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List of all assertions around a specific beingtype

ID Short Description & Text Name Being Type
1

A spirit or familiar from Hatfield Peverel, known to appear in various forms including a white spotted cat, a large dog and a toad. Sathan is said to speak in a strange, hollow voice, and to require a drop of blood for every deed requested of him; the pricks would leave a lasting red mark. He was used by several witches. Elizabeth Francis received Sathan as part of her induction into witchcraft; her grandmother Eve of Hatfield Peverel instructed her to give Sathan her blood, feed him with bread and milk, and to keep him in a basket. Francis first asked Sathan to make her "be ryche and to haue goodes," so he brought her 18 sheep, but these sheep soon wore away. Sathan also advised her to have sex with Andrew Byles, a wealthy man Francis desired for a husband, but he refused to marry her after. Furious, she had Sathan "waste his goodes" and then kill him; Sathan also advised her on which herb to drink to abort her pregnancy. Francis later successfully married Christopher Francis, but their marriage was unhappy; Francis first had Sathan kill their infant daughter and later lame Christopher. Francis passed Sathan on to Mother Agnes Waterhouse in exchange for a cake about 15 years after receiving him. Mother Waterhouse used Sathan for numerous mischiefs against her neighbours, including killing livestock, spoiling a brewing, spoiling curds and causing death by illness; she rewarded him with a drop of blood and a chicken, which he ate down to the bones and feathers. Mother Waterhouse also had Sathan kill her husband, as she too had an unhappy marriage. Sathan would make her pray in Latin. Though Sathan came to her as a cat, Mother Waterhouse had him turned into a toad and kept him in a wool-pot. He allegedly had the gift of prophecy, warning her in advance of her apprehension and execution. Joan Waterhouse, Mother Waterhouse's daughter borrowed Sathan once when the neighbour's daughter, Agnes Brown, refused her bread and cheese. Sathan appeared in the form of a large dog with horns and demanded her body and soul in exchange for scaring Brown; Joan agreed. Brown claimed that Sathan came several times in the form of a large black dog with an ape's face, a short tail, a chain and a silver whistle appeared with the milkhouse key in its mouth and demanded butter; the last time the dog appeared he held a dagger in his mouth and identified himself as belonging to Mother Waterhouse. (9-13)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 9-13

Sathan
Familiar
6

One of four familiars which allegedly belong to Ursula Kempe of St. Osyth, Essex, which, according to her son, Thomas Rabbet, she allegedly feeds with "beere to drinke, and of a white Lofe or Cake to eate," and allows "sucke blood of her vpon her armes and other places of her body." According to both Kempe and her son, this familiar, Tyttey, appears in the shape of gray male cat; according to Kempe her male familiars "were to punishe and kill unto death." Kempe later confesses as much, stating that she "sent Tyttey to punishe Thorlowes wife." (A3v-A4)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A3v-A4

Tyttey
Familiar
7

One of three familiar spirits from Raunds in Northampton, alleged to belong to Arthur BIll. Their shape, use and the conditions of their upkeep are unknown; Bill is said to have given this one the name Jacke. (C4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C4

Jacke
Familiar
8

One of four familiars which allegedly belong to Ursula Kempe of St. Osyth, Essex, which, according to her son, Thomas Rabbet, she allegedly feeds with "beere to drinke, and of a white Lofe or Cake to eate," and allows "sucke blood of her vpon her armes and other places of her body." According to both Kempe and her son, this familiar, Tyttey, appears in the shape of black female toad. Kempe also claims that her female familiars "were to punishe with lamenes, and other diseases of bodyly harm: and also to destroy cattell." Pigin does not appear to have done these things with Pigin, however. Kempe later confessed that she sent Pigin to punish "Letherdalls Childe" and then "burst out in teares and fell vpon her knees, and asked forgiuenesse of the sayde Letherdalls wife." (A3v-A4)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A3v-A4

Pigin
Familiar
9

One of four familiars which allegedly belong to Ursula Kempe of St. Osyth, Essex, which, according to her son, Thomas Rabbet, she allegedly feeds with "beere to drinke, and of a white Lofe or Cake to eate," and allows "sucke blood of her vpon her armes and other places of her body." According to both Kempe and her son, this familiar, Tyffin appears in the shape of white female lamb, and of her familiars, the "shees were to punishe with lamenes, and other diseases of bodyly harm: and also to destroy cattell." Kempe later confessed "that vpon the falling out betweene Thorlowes wife and her, shee sent Tyffin, the spirite vnto her childe, which lay in the Cradle, and willed the same to [knock] the Cradle ouer, so as the childe might fall out thereof, and breake the necke of it." Unlike Kempe's other familiars, Tyffin speaks several times to Kempe, giving her information on other witches and their familiars: that Mother Bennets had two familiar, "the one of them like a blacke Dogge, and the other redde like a Lyon, and that their names were Suckin and Lyerd"; that one of Ales Hunt's familiars (Jack or Robbin) "had killed Heywarde of Frowicke sixe beastes which were lately dressed of the gargette"; that Annis Glascocke sent on of her familiars to kill Martha Stevens, and that Annis had herself bewitched Charity Page and the Page's other child; informed Kempe about the details of the fight Ales Newman had with John Johnson and that she had (as part of a group, perhaps, the person who plagued Durrant May have been Ales Hunt, bewitched the butcher, Henry Durrant's daughter. Rebecca. Kempe was question specifcally on the reliability of Tyffin's testimony; she replied "that the saide spirite did euer tell her true in any matter shee required of it, and saith, that shee neuer knewe it to tell her otherwise then truth." (A3v-A4)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A3v-A4

Tyffin
Familiar
10

One of two mini-horse spirits which, according to her daughter, Feby Hunt, allegedly belong to Ales Hunt of St. Osyth, in the county of Essex. This familiar, Robbin, is said to be white. Febey contends that Robbin and its black-colored sibling, Jacke, are "kept in a litle lowe earthen pot with woll, colour white and blacke," kept by her mother's bedside, and fed with "milke out of a blacke trening dishe." She walks the constables through her home, pointing to their shelf and the dish which they ate from (which the constables confiscated.) Although she did "also confesse that her mother had charged her not to tell any thing," Feby also contends that her mother sent both her familiars to Hayward of Frowicke, but to what end shee can not tell, & shee being asked howe she knew the same, saieth, that shee hard her mother bid them to go." Hunt later confesses, on her knees and in tears, to having Jacke and its partner Robbin, but claimed that both of them had abandoned her, "and willed her therefore to shift for her selfe. And so they went from her, and sithence this Examinate saith shee sawe them not." (C3-C3v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C3-C3v

Robbin
Familiar
11

A female familiar which appears in the shape of a black dog that belongs to Elizabeth Bennet. She allegedly sends Suckin to "plague one Willingall," who languished, sickened, and died, to William Willes' who also languished for years and died. Suckin and Lyerd stalked her through an entire bread making process, from grinding the grain at the mill, where they first appeared They first came to her at the mill, stopping her in her tracks and refusing to let her move for over two hours, on her way home, while she sifted the meal (and stayed with her as she added the yeast), returned as she kneaded her bread, again as she prepared her fire (and again as she stoked it). Finally, they had enough. Bennett testified that they "tooke this examinat by the hippes, and saide, seeing thou wilt not be ruled, thou shalt haue a cause, & would haue thrust this examinat into ye burning Ouen, & so had (as this examinat saith) but for the foresaide forke, but this examinat striuing and dooing what shee coulde to her vttermost, the saide spirite burnt her arme, the which burning is apparaunt and euidently too bee seene." They did corrupt her finally, however, when she sought revenge on Byet. Byet "had oftentimes misused her this examinat and her Cattell." Bennett confessed to sending Lyerd to plague his black cow and his red cow to death. Suckin, however, acted on Bennett's behalf (or so it claimed) but not at her behest, when it "plagued y^ said Byets wife to the death," alleging that "I knowe that Byet and his wife haue wronged thee greatly, and doone thee seuerall hurtes, and beaten thy swyne, and thrust a pytchforke in one of them." In for a penny, and outraged that Byet has called "her olde trot, old whore, and other lewde speaches," Bennett finally gave in entirely to temptation and "caused the spirite, called Suckin, to goe and plague the sayde Willyam Byette where that woulde: The which the sayd spyrite did, and at the retourne of it, it tolde this Examinate, that it met Byet in the barne yarde, and that it had plagued him in the hippes, euen vnto death." Bennett finally theorizes that she suspected that Mother Turner has deliberately unleashed this mini-plague on her after she refused to give Turner milk; Cecilly Sellis also mentions Mother Turner (Joan Turner) as being one of the possible refuges her familiars, Robin, Jack, the William, and Puppet (alias Mamet) sought when she was indicted. (B2v, B4)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, B2v, B4

Suckin
Familiar
12

A male familiar which appears in the shape of a red lion or a hare, which belongs to Elizabeth Bennet. She allegedly sends it to "plague Fortunes wife and his chylde," to Bonners' wife "to plague her," to lame William Bonner's wife on the knee, lips, and eyes, plagues two of "Byets beastes [...] the one a red Cow, the other a blacke" to death. Both Suckin and Lyerd pursued Bennett relentlessly before she finally agreed to engage their services. Suckin and Lyerd stalked her through an entire bread making process, from grinding the grain at the mill, where they first appeared They first came to her at the mill, stopping her in her tracks and refusing to let her move for over two hours, on her way home, while she sifted the meal (and stayed with her as she added the yeast), returned as she kneaded her bread, again as she prepared her fire (and again as she stoked it). Finally, they had enough. Bennett testified that they "tooke this examinat by the hippes, and saide, seeing thou wilt not be ruled, thou shalt haue a cause, & would haue thrust this examinat into ye burning Ouen, & so had (as this examinat saith) but for the foresaide forke, but this examinat striuing and dooing what shee coulde to her vttermost, the saide spirite burnt her arme, the which burning is apparaunt and euidently too bee seene." They did corrupt her finally, however, when she sought revenge on Byet. Byet "had oftentimes misused her this examinat and her Cattell." Bennett confessed to sending Lyerd to plague his black cow and his red cow to death. Suckin, however, acted on Bennett's behalf (or so it claimed) but not at her behest, when it "plagued y^ said Byets wife to the death," alleging that "I knowe that Byet and his wife haue wronged thee greatly, and doone thee seuerall hurtes, and beaten thy swyne, and thrust a pytchforke in one of them." In for a penny, and outraged that Byet has called "her olde trot, old whore, and other lewde speaches," Bennett finally gave in entirely to temptation and "caused the spirite, called Suckin, to goe and plague the sayde Willyam Byette where that woulde: The which the sayd spyrite did, and at the retourne of it, it tolde this Examinate, that it met Byet in the barne yarde, and that it had plagued him in the hippes, euen vnto death." Bennett finally theorizes that she suspected that Mother Turner has deliberately unleashed this mini-plague on her after she refused to give Turner milk; Cecilly Sellis also mentions Mother Turner (Joan Turner) as being one of the possible refuges her familiars, Robin, Jack, the William, and Puppet (alias Mamet) sought when she was indicted. (B2v, B4)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, B2v, B4

Lyerd
Familiar
13

A familiar or devil, known to be from Edmonton in the County of Middlesex, now part of the London Borough of Enfield, which is said to have first appeared to Elizabeth Sawyer eight years before when she was cursing, swearing and blaspheming. He would visit her three times a week, reporting what mischiefs he had done on her behalf, including causing damage to animals and killing two infants. He demanded her soul and her body for his services, and would suck blood from a teat "a little aboue [her] fundiment, and that place chosen by himselfe." He would suck for a quarter of an hour at a time, which caused her no pain. Sawyer refers to this being alternately as the Devil and as Tom; he allegedly comes to her in the form of a dog, sometimes white, sometimes black, and liked her to stroke his back. He would be white, which was also the smaller shape, when she way praying. Tom did not like to hear her praying to Jesus, and taught her another prayer in Latin, "Santibicetur nomen tuum" to pray to him instead. Sawyer claimed that Tom did not visit her in prison. (C2-C4)

Appears in:
Goodcole, Henry. The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton. London: 1621, C2-C4

Tom
Familiar
14

One of two familiars which appears in the shape of a toad, and is allegedly given to Margery Sammon in a "wicker basket, more then half full of white and blacke wooll" by her mother, the Widow Barnes on the day she died (February 12, 1582). Sammon confesses she was instructed to feed and keep them (she does not appear to have used them to commit any felonies) and to feed them with milk, lest they get hungry and drink her blood. Sammon "fed them twise out of a dyshe with mylk," but does not claim to have kept them long. Mother Barnes allegedly suggested to Sammon that she should send the familiars to Mother Pechey if she did not want them, and that Pechey "is a Witch, and will bee glad of them." After hearing that Ursula Kempe was apprehended as a witch, Sammon claims to have taken the familiars, in a basket to a field, released them, and "bad them goe to the sayde Mother Pechey," who Sammon claims may well have them. (C4-C4v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C4-C4v

Robbyn
Familiar
15

One of four imps that allegedly belong to Alice Manfield, which were gifted to her by Margaret Grevell. According to information given by Richard Rosse, Manfield called her imps Robin, Jack, William, and Puppet. The imps are described as "two shees" and "two hees," with all four being "like vnto blacke Cats," which Manfield kept "in a boxe with woll" upon a shelf by her bed; the imps are fed with blood they suck from Manfield's body, as well as bread and beer when they do her bidding. The imps perform a variety of tasks for Manfield: Robin and Puppet are sent on separate occasions to plague Joan Cheston's cattle after Cheston and Manfield had a falling out; Jack is sent, two years after Robin is sent to plague cattle, to plague Joan Cheston's husband, Robert Cheston, to death; William informs Manfield, the day before her apprehension, that she will be captured and "called in question," and also destroys stores of food and drink. (61-67)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, 61-67

Robin
Familiar
17

One of four imps that allegedly belong to Alice Manfield, which were gifted to her by Margaret Grevell. According to information given by Richard Rosse, Manfield called her imps Robin, Jack, William, and Puppet. The imps are described as "two shees" and "two hees," with all four being "like vnto blacke Cats," which Manfield kept "in a boxe with woll" upon a shelf by her bed; the imps are fed with blood they suck from Manfield's body, as well as bread and beer when they do her bidding. The imps perform a variety of tasks for Manfield: Robin and Puppet are sent on separate occasions to plague Joan Cheston's cattle after Cheston and Manfield had a falling out; Jack is sent, two years after Robin is sent to plague cattle, to plague Joan Cheston's husband, Robert Cheston, to death; William informs Manfield, the day before her apprehension, that she will be captured and "called in question," and also destroys stores of food and drink. (61-67)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, 61-67

Puppet
Familiar
19

A familiar in the shape of a black frog, one of four "principle" spirits which allegedly belonged to Joan Cunny, which allegedly include Jack, Jyll, Nicholas, and Ned, and like Jack, is one of the spirits invoked through a magic circle which she cast with Mother Humfrye of Maplested. The two spirits make Cunny promise to "giue them her soule for their trauaile, for otherwise: they would doo nothing for her," which she promised to do. She sent them to "milke Hurrelles Beastes," however, they refused to share the milk with her. Although she had attempted unsuccessfully to bewitch Minister Kitchin Minister and the shoemaker George Coe, Jack and Jyll bewitched the miller, William Unglee and his servant, Barnabie Griffyn. Jack accompanies Cunny's grandson to Sir Edward Huddlestones property, where Jack extracted a "mighty Oke-tree," from the ground "by the roots: and no winde at all stirring at this time." (A3-A4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A3-A4v

Jack
Familiar
20

A familiar in the shape of a black frog, one of four "principle" spirits (of nine in total) which allegedly belonged to Joan Cunny, of Stisted, Essex, which allegedly include Jack, Jyll, Nicholas, and Ned, which are said to "sucke commonly vpon a sore leg which this mother Cunny had." Like Jack, Jyll is one of the spirits invoked through a magic circle which she cast with Mother Humfrye of Maplested. The two spirits make Cunny promise to "giue them her soule for their trauaile, for otherwise: they would doo nothing for her," which she promised to do. She sent them to "milke Hurrelles Beastes," however, they refused to share the milk with her. Although she had attempted unsuccessfully to bewitch Minister Kitchin Minister and the shoemaker George Coe, Jack and Jyll bewitched the miller, William Unglee and his servamt, Barnabie Griffyn. Jyll also lamed a local boy, Anonymous 64. Most grievously, however, Jyll is said to have killed two year old Susan Glascock. (A3-A4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A3-A4v

Jyll
Familiar
21

A familiar which appears in the shape of a mole that belongs to Joan Upney of Dagenham, Essex, given to her by Mother Arnold (alias White-Cote) circa 1581. Upney could send it to "clap" anyone who did her "ill will." Like most of Upney's familiars this being was short lived. It "taryed not aboue a yeere with her, but it consumed away." (Sig. Aiiiv, B)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, Sig. Aiiiv, B

Anonymous 114
Familiar
22

A familiar that appears in the form of a toad and belongs to Joan Upney of Dagenham, Essex, given to her by Mother Arnold (alias White-Cote) circa 1581 or 1582 along with a mole-shaped familiar, presumably as replacements for the first preternatural being (a mole) which died. She was able to keep this toad "a great while," but it also presumably died. (Sig. Aiiiv, B)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, Sig. Aiiiv, B

Anonymous 113
Familiar
23

A familiar in the shape of a dun colored ferret, described as having fiery eyes, and which allegedly appears to Joan Prentice of Hinningham Sibble (aka Sible Hedingham), Essex circa November, 1583 as she sits in an alms house, claiming to be Satan and demanding her soul. Prentice responds that her soul belongs "onely vnto Iesus Christ, by whose precious blood shedding, it was bought and purchased," but willingly granted him her blood. The moment of malefic compact would not be the only time Bidd would drink from her, however. He "sucked blood out of her lefte cheeke," before Prentice sent him to spoil William Adams' brew. Bidd allegedly "leapt vpon her left shoulder, and sucked blood out of her lefte cheeke," before she sent him to "nippe" two year old Sara Glascock. What exactly that order entailed became a point of contention between Prentice and Bidd. She allegedly scolded him after he killed the child, and Bidd disappeared from her life. Bidd does not appear in the legal record. ()

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589,

Bidd
Familiar
24

A familiar that appears in the forms of a gray-blackish dog and a human with cloven feat, and is allegedly kept by John Walsh. Walsh apparently kept the familiar for one year of his master's life, and for three years after his master's death. After performing various tasks for Walsh, the familiar would be given "some lyving thing, as a Chicken, a Cat, or a Dog." Walsh also had to give the familiar "two lyving thynges once a year," along with one drop of Walsh's blood," which the "Spirite did take away upon hys paw." (4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination of John Walsh before Master Thomas Williams. London: 1566, 4

Anonymous 120
Familiar
29

A familiar from Stathorne in the County of Leicestershire, allegedly belonging to Ellen Greene; this spirit appeared in the form of a kitlin, or kitten. Ellen Greene claimed to have received this spirit, and one other in the form of a mole, from Joan Willimott, and that Willimott had named it Pusse. Pusse would sit on her right shoulder and suck from her neck beneath her ear. Greene sent Pusse to bewitch several people to death, including the Baker for the town of Goadby (Anonymous 65), a husbandman named Willison, Mrs. Patchett and the Patchett's child. In exchange for Pusse's services, Greene gave her soul to the Devil and let Pusse suck from her at the change and full of the moon. (Fv-F2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv-F2

Pusse
Familiar
30

A familiar from Stathorne in the County of Leicestershire, allegedly belonging to Ellen Greene; this spirit appeared in the form of a Moledewarp, or mole. Ellen Greene claimed to have received this spirit, and one other in the form of a kitten, from Joan Willimott, and that Willimott had named it Hisse Hisse. Hisse Hisse would sit on her left shoulder and suck from her neck beneath her ear. Greene sent Hisse Hisse to bewitch several people to death, including the Anne Dawse, a husbandman's son named Robert WIlliman, Mrs. Patchett and the Patchett's child. In exchange for Hisse Hisse's services, Greene gave her soul to the Devil and let Hisse Hisse suck from her at the change and full of the moon. (Fv-F2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv-F2

Hisse Hisse
Familiar
33

A familiar that appears in the form of a rat, and is allegedly kept by Elizabeth Stile. Philip is fed with crumbs of bread and blood drawn from Stiles right wrist, an act that has evidently left permanent marks on her skin. At one time, Philip provided Stile with milk and cream when she was unable to beg any. (11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579, 11

Phillip
Familiar
35

The spirit of a man in St. James's in London, who used to carry "stockins and such ware about to sell," whose servant murdered him "for the money" before running away and becoming a soldier. The spirit appears to this servant (Anonymous 403) as a "headless Man," and stood by his Bed, saying, "Wilt thou yet confess?" Eventually, the spirit turns into a "bed-fellow" for the servant, still saying "Wilt thou yet confess?" When the servant confesses, he is sent to Hispaniola. (57)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 57

Anonymous 162
Familiar
36

One of the twelve imps which allegedly belong to Margaret Moone which include Jockey, Sandy, Mris. Elizabeth, Collyn, Christ, and Mounsier. Her imps, presumably in the shape of mice or rats, or whatever might emerge from a hole in the wall, can allegedly be called to manifest with a bit of bread and beer. She claims, when they do not appear, that her "Devilish Daughters" must have "carried her Impes away in a white bagge." Although Moone is searched and found to have witch-marks, accusations against her do not include the entertaining or employing of spirits. (25)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 25

Jesus
Familiar
37

One of the twelve imps which allegedly belong to Margaret Moone which include Jockey, Sandy, Mris. Elizabeth, Collyn, Christ, and Mounsier. Her imps, presumably in the shape of mice or rats, or whatever might emerge from a hole in the wall, can allegedly be called to manifest with a bit of bread and beer. She claims, when they do not appear, that her "Devilish Daughters" must have "carried her Impes away in a white bagge." Although Moone is searched and found to have witch-marks, accusations against her do not include the entertaining or employing of spirits. (25)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 25

Jockey
Familiar
41

A familiar in the shape of a mouse allegedly owned and used by Marian Hocket. Hocket is searched and has no discernible witch's marks, yet she is found guilty of entertainging, employing, and feeding "three evil spirits in the form "of a mowse" called Littleman, "of a mowse" called Pretttyman and "of a mowse" called Daynty." (29-31)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 29-31

Littleman
Familiar
42

A familiar in the shape of a mouse allegedly owned and used by Marian Hocket. Hocket is searched and has no discernible witch's marks, yet she is found guilty of entertaining, employing, and feeding "three evil spirits in the form "of a mowse" called Littleman, "of a mowse" called Pretttyman and "of a mowse" called Daynty." (29-31)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 29-31

Pretty-man
Familiar
43

A familiar in the shape of a mouse allegedly owned and used by Marian Hocket. Hocket is searched and has no discernible witch's marks, yet she is found guilty of entertainging, employing, and feeding "three evil spirits in the form "of a mowse" called Littleman, "of a mowse" called Pretttyman and "of a mowse" called Daynty." (29-31)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 29-31

Dainty
Familiar
44

A spirit in the form of a mouse that allegedly comes out of the mouth of Anne Ashby. During Ashby's examination, a groom who was present called Rug to come into his mouth, and a fortnight later the groom died near the City of London. (5)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 5

Rug
Familiar
48

A familiar that appears in the form of mouse, and allegedly belongs to Anne Cate, alias Maidenhood, of Much Holland in the county of Essex, given to her in approximately 1623 by her mother, Anonymous 345. This may be the familiar which Cate sends to "nip the knee of one Robert Freeman," laming him immediately, and contributing to his death within six months. Cate claims she sent Prickeare to kill John Tillet, and to kill Susan, the daughter of John Rawlins (John Rowlandson) of Much-Holland, a crime for which she was convicted. (38-39)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38-39

Prickeare
Familiar
49

A familiar that appears in the form of mouse and allegedly belongs to Anne Cate, alias Maidenhood, of Much Holland in the county of Essex, given to her in approximately 1623 by her mother, Anonymous 345. This may be the familiar which Cate sends to "nip the knee of one Robert Freeman," laming him immediately, and contributing to his death within six months. (38-39)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38-39

James
Familiar
50

A familiar that appears in the form of a Sparrow, and is allegedly kept by Anne Cate; the familiar was given to Cate in approximately 1620 by her mother. Cate claims that "to whomsoever shee sent the said Imp called Sparrow, it killed them presently." (34)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 34

Sparrow
Familiar
53

A familiar that appears in the form of a dog and is allegedly kept by John Palmer. George appears to Palmer after he participated in a malefic compact with the Devil, and is accompanied by another familiar named Jezebell, who appears in the form of a woman. This familiar was possibly responsible for an attack on Mr. Cleavers' horse. (3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott. London: 1649, 3-4

George
Familiar
54

A familiar that appears in the form of a woman and is allegedly kept by John Palmer. Jezebell appears to Palmer after he participated in a malefic compact with the Devil, and is accompanied by another familiar named George, who appears in the form of a dog. This familiar was possibly involved with the killing of one of Mr. Cleaver's horses. (3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott. London: 1649, 3-4

Jezebell
Familiar
55

A familiar that appears in the form of a toad, allegedly kept by Mother Dutton which she names Mawde. Mawde lives in the border of green herbs within Mother Duttons garden, is fed with blood drawn from her owne flancke, and can allegedly tell every man's errand on sight. (9-10)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579, 9-10

Mawde
Familiar
56

A familiar that appears in the form of a black cat, and is allegedly kept by Mother Devell. Gille is used to aid Mother Devell in her witchcraft, and is fed daily with a mixture of milk and Mother Devells blood. (10)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579, 10

Gille
Familiar
57

A familiar that appears in the form of a kitten and is allegedly kept by Mother Margaret. Ginnie is fed with crumbs of bread and Mother Margarets blood. (11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579, 11

Ginnie
Familiar
58

A familiar which appears in the form of a squirrel to Joan Peterson, alleged to have taught Peterson all of the strange things she is known to do. This being was seen and heard talking with Peterson through the night by a maidservant, "which so affrighted her that she lay as if she were in a trance;" the maidservant "was so bewitched by it, that she could not remember one word" of the conference between the two. Peterson's son also knew of the familiar, and was known to speak of it to his schoolfellows. (5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 5-6

Anonymous 2
Familiar
59

A familiar that appears in the forms of "a sandee spannel" and a tan spaniel, and allegedly belongs to Elizabeth Clarke. Hopkins describes him as kept fat off Elizabeth Clarke's blood. Although Jarama is only ever mentioned by Hopkins and Edward Parsely as discovered in terms of her being watched, and is not mentioned in the criminal accusations against Clarke, he is named as part of the legal indictment against her, and she is found guilty of entertaining, employing, end feeding Jamara, with the "intention of obtaining their help in "Witchcraftes, inchtement, charmes and sorecrices." Clarke is hanged on a different charge. (6-10)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 6-10

Jarmara
Familiar
60

An familiar that appears in the form of a long-legged greyhound with a head like an ox to Elizabeth Clark. Matthew Hopkins describes him as being able to turn into a headless child. Although Vinegar Tom is only ever mentioned by Hopkins, John Sterne, and Edward Parsely as discovered in terms of her being watched, and is not mentioned in the criminal accusations against Clarke, he is named as part of the legal indictment against her, and she is found guilty of entertaining, employing, nd feeding Vinegar Tome, with the "intention of obtaining [its] help in "Witchcraftes, inchtement, charmes and sorecrices." Clarke is hanged on a different charge. (6-10)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 6-10

Vinegar Tom
Familiar
65

A familiar from Belvoir in the County of Leicestershire, known to appear in the form of a cat and have the name Rutterkin, and to allegedly belong to Joan Flower. To aid her bewitchment of Sir Francis Manners and his family, Flower would rub various objects belonging to Manners' family on Rutterkin. This included a glove from Henry Lord Rosse, another glove from Francis Lord Rosse, a handkerchief from Lady Katherine Manners, and wool from the mattress Countess Manners gave Margaret Flower with her severance. Rutterkin was thus instrumental in bewitching Henry Lord Rosse to death, causing the illness of Francis Lord Rosse, and rendering Sir Francis and the Countess unable to conceive more children. However, Rutterkin could do nothing against Lady Katherine; when Flower tried, "Rutterkin whined and cryed Mew: whereupon shee said, that Rutterkin had no power ouer the Lady Katherine to hurt her." According to Phillip Flower, Rutterkin would leap onto Joan Flower's shoulder and suck from her neck. Margaret Flower alleged that Rutterkin was among the devils that "appeared vnto her in Lincolne layle, at eleauen or twelue a clocke at midnight." (F3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F3

Rutterkin
Familiar
69

A familiar from the County of Huntingdon, known to take the shape of a white cat, whom Elizabeth Weed allegedly gave to Francis Moore for the purpose of killing any person Moore chose to curse. In exchange for Tiffy, Weed had Moore deny God and affirm it with her blood, which Tiffy licked from Moore's pricked finger. Tiffy is said to have killed William Foster at Moore's behest after Foster threatened to hang Moore's children for trying to steal bread. Foster became sick and lay in pain for seven or eight days before finally dying. Moore claimed that she had killed Tiffy the year before her examination, but that the cat had been haunting her, and crept under her clothes after Moore was apprehended to torture her so she couldn't speak to confess freely. (5)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 5

Tiffy
Familiar
77

A familiar from the Forest of Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be a shapeshifter and to belong to Elizabeth Southerns, alias Dembdike. Tibb first appeared to Southerns as she came home from begging, in the form of a boy with a coat half brown, half black. He requested her soul, said she could have anything she asked for in return, and introduced himself. She gave him her soul, but did not ask anything of him for five or six years though he would appear regularly to ask what she would have of him. At the end of six years, Tibb appeared while she was dozing in the sun with a child on her lap; he appeared in the shape of a brown dog and forced her to her knees to get blood from under her left arm. She sent him away by invoking Jesus' name, but was left mad for eight weeks after. Southerns claimed to have set Tibb to take revenge from Richard Baldwyn or his family, after he drove her out of his house calling her and her granddaughter Alison Device whore and witches and threatening them with burning and hanging; she had been there to collect payment for some work her daughter Elizabeth Device had done for him at his mill. Anne Whittle claimed that Tibb sometimes appeared in the shape of a spotted bitch, and that he once provided a feast for her and Southerns with her familiar Fancie. Southerns said that she and Tibb, who was in the shape of a black cat at the time, had witnessed Whittle and Anne Redferne making clay images of Robert, Marie and Christopher Nutter, but that Tibb knocked her into a ditch to prevent her from joining them and vanished. When she headed home, he reappeared in the shape of a hare. (B2v-B3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B2v-B3

Tibb
Familiar
78

A familiar from Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to appear most often in the shape of a man, and sometimes in the shape of a bear, and to belong to Anne Whittle, alias Chattox. Tibb first appeared to Whittle when she was a guest of Elizabeth Southerns' where he provided a feast along with Southerns' familiar Tibb. At that feast, Southerns convinced Whittle to become a witch and accept Fancie as her familiar; at first, she would only let him suck from her. Fancie would appear to her regularly for the next four years, requesting her soul; at the end of those four years, she agreed. In exchange, he told her "Thou shalt want nothing; and be reuenged of whom thou list," and commanded her to call him by the name of Fancie whenever she wanted something. She set him on Robert Nutter for making advances on her daughter Anne Redferne and threatening her with eviction when she refused him; Nutter was ill for about three months before finally dying. She also sent Fancie to kill Anthony Nutter's cow for favouring Elizabeth Southerns. (B4-B4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4-B4v

Fancie
Familiar
91

A spirit in the form of a partially coloured red and white dog who belongs to Alice Goodridge that she sends to torment Thomas Darling (29)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A Brief Apologie Prouing the Possession of William Sommers. Middleburg: 1599, 29

Minnie
Familiar
106

A cat that Mary Smith allegedly uses to bewitch Cicely Balye. It is believed that Smith placed the cat (Anonymous 21) upon Balye, causing her to become sick, languished, and exceedingly lean, ailments that continued for over a year. (56)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 56

Anonymous 21
Familiar
108

A familiar that appears in the form of a mole, and is allegedly kept by Mother Lakeland. Lakeland uses her familiar to torment and kill Mrs. Jennings' maid after she denied Lakeland a needle. (8)

Appears in:
Lakeland, Mother. The Laws Against Witches and Conjuration. London: 1645, 8

Anonymous 125
Familiar
111

A familiar which appears in the shape of a toad that belongs to Joan Upney of Dagenham, Essex. Upney confesses to leaving this toad at John Harrold's house where it "pinched his wife and sucked her til she dyed." This was the last act which this toad did for Upney. It soon after disappeared. (Sig. Aiiiv, B)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, Sig. Aiiiv, B

Anonymous 112
Familiar
117

One of two familiars that appear in the form of a dog, and is allegedly kept by Mother Lakeland. Lakeland sends one of her dog familiars to torment and kill Mr. Lawrence and his child. Upon Lakeland's death, when she was executed by burning, something in the form of a dog grew upon the leg of Mr. Beale, after which it could not be used. (7-8)

Appears in:
Lakeland, Mother. The Laws Against Witches and Conjuration. London: 1645, 7-8

Anonymous 126
Familiar
118

One of two familiars that appear in the form of a dog, and is allegedly kept by Mother Lakeland. Lakeland sends one of her dog familiars to torment and kill Mr. Lawrence and his child. Upon Lakeland's death, when she was executed by burning, something in the form of a dog grew upon the leg of Mr. Beale, after which it could not be used. (7-8)

Appears in:
Lakeland, Mother. The Laws Against Witches and Conjuration. London: 1645, 7-8

Anonymous 127
Familiar
141

A spirit or familiar known to appear in the form of a owl, and allegedly kept by Joan Flower. According to Joan Willimott, Anonymous 151 appears with another spirit, Anonymous 150, which appears in the form of a rat. These two spirits are said to suck from beneath Flower's right ear, and to have told Flower that she "should neyter be hanged nor burnt" for witchcraft, which proved true as Flower died before her trial. (E4v-F)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E4v-F

Anonymous 151
Familiar
142

A spirit or familiar known to appear in the form of a rat, and allegedly kept by Joan Flower. According to Joan Willimott, Anonymous 150 appears with another spirit, Anonymous 151, which appears in the form of an owl. These two spirits are said to suck from beneath Flower's right ear, and to have told Flower that she "should neyter be hanged nor burnt" for witchcraft, which proved true as Flower died before her trial. (E4v-F)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E4v-F

Anonymous 150
Familiar
150

A familiar from the County of Huntingdon, known to take the shape of a little black puppy, whom Margaret Simon allegedly gave to Francis Moore for the purpose of killing any animal Moore chose to curse. Simon told Moore "that she must keep that dog all her lifetime." Pretty was used to kill two cows, the first belonging to Edward Hull and the second belonging to Peter Browne, after the cows got into her field and ate her grain and corn respectively. Pretty caused Hull's cow to swell before dying. Moore claimed that she had killed Pretty the year before her examination, but that the dog had been haunting her, and crept under her clothes after Moore was apprehended to torture her so she couldn't speak to confess freely. (5)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 5

Pretty (2)
Familiar
152

A familiar from Bythorn in the County of Huntingdon, known to appear in the form of a brown mouse with a white belly, which allegedly appeared to Anne Desborough in the company of another mouse-spirit, this one entirely brown, which had appeared to her before. The two mouse-spirits demanded to suck her blood; Desborough agreed, denied God and promised them her soul on her death. She later named this mouse-spirit Jone (the first was named Tib); it promised to hurt cattle at her bidding, but was never asked to. Jone appeared to her daily to suck her blood. (10-11)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 10-11

Jone
Familiar
153

A familiar from Bythorn in the County of Huntingdon, known to appear in the form of a brown mouse, which allegedly appeared to Anne Desborough one day while she was sleeping, nipped her, then demanded her soul. It disappeared when she began to pray, only to return five or six days later with another mouse-spirit, slightly smaller than the first and with a white belly, this time demanding to suck her blood. Desborough agreed to this, in addition to denying God and promising them her soul on her death. She later named this first mouse-spirit Tib; it promised to hurt men at her bidding, but was never asked to. Tib appeared to her daily to suck her blood. (10-11)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 10-11

Tib
Familiar
155

A spirit or familiar from Milton in the county of Bedford, known to take the form of a beetle and thought to belong to Mary Sutton and Mother Sutton. When an old servant of Master Enger's (Anonymous 89) was heard talking of the Suttons' misdeeds, "a Betle came, and stroke the same fellow on the breast: and hee presently fell into a trance as he was guiding the Plough." His fellow servants were unable to help him; after a time he recovered on his own and headed home to report the incident to Master Enger. (B2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, B2v

Anonymous 155
Familiar
156

A spirit or familiar from Milton in the county of Bedford, known to belong to Mother Sutton and Mary Sutton. After sucking on the Suttons' teats along with fellow familiar Jude, Dicke was charged with striking down Master Enger's young son. The child was soon "put to such bitter and insupportable misery, as by his life his torments were augmented, and by his death they were abridged." (Cv)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, Cv

Dicke
Familiar
157

A spirit or familiar from Milton in the county of Bedford, known to belong to Mother Sutton and Mary Sutton. After sucking on the Suttons' teats along with fellow familiar Dicke, Jude was charged with striking down Master Enger's young son. The child was soon "put to such bitter and insupportable misery, as by his life his torments were augmented, and by his death they were abridged." (Cv)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, Cv

Jude
Familiar
159

A spirit from Molesworth in the County of Huntingdon, known to appear like a small iron-grey rat, which allegedly appeared to Ellen Shepherd at her home one day when she was "swearing and cursing about the discords of her children." She claimed that this spirit had bid her to go with it, but she sent it away. Not long after, she went into the field, swearing, cursing and blaspheming once again, and the same spirit came to her with three more spirits also like rats, demanding that she renounce God and Christ to worship them instead and promising happiness in exchange. She agreed, and they told her they must have her body and soul when she died, and blood from her while she lived, which she also consented to. The spirits sucked "upon and about her hippes, and they have used very often to come to her since." She claimed that she never set them on any creature, but that they had tormented her that afternoon. (9-10)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 9-10

Anonymous 133
Familiar
160

One of four spirits from Molesworth in the County of Huntingdon, known to appear like a small iron-grey rat, which allegedly came to Ellen Shepherd in the company of Anonymous 133, the original rat-shaped spirit to approach her, and two others (Anonymous 135 and Anonymous 136). They were enticed by Shepherd's swearing, cursing and blaspheming, and demanded that she renounce God and Christ to worship them instead, promising happiness in exchange. She agreed, and they told her they must have her body and soul when she died, and blood from her while she lived, which she also consented to. The spirits sucked "upon and about her hippes, and they have used very often to come to her since." She claimed that she never set them on any creature, but that they had tormented her that afternoon. (9-10)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 9-10

Anonymous 134
Familiar
161

One of four spirits from Molesworth in the County of Huntingdon, known to appear like a small iron-grey rat, which allegedly came to Ellen Shepherd in the company of Anonymous 133, the original rat-shaped spirit to approach her, and two others (Anonymous 134 and Anonymous 136). They were enticed by Shepherd's swearing, cursing and blaspheming, and demanded that she renounce God and Christ to worship them instead, promising happiness in exchange. She agreed, and they told her they must have her body and soul when she died, and blood from her while she lived, which she also consented to. The spirits sucked "upon and about her hippes, and they have used very often to come to her since." She claimed that she never set them on any creature, but that they had tormented her that afternoon. (9-10)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 9-10

Anonymous 135
Familiar
164

A familiar that appears in the form of a greyhound, and is allegedly kept by witches living in Manningtree, Essex (either Jane Wallis, Anne West, or Elizabeth Clarke). Greedigut is "found" under the auspice of Matthew Hopkins and John Sterne's witch hunts. Greedigut also appears with Grizzel, and the two also appear as humanoids to Joan Wallis of Keyston in Huntingdonshire. Wallis alleged in her confession that Greedigut and Grizzel had been given to her by a spirit calling himself Blackeman; she described them as dogs with bridles of hog's hair, and said they would come to her with Blackeman bearing two or three shillings at a time. Edward Wingfield alleged that Willis told him Greedigut and Grizzel would suck from her body where marks had been found, they sometimes took forms other than those of dogs, and that once they had pulled a man from his horse to rob him of his money. (2-3)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 2-3

Greedigut
Familiar
167

A familiar that appears in the form of a toad, and is allegedly kept by Teecle's wife. Anonymous 236 is thought to have been the cause of Jane Walter's bewitchment, as he would often creep into her lap. This caused Walter's to have a tongue "tied in her Head with a Hempenstring, and run full of Pins." Walter also suffered from "many strange Fits, sometimes 20 or more in a day." It is believed that the toad managed to affect Jane Walter by climbing into her lap on multiple occasions. When it was offered to burn the familiar, it mysterious disappeared. (7)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 7

Anonymous 236
Familiar
176

The familiar devil which allegedly belonged to Elizabeth Bradwell and appeared to her in the form of a black bird. (48)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 48

Black Bird
Familiar
178

A cat sized, many legged thing with rough hair. The familiar spirit of Margaret Waite. (32)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 32

Deformed Thing
Familiar
179

A white spotted cat; the familiar spirit belonging to Margaret Waite's daughter. (33)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 33

Inges
Familiar
180

A large black cat spirit; the familiar spirit of Jennit Dribble. (33)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 33

Gibbe
Familiar
181

A yellow bird, the size of a crow, which belongs to Margaret Thorpe. (33)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 33

Tewhit
Familiar
182

A familiar spirit in the form of a white cat which allegedly belonged to 'the strange woman' (Anonymous 116) for twenty years. (34, 85)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 34, 85

Fillie
Familiar
183

An imp familiar in the form of a white kitten that is allegedly kept by Elizabeth Clarke. Although Holt is only ever mentioned by Hopkins, and is not mentioned in the other accusations against Clarke, he is named as part of the legal indictment against her, and she is found guilty of entertaining, employing, end feeding Holt, with the "intention of obtaining [its] help in "Witchcraftes, inchtement, charmes and sorecrices." Clarke is hanged on a different charge. This may the familiar represented as Anonymous 49. (2)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 2

Holt
Familiar
185

An imp familiar that appears in the form of a polecat with a slightly bigger head, and is allegedly conjured by Elizabeth Clarke. Although Newes is mentioned by Hopkins as discovered in terms of her being watched, a mysterious pole-cat sounding shriek is mentioned by Richard Edwards, in reference to Elizabeth Clarke and Rebecca West. Newes does not appear in the Elizabeth Clarke's legal indictment. However, a Newes does appear in the legal indictment against Rebecca West. West is accused entertaining, employng, and feeding "'a white katt' called Newes" with the "intention of getting [its] help in withcraft and sorcery." (2)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 2

Newes
Familiar
186

An familiar allegedly kept by Anne West, or Elizabeth Clarke, witches living in Manningtree, Essex. Elemauzer was "found" under the auspice of Matthew Hopkins and John Sterne's witch hunts. (2-3)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 2-3

Elemauzer
Familiar
187

A familiar allegedly kept by Jane Wallis, Anne West, or Elizabeth Clarke, witches living in Manningtree, Essex. Pyewacket was "found" under the auspice of Matthew Hopkins and John Sterne's witch hunts. (2-3)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 2-3

Pyewacket
Familiar
188

An imp familiar allegedly kept by a coven of witches living in Manningtree, Essex. (2-3)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 2-3

Peckin the Crown
Familiar
189

A familiar that appears in the form of a greyhound, and is allegedly kept by witches living in Manningtree, Essex (either Jane Wallis, Anne West, or Elizabeth Clarke). Grizzel is "found" under the auspice of Matthew Hopkins and John Sterne's witch hunts. Grizzell also appears with Greedigut, and the two also appear as humanoids to Joane Wallis of Keyston in Huntingdonshire. Wallis alleged in her confession that Greedigut and Grizzel had been given to her by a spirit calling himself Blackeman; she described them as dogs with bridles of hog's hair, and said they would come to her with Blackeman bearing two or three shillings at a time. Edward Wingfield alleged that Willis told him Greedigut and Grizzel would suck from her body where marks had been found, and that once they had pulled a man from his horse to rob him of his money. (2-3)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 2-3

Grizzel
Familiar
190

A familiar in the shape of a cat, that serves Elizabeth Knott by appearing before her at twelve at night, and promising her "anything she would desire, except money." Elizabeth Knott wishes to have John Laman's cow bewitched, as his wife denied her money which was due to her. Three weeks later, a familiar in the shape of a cat bewitches John Lamans' cow. This familiar sucked upon the breast of Elizabeth Knott "when she was cast upon the water." However, "after she came out of the water, she never saw it any more." (4 - 5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott. London: 1649, 4 - 5

Anonymous 241
Familiar
194

A devil or familiar from Feversham in the County of Kent, known to appear primarily in the shape of a little dog and sometimes in the shape of a mouse, and to belong to Joan Williford. In her confession, Williford claimed to have signed a contract with the Devil in which he promised to be her servant for 20 years, which contract was almost up. Seven years before, the Devil appeared to her in the shape of a little dog and asked her to forsake God and rely on him instead, promising that she would lack for nothing. She called him Bunne, and he would bring her money thereafter. Bunne allegedly carried Thomas Gardler out a window to fall on his backside. Williford also claimed Bunne told her that Elizabeth Harris had cursed John Woodcott's boat several years before. This familiar is said to have come to her twice while she was in prison to suck from her in the form of a mouse. Harris claimed that Williford told her that Bunne told her that "though the Boate, (she not knowing what Boat,) went chearfully out, it should not come so chearfully home." (1-2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott. London: 1645, 1-2

Bunne
Familiar
195

A grey cat Temperance Lloyd and Grace Thomas claim to have seen going into Thomas Eastchurch's shop. Lloyd also met with the cat the following day, after which the cat retired and went back to Thomas Eastchurch's house. (14)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 14

Anonymous 93
Familiar
201

A familiar that appears in the form of a dog, and is allegedly kept by Alice Gooderidge. Gooderidge claims that she received her familiar from her mother, Elizabeth Wright, and that her famliar resembles William Gregories' dog. This statement leads others to believe that William Gregories' dog is actually Gooderidge's famliar. (27)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 27

Anonymous 191
Familiar
207

A familiar spirit from Paddiham in the county of Lancashire, known to appear in the shape of a man with cloven feet and to belong to Margaret Pearson. According to Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, Pearson and this spirit " hath done very much harme to one Dodgesons goods, who came in at a loope-hole into the said Dodgesons Stable, and shee and her Spirit together did sit vpon his Horse or Mare, vntill the said Horse or Mare died." (S4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, S4v

Anonymous 153
Familiar
209

A familiar in the shape of a toad belonging to Anonymous 154 that drinks the milk that is left out for it in a flat dish. This toad likely functions as any other familiar, to perform a variety of services for the witch it belongs to. In this case, however, the familiar functions to debunk witch beliefs. it is dissected and proves to be a 'normal' toad. (283)

Appears in:
Bickley et al., A.C.. The Gentleman's Magazine Library. London: 1884, 283

Anonymous 124
Familiar
211

A group of imps that appear in the form of kittens and belong to Mother Benefield. Benefield states that the imps are her children, which "she had by as handsome a man as any was in England." Benefield sends the imps to kill a horse, a cow, and a child (Anonymous 193). (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex. London: 1645, 2

Anonymous 210 (plural)
Familiar
215

A familiar that appears in the form of a toad, and is allegedly kept by Mary Smith. This unfortunate amphibian appears in Edmund Newton's shoe making shop ,and is burned alive (for over 15 minutes) as an act of counter magic; it takes over an hour for the toad to burn. (57-58)

Appears in:
Holland, Henry. A Treatise Against Witchcraft. Cambridge: 1590, 57-58

Anonymous 214
Familiar
216

A a group of crustaceans (crabs) which mysteriously appear and scuttle about the floor boards of Edmund Newton's shoe making shop. They allegedly belong to Mary Smith and operate as her familiars, although they aren't purported to do anything. (57-58)

Appears in:
Holland, Henry. A Treatise Against Witchcraft. Cambridge: 1590, 57-58

Anonymous 213 (plural)
Familiar
217

A "great Cat" that appears at Mary Smith's home. Despite being stabbed with a sword, beaten over the head with a staff, and thrown in a sack, the cat does not die. It is finally stashed under the stairs, where it disappears of its own accord. (54)

Appears in:
Holland, Henry. A Treatise Against Witchcraft. Cambridge: 1590, 54

Anonymous 212
Familiar
224

A familiar spirit from Chatton in the County of Northumberland, appearing in the form of a black greyhound, which Margaret White, in her confession, claimed came to her after she had made a malefic compact with the Devil. (24)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 24

Anonymous 33
Familiar
225

The familiar of Mother Atkins who visits the servant Richard Burt in the shape of a "monstrous black cat" during his lunch hour in Pinner, Middlesex. The cat startles Richard Burt, and "began to shake the strawe, and to make a wad thereof." (3)

Appears in:
B., G.. A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England) . London: 1592, 3

Anonymous 91
Familiar
227

A familiar of Mother Atkins who darts across the path of the servant, Richard Burt, in Pinner, Middlesex, who is walking his master's dog. The dog "began to faint, and runne rounde about his maister, and to whine pitifully, as who shoulde say that hinde of game was not for them," and once the servant follow the hare, he discovers it going to the notorious witch Mother Atkin's house. (2-3)

Appears in:
B., G.. A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England) . London: 1592, 2-3

Anonymous 92
Familiar
230

A spirit in the shape of a mouse that appears to Anonymous 254 before he is plagued by strange fits. The spirit appears to be a possessing agent, but is kept at bay by an amulet given to Anonymous 254 by a wizard (Anonymous 255). (20)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 20

Anonymous 36
Familiar
232

A number of familiars that appear in the form of imps, and who suck from alleged witches Thomas Evererd and Mary Evererd of Halesworth, Suffolk. These two witches are tried, convicted, and condemned to death in 1645, at a session in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. (3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 3

Anonymous 94
Familiar
233

A collection of familiars that appear in the form of imps, who belong to one old woman (Anonymous 271) present at a session in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk in 1645. They come to her "in severall shapes," although it is unclear what these forms are. (3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 3

Anonymous 95 (Plural)
Familiar
234

Familiars in the form of several imps who belong to a number of witches imprisoned and searched at Bury St. Edmunds, found by four searchers from Suffolk. These imps take suck from their masters, and leave teats in various parts of the body. The imps also visit in "divers other shapes," including snakes, wasps, rats, and hornets. (4-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 4-5

Anonymous 96 (Plural)
Familiar
235

A familiar in the form of an imp who is sent by a woman from Suffolk in 1645 (Anonymous 274) "in the likenesse of a little black smoth Dog" to play with the young son (Anonymous 275) and only child of a gentleman (Anonymous 281) and his wife (Anonymous 282) who offended the woman by being discontented with her frequent visits. At first, the child "refused to play with it," but the imp persisted, until "at length the Child made much of it" and the imp brought the young son to " a water side, and there drowned the said child to the great grief of the parents." (5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 97
Familiar
236

Familiars in the form of a number of imps who are associated with a woman (Anonymous 276) imprisoned in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk in 1645. The imps are stripped of their power to harm others by the prayers of "divers godly Ministers" at the pleading of that same woman "who seemeth to be very penitent for her former lewd and abominable indeavours, and acts." (5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 98 (Plural)
Familiar
238

A familiar that appears in the form of a gray imp who is sent to Anne Leech in Mistley, Suffolk and kills a black cow and white cow belonging to Richard Edwards and two horses belonging to Mr. Bragge. Anonymous 99 sucks from Anne Leech and speaks to her often. Anonymous 99 also kills Elizabeth Kirk, and the daughter of Widow Rawlyns. (7-8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 7-8

Anonymous 99
Familiar
239

A familiar that appears in the form of a black imp, and is allegedly kept by Elizabeth Clarke of Suffolk. Clarke sends Anonymous 100 to kill two cows belonging to Mr. Edwards; Anonymous 100 is sent to complete this task alongside imps sent by Elizabeth Gooding and Anne Leech. (7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 7

Anonymous 100
Familiar
240

A familiar that appears in the form of a white imp, and is allegedly kept by Elizabeth Gooding of Suffolk. Gooding sends Anonymous 101 to kill two cows belonging to Mr. Edwards; Anonymous 101 is sent to complete this task along with an imp belonging to Anne Leech, and an imp belonging to Elizabeth Clarke. (7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 7

Anonymous 101
Familiar
241

A familiar in the form of a white imp who is sent by Anne Leech of Mistley in the county of Essex to destroy John Edwards, the infant son of Richard Edwards, along with a black imp sent by Elizabeth Gooding. The white imp is exchanged with Anne Pearce, and among several others (Anonymous 105, Anonymous 104), causing mischief as exchanged. The imp also took suck from Anne Leech, and often spoke to her. This may be one of the two imps Gooding is legally charged with having, one of which is in the "form of a 'younge catt' and the other of a mouse, and one was called 'pease.'" (7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 7

Anonymous 102
Familiar
242

A familiar in the form of a black imp who is allegedly sent by Elizabeth Gooding of Mistley in the county of Essex to kill John Edwards, the infant son of Richard Edwards, along with a white imp belonging to Anne Leech. This may be meant to represent one of the two imps which Gooding is legally indicted for entertaining and feeding, which include "a 'younge catt' and the other of a mouse, and one was called 'pease.'" (7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 7

Anonymous 103
Familiar
243

A familiar that appears in the form of a gray imp who is exchanged among Anonymous 105, Anonymous 102, Anne Pearce of Stoke in Ipswich, Suffolk, and Anne Leech, her sister-in-law. The gray imp causes mischief between the exchanges, sucked from Anne Leech, and often spoke to her. (7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 7

Anonymous 104
Familiar
244

A familiar that appears in the form of a black imp who is exchanged among Anonymous 104, Anonymous 102, Anne Leech of Mistley, Suffolk, and her sister-in-law, Anne Pearce of Ipswich, Suffolk. The black imp causes mischief between exchanges, sucks from Anne Leech, and often speaks to her. (7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 7

Anonymous 105
Familiar
246

A familiar that appears in the form of an imp, and is allegedly kept by Elizabeth Gooding. Gooding allegedly sends Anonymous 106 "to vex and torment Mary the wife of John Tayler of Mannyntree" in 1642. (8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 8

Anonymous 106
Familiar
250

A familiar in the shape of a horse, which belongs to Anonymous 269, one of the nine witches tried and executed at Husband Bosworth in the county of Leicester (July 18th, 1616) for the bewitchment of John Smyth. Six of these witches allegedly had familiars which possessed Smyth, a possession manifest by him making the noise which corresponded to the familiar's shape: "when the hors tormented him, he woold whinny." The familiar would be temporarily exorcised when the accused witch would recall her spirit from him by saying "I such a one chardge the hors, yf I be a wiche, that thou com forthe of the chilld." And then another by her sperit to doe the like; and so till all had doone." (6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 39
Familiar
251

A familiar in the shape of a dog which belongs to Anonymous 292, one of the nine witches tried and executed at Husband Bosworth in the county of Leicester (July 18th, 1616) for the bewitchment of John Smyth. Six of these witches allegedly had familiars which possessed Smyth, a possession manifest by him making the noise which corresponded to the familiar's shape. In this case, Smyth would presumably bark like a dog, to signify he was possessed by Anonymous' dog spirit (Anonymous The familiar would be temporarily exorcised when the accused witch would recall her spirit from him by saying "I such a one chardge the [dog], yf I be a wiche, that thou com forthe of the chilld." And then another by her sperit to doe the like; and so till all had doone." (6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 40
Familiar
252

A familiar in the shape of a cat which belongs to Anonymous 293, one of the nine witches tried and executed at Husband Bosworth in the county of Leicester (July 18th, 1616) for the bewitchment of John Smyth. Six of these witches allegedly had familiars which possessed Smyth, a possession manifest by him making the noise which corresponded to the familiar's shape. In this case, "when the cat tormented him, he would cry like a cat." The familiar would be temporarily exorcised when the accused witch would recall her spirit from him by saying "I such a one chardge the [cat], yf I be a wiche, that thou com forthe of the chilld." And then another by her sperit to doe the like; and so till all had doone." (6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 41
Familiar
253

A familiar in the shape of a polecat which belongs to Anonymous 293, one of the nine witches tried and executed at Husband Bosworth in the county of Leicester (July 18th, 1616) for the bewitchment of John Smyth. Six of these witches allegedly had familiars which possessed Smyth, a possession manifest by him making the noise which corresponded to the familiar\'s shape. In this case, when the polecat tormented him, he would hisse. The familiar would be temporarily exorcised when the accused witch would recall her spirit from him by saying "I such a one chardge the [pullemar], yf I be a wiche, that thou com forthe of the chilld." And then another by her sperit to doe the like; and so till all had doone." (6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 42
Familiar
254

A familiar in the shape of a fish which belongs to Anonymous 293, one of the nine witches tried and executed at Husband Bosworth in the county of Leicester (July 18th, 1616) for the bewitchment of John Smyth. Six of these witches allegedly had familiars which possessed Smyth, a possession manifest by him making the noise which corresponded to the familiar\'s shape. In this case, when the fish tormented him, he would blow bubbles, or open and close his mouth like a fish. The familiar would be temporarily exorcised when the accused witch would recall her spirit from him by saying "I such a one chardge the [fish], yf I be a wiche, that thou com forthe of the chilld." And then another by her sperit to doe the like; and so till all had doone." (6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 43
Familiar
255

A familiar in the shape of a code (cod?) which belongs to Anonymous 293, one of the nine witches tried and executed at Husband Bosworth in the county of Leicester (July 18th, 1616) for the bewitchment of John Smyth. Six of these witches allegedly had familiars which possessed Smyth, a possession manifest by him making the noise which corresponded to the familiar's shape. In this case, when the fish tormented him, he would blow bubbles, or open and close his mouth like a fish. The familiar would be temporarily exorcised when the accused witch would recall her spirit from him by saying "I such a one chardge the [fish], yf I be a wiche, that thou com forthe of the chilld." And then another by her sperit to doe the like; and so till all had doone." (6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 44
Familiar
257

One of two imps which came into Joyce Boanes' "bed to her in the likenesse of Mouses," and "sucked on [her] body." Rug, along with Anonymous 45 was used to kill ten or twelve of Richard Welch's lambs, and later to kill a Calf, a Sheep and a Lamb which belonged to Thomas Clynch. Rug was also used, in concert with Margaret Landish, Susan Cock, and Rose Hallybread's familiar, to torment and kill Robert Turner's servant; Rug's job was to make him bark like a dog. Rug also participated in the murder of ten or twelve of John Spall's sheep. Boanes was indicted and found guilty on charges of having entertained and fed Rug. She was hanged on this charge as a witch in 1645. (33-37)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 33-37

Rug (2)
Familiar
258

One of two imps that appears in the form of a rat, which Joyce Boanes "bed to her in the likenesse of Mouses," and "sucked on [her] body." Along with a familiar named Rug, Anonymous 45 helps to kill ten or twelve of Richard Welch's lambs, and to later to kill a Calf, a Sheep and a Lamb which belonged to Thomas Clynch. This familiar may be the one described by Rebecca Jones as Boane's dun coloured mouse allegedly used to kill Thomas Bumstead, who died "about three weekes after," a murder spurred on by Bumstead having beaten Rebecca Jones' son. (33-37)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 33-37

Anonymous 45
Familiar
259

A familiar in the shape of a yellow cat, gifted to Susan Cock by her Mother, Margery Stoakes, and which appeared to Cock the "same night her said mother dyed." Besse, along with the "imps of the said Rose Hallybread, Joyce Boanes, and Margaret Lindish" killed ten or twelve of John Spall's sheep, tormented Robert Tender's servant, and, along with Margaret Landish's imp, "killed six or seven shoots or hogges of the said Mr Mannock." Cock is indicted, tried, and found guilty entertaining, employing, and feeding this "evil spirit in the form 'of a yellow catt'" a crime for which she is hung. (33-37)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 33-37

Besse
Familiar
260

A familiar that appears in the form of a mouse named Susan, and was gifted to Susan Cock by her mother, Margery Stoakes. Susan appeared to Cock the "same night her said mother dyed," and is thought to be one of the imps that "killed six or seven shoots or hogges of the said Mr Mannock." Susan is also likely one of the imps Cock sent "to the house of one Robert Tender [...] to torment his servant," as an act of revenge for the servant refusing to give Cock "a sack full of chips." (33)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, 33

Susan 1
Familiar
261

A familiar, which may appear in the form of a yellow cat named Besse, that is allegedly sent by Susan Cock to Margaret Landish. Landish claimed the famliiar "sucked on her privie parts, and much pained and tormented her." The familiar was allegedly used to kill and torment Robert Turners's servant, making him bark like a dog, groan, crow, and sing, and to kill "six or seven shoots or hogges" which belonged to Mr. Mannock. Landish denied that she had used her familiar to do any harm. (33-37)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 33-37

Anonymous 46
Familiar
262

A familiar gifted to Rose Hallybread by Goodwife Hagtree. Hallybread fed her familiar with blood and oatmeal "for the space of a yeer and a halfe," but soon thereafter lost it. (33)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 33

Anonymous 47
Familiar
263

A famliar that appears in the form of a small gray bird, and is given to Rose Hallybread by Joyce Boanes. Hallybread uses this familiar to kill Thomas Toakley's son, and torment and kill Robert Turner's servant. (33-37)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 33-37

Anonymous 48
Familiar
265

One of the familiars allegedly kept by Elizabeth Clarke of Manningtree in Essex. Clarke offers to call this spirit to come and play on her lap if Matthew Hopkins and John Sterne promise not to hurt her. They refuse and the familiar does not appear. This may be Holt, the white kitten that Clake is found guilty of entertaining, employing, end feeding with the "intention of obtaining [its] help in "Witchcraftes, inchtement, charmes and sorecrices," or it may be another familiar. Clarke is hanged on a different charge. (6)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 6

Anonymous 49
Familiar
266

One of three familiar spirits allegedly owned, fed, and entertained by Mary Johnson. She allegedly keeps this particular familiar in her pocket, and describes it as being "in shape somewhat like a Rat, but without tayl and eares." Johnson uses this familiar to kill Elizabeth Otley's child. (21-22)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 21-22

Anonymous 50
Familiar
267

One of three black mole shaped familiars which allegedly belongs to Anne Cooper and "suckled on the lower parts of her body." This familiar is allegedly sent by Cooper to kill Gregory and Joan Rous' child, Mary, who was "strangely taken sick, and languishing, and within a short time died. Panu also appears with moles named Jeso and Wynowe. Wynowe may have been presumed to be involved in John Curstissurre's bewitchment. (22-23)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 22-23

Wynowe
Familiar
268

One of three black mole shaped familiars which allegedly belongs to Anne Cooper and "suckled on the lower parts of her body." This familiar is allegedly sent by Cooper to kill Gregory and Joan Rous' child, Mary, who was "strangely taken sick, and languishing, and within a short time died. Panu also appears with moles named Jeso and Wynowe. Wynowe may have been presumed to be involved in John Curstissurre's bewitchment. (22-23)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 22-23

Jeso
Familiar
270

A familiar that appears in the form of a grey bird, and is gifted to Sarah Cooper by her mother, Anne Cooper (22-23)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 22-23

Tom Boy
Familiar
271

An familiar spirit allegedly belonging to Mary Johnson. This familar is manifest by making the deafening buzz of a hornet. It torments George Durrant, making him shriek, sweat, swell, and otherwise lay "in a great extremity." (24-25)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 24-25

Hornet
Familiar
273

One of the twelve imps which allegedly belong to Margaret Moone which include Jesus, Jockey, Sandy, Collyn, Christ, and Mounsier. Her imps, presumably in the shape of mice or rats, or whatever might emerge from a hole in the wall, can allegedly be called to manifest with a bit of bread and beer. She claims, when they do not appear, that her "Devilish Daughters" must have "carried her Impes away in a white bagge." Although Moone is searched and found to have witch-marks, accusations against her do not include the entertaining or employing of spirits. (25)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 25

Mris. Elizabeth
Familiar
274

One of the twelve imps which allegedly belong to Margaret Moone which include Jesus, Jockey, Sandy, Collyn, Christ, and Mounsier. Her imps, presumably in the shape of mice or rats, or whatever might emerge from a hole in the wall, can allegedly be called to manifest with a bit of bread and beer. She claims, when they do not appear, that her "Devilish Daughters" must have "carried her Impes away in a white bagge." Although Moone is searched and found to have witch-marks, accusations against her do not include the entertaining or employing of spirits. (25)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 25

Christ
Familiar
275

One of the twelve imps which allegedly belong to Margaret Moone which include Jesus, Jockey, Sandy, Collyn, and Christ. Her imps, presumably in the shape of mice or rats, or whatever might emerge from a hole in the wall, can allegedly be called to manifest with a bit of bread and beer. She claims, when they do not appear, that her "Devilish Daughters" must have "carried her Impes away in a white bagge." Although Moone is searched and found to have witch-marks, accusations against her do not include the entertaining or employing of spirits. ()

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645,

Mounsier
Familiar
276

An evil spirit familiar in the form of a gray cat that allegedly belongs to Rebecca West. West is indicted on charges of entertaining, employing, and feeding Germany for the purpose of witchcraft and sorcery, but does not appear to have been prosecuted or found guilty on these charges. WItnesses to her case include John Cutler and Thomas Hart (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=340914)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=340914

Germany
Familiar
277

A familiar that appears in the form of a bird, and is allegedly kept by Margaret Grewe. According to witnesses John Panant, Ellen Mayer, and Elizabeth Hunt, Grewe named the bird Jay, and possibly used it to bring about the instantaneous death of John Munt. After her indictment Grewe pled not guilty, but was found guilty and executed by hanging. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341098)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341098

Jay
Familiar
278

A spirit that appears in the form of a dun coloured mouse, and is allegedly kept by Dorothy Waters of Clacton in the county of Essex. Waters allegedly "did entertaine, employ and feede" the spirit. Witnesses Joseph Longe and Richard Cole gave evidence regarding this accusation, testimony that aided in Dorothy Waters' indictment. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341106)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341106

Anonymous 51
Familiar
279

A familiar spirit in the form of a squirrel that is allegedly kept by Elizabeth Hare of Great Clacton in the county of Essex. Hare is indicted, found guilty, and executed by hanging on charges of having etertained, employed, and fed a familiar "in the likenesses of a squirrell." Her case is witnessed by Roger Himpson and John Knightes. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341110)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341110

Anonymous 52
Familiar
280

One of two familiars allegedly "entertaine[d] and feede" by Anne Thurston of Great Holland. Thurston is charged with keeping "two evil spirits, one in the form of a bird, the other of a mouse." Her case is witnessed by Samuel Wray and John Alderton. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341142)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341142

Anonymous 53
Familiar
281

One of two familiars allegedly "entertaine[d] and feede" by Anne Thurston of Great Holland. Thurston is charged with keeping "two evil spirits, one in the form of a bird, the other of a mouse." Her case is witnessed by Samuel Wray and John Alderton. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341142)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341142

Anonymous 54
Familiar
282

One of two familiar spirits that are allegedly kept by Joyce Boanes. Boanes is accused of entertaining and feeding "two evill spirittes, one called Jockey and the other Rugge." Boanes pleads not guilty to the charges, but is ultimately found guilty and executed by hanging in 1645. WItnesses to the case include Robert Turner, Elizabeth Parker, and Rose Handkin. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341174)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341174

Jockey (2)
Familiar
283

A red mouse shaped familiar allegedly owned by Elizabeth Harvey, allegedly given to her by Marion Hocket in around 1638-1639 who promised her that "if shee would receive them, shee should never want so long as she lived." Since receiving, her and Hocket had a falling out, and Harvey claimed to have wanted to send these familiars, (one of the red mice as perhaps represented by Littleman, Pretttyman, and Daynty), back to their mistress, but was unable to. They tormented her, causing her to pained, and "much torn and troubled in her privy parts," as if these malicious imps "had pulled her in pieces." Harvey is indicted, tried, and found guilty on charges of having entertained, employed, and fed, "three evil spirits in the form 'of a red mousse.'" She is found guilty on these charges; however, Harvey is "reprieved after judgement and to remain to gaol until the next Gaol Delivery." (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341194)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341194

Anonymous 55
Familiar
287

A red mouse shaped familiar allegedly owned by Elizabeth Harvey, allegedly given to her by Marion Hocket in around 1638-1639 who promised her that "if shee would receive them, shee should never want so long as she lived." Since receiving, her and Hocket had a falling out, and Harvey claimed to have wanted to send these familiars (either the three red mouse or Littleman, Pretttyman, and Daynty), back to their mistress, but was unable to. They tormented her, causing her to pained, and "much torn and troubled in her privy parts," as if these malicious imps "had pulled her in pieces." Harvey is indicted, tried, and found guilty on charges of having entertained, employed, and fed, "three evil spirits in the form 'of a red mousse.'" She is found guilty on these charges; however, Harvey is "reprieved after judgement and to remain to gaol until the next Gaol Delivery." (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341194)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341194

Anonymous 56
Familiar
288

A red mouse shaped familiar allegedly owned by Elizabeth Harvey, allegedly given to her by Marion Hocket in around 1638-1639 who promised her that "if shee would receive them, shee should never want so long as she lived." Since receiving, her and Hocket had a falling out, and Harvey claimed to have wanted to send these familiars, (one of the red mice as perhaps represented by Littleman, Pretttyman, and Daynty), back to their mistress, but was unable to. They tormented her, causing her to pained, and "much torn and troubled in her privy parts," as if these malicious imps "had pulled her in pieces." Harvey is indicted, tried, and found guilty on charges of having entertained, employed, and fed, "three evil spirits in the form 'of a red mousse.'" She is found guilty on these charges; however, Harvey is "reprieved after judgement and to remain to gaol until the next Gaol Delivery." (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341194)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341194

Anonymous 57
Familiar
289

A familiar that appears in the form of a mouse, which Bridge Mayers allegedly "did enterteine, employ, and feede." (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341202)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341202

Prickeare (2)
Familiar
290

One of two black mole shaped familiars that are allegedly kept by Susan Went of Langham, Essex. Went is accused of entertaining, employing, and feeding "two evil spirits," charges that she "pleads not guilty" to. Went is ultimately found guilty of the charges against her, and is executed by hanging. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341206)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341206

Anonymous 58
Familiar
291

One of two familiars that appear in the form of black moles, which Susan West of Langham, Essex allegedly "did enterteine, employ, and feede. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341206)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341206

Anonymous 59
Familiar
292

A familiar in the shape of a mouse which allegedly appears from the lumps on Richard Dugdale's chest and belly during one of his fits, believed to be caused by the Devil, which runs up and down his clothes. (46)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 46

Anonymous 107
Familiar
293

A familiar in the shape of a dog which allegedly appears from the lumps on Richard Dugdale's chest and belly during one of his fits before Mr. Jolly, believed to be caused by the Devil. (46)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 46

Anonymous 108
Familiar
295

An evil spirit familiar in the form of a young man that allegedly belongs to Rebecca West. West is indicted on charges of entertaining, employing, and feeding Anonymous 90, whom she calls "Her Husband," for the purpose of witchcraft and sorcery, but does not appear to have been prosecuted or found guilty on these charges. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=340914)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=340914

Anonymous 90
Familiar
301

One of three familiar spirits, two mice and one frog, allegedly owned by Joan Cooper. Jack, a mouse spirit, may be the imp Cooper sent to kill "a child of one Thomas Woodward, which her said Imp did kill within a fortnight after." (38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38

Jack (3)
Familiar
302

One of three familiar spirits, two mice and one frog, allegedly owned by Joan Cooper. Prickeare, a mouse spirit, may be the imp Cooper sent to kill "a child of one Thomas Woodward, which her said Imp did kill within a fortnight after." (38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38

Prickeare (3)
Familiar
304

One of three familiar spirits, two mice and one frog, allegedly owned by Joan Cooper. Frog, a Frog spirit, may be the imp Cooper sent to kill "two of John Cartwrights children," who die within two or three weeks, and "to destroy the wife of one George Parby of Much-Holland aforesaid, which did kill her within three dayes after." (38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38

Frog
Familiar
306

One of "foure little things in the shape of black rabbits," allegedly seen by menacingly "leaping and skipping about" outside of Anne West's door one morning by an Honest Man from Manningtree (maybe a glover?). Despite the glover's best efforts, these imps are indestructible; they can not be brained, strangled, or drowned, and simply disappear. When her accuses Anne Clarke of sending them to "trouble him" she does not deny owning them, but allegedly suggests that they are "Scouts upon another designe" (38, 39)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38, 39

Anonymous 64
Familiar
307

One of "foure little things in the shape of black rabbits," allegedly seen by menacingly "leaping and skipping about" outside of Anne West's door one morning by an Honest Man from Manningtree (maybe a glover?). Despite the glover's best efforts, these imps are indestructible; they can not be brained, strangled, or drowned, and simply disappear. When her accuses Anne Clarke of sending them to "trouble him" she does not deny owning them, but allegedly suggests that they are "Scouts upon another designe" (38, 39)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38, 39

Anonymous 65
Familiar
308

One of "foure little things in the shape of black rabbits," allegedly seen by menacingly "leaping and skipping about" outside of Anne West's door one morning by an Honest Man from Manningtree (maybe a glover?). Despite the glover's best efforts, these imps are indestructible; they can not be brained, strangled, or drowned, and simply disappear. When her accuses Anne Clarke of sending them to "trouble him" she does not deny owning them, but allegedly suggests that they are "Scouts upon another designe" (38, 39)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38, 39

Anonymous 66
Familiar
309

One of "foure little things in the shape of black rabbits," allegedly seen by menacingly "leaping and skipping about" outside of Anne West's door one morning by an Honest Man from Manningtree (maybe a glover?). Despite the glover's best efforts, these imps are indestructible; they can not be brained, strangled, or drowned, and simply disappear. When her accuses Anne Clarke of sending them to "trouble him" she does not deny owning them, but allegedly suggests that they are "Scouts upon another designe" (38, 39)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38, 39

Anonymous 67
Familiar
311

A familiar that appears in the form of a white cat, and allegedly belongs to Father Rosimond's daughter. (15)

Appears in:
Galis, Richard. A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates. London: 1572, 15

Anonymous 1
Familiar
312

A familiar that appears in the form of a great black cat, is named Bun, and is allegedly kept by Elizabeth Stile. Bun attempts to rescue Stile on her way to jail, only to be banished, as Stile hoped to gain favor though cooperation. (27)

Appears in:
Galis, Richard. A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates. London: 1572, 27

Bun
Familiar
318

A familiar which appears in the shape of a mole that belongs to Joan Upney of Dagenham, Essex, given to her by Mother Arnold (alias White-Cote) circa 1581 or 1582 along with a toad-shaped familiar, presumably as replacements for the first preternatural being (a mole) which died. (Sig. Aiiiv, B)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, Sig. Aiiiv, B

Anonymous 111
Familiar
319

A familiar which appears in the shape of a toad that belongs to Joan Upney of Dagenham, Essex. Upney allegedly sends this toad hopping over the threshold of her home or more likely Richard Fosters's home, as his wife was also approaching. The toad allegedly "pinched her." This was the last act attributed to this toad. It "neuer returned againe" to Upney. (Sig. Aiiiv, B)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, Sig. Aiiiv, B

Anonymous 98
Familiar
322

A spirit that appears in the form of a black dog, and is allegedly seen leaving Widow Webbe's home immediately following the death of her daughter; the daughter had been struck in the face by Ellen Smith causing her to become ill and die in vengeance for a falling out with Ellen Smith's daughter, implying that this being had been summoned at her behest. The sight of the black dog distressed Widow Webbe out of her wits. (9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 9

Anonymous 76
Familiar
323

A familiar in the shape of a black frog, one of four "principle" spirits (of nine in total) which allegedly belonged to Joan Cunny of Stisted, Essex, which allegedly include Jack, Jyll, Nicholas, and Ned which allegedly "did sucke commonly vpon a sore leg which this mother Cunny had." Unlike Jack and Jyll, however, the shape and function of Ned, Nicholas, and four other unnamed spirits is not mentioned. The ninth spirit is described as a toad faced black dog. (A3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A3

Ned
Familiar
324

A familiar in the shape of a black frog, one of four "principle" spirits (of nine in total) which allegedly belonged to Joan Cunny of Stisted, Essex, which include Jack, Jyll, Nicholas, and Ned, and which "did sucke commonly vpon a sore leg which this mother Cunny had." Unlike Jack and Jyll, however, the shape and function of Ned, Nicholas, and four other unnamed spirits is not mentioned. The ninth spirit is described as a toad faced black dog. (A3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A3

Nicholas
Familiar
325

A familiar in the shape of a black dog with the face of a toad and one of the nine spirits in total which allegedly belonged to Joan Cunny of Stisted, Essex, which allegedly include Jack, Jyll, Nicholas, and Ned, and which allegedly "did sucke commonly vpon a sore leg which this mother Cunny had." (A3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A3

Anonymous 77
Familiar
326

One of the nine spirits which allegedly belonged to Joan Cunny of Stisted, Essex, which include Jack, Jyll, Nicholas, and Ned, and which allegedly "did sucke commonly vpon a sore leg which this mother Cunny had." Unlike Jack and Jyll, however, the shape and function of Ned, Nicholas, and four other unnamed spirits is not mentioned. The ninth spirit is described as a toad faced black dog. (A3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A3

Anonymous 78
Familiar
327

One of the nine spirits which allegedly belonged to Joan Cunny of Stisted, Essex, which include Jack, Jyll, Nicholas, and Ned, and which allegedly "did sucke commonly vpon a sore leg which this mother Cunny had." Unlike Jack and Jyll, however, the shape and function of Ned, Nicholas, and four other unnamed spirits is not mentioned. The ninth spirit is described as a toad faced black dog. (A3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A3

Anonymous 79
Familiar
328

One of the nine spirits which allegedly belonged to Joan Cunny of Stisted, Essex, which include Jack, Jyll, Nicholas, and Ned, and which allegedly "did sucke commonly vpon a sore leg which this mother Cunny had." Unlike Jack and Jyll, however, the shape and function of Ned, Nicholas, and four other unnamed spirits is not mentioned. The ninth spirit is described as a toad faced black dog. (A3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A3

Anonymous 80
Familiar
329

One of the nine spirits which allegedly belonged to Joan Cunny of Stisted, Essex, which include Jack, Jyll, Nicholas, and Ned, and which allegedly "did sucke commonly vpon a sore leg which this mother Cunny had." Unlike Jack and Jyll, however, the shape and function of Ned, Nicholas, and four other unnamed spirits is not mentioned. The ninth spirit is described as a toad faced black dog. (A3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A3

Anonymous 81
Familiar
330

One of the four toads allegedly owned by Joan Upney of Dagenham, Essex. Upney's final two toads perish after she flees, having been accused of being a witch by John Harolds (Harwood) and Richard Foster of being a witch. It presumably starves to death, or dies of neglect. (A4v, B)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A4v, B

Anonymous 82
Familiar
331

One of the four toads allegedly owned by Joan Upney of Dagenham, Essex. Upney's final two toads perish after she flees, having been accused of being a witch by John Harolds (Harwood) and Richard Foster of being a witch. It presumably starves to death, or dies of neglect. (A4v, B)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A4v, B

Anonymous 83
Familiar
337

A familiar known to belong to Mother Nokes; when angry with her husband and a tailor's wife for their infidelity and asked to reconcile with them, Nokes declared that "she cared for none of them all, as longe as Tom helde on her side, meanyng her Feende." (16)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 16

Tom (2)
Familiar
338

A familiar spirit that takes on the form of both a rat and a toad, known to belong to Ellen Smith; when John Eastwood refused Ellen Smith's son alms, Smith sent this spirit to Eastwood's home to cause him pain. Eastwood, with the assistance of a visiting neighbor, catches the familiar in tongs and holds it in the fire, causing the fire to turn bright blue and almost go out, and bringing an agonized Smith to his door. (6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 6-7

Anonymous 115
Familiar
339

One of three familiar spirits allegedly owned, fed, and entertained by Mary Johnson of Wivenhoe, Essex. This familiar appears in the form of a mouse. (226)

Appears in:
Ewen, L'Estrange C.. Witch Hunting and Witch Trials. London: 1929, 226

Anonymous 116
Familiar
340

One of three familiar spirits allegedly owned, fed, and entertained by Mary Johnson of Wivenhoe, Essex. This familiar appears in the form of a rat. (226)

Appears in:
Ewen, L'Estrange C.. Witch Hunting and Witch Trials. London: 1929, 226

Anonymous 118
Familiar
341

A familiar that appears in the form of mouse, and is allegedly kept by Anne Cate, alias Maidenhood, of Much Holland in the county of Essex, given to her in approximately 1623 by her mother, Anonymous 345. This may be the familiar which Cate sends to "nip the knee of one Robert Freeman," laming him immediately, and contributing to his death within six months. (38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38

Robyn
Familiar
347

One of four spirits from Molesworth in the County of Huntingdon, known to appear like a small iron-grey rat, which allegedly came to Ellen Shepherd in the company of Anonymous 133, the original rat-shaped spirit to approach her, and two others (Anonymous 134 and Anonymous 135). They were enticed by Shepherd's swearing, cursing and blaspheming, and demanded that she renounce God and Christ to worship them instead, promising happiness in exchange. She agreed, and they told her they must have her body and soul when she died, and blood from her while she lived, which she also consented to. The spirits sucked "upon and about her hippes, and they have used very often to come to her since." She claimed that she never set them on any creature, but that they had tormented her that afternoon. (9-10)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 9-10

Anonymous 136
Familiar
351

A familiar from Belvoir in the County of Leicestershire, known to be spotted black in colour allegedly belonging to Margaret Flower. Flower claimed during her examination that Anonymous 140 would suck from "the inward part of her secrets." When it first came to her, she promised it her soul, and it made a covenant with her to do whatever she commanded of it. (G)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, G

Anonymous 140
Familiar
353

A familiar from Lowestoft in the County of Suffolk, known to belong to Amy Denny and take the form of a toad. According to Dorothy Durent's deposition against Denny, the toad fell out of infant William Durent's blanket after Durent followed the directions of Dr. Jacob of Yarmouth. Durent had a youth of her household catch the toad in tongs and hold it in the fire, where it "made a great and horrible Noise, and after a space there was a flashing in the Fire like Gun-powder, making a noise like the discharge of a Pistol, and thereupon the Toad was no more seen nor heard." The next day, Denny's niece (Anonymous 389) and Durent separately found Denny to be scorched and burnt by fire. (9-11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 9-11

Anonymous 142
Familiar
354

A familiar from Lowestoft in the County of Suffolk, known to belong to Rose Cullender and take the form of a dog. According to Mary Chandler's deposition against Cullender, Susan Chandler saw an apparition of Cullender accompanied by the dog during her fits of vomiting pins, blindness and dumbness. (40-41)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 40-41

Anonymous 143
Familiar
355

An unknown number of familiars from Lowestoft in the County of Suffolk, known to belong to Rose Cullender and Amy Denny. According to Margaret Arnold's deposition against Cullender and Denny, her nieces Elizabeth and Deborah Pacy cried out "Why do not you come your selves, but send your Imps to Torment us?" during one of their fits. (32-33)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 32-33

Anonymous 144
Familiar
359

A familiar or spirit, known to take the form of a white dog, allegedly belonging to Anne Baker. Baker claimed in her examination that Anonymous 147 was her "good spirit," but revealed nothing of its function. (D4, E2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D4, E2

Anonymous 147
Familiar
360

A familiar from Goadby in the County of Leicestershire, known to take the shape of a little white dog, allegedly belonging to Joan Willimott. Ellen Greene claimed during her examination to have seen this spirit sucking on Willimott under her left flank at Willimott's home, around the time of the last barley harvest. (Fv-F2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv-F2

Anonymous 148
Familiar
362

A familiar spirit from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, known to belong to Elizabeth Weed, which appears in the form of a young man or boy. This spirit allegedly appeared to Elizabeth Weed and offered its services, in addition to two other spirits named Lilly and Priscill, if Weed would renounce God and Christ and worship them instead. This spirit had her sign a compact in her blood, which he extracted from her left armpit; the compact gave Weed 21 years of service from the familiars and required that she give up her soul. Thereafter, this spirit's role was "to lye with her carnally, when and as often as she desired, and that hee did lye with her in that manner very often." (1-2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 1-2

Anonymous 159
Familiar
364

A familiar from Keyston in the County of Huntingdon, which Mary Darnell claimed belonged to Elizabeth Chandler and had caused her furmity to boil over even after removed from the fire. Chandler denied having any familiars, though she added "she did call a logg of wood Beelzebub, and a sticke Trullibub" (7, 8)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 7, 8

Beelzebub
Familiar
367

One of two min-horse spirits which, according to her daughter, Feby Hunt, allegedly belong to Ales Hunt of St. Osyth, in the county of Essex. This familiar, Jacke, is said to be black. Febey contends that Jacke and its white-colored sibling are "kept in a litle lowe earthen pot with woll, colour white and blacke," kept by her mother's bedside, and fed with "milke out of a blacke trening dishe." She walks the constables through her home, pointing to their shelf and the dish which they ate from (which the constables confiscated.) Although she did "also confesse that her mother had charged her not to tell any thing," Feby also contends that her mother sent both her familiars to Hayward of Frowicke, but to what end shee can not tell, & shee being asked howe she knew the same, saieth, that shee hard her mother bid them to go." Hunt later confesses, on her knees and in tears, to having Jacke and its partner Robbin, but claimed that both of them had abandoned her, "and willed her therefore to shift for her selfe. And so they went from her, and sithence this Examinate saith shee sawe them not." (C3-C3v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C3-C3v

Jacke (2)
Familiar
368

A familiar from Brightling in the county of Sussex, who is witnessed by some members of Joseph Cruttenden's household to be "tumbling about" when Cruttenden's house catches an unnatural fire, which "flashes somewhat like Gunpowder," and "flamed not." The familiar is in the shape of a black bull, and might belong to an old woman (Anonymous 398) who predicted the fire to a servant girl of Cruttenden's. (55)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 55

Anonymous 161
Familiar
373

A number of tiny white speckled and black birds which allegedly belong to Annis Heard of Little Oakly, Essex. According to her seven year old daughter, Annis Dowsing, Heard keeps these spirits in a box, and feeds them with wheat, barley, oats, bread, and cheese and gives them water or beer to drink. The bird spirits would, according to Dowsing, suck blood from her mother's hands and her brother's legs, but appear to have left Dowsing alone (she had to clarify to the examiners that the spot upon her hand was a burn, presumably as opposed to a witch's mark. Despite their vampiric tendencies, these spirits are described as rather begin. Dowsing claimed that brother would evidently play with these bird spirits until their "tuitling and tetling," grew tiresome, at which time he would put them back into their box. Despite her daughter's colourful evidence, Annis Heard "denieth that she hath any imps Aueses or blacke birds." (F4-F4v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, F4-F4v

Anonymous 167 (Plural)
Familiar
374

A number of tiny black and white and red and white cow spirits, the size of rats with short horns, which allegedly belong to Annis Heard of Little Oakly, Essex. According to her seven year old daughter, Annis Dowsing, Heard keeps these spirits in a box lined with black and white wool, and feeds them with wheat straw, barley straw, oat straw, and hay, and gives them water or beer to drink. Dowsing claims her mother gave her a tiny black and white cow spirit named Crowe and gave her brother a red and white cow spirit named Donne; she does not testify that they did any magic with these spirits. Annis Heard responds to these accuations quite emphatically, claiming she did not have "any kine called Crowe or Donne." (F4-F4v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, F4-F4v

Anonymous 168 (Plural)
Familiar
375

A tiny black and white cow spirit which allegedly belongs to seven year old Annis Dowsing, daughter of Annis Heard of Little Oakly, Essex. Dowsing claims that Crowe is one of numerous mini-kine her mother keeps (Heard, she alleges, has a whole box full), and that her brother was also the recipient of one of these spirits. If the children care for these spirits as their mother does, they would sleep on wool, be feed with wheat straw, barley straw, oat straw, and hay, given water or beer to drink. They do not, however, appear to have done maelficium or mischief with their spirits. (F4-F4v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, F4-F4v

Crowe
Familiar
376

A tiny red and white cow spirit which allegedly belongs to the son of Annis Heard of Little Oakly, Essex. According to his seven year old sister, Annis Dowsing, Donne is one of numerous mini-kine her mother keeps (Heard, she alleges, has a whole box full), and that she was also the recipient of one of these spirits. If the children care for these spirits as their mother does, they would sleep on wool, be feed with wheat straw, barley straw, oat straw, and hay, given water or beer to drink. They do not, however, appear to have done maelficium or mischief with their spirits. (F4-F4v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, F4-F4v

Donne
Familiar
379

The familiar of a woman of "evil fame," (Anonymous 419) residing in Winchester in the county of Hampshire, who approaches a schoolmistress (Anonymous 418) after the woman of "evil fame" muttered against the schoolmistress. The familiar is described as "a monstrous great Toad walking on all four like a Cat," and came from the house of the suspect woman. (Anonymous 419) The schoolmistress retires into her house, and gets her husband to "get some Instrument, wherewithal to dispatch that monstrous vermin." Before John H. has the chance to strike it, however, "it rusht suddenly into another room, and was never seen afterwards." (190)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 190

Anonymous 170
Familiar
380

A number of familiars in the form of cats, belonging to a woman of "evil fame" (Anonymous 419) in Winchester in the county of Hampshire. These seven or nine cats appear to a schoolmistress (Anonymous 418) "just before the coming of her fit," one by one. They would then "crawl about, and stick against the walls, making a dreadful yelling," as well as "hideous noise." This is continued for a quarter of an hour in the same room as the schoolmistress who is to experience a fit, and then they would disappear, and be followed by a "mighty great light." The two pet cats belonging to the schoolmistress herself would "fly as if they were Devil-drove" if they were in the same room as these familiars. The pet cats would go to the fire, the oven, the chimney, or "any way to avoid the room," and could not rest or eat after an encounter, but instead "pin'd away after a piteous manner." (191)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 191

Anonymous 171
Familiar
386

One of two familiars which appear in the shape of a toad, and are allegedly given to Margery Sammon in a "wicker basket, more then half full of white and blacke wooll" by mother, the Widow Barnes on the day she died (February 12, 1582). Sammon confesses she was instructed to feed and keep them (she does not appear to have used them to commit any felonies) and to feed them with milk, lest they get hungry and drink her blood. Sammon "fed them twise out of a dyshe with mylk," but does not claim to have kept them long. Mother Barnes allegedly suggested to Sammon that she should send the familiars to Mother Pechey if she did not want them, and that Pechey "is a Witch, and will bee glad of them." After hearing that Ursula Kempe was apprehended as a witch, Sammon claims to have taken the familiars, in a basket to a field, released them, and "bad them goe to the sayde Mother Pechey," who Sammon claims may well have them. (C4-C4v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C4-C4v

Tom (3)
Familiar
387

One of four familiars which allegedly belong to Ursula Kempe of St. Osyth, Essex, which, according to her son, Thomas Rabbet, she allegedly feeds with "beere to drinke, and of a white Lofe or Cake to eate," and allows "sucke blood of her vpon her armes and other places of her body." According to both Kempe and her son, this familiar, Jacke, appears in the shape of black male cat. Kempe claims that her "two hee spirites were to punishe and kill unto death." This is consistent with the rest of her confessions; Kempe later confessed that "shee was the death of her brother Kemps wife, and that she sent the spirite Iacke to plague her, for that her sister had called her whore and witche." (A3v-A4)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A3v-A4

Jacke (4)
Familiar
389

A familiar spirit from Gisborne in Craven in the County of York, known to appear in the shape of a white foal with a black spot on its forehead, allegedly belonging to Jennet Preston. (I2v-I3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, I2v-I3

Anonymous 179
Familiar
395

A spirit or familiar from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, known to appear in the shape of a hare. This spirit appeared to James Device after he saw Thomas, Marie and Anne Redferne with clay images outside their home, and spat fire at him. The circumstances of its appearance suggests the hare may belong to Anne Redferne, who was accused of witchcraft. (O2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, O2v

Anonymous 185
Familiar
396

A devil or familiar from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, said to take the form of a black dog with fiery eyes and large teeth with a "terrible countenance," allegedly belonging to Alison Device. According to Device's confession, her grandmother Elizabeth Southerns convinced her to accept a familiar, and when Anonymous 186 appeared to her, agreed to give it her soul and allow it to suck from her breasts just under her nipples. The spot where Anonymous 186 sucked remained blue for six months. Device bid her familiar to lame John Law, a pedlar, when he refused to sell or give her pins. Law fell down in the road and lay in great pain, unable to move, and claimed to be tormented day and night thereafter. (R3v-R4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, R3v-R4

Anonymous 186
Familiar
397

A spirit or familiar from Paddiham in the County of Lancashire, known to appear in the shape of a toad, allegedly belonging to Margaret Pearson. Jennet Booth claimed to have seen this spirit sitting in the fire at Pearson's home the week after Pearson was gaoled. Booth's young daughter carried the toad out of the house in a pair of tongs. (T)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, T

Anonymous 187
Familiar
398

An unknown number of spirits or familiars from MIlton in the county of Bedford, known to belong to Mary Sutton. According to Mary's son Henry Sutton, they took the form of cats, moles and more, and would suck from the teat found under her left thigh. (C2v-C3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, C2v-C3

Anonymous 188
Familiar
401

A devil or familiar from Feversham in the County of Kent, alleged to have appeared to Joan Cariden, alias Argoll, in the form of "a black rugged Dog". Cariden claimed this familiar came to her in the night and "spake to her in mumbling language." He returned the next night to demand that she deny God and rely on him instead, promising her that he would revenge her of anyone she wanted. Caridan agreed and allowed the familiar to suck from her; he did so numerous times thereafter and the sucking did not cause her pain. (3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott. London: 1645, 3

Anonymous 215
Familiar
403

A devil or familiar from Feversham in the County of Kent, alleged to appear in the form of a mouse and belong to Elizabeth Harris. Harris claimed during her examination that this familiar first appeared to her 19 year before and told her that he would fulfil her desire to be revenged; she called him her Impe. Anonymous 217 demanded that she forsake Christ and rely on him instead, so she scratched her breast with her nails and gave him the blood to write the covenant with. A fortnight later, he sucked from her for the first time and she felt no pain. When she wanted it to revenge her on someone, she would say that "she desired that God would revenge her of him." In this manner, she called on Anonymous 217 to go after Goodman Chilman, who had accused her of stealing a pig. Chilman soon pined away and died. She also bid Anonymous 217 to revenge her on John Woodcott's "High," for her son had drowned while out in it, and soon after the boat was cast away. (5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott. London: 1645, 5-6

Anonymous 217
Familiar
404

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to appear in the shape of a dun chicken. Mother Alice Samuel alleged during her confession that an upright man "told her that M. Throgmorton was a hard man & would trouble her much, wherefore he would give her six spirits that should vex and torment his children, and so he did." He told her that if she called on these six spirits, they would come, and taught her to call three of them by the names of Pluck, Catch, White, and the rest with three smacks of her mouth; they all appeared to her in the shape of dun chickens. These spirits fed on blood from her chin, and the Throckmorton children's claims about these spirits were correct, and often times she did giue a privie becke or nod, with her finger or head, & then the spirits presently stopped the childrens mouths, that they could not speake untill they came out againe: & then would y children wipe their eyes and be well again." She knew the spirits had left the children alone because they "are now come into her, and are now in the bottome of her bellie, and make her so full, that she is like to burst, and this morning they caused her to be so full, that she could scant lace her cote, and that on the way as she came, they weighed so heuie, that the horse she rid on did fall downe and was not able to carrie her." These spirits would also advise her, and told her during her examination that the man who gifted them to her was named Langlad, that he had no dwelling, and had left on a sea voyage. This spirit claims to be one of three named Smack, and visits Joan Throckmorton frequently after Agnes Samuel comes to live in the Throckmorton house; it fights with and injures the other spirits. Smack also answers others through Joan, who relays that "There was three which were called by the name of Smackes, the 4. Plucke, the 5. Blew, the 6. Catch, the 7. White, the 8. Callico, the 9. Hardname. Mistres Ioane Throckmorton had himselfe, who was the first of the Smackes, Mistresse Mary had his cozen Smacke, mistresse Elizabeth had his other cozen Smack, mistres Iane had Blew, Mistres Grace had White, and the old woman had Hardname still with her in the Iayle, and what was become of the rest he could not tell." Mother Samuel would feed them all with blood from her chin. (59-61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59-61

Smack
Familiar
409

A spirit or spirits from Warboys in the county of Hampshire, known to appear in the shape of spirit and a dun chicken, to belong to Mother Alice Samuel and to appear to Jane, Joan, Elizabeth, Mary and Grace Throckmorton. This spirit claimed to have been sent by Mother Samuel to torment and vex them, and would "declare to the children many things concerning mother Samuell, insomuch that she coulde doo almost nothing at home for a great time, but the spirit woulde disclose." It also accused Mother Samuel of bewitching the children and the servants, and told them that if they went to Mother Samuel's home or had her brought to them, they would emerge from their fits; this proved true, but the fits would resume as soon as they were away from Mother Samuel. By Halloween 1592, Anonymous 222 speaks to the children regularly, predicting the type of fit they are to suffer, conversing with them at the end of their fits and reporting Mother Samuel's doings. It would often afflict them in the morning, at meals, on Sundays and when the church bells rang. The text is unclear on whether this is one spirit or a cooperation of several. (33-35)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 33-35

Anonymous 222
Familiar
411

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to appear in the shape of a dun chicken. Mother Alice Samuel alleged during her confession that an upright man "told her that M. Throgmorton was a hard man & would trouble her much, wherefore he would give her six spirits that should vex and torment his children, and so he did." He told her that if she called on these six spirits, they would come, and taught her to call three of them by the names of Pluck, Catch, White, and the rest with three smacks of her mouth; they all appeared to her in the shape of dun chickens. These spirits fed on blood from her chin, and the Throckmorton children's claims about these spirits were correct, and often times she did giue a privie becke or nod, with her finger or head, & then the spirits presently stopped the childrens mouths, that they could not speake untill they came out againe: & then would y children wipe their eyes and be well again." She knew the spirits had left the children alone because they "are now come into her, and are now in the bottome of her bellie, and make her so full, that she is like to burst, and this morning they caused her to be so full, that she could scant lace her cote, and that on the way as she came, they weighed so heuie, that the horse she rid on did fall downe and was not able to carrie her." These spirits would also advise her, and told her during her examination that the man who gifted them to her was named Langlad, that he had no dwelling, and had left on a sea voyage. According to the spirit Smack, who spoke often through Joan Throckmorton, White was fed blood daily from Mother Samuel's chin even after her imprisonment. (59-61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59-61

Pluck
Familiar
412

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to appear in the shape of a dun chicken. Mother Alice Samuel alleged during her confession that an upright man "told her that M. Throgmorton was a hard man & would trouble her much, wherefore he would give her six spirits that should vex and torment his children, and so he did." He told her that if she called on these six spirits, they would come, and taught her to call three of them by the names of Pluck, Catch, White, and the rest with three smacks of her mouth; they all appeared to her in the shape of dun chickens. These spirits fed on blood from her chin, and the Throckmorton children's claims about these spirits were correct, and often times she did giue a privie becke or nod, with her finger or head, & then the spirits presently stopped the childrens mouths, that they could not speake untill they came out againe: & then would y children wipe their eyes and be well again." She knew the spirits had left the children alone because they "are now come into her, and are now in the bottome of her bellie, and make her so full, that she is like to burst, and this morning they caused her to be so full, that she could scant lace her cote, and that on the way as she came, they weighed so heuie, that the horse she rid on did fall downe and was not able to carrie her." These spirits would also advise her, and told her during her examination that the man who gifted them to her was named Langlad, that he had no dwelling, and had left on a sea voyage. According to the spirit Smack, who spoke often through Joan Throckmorton, White was fed blood daily from Mother Samuel's chin even after her imprisonment. (59-61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59-61

Catch
Familiar
413

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to appear in the shape of a dun chicken. Mother Alice Samuel alleged during her confession that an upright man "told her that M. Throgmorton was a hard man & would trouble her much, wherefore he would give her six spirits that should vex and torment his children, and so he did." He told her that if she called on these six spirits, they would come, and taught her to call three of them by the names of Pluck, Catch, White, and the rest with three smacks of her mouth; they all appeared to her in the shape of dun chickens. These spirits fed on blood from her chin, and the Throckmorton children's claims about these spirits were correct, and often times she did giue a privie becke or nod, with her finger or head, & then the spirits presently stopped the childrens mouths, that they could not speake untill they came out againe: & then would y children wipe their eyes and be well again." She knew the spirits had left the children alone because they "are now come into her, and are now in the bottome of her bellie, and make her so full, that she is like to burst, and this morning they caused her to be so full, that she could scant lace her cote, and that on the way as she came, they weighed so heuie, that the horse she rid on did fall downe and was not able to carrie her." These spirits would also advise her, and told her during her examination that the man who gifted them to her was named Langlad, that he had no dwelling, and had left on a sea voyage. According to the spirit Smack, who spoke often through Joan Throckmorton, White was assigned to Grace Throckmorton by Agnes Samuel after Mother Samuel was imprisoned, and was fed blood daily from Mother Samuel's chin. (59-61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59-61

White
Familiar
414

A familiar or spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to belong first to Mother Alice Samuel and then to Agnes Samuel. This spirit possesses Joan Throckmorton after Mother Samuel is imprisoned, and may also be the same spirit that possessed her in her initial fits. (6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6

Anonymous 224
Familiar
415

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to appear in the shape of a dun chicken. Mother Alice Samuel alleged during her confession that an upright man "told her that M. Throgmorton was a hard man & would trouble her much, wherefore he would give her six spirits that should vex and torment his children, and so he did." He told her that if she called on these six spirits, they would come, and taught her to call three of them by the names of Pluck, Catch, White, and the rest with three smacks of her mouth; they all appeared to her in the shape of dun chickens. These spirits fed on blood from her chin, and the Throckmorton children's claims about these spirits were correct, and often times she did giue a privie becke or nod, with her finger or head, & then the spirits presently stopped the childrens mouths, that they could not speake untill they came out againe: & then would y children wipe their eyes and be well again." She knew the spirits had left the children alone because they "are now come into her, and are now in the bottome of her bellie, and make her so full, that she is like to burst, and this morning they caused her to be so full, that she could scant lace her cote, and that on the way as she came, they weighed so heuie, that the horse she rid on did fall downe and was not able to carrie her." These spirits would also advise her, and told her during her examination that the man who gifted them to her was named Langlad, that he had no dwelling, and had left on a sea voyage. According to the spirit Smack, who spoke often through Joan Throckmorton, Smack (3) was assigned to Mary Throckmorton by Agnes Samuel after Mother Samuel was imprisoned, and was fed blood daily from Mother Samuel's chin. (59-61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59-61

Smack (3)
Familiar
416

A spirit from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to appear in the shape of a dun chicken. Mother Alice Samuel alleged during her confession that an upright man "told her that M. Throgmorton was a hard man & would trouble her much, wherefore he would give her six spirits that should vex and torment his children, and so he did." He told her that if she called on these six spirits, they would come, and taught her to call three of them by the names of Pluck, Catch, White, and the rest with three smacks of her mouth; they all appeared to her in the shape of dun chickens. These spirits fed on blood from her chin, and the Throckmorton children's claims about these spirits were correct, and often times she did giue a privie becke or nod, with her finger or head, & then the spirits presently stopped the childrens mouths, that they could not speake untill they came out againe: & then would y children wipe their eyes and be well again." She knew the spirits had left the children alone because they "are now come into her, and are now in the bottome of her bellie, and make her so full, that she is like to burst, and this morning they caused her to be so full, that she could scant lace her cote, and that on the way as she came, they weighed so heuie, that the horse she rid on did fall downe and was not able to carrie her." These spirits would also advise her, and told her during her examination that the man who gifted them to her was named Langlad, that he had no dwelling, and had left on a sea voyage. According to the spirit Smack, who spoke often through Joan Throckmorton, Smack (2) was assigned to Elizabeth Throckmorton by Agnes Samuel after Mother Samuel was imprisoned, and was fed blood daily from Mother Samuel's chin. (59-61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59-61

Smack (2)
Familiar
417

A spirit or familiar from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, said to belong first to Mother Alice Samuel, and then to her daughter Agnes Samuel. According to Joan Throckmorton, this sprit afflicted her with fits of extreme pain in her legs, and would talk to her. It also made her bleed at the nose. When they spoke, Joan would repeat Blew's word back at him. Blew allegedly told her that he would continue to torment her until Agnes Samuel, his "dame," was brought to her end. Her fits would often come to pass as described by this spirit. According to the spirit Smack, who spoke often through Joan Throckmorton, Blew was assigned to Jane Throckmorton by Agnes Samuel after Mother Samuel was imprisoned, and was fed blood daily from Mother Samuel's chin. (64-69)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 64-69

Blew
Familiar
418

A spirit or familiar from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to belong to Mother Alice Samuel and to have been given to her by the man known only as Langlad. According to the spirit Smack, this spirit will support him in his fights against Pluck, Catch, Blew and White. Smack says "his name standeth upon eight letters, and euery letter standeth for a word, but what his name is we know not." Smack claims through Joan Throckmorton that Hardname is the one spirit that stayed with Mother Samuel during her imprisonment, and was fed daily with blood from her chin. (71-72)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 71-72

Hardname
Familiar
419

A spirit or familiar from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to belong to Mother Alice Samuel and to have been given to her by the man known only as Langlad. The spirit Smack claims through Joan Throckmorton that Calico was fed daily with blood from Mother Samuel's chin even after her imprisonment. (94)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 94

Calico
Familiar
421

A spirit or familiar from Stradbrook in the county of Suffolk, known to appear in the shape of a toad and to belong to Doll Barthram. After Barthram had a falling out with Joan Jordan, Barthram sent a series of three toads to torment Jordan and keep her from sleeping. Anonymous 228 was the first of these toads. When it first appeared in Jordan's chamber, she tossed it into the centre of the room; it returned to her bedside and sat there croaking. She then threw it out the window. (92-93)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 92-93

Anonymous 228
Familiar
422

A spirit or familiar from Stradbrook in the county of Suffolk, known to appear in the shape of a toad and to belong to Doll Barthram. After Barthram had a falling out with Joan Jordan, Barthram sent a series of three toads to torment Jordan and keep her from sleeping. Anonymous 229 was the second of these toads. It appeared a few days after the first, Anonymous 228, was thrown out of Jordan's window. Jordan took Anonymous 229 and burnt it. (92-93)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 92-93

Anonymous 229
Familiar
423

A spirit or familiar from Stradbrook in the county of Suffolk, known to appear in the shape of a toad and to belong to Doll Barthram. After Barthram had a falling out with Joan Jordan, Barthram sent a series of three toads to torment Jordan and keep her from sleeping. Anonymous 230 was the third and last of the toads. Jordan was advised to burn it herself, so she picked it up and went to do so, but she fell down the stairs. Jordan's employer, Symon Fox, put Anonymous 230 in the fire for her, and when it began to burn, saw a massive flame arise at the foot of the stairs. The fire seemed to endanger the house, but did no damage. (92-93)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 92-93

Anonymous 230
Familiar
424

A spirit or familiar from Stradbrook in the county of Suffolk, known to belong to Doll Barthram. This spirit answers to the name of Tom. According to the familiar Gyles, Tom, Gyles and J. were ordered to hang Caver's wife by Barthram. Tom "brought a rope and put it vnder her chaps" and Gyles pulled her up. (95-96)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 95-96

Tom (4)
Familiar
425

A spirit or familiar from Stradbrook in the county of Suffolk, known to belong to Doll Barthram. This spirit answers to the name of J. According to the familiar Gyles, J. would tear Joan Jorden to pieces after Gyles killed her. J., Gyles and Tom were ordered to hang Caver's wife by Barthram. Tom "brought a rope and put it vnder her chaps" and Gyles pulled her up. (94-96)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 94-96

J.
Familiar
427

A spirit or familiar from Thames Street in London, known to belong to Anne Kirk and to have possessed Anne Nayler. This spirit caused her to have frenzied tormenting fits. It also told father, Master Nayler "one would come after who should discouer the causer, and the truth of all." (101)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 101

Anonymous 231
Familiar
428

A spirit or familiar from Thames Street in London, known to belong to Anne Kirk and to have possessed Joan Nayler. This spirit was heard to say ""Giue me thy liuer, thy lights, thy heart, thy soule, &c; then thou shalt be released, then I will depart fro[m] thee" and to bid Joan to hang herself. It contorted her body in tormenting fits, during which she accused Anne Kirk of bewitching her. Master Nayler had Kirk apprehended, and thereafter Joan was witnessed to fall into fits whenever in Kirk's presence. (101-103)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 101-103

Anonymous 233
Familiar