 133, the original rat-shaped spirit to approach her, and two others (Anonymous 134 and Anonymous 136). They were enticed by Shepherd's swearing, cursing and blaspheming, and demanded that she renounce God and Christ to worship them instead, promising happiness in exchange. She agreed, and they told her they must have her body and soul when she died, and blood from her while she lived, which she also consented to. The spirits sucked "upon and about her hippes, and they have used very often to come to her since." She claimed that she never set them on any creature, but that they had tormented her that afternoon. (9-10)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 9-10

Anonymous 135
Spirit
191

One of two of Elizabeth Fletcher's two spirits who often appears in the shape of a boy and who torments Helen and Elizabeth Fairfax (59-61)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 59-61

Fletcher's boy 1
Spirit
192

One of two of Elizabeth Fletcher's two spirits who often appears in the shape of a boy and who torments Helen and Elizabeth Fairfax (59-61)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 59-61

Fletcher's boy 2
Spirit
198

A green angel that appears to Thomas Darling, along with a green cat, while he is having a violent fit. Darling claims the green angel troubled him, a statement that lead his friends to believe a "lightnes in his head" was causing him to say such things. (1)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 1

Anonymous 193
Spirit
205

A spirit from the Forest of Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to appear in the shape of hare. This sprit allegedly appeared to James Device after his grandmother Elizabeth Southerns asked him to go to church and bring the communion bread to the spirit she sent to meet him on the way home. He ate it instead, and the hare-spirit threatened to pull him to pieces. Device prayed to God, and the spirit vanished. (H3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, H3

Anonymous 152
Spirit
213

A spirit that appears in the form of a red dog, and is allegedly kept by Elizabeth Clarke. Elizabeth sends the spirit to Mr. Long to make him fall off his horse and break his neck, which it fails to do. According to Goodwife Clarke, the red dog spirit did not perform its task "because the power of God was above the power of the Devil." (5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex. London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 209
Spirit
219

A spirit or angel from Spital in the County of Northumberland, one of two that allegedly appeared to Margaret Muschamp "bodyed like Birds, as big as Turkies, and faces like Christians, but the sweetest creatures that ever eyes beheld." This one was also known to take the shape of a dove. They would appear to her during her fits; Muschamp claimed they were angels sent by God to receive her soul. She was often observed in discourse with them thereafter. The spirits allegedly protected her when she was attacked by an apparition she called the Rogue (Anonymous 156), and acted as her protector against witches during subsequent fits. According to Muschamp, the angels urged her to speak out and accuse Dorothy Swinow of killing her aunt Lady Hambleton, consuming her brother, tormenting her and causing James Fauset's unnatural fits; they also bid her accuse John Hutton of being her worst tormentor. Muschamp claimed that if the Justices and Judges of the Assizes would not give her family justice, her angels would "would visibly, to the admiration of all the beholders, appear like a man and a woman, and justifie the truth." They once left Muschamp for a space of twelve weeks, much to her distress, and told her that unless she took care to not be frightened or angered for that duration, they would not return. While they were absent, "her enemy would make every third fit a terrible one." Muschamp credited these beings with foretelling strange things before they happened. In her final fit, Muschamp addressed her angels at length; this speech was witnessed by over 100 onlookers and recorded for posterity. (1)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 1

Anonymous 157
Spirit
220

A spirit or angel from Spital in the County of Northumberland, one of two that allegedly appeared to Margaret Muschamp "bodyed like Birds, as big as Turkies, and faces like Christians, but the sweetest creatures that ever eyes beheld." This one was also known to take the shape of a partridge. They would appear to her during her fits; Muschamp claimed they were angels sent by God to receive her soul. She was often observed in discourse with them thereafter. The spirits allegedly protected her when she was attacked by an apparition she called the Rogue (Anonymous 156), and acted as her protector against witches during subsequent fits. According to Muschamp, the angels urged her to speak out and accuse Dorothy Swinow of killing her aunt Lady Hambleton, consuming her brother, tormenting her and causing James Fauset's unnatural fits; they also bid her accuse John Hutton of being her worst tormentor. Muschamp claimed that if the Justices and Judges of the Assizes would not give her family justice, her angels would "would visibly, to the admiration of all the beholders, appear like a man and a woman, and justifie the truth." They once left Muschamp for a space of twelve weeks, much to her distress, and told her that unless she took care to not be frightened or angered for that duration, they would not return. While they were absent, "her enemy would make every third fit a terrible one." Muschamp credited these beings with foretelling strange things before they happened. In her final fit, Muschamp addressed her angels at length; this speech was witnessed by over 100 onlookers and recorded for posterity. (1)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 1

Anonymous 158
Spirit
222

One of potentially several spirits allegedly kept by Margaret Wellam. Margaret is "accused upon suspicion 'to be a witch and to give sucke or feede evill spirrits'." (265)

Appears in:
Le Hardy, William. County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16. Middlesex: 1937, 265

Anonymous 31
Spirit
223

An evil spirit (Anonymous 244), aka "the Devil's instrument," who afflicts a woman living on Goswell Street (Anonymous 236). This woman's brother-in-law (Anonymous 236) decides to pursue this spirit in an attempt to exorcise her of it. On June 13, 1678, he prepares a fire, and "phasied the Evil Spirit to be got into a Stone-Bottle that hung over the fire," a bottle which roared loudly. The room he finds himself in becomes filled with unexplained smoke and fire. Anonymous 236 also hears a noise like a Clap of Thunder, or the report of a Cannon, and suffers a blow to the side of his head that makes him feel as if he has been stuck with awls (tools) or needles, which throws him to the ground. The Evil Spirit then departs up the Chimney, "carrying away the Pot-hangers and Bottle with him; but the Bottle came down again, still roaring and casting a dismal tract of Smoak, but not in any part broken." The spirit seems gone, or trapped in the bottle. After this incident, Anonymous 224 seems cured of her affliction. (5 - 7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange and Wonderful News from Goswell-street: or, a Victory over the Devil. London: 1678, 5 - 7

Anonymous 244
Spirit
228

One of two imps allegedly sent by Goodwife Harwood and Goodwife Young to torment Mr. Hall, who, finding they were unable to hurt, plagued his daughter Mary Hall. They spirits, which speak through Hall, claim that they sometimes we are in the shape of Serpents, sometimes of Flyes, sometimes of Rats or Mice." They entered her home, via the chimney and entered her body, via Mary's foot. They would blaspheme and mock Dr. Woodhouse, they would tempt Hall to choke herself and prevent her from reading the bible. They would prevent her from riding her horse, by make her dance about and smash her against walls. The imps instruct Mary Hall's mother to buy Hall gifts, but telling her she "should not sleep, and would sometimes heave her up in bed, and tell her, Mary, we will buy you a black Gown, Hoods, and Scarfs, and Ribbins, Hay! Ribbins, Ribbins, Ribbins, Ribbins." They also refuse to answer the philosophical posed to them by William Drage. (32-39)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 32-39

Anonymous 34
Spirit
229

One of two imps allegedly sent by Goodwife Harwood and Goodwife Young to torment Mr. Hall, who, finding they were unable to hurt, plagued his daughter Mary Hall. They spirits, which speak through Hall, claim that they sometimes we are in the shape of Serpents, sometimes of Flyes, sometimes of Rats or Mice." They entered her home, via the chimney and entered her body, via Mary's foot. They would blaspheme and mock Dr. Woodhouse, they would tempt Hall to choke herself and prevent her from reading the bible. They would prevent her from riding her horse, by make her dance about and smash her against walls. The imps instruct Mary Hall's mother to buy Hall gifts, but telling her she "should not sleep, and would sometimes heave her up in bed, and tell her, Mary, we will buy you a black Gown, Hoods, and Scarfs, and Ribbins, Hay! Ribbins, Ribbins, Ribbins, Ribbins." They also refuse to answer the philosophical posed to them by William Drage. (32-39)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 32-39

Anonymous 35
Spirit
230

A spirit in the shape of a mouse that appears to Anonymous 254 before he is plagued by strange fits. The spirit appears to be a possessing agent, but is kept at bay by an amulet given to Anonymous 254 by a wizard (Anonymous 255). (20)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 20

Anonymous 36
Spirit
237

A spirit in the shape of a "whyte thing" that surrounds Anne Mylner when she returns home from Fathers Kyne's and passes into the fieldes along the "high way neare to the City." The day after encountering this entity, Mylner is forced to stay in bed due to illness and pain all over her body, and does not eat or drink for several days. Mylner suffers from fits and is considered possessed for upwards of fifteen weeks. Master (John) Lane preaches and prays for Mylner repeatedly and she is eventually restored to a perfect health and liking. (1-3)

Appears in:
Fisher, John. The Copy of a Letter Describing the Wonderful Woorke of God in Deliuering a Mayden within the City of Chester. London: 1565, 1-3

Anonymous 37
Spirit
264

An imp that is allegedly employed by Aubrey Grinset of Dunwich in the County of Suffolk. Grinset is alleged to have sent this imp to cause Thomas Spatchet's fits, which was done at the Devil's urging. (19, 20)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 19, 20

Imp 6
Spirit
295

An evil spirit familiar in the form of a young man that allegedly belongs to Rebecca West. West is indicted on charges of entertaining, employing, and feeding Anonymous 90, whom she calls "Her Husband," for the purpose of witchcraft and sorcery, but does not appear to have been prosecuted or found guilty on these charges. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=340914)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=340914

Anonymous 90
Spirit
296

An evil spirit familiar which is allegedly the Devil, who spoke through Richard Dugdale during one of his fits in front of the minister, Mr. Jolly. The spirit claims that Richard Dugdale is "his own." (76)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 76

Anonymous 109
Spirit
313

One of five spirits that appears to Anne Bodenham in the form of a ragged boy. The group of ragged boys appears to Bodenham after she "took her staff, and there drew him about the house, making a kind of a Circle, and then took a book, and carrying it over the Circle, with her hands, and taking a green Glass, did lay it upon the book, and placed in the Circle an earthen pan of Coles, wherein she threw something, which burning caused a very noysome stinck." Bodenham also called upon "Belzebub, Tormentor, Satan, and Lucifer" during the conjuring process. After they appear, the ragged boys "run about the house, where she [Bodenham] had drawn the Staff," and ate the crumbs of bread Bodenham threw on the ground. (4-5)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 4-5

Anonymous 69
Spirit
314

One of five spirits that appears to Anne Bodenham in the form of a ragged boy. The group of ragged boys appears to Bodenham after she "took her staff, and there drew him about the house, making a kind of a Circle, and then took a book, and carrying it over the Circle, with her hands, and taking a green Glass, did lay it upon the book, and placed in the Circle an earthen pan of Coles, wherein she threw something, which burning caused a very noysome stinck." Bodenham also called upon "Belzebub, Tormentor, Satan, and Lucifer" during the conjuring process. After they appear, the ragged boys "run about the house, where she [Bodenham] had drawn the Staff," and ate the crumbs of bread Bodenham threw on the ground. (4-5)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 4-5

Anonymous 70
Spirit
315

One of five spirits that appears to Anne Bodenham in the form of a ragged boy. The group of ragged boys appears to Bodenham after she "took her staff, and there drew him about the house, making a kind of a Circle, and then took a book, and carrying it over the Circle, with her hands, and taking a green Glass, did lay it upon the book, and placed in the Circle an earthen pan of Coles, wherein she threw something, which burning caused a very noysome stinck." Bodenham also called upon "Belzebub, Tormentor, Satan, and Lucifer" during the conjuring process. After they appear, the ragged boys "run about the house, where she [Bodenham] had drawn the Staff," and ate the crumbs of bread Bodenham threw on the ground. (4-5)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 4-5

Anonymous 71
Spirit
316

One of five spirits that appears to Anne Bodenham in the form of a ragged boy. The group of ragged boys appears to Bodenham after she "took her staff, and there drew him about the house, making a kind of a Circle, and then took a book, and carrying it over the Circle, with her hands, and taking a green Glass, did lay it upon the book, and placed in the Circle an earthen pan of Coles, wherein she threw something, which burning caused a very noysome stinck." Bodenham also called upon "Belzebub, Tormentor, Satan, and Lucifer" during the conjuring process. After they appear, the ragged boys "run about the house, where she [Bodenham] had drawn the Staff," and ate the crumbs of bread Bodenham threw on the ground. (4-5)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 4-5

Anonymous 72
Spirit
317

One of five spirits that appears to Anne Bodenham in the form of a ragged boy. The group of ragged boys appears to Bodenham after she "took her staff, and there drew him about the house, making a kind of a Circle, and then took a book, and carrying it over the Circle, with her hands, and taking a green Glass, did lay it upon the book, and placed in the Circle an earthen pan of Coles, wherein she threw something, which burning caused a very noysome stinck." Bodenham also called upon "Belzebub, Tormentor, Satan, and Lucifer" during the conjuring process. After they appear, the ragged boys "run about the house, where she [Bodenham] had drawn the Staff," and ate the crumbs of bread Bodenham threw on the ground. (4-5)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 4-5

Anonymous 73
Spirit
320

A spirit that appears in the form of a little rugged dog with a white coat, who appeared to Elizabeth Francis when she cursed Alice Poole for refusing to loan her yeast; this spirit promised to plague Poole in the head in exchange for a crust of white bread. (4-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 4-5

Anonymous 74
Spirit
322

A spirit that appears in the form of a black dog, and is allegedly seen leaving Widow Webbe's home immediately following the death of her daughter; the daughter had been struck in the face by Ellen Smith causing her to become ill and die in vengeance for a falling out with Ellen Smith's daughter, implying that this being had been summoned at her behest. The sight of the black dog distressed Widow Webbe out of her wits. (9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 9

Anonymous 76
Spirit
333

A spirit that appears in the form of a "great black man with no head" to Anne Styles during her fits and asks her for her soul. When Styles replied that it was not hers to give even though he had her blood, Anonymous 85 tumbled and threw her about, before vanishing in a great gleaning fire. (6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Doctor Lambs Darling. London: 1653, 6

Anonymous 85
Spirit
334

One of two spirits that appear in the form of ragged boys before Anne Styles at the behest of Anne Bodenham. Styles claims that Bodenham took the"fore-finger of her right hand, and pricked it with a pin, and put it into a pen, and put the pen into [her] hand, and held her hand to write in a book," at which point "one of the Spirits laid his hand or claw upon the Witches, whilest the maid wrote," with the spirit's hand being noticeably cold. According to Styles, after this malefic compact was made, she, Bodenham and the spirit all said "Amen," and the spirit gave Bodenham a piece of silver that he had bitten. (5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Doctor Lambs Darling. London: 1653, 5

Anonymous 86
Spirit
335

One of two spirits that appear in the form of ragged boys before Anne Styles at the behest of Anne Bodenham. Styles claims that Bodenham took the"fore-finger of her right hand, and pricked it with a pin, and put it into a pen, and put the pen into [her] hand, and held her hand to write in a book," at which point "one of the Spirits laid his hand or claw upon the Witches, whilest the maid wrote," with the spirit's hand being noticeably cold. According to Styles, after this malefic compact was made, she, Bodenham and the spirit all said "Amen," and the spirit gave Bodenham a piece of silver that he had bitten. (5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Doctor Lambs Darling. London: 1653, 5

Anonymous 87
Spirit
336

One of two spirits that possess the young Maid from Arpington (Annoymous 32) in the county of Kent, causing her to suffer from tormenting fits. The two spirits (Anonymous 18 and Anonymous 88) speak from within the Maid and chant, "Weaker and weaker, weaker and weaker," as well as cause her to "bark like a little Dogg twice together." One of the spirits (Anonymous 18) is exorcised from the Maid after Doctor Boreman prays for her, with the spirit emerging from her mouth in the form of a serpent. Anonymous 88, however, remains within the maid, causing her face to contort so horribly, it is believed that not even her closest relatives would recognize her. This spirit would also make noise whenever Anonymous 32 moves, sometimes answering questions posed to it, and "at other times, making a hideous murmuring, as if it disliked its present habitation." This spirit appears to remain in possession of the maid. (3-6)

Appears in:
Hopper, Mrs. Strange News from Arpington near Bexly in Kent being a True Narrative of a Young Maid who was Possest with Several Devils or Evil Spirits. London: 1679, 3-6

Anonymous 88
Spirit
347

One of four spirits from Molesworth in the County of Huntingdon, known to appear like a small iron-grey rat, which allegedly came to Ellen Shepherd in the company of Anonymous 133, the original rat-shaped spirit to approach her, and two others (Anonymous 134 and Anonymous 135). They were enticed by Shepherd's swearing, cursing and blaspheming, and demanded that she renounce God and Christ to worship them instead, promising happiness in exchange. She agreed, and they told her they must have her body and soul when she died, and blood from her while she lived, which she also consented to. The spirits sucked "upon and about her hippes, and they have used very often to come to her since." She claimed that she never set them on any creature, but that they had tormented her that afternoon. (9-10)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 9-10

Anonymous 136
Spirit
349

A spirit known by the name of Aubon who claims to be from Ireland, allegedly possessed Alexander Nyndge, and was said to be driven out by prayers led by Edward Nyndge. Aubon tormented Alexander Nyndge for six months, in which his body swelled, eyes bulged, lumps moved under his skin, he behaved and gestured oddly, flapping noises were heard from his body, he flung himself from the bed against the floor an bedstead, and his face and body were deformed. Edward Nyndge conjured Aubon forth to converse with him on multiple occasions, in which the spirit gave his name, origins and claimed to be tormenting Alexander Nyndge in order to claim his soul. Aubon is said to have a hollow voice when speaking through Alexander. (Title Page, A3, A4, A5, A7)

Appears in:
Nyndge, Edward. A True and Fearefull Vexation of one Alexander Nyndge being Most Horribly Tormented with the Deuill. London: 1615, Title Page, A3, A4, A5, A7

Aubon
Spirit
352

One of four spirits, or devils, that appeared to Margaret Flower "at eleauen or twelue a clocke at midnight" while she was imprisoned in Lincoln Gaol. She recognized this spirit as Spirit. The purpose of the devils' visit is unclear, but Flower states that "shee neuer mistrusted them." (G)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, G

Spirit
Spirit
359

A familiar or spirit, known to take the form of a white dog, allegedly belonging to Anne Baker. Baker claimed in her examination that Anonymous 147 was her "good spirit," but revealed nothing of its function. (D4, E2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D4, E2

Anonymous 147
Spirit
360

A familiar from Goadby in the County of Leicestershire, known to take the shape of a little white dog, allegedly belonging to Joan Willimott. Ellen Greene claimed during her examination to have seen this spirit sucking on Willimott under her left flank at Willimott's home, around the time of the last barley harvest. (Fv-F2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv-F2

Anonymous 148
Spirit
361

One of three familiar spirits from Raunds in Northampton, alleged to belong to Arthur BIll. Their shape, use and the conditions of their upkeep are unknown; Bill is said to have given this one the name Ball. (C4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C4

Ball (2)
Spirit
363

A spirit from Keyston in the County of Huntingdon, which Elizabeth Chandler alleged began to torment her in the night with puffing and roaring six months after Goodwife Darnell turned her into a duck. Chandler claimed that she found the bottom of her belly sore after this spirit visited her, and that "she did never willingly invoke or imploy the same, but hath prayed to God to deliver her therfrom." (7-8)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 7-8

Anonymous 160
Spirit
365

A familiar from Keyston in the County of Huntingdon, which allegedly belonged to Elizabeth Chandler. Chandler denied having any familiars, though she added "she did call a logg of wood Beelzebub, and a sticke Trullibub" (8)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 8

Trullibub
Spirit
373

A number of tiny white speckled and black birds which allegedly belong to Annis Heard of Little Oakly, Essex. According to her seven year old daughter, Annis Dowsing, Heard keeps these spirits in a box, and feeds them with wheat, barley, oats, bread, and cheese and gives them water or beer to drink. The bird spirits would, according to Dowsing, suck blood from her mother's hands and her brother's legs, but appear to have left Dowsing alone (she had to clarify to the examiners that the spot upon her hand was a burn, presumably as opposed to a witch's mark. Despite their vampiric tendencies, these spirits are described as rather begin. Dowsing claimed that brother would evidently play with these bird spirits until their "tuitling and tetling," grew tiresome, at which time he would put them back into their box. Despite her daughter's colourful evidence, Annis Heard "denieth that she hath any imps Aueses or blacke birds." (F4-F4v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, F4-F4v

Anonymous 167 (Plural)
Spirit
374

A number of tiny black and white and red and white cow spirits, the size of rats with short horns, which allegedly belong to Annis Heard of Little Oakly, Essex. According to her seven year old daughter, Annis Dowsing, Heard keeps these spirits in a box lined with black and white wool, and feeds them with wheat straw, barley straw, oat straw, and hay, and gives them water or beer to drink. Dowsing claims her mother gave her a tiny black and white cow spirit named Crowe and gave her brother a red and white cow spirit named Donne; she does not testify that they did any magic with these spirits. Annis Heard responds to these accuations quite emphatically, claiming she did not have "any kine called Crowe or Donne." (F4-F4v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, F4-F4v

Anonymous 168 (Plural)
Spirit
375

A tiny black and white cow spirit which allegedly belongs to seven year old Annis Dowsing, daughter of Annis Heard of Little Oakly, Essex. Dowsing claims that Crowe is one of numerous mini-kine her mother keeps (Heard, she alleges, has a whole box full), and that her brother was also the recipient of one of these spirits. If the children care for these spirits as their mother does, they would sleep on wool, be feed with wheat straw, barley straw, oat straw, and hay, given water or beer to drink. They do not, however, appear to have done maelficium or mischief with their spirits. (F4-F4v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, F4-F4v

Crowe
Spirit
376

A tiny red and white cow spirit which allegedly belongs to the son of Annis Heard of Little Oakly, Essex. According to his seven year old sister, Annis Dowsing, Donne is one of numerous mini-kine her mother keeps (Heard, she alleges, has a whole box full), and that she was also the recipient of one of these spirits. If the children care for these spirits as their mother does, they would sleep on wool, be feed with wheat straw, barley straw, oat straw, and hay, given water or beer to drink. They do not, however, appear to have done maelficium or mischief with their spirits. (F4-F4v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, F4-F4v

Donne
Spirit
377

The ghost of the father of Mr. Philip Furze, who allegedly appears to the servant Francis Fey in Spreyton, in the county of Devon. The ghost approaches Francis Fey, "with a Pole or Staff in his hand, resembling that he was wont to carry when living, to kill the moles withal." He tells Francis Fey not to fear him, for he seeks only to have "several Legacies which by his Testament he had bequeathed were unpaid," be fulfilled. This includes giving ten shillings to two persons, one of whom is dead, and so the money went to the next relation. The specter also asked that twenty shillings be given to "a Gentlewoman, Sister to the deceased," and promised to leave the servant boy alone should this be fulfilled. The specter also speaks of his second wife, also deceased, as "a wicked woman," though she was otherwise generally "esteemed [...] a very good woman." After Francis Fey attempts to fulfill these wishes, the specter visits him, and learns that the Gentlewoman refused to accept the shillings, as she believed they were "sent her from the Devil." The specter replied that Francis Fey must go to Totnes, and "buy for her a Ring of that value," which she would then accept. This comes to pass, and the old Gentleman "hath seemed to be a rest, having never given the young man any further trouble." (177 - 179)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 177 - 179

Furze (Ghost)
Spirit
378

A Daemon, who appears to be the spirit of the deceased second wife of the deceased father of Mr. Philip Furze, who appears before Mr. Philip Furze's servant, Francis Fey. She first appears to Francis Fey when she throws him off his horse on his way home to Spreyton, in the county of Devon, from Totnes. He was cast "with such violence" to the ground, that there was a "resounding [...] great noise." The female spirit also caused Francis Fey's horse to leap "25 foot, to the amazement of all that saw it." The spirit also shows herself to other members of the household, such as Thomasine Gidly, Ann Langdon, and a small child (Anonymous 414), "which by reason of the troublesomenes of the Spirit, they were fain to remove from that house." The spirit is further capable of changing shape: she is sometimes "very horrid," at other times "like a monstrous Dog belching out fire." She has also been described "in the shape of a Horse, carrying with it one pane of glass, & a small piece of Iron" taken from a window she flew at. The Daemon also takes great delight in causing trouble for Francis Fey: his head is thrust into "a very strait place," between a bed and wall, which required "the strength of divers men" to free him; she causes the binding of his arm after these injuries to be "strained with such violence," that he is almost strangled to death. The binding also makes a "strange and dismal noise." She also attempts to strangle Francis Fey using "Cravats, and Handkerchief" worn around his neck. This Daemon also "shewed great offence at the Perriwigs which the young man used to wear;" on one occasion, she breaks through two boxes and a number of weights protecting a perriwig in order to cut it "into many small parts and tatters,"; another time, she tore a perriwig off of his head, and "reduced [it] into very small fragments." On another occasion, the specter tears out one of the shoe-strings of Francis Fey's shoe, and caused it clasp and curl around the hand of a maid (Anonymous 415) "like a living Eel, or Serpent." The daemon further causes damage by tearing up a pair of gloves, "which is so dexterously tatter'd, and so artificially torn, that it is conceived a Cutler could not have contrived an Instrument, to have laid it abroad so accurately," however this was done in Francis Fey's pocket in less than a minute. The spirit also tore up the clothing of Francis Fey and "a servant maid" if they wore their own clothes. Other "strange and fantastical freaks" accomplished by the spirit include: moving a barrel of salt; placing bacon on a hand-iron; and twisting the feet and legs of Francis Fey so they are about his neck or chairs and stools. It is said that the specter "appears in resemblance of her own person, she seems to be habited in the same cloaths, and dress." On Easter evening, in 1628, she takes Francis Fey "up by the skirt of his doublet, [...] and carried [him] a heighth into the Air." When Francis Fey is found again after being missing, he is found in a "Trance, or extatick fit," but upon recovering from this fit, claimed that he had been in "perfect sense" and that the Daemon had carried him very high into the air - a fact verified by the finding of a shoe and a perriwig in a tree and out of doors. The spirit also comes to Francis Fey in Crediton, in the shape of a bird, and threw a "weight of Brass or Copper" at the forehead of Francis Fey when he is being treated by a Physician. The spirit "continued to molest the young man in a very severe and rugged manner, often handling him with great extremity," and continued to haunt him for some time. (180)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 180

Anonymous 169
Spirit
384

A spirit from Belvoir in the county of Leicestershire, known to be white in colour and to belong to Joan Flower, which Joan Willimott claimed during her examination had stricken Sir Francis Manners' son, Henry Lord Rosse. (E2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E2v

Anonymous 175
Spirit
388

A spirit from the Forest of Pendle in the Count of Lancashire, known to be black in colour and about the size of a hare or cat. James Device claimed this spirit came to him one night around midnight and sat heavily on him for about an hour, then left through his bedroom window. (C2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2

Anonymous 178
Spirit
389

A familiar spirit from Gisborne in Craven in the County of York, known to appear in the shape of a white foal with a black spot on its forehead, allegedly belonging to Jennet Preston. (I2v-I3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, I2v-I3

Anonymous 179
Spirit
390

A spirit known to be covered in a white sheet that appeared at Two Bridges on the road between Preston and Salmesbury, which Grace Sowerbutts claimed rescued her from Jennet Bierley. Bierley had taken the shape of a dog with two legs, and tried to convince Sowerbutts to drown herself. Bierley disappeared when Anonymous 180 came. It carried Sowerbutts away and then vanished. (K4v-L)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K4v-L

Anonymous 180
Spirit
395

A spirit or familiar from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, known to appear in the shape of a hare. This spirit appeared to James Device after he saw Thomas, Marie and Anne Redferne with clay images outside their home, and spat fire at him. The circumstances of its appearance suggests the hare may belong to Anne Redferne, who was accused of witchcraft. (O2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, O2v

Anonymous 185
Spirit
398

An unknown number of spirits or familiars from MIlton in the county of Bedford, known to belong to Mary Sutton. According to Mary's son Henry Sutton, they took the form of cats, moles and more, and would suck from the teat found under her left thigh. (C2v-C3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, C2v-C3

Anonymous 188
Spirit
399

A devil or spirit from Great Gadston in the County of Buckinghamshire, one of two that allegedly possessed the girl Anonymous 28 at the bidding of Anonymous 430 and Anonymous 431 after Anonymous 430 had a falling out with the girl's father, Anonymous 429. This sprit was originally intended to possess Anonymous 429, but failed when it found him at prayer; it was sent to Anonymous 28 instead. This spirit, along with fellow spirit Anonymous 190, caused two lumps like eggs to rise in Anonymous 28's throat, and would speak through her in a rough voice. It caused her to blaspheme, and was known to converse with bystanders. When Anonymous 429 had his daughter exorcised, this spirit remained in her, taking the use of her legs, flinging her about in her chair, and attempting to prevent girl from reading from the Bible. It also caused her to ride home facing the rear of her horse. At other times, it was known to levitate her or make her bark like a dog, bellow like a bull or roar. It also prevented her from drinking at a party, and tried to get her to drown herself in the well in the host's yard. It continued to possess her until the time of the account's publication. (2-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire. London: 1677, 2-4

Anonymous 189
Spirit
400

A devil or spirit from Great Gadston in the County of Buckinghamshire, one of two that allegedly possessed the girl Anonymous 28 at the bidding of Anonymous 430 and Anonymous 431 after Anonymous 430 had a falling out with the girl's father, Anonymous 429. This sprit was originally intended to possess Anonymous 429, but failed when it found him at prayer; it was sent to Anonymous 28 instead. This spirit, along with fellow spirit Anonymous 189, caused two lumps like eggs to rise in Anonymous 28's throat, and would speak through her in a rough voice. It caused her to blaspheme, and was known to converse with bystanders. When Anonymous 429 had his daughter exorcised, this spirit was successfully ejected. (2-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire. London: 1677, 2-4

Anonymous 190
Spirit
404

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to appear in the shape of a dun chicken. Mother Alice Samuel alleged during her confession that an upright man "told her that M. Throgmorton was a hard man & would trouble her much, wherefore he would give her six spirits that should vex and torment his children, and so he did." He told her that if she called on these six spirits, they would come, and taught her to call three of them by the names of Pluck, Catch, White, and the rest with three smacks of her mouth; they all appeared to her in the shape of dun chickens. These spirits fed on blood from her chin, and the Throckmorton children's claims about these spirits were correct, and often times she did giue a privie becke or nod, with her finger or head, & then the spirits presently stopped the childrens mouths, that they could not speake untill they came out againe: & then would y children wipe their eyes and be well again." She knew the spirits had left the children alone because they "are now come into her, and are now in the bottome of her bellie, and make her so full, that she is like to burst, and this morning they caused her to be so full, that she could scant lace her cote, and that on the way as she came, they weighed so heuie, that the horse she rid on did fall downe and was not able to carrie her." These spirits would also advise her, and told her during her examination that the man who gifted them to her was named Langlad, that he had no dwelling, and had left on a sea voyage. This spirit claims to be one of three named Smack, and visits Joan Throckmorton frequently after Agnes Samuel comes to live in the Throckmorton house; it fights with and injures the other spirits. Smack also answers others through Joan, who relays that "There was three which were called by the name of Smackes, the 4. Plucke, the 5. Blew, the 6. Catch, the 7. White, the 8. Callico, the 9. Hardname. Mistres Ioane Throckmorton had himselfe, who was the first of the Smackes, Mistresse Mary had his cozen Smacke, mistresse Elizabeth had his other cozen Smack, mistres Iane had Blew, Mistres Grace had White, and the old woman had Hardname still with her in the Iayle, and what was become of the rest he could not tell." Mother Samuel would feed them all with blood from her chin. (59-61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59-61

Smack
Spirit
405

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Hampshire, known to possess Joan Throchkmorton. Joan claimed, while she is in her fits, that Mother Alice Samuel was responsible for her torments and possession by Anonymous 218. She also claimed that Anonymous 218 "would sound in her eares some thinge which shee would declare in her fit." Among other things, this spirit told her that "there should bee twelve of them which should be bewitched in that house, in one sorte or other, and named them all unto her, being all women kinde, and servantes in the house, her selfe and her Sisters being fiue of the number." This came to pass, as many of the servants of the Throckmorton household began having fits as well. (6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6-7

Anonymous 218
Spirit
406

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be possessing Elizabeth Throckmorton at the behest of Mother Alice Samuel. According to Elizabeth, Anonymous 219 was responsible for her tormenting fits of thrashing, shrieking and sneezing. She claimed that it would not permit her to pray, and she was witnessed falling into fits whenever someone prayed or read the Bible in front of her. This spirit also prevented her from eating, causing her to put "her hand besides her meate and her meate besides her mouth, mocking her, and making her misse her mouth." Elizabeth's uncle, Gilbert Pickering, discovered that he could end her fits by taking her abroad from the house. However, her fits would resume the moment she returned. Later, this spirit became more active. Elizabeth claimed to hear it lapping milk from within her belly, it caused her to thrash and throw books whenever she read anything "good," and it answered questions posed to it by causing her to react or remain quiet. Its responses showed it likes papistry and witchcraft, but despised prayer and gospel: "love you the woord of God: whereas shee was sore troubled and vexed. But love you Witchcraft? it seemed content: or love you the Bible? Againe, it shaked hir, but love you Papistry: it was quiet. Love you praiers: it raged. Love you the Masse: it was stil. Love you the Gospell? againe it heaued up hir belly: so that what good thing soever you named, it miss-liked, but whatsoever concerning the Popes paltrie, it seemed, pleased, and pacified. " (12-15)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 12-15

Anonymous 219
Spirit
409

A spirit or spirits from Warboys in the county of Hampshire, known to appear in the shape of spirit and a dun chicken, to belong to Mother Alice Samuel and to appear to Jane, Joan, Elizabeth, Mary and Grace Throckmorton. This spirit claimed to have been sent by Mother Samuel to torment and vex them, and would "declare to the children many things concerning mother Samuell, insomuch that she coulde doo almost nothing at home for a great time, but the spirit woulde disclose." It also accused Mother Samuel of bewitching the children and the servants, and told them that if they went to Mother Samuel's home or had her brought to them, they would emerge from their fits; this proved true, but the fits would resume as soon as they were away from Mother Samuel. By Halloween 1592, Anonymous 222 speaks to the children regularly, predicting the type of fit they are to suffer, conversing with them at the end of their fits and reporting Mother Samuel's doings. It would often afflict them in the morning, at meals, on Sundays and when the church bells rang. The text is unclear on whether this is one spirit or a cooperation of several. (33-35)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 33-35

Anonymous 222
Spirit
410

An apparition from Warboys in the County of Huntingdon, known to belong to Mother Alice Samuel. The Throckmorton children, Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Mary and Grace, claim to see it once Mother Samuel is living in the household. They allege that Mother Samuel sent it, and is only pretending not to see or hear its capers. They tell their father that this spirit is one of several at her command, and that she feeds them with her blood. Robert Throckmorton demands Mother Samuel to confess to this, but she denies it vehemently. (42-44)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 42-44

Anonymous 223
Spirit
411

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to appear in the shape of a dun chicken. Mother Alice Samuel alleged during her confession that an upright man "told her that M. Throgmorton was a hard man & would trouble her much, wherefore he would give her six spirits that should vex and torment his children, and so he did." He told her that if she called on these six spirits, they would come, and taught her to call three of them by the names of Pluck, Catch, White, and the rest with three smacks of her mouth; they all appeared to her in the shape of dun chickens. These spirits fed on blood from her chin, and the Throckmorton children's claims about these spirits were correct, and often times she did giue a privie becke or nod, with her finger or head, & then the spirits presently stopped the childrens mouths, that they could not speake untill they came out againe: & then would y children wipe their eyes and be well again." She knew the spirits had left the children alone because they "are now come into her, and are now in the bottome of her bellie, and make her so full, that she is like to burst, and this morning they caused her to be so full, that she could scant lace her cote, and that on the way as she came, they weighed so heuie, that the horse she rid on did fall downe and was not able to carrie her." These spirits would also advise her, and told her during her examination that the man who gifted them to her was named Langlad, that he had no dwelling, and had left on a sea voyage. According to the spirit Smack, who spoke often through Joan Throckmorton, White was fed blood daily from Mother Samuel's chin even after her imprisonment. (59-61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59-61

Pluck
Spirit
412

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to appear in the shape of a dun chicken. Mother Alice Samuel alleged during her confession that an upright man "told her that M. Throgmorton was a hard man & would trouble her much, wherefore he would give her six spirits that should vex and torment his children, and so he did." He told her that if she called on these six spirits, they would come, and taught her to call three of them by the names of Pluck, Catch, White, and the rest with three smacks of her mouth; they all appeared to her in the shape of dun chickens. These spirits fed on blood from her chin, and the Throckmorton children's claims about these spirits were correct, and often times she did giue a privie becke or nod, with her finger or head, & then the spirits presently stopped the childrens mouths, that they could not speake untill they came out againe: & then would y children wipe their eyes and be well again." She knew the spirits had left the children alone because they "are now come into her, and are now in the bottome of her bellie, and make her so full, that she is like to burst, and this morning they caused her to be so full, that she could scant lace her cote, and that on the way as she came, they weighed so heuie, that the horse she rid on did fall downe and was not able to carrie her." These spirits would also advise her, and told her during her examination that the man who gifted them to her was named Langlad, that he had no dwelling, and had left on a sea voyage. According to the spirit Smack, who spoke often through Joan Throckmorton, White was fed blood daily from Mother Samuel's chin even after her imprisonment. (59-61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59-61

Catch
Spirit
413

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to appear in the shape of a dun chicken. Mother Alice Samuel alleged during her confession that an upright man "told her that M. Throgmorton was a hard man & would trouble her much, wherefore he would give her six spirits that should vex and torment his children, and so he did." He told her that if she called on these six spirits, they would come, and taught her to call three of them by the names of Pluck, Catch, White, and the rest with three smacks of her mouth; they all appeared to her in the shape of dun chickens. These spirits fed on blood from her chin, and the Throckmorton children's claims about these spirits were correct, and often times she did giue a privie becke or nod, with her finger or head, & then the spirits presently stopped the childrens mouths, that they could not speake untill they came out againe: & then would y children wipe their eyes and be well again." She knew the spirits had left the children alone because they "are now come into her, and are now in the bottome of her bellie, and make her so full, that she is like to burst, and this morning they caused her to be so full, that she could scant lace her cote, and that on the way as she came, they weighed so heuie, that the horse she rid on did fall downe and was not able to carrie her." These spirits would also advise her, and told her during her examination that the man who gifted them to her was named Langlad, that he had no dwelling, and had left on a sea voyage. According to the spirit Smack, who spoke often through Joan Throckmorton, White was assigned to Grace Throckmorton by Agnes Samuel after Mother Samuel was imprisoned, and was fed blood daily from Mother Samuel's chin. (59-61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59-61

White
Spirit
414

A familiar or spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to belong first to Mother Alice Samuel and then to Agnes Samuel. This spirit possesses Joan Throckmorton after Mother Samuel is imprisoned, and may also be the same spirit that possessed her in her initial fits. (6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6

Anonymous 224
Spirit
415

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to appear in the shape of a dun chicken. Mother Alice Samuel alleged during her confession that an upright man "told her that M. Throgmorton was a hard man & would trouble her much, wherefore he would give her six spirits that should vex and torment his children, and so he did." He told her that if she called on these six spirits, they would come, and taught her to call three of them by the names of Pluck, Catch, White, and the rest with three smacks of her mouth; they all appeared to her in the shape of dun chickens. These spirits fed on blood from her chin, and the Throckmorton children's claims about these spirits were correct, and often times she did giue a privie becke or nod, with her finger or head, & then the spirits presently stopped the childrens mouths, that they could not speake untill they came out againe: & then would y children wipe their eyes and be well again." She knew the spirits had left the children alone because they "are now come into her, and are now in the bottome of her bellie, and make her so full, that she is like to burst, and this morning they caused her to be so full, that she could scant lace her cote, and that on the way as she came, they weighed so heuie, that the horse she rid on did fall downe and was not able to carrie her." These spirits would also advise her, and told her during her examination that the man who gifted them to her was named Langlad, that he had no dwelling, and had left on a sea voyage. According to the spirit Smack, who spoke often through Joan Throckmorton, Smack (3) was assigned to Mary Throckmorton by Agnes Samuel after Mother Samuel was imprisoned, and was fed blood daily from Mother Samuel's chin. (59-61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59-61

Smack (3)
Spirit
416

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to appear in the shape of a dun chicken. Mother Alice Samuel alleged during her confession that an upright man "told her that M. Throgmorton was a hard man & would trouble her much, wherefore he would give her six spirits that should vex and torment his children, and so he did." He told her that if she called on these six spirits, they would come, and taught her to call three of them by the names of Pluck, Catch, White, and the rest with three smacks of her mouth; they all appeared to her in the shape of dun chickens. These spirits fed on blood from her chin, and the Throckmorton children's claims about these spirits were correct, and often times she did giue a privie becke or nod, with her finger or head, & then the spirits presently stopped the childrens mouths, that they could not speake untill they came out againe: & then would y children wipe their eyes and be well again." She knew the spirits had left the children alone because they "are now come into her, and are now in the bottome of her bellie, and make her so full, that she is like to burst, and this morning they caused her to be so full, that she could scant lace her cote, and that on the way as she came, they weighed so heuie, that the horse she rid on did fall downe and was not able to carrie her." These spirits would also advise her, and told her during her examination that the man who gifted them to her was named Langlad, that he had no dwelling, and had left on a sea voyage. According to the spirit Smack, who spoke often through Joan Throckmorton, Smack (2) was assigned to Elizabeth Throckmorton by Agnes Samuel after Mother Samuel was imprisoned, and was fed blood daily from Mother Samuel's chin. (59-61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59-61

Smack (2)
Spirit
417

A spirit or familiar from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, said to belong first to Mother Alice Samuel, and then to her daughter Agnes Samuel. According to Joan Throckmorton, this sprit afflicted her with fits of extreme pain in her legs, and would talk to her. It also made her bleed at the nose. When they spoke, Joan would repeat Blew's word back at him. Blew allegedly told her that he would continue to torment her until Agnes Samuel, his "dame," was brought to her end. Her fits would often come to pass as described by this spirit. According to the spirit Smack, who spoke often through Joan Throckmorton, Blew was assigned to Jane Throckmorton by Agnes Samuel after Mother Samuel was imprisoned, and was fed blood daily from Mother Samuel's chin. (64-69)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 64-69

Blew
Spirit
418

A spirit or familiar from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to belong to Mother Alice Samuel and to have been given to her by the man known only as Langlad. According to the spirit Smack, this spirit will support him in his fights against Pluck, Catch, Blew and White. Smack says "his name standeth upon eight letters, and euery letter standeth for a word, but what his name is we know not." Smack claims through Joan Throckmorton that Hardname is the one spirit that stayed with Mother Samuel during her imprisonment, and was fed daily with blood from her chin. (71-72)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 71-72

Hardname
Spirit
419

A spirit or familiar from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to belong to Mother Alice Samuel and to have been given to her by the man known only as Langlad. The spirit Smack claims through Joan Throckmorton that Calico was fed daily with blood from Mother Samuel's chin even after her imprisonment. (94)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 94

Calico
Spirit
425

A spirit or familiar from Stradbrook in the county of Suffolk, known to belong to Doll Barthram. This spirit answers to the name of J. According to the familiar Gyles, J. would tear Joan Jorden to pieces after Gyles killed her. J., Gyles and Tom were ordered to hang Caver's wife by Barthram. Tom "brought a rope and put it vnder her chaps" and Gyles pulled her up. (94-96)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 94-96

J.
Spirit
427

A spirit or familiar from Thames Street in London, known to belong to Anne Kirk and to have possessed Anne Nayler. This spirit caused her to have frenzied tormenting fits. It also told father, Master Nayler "one would come after who should discouer the causer, and the truth of all." (101)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 101

Anonymous 231
Spirit
428

A spirit or familiar from Thames Street in London, known to belong to Anne Kirk and to have possessed Joan Nayler. This spirit was heard to say ""Giue me thy liuer, thy lights, thy heart, thy soule, &c; then thou shalt be released, then I will depart fro[m] thee" and to bid Joan to hang herself. It contorted her body in tormenting fits, during which she accused Anne Kirk of bewitching her. Master Nayler had Kirk apprehended, and thereafter Joan was witnessed to fall into fits whenever in Kirk's presence. (101-103)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 101-103

Anonymous 233
Spirit
433

A devil in the form of an evil spirit, who possesses Sarah Bower, a fourteen year old girl from Wapping in London. The evil spirit causes her fits "to be somewhat quiet just before any Divine comes into the Room where she is." However it causes her to be "troublesome, sometimes falling out a Laughing," as well as spitting on those who pray for her. The spirit also causes Sarah Bower to "bark like a Dog, or make other most hedious Noise." It also tossed her from one end of the bed to another, and would make her tear her clothes, giving her strength so that "scarce six Men can hold her in." It also causes her to low like a bull, and roar like a lion. The spirit sometimes presents itself to Sarah Bower in the shape "of a Monstrous Fiery Dragon, other whiles a Lyon," and pulls her towards hell, even as an Angel (Anonymous 27) pulls her towards Heaven. (6 - 7)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 6 - 7

Anonymous 238
Spirit
434

A deceased woman "from below," who allegedly sent a spirit (Anonymous 240) to possess a woman in Old Gravel Lane (Anonymous 19). The spirit names her to a number of ministers who question him while he possesses the woman of Old Gravel Lane, and stated that he was sent to prevent the woman from convincing her husband (Anonymous 482) to be baptized. (3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. News from Old-Gravel Lane. London: 1675, 3

Anonymous 239
Spirit
435

A spirit in Old Gravel Lane in an unknown area of England, who is sent by "a woman below, (Anonymous 239)" to possess a woman in Old Gravel Lane (Anonymous 19), and prevent her from convincing her husband (Anonymous 482) from being baptized. The spirit converses with a number of ministers (Anonymous 483), telling them that he intend to possess the woman for as long as he could. The ministers believe the spirit is the Devil himself. This spirit speaks through the woman, and prevents her from eating, causing "the Vessels of her throat" to swell, so she could not swallow. When speaking with a number of divines (Anonymous 284), the spirit threatens to force Anonymous 19 to kill herself by throwing her "into the water." He also threatens the divines, claiming that he will make them sick should they fast and pray for the woman, further adding that "Prayers were not effectual, save only in [the] Pulpit." (2 - 3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. News from Old-Gravel Lane. London: 1675, 2 - 3

Anonymous 240
Spirit
440

Five spirits, who allegedly possess the young boy, James Barrow. These spirits are seen to depart the boy during his dispossession, an event consisting of prayer and fasting which lasts three days. At the departure of each spirit, "a kind of strange rising upwards to his throat as if he was ready to be choaked, bursting forth with a kind of belching," was observed. As each spirit leaves James Barrow, he counts how many have left him. Once all the spirits are gone, the boy is allegedly dispossessed. (16 - 17)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 16 - 17

Anonymous 243 (Plural)
Spirit
444

An evil spirit allegedly responsible for Margaret Hooper's strange behaviour and thought to possess her. The spirit causes Margaret Hooper to mutter to herself frequently, or to "use much idle talke," as well as causing a number of fits: she is once pinned to her bed and foams at the mouth; in another fit she cries out in the night. The spirit (Anonymous 248) allegedly leaves Margaret Hooper when a child surrounded by light (Anonymous 246) visits her at the Hooper household. (2 - 3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Most Fearful and Strange News from Durham being a True Relation of one Margaret Hooper of Edenbyres. London: 1641, 2 - 3

Anonymous 248
Spirit