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14 records returned.

List of all assertions around a specific beingtype

ID Short Description & Text Name Being Type
61

The Devil allegedly appeared to Thomas Sawdie first in the form of a woman who offered him money, and when Sawdie refused, as a great black dog with fiery eyes for the next three nights until the boy accepted and agreed to meet him in a field in eight weeks' time. The morning after Sawdie made his compact, he began suffering fits. Sawdie also began howling and whistling whenever anyone prayed or read scripture, and then would fall into a dead sleep. The Devil appeared thereafter in the form of "a little man, with long fingers, and great eyes, clad all in black, and that usually like Velvet" who would sometimes be pleasant and show Sawdie wondrous things, and at other times would threaten him. The Devil was finally cast out when Sawdie's Master, John Roberts, gathered the aid of several ministers, led by Mr. Teag, to pray over the boy, which weakened the possession enough that Sawdie was freed the next day after being made to recite the Lord's Prayer repeatedly out in the field. Sawdie claimed that reciting the Lord's Prayer caused the Devil to leave him out his mouth in the form of a rat which went into a fire at the hedge in the ditch bordering the field, at which time the fire ascended into the air with the rat and sailed off into the distance. (1-2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Return of Prayer: or A Faithful Relation of Some Remarkable Passages of Providence concerning Thomas Sawdie. London: 1664, 1-2

The Devil
Devil
64

One of four spirits, or devils, that appeared to Margaret Flower "at eleauen or twelue a clocke at midnight" while she was imprisoned in Lincoln Gaol. Anonymous 146 stood at the foot of her bed, and is said to have "a blacke head like an Ape." he spoke to her, but she could not recount what he said because he would not speak plainly "or let her vnderstand his meaning." The purpose of the devils' visit is unclear, but Flower states that "shee neuer mistrusted them." (G)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, G

Anonymous 146
Devil
66

One of four spirits, or devils, that appeared to Margaret Flower "at eleauen or twelue a clocke at midnight" while she was imprisoned in Lincoln Gaol. She recognized this spirit as Little Robin. The purpose of the devils' visit is unclear, but Flower states that "shee neuer mistrusted them." (G)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, G

Little Robin
Devil
194

A devil or familiar from Feversham in the County of Kent, known to appear primarily in the shape of a little dog and sometimes in the shape of a mouse, and to belong to Joan Williford. In her confession, Williford claimed to have signed a contract with the Devil in which he promised to be her servant for 20 years, which contract was almost up. Seven years before, the Devil appeared to her in the shape of a little dog and asked her to forsake God and rely on him instead, promising that she would lack for nothing. She called him Bunne, and he would bring her money thereafter. Bunne allegedly carried Thomas Gardler out a window to fall on his backside. Williford also claimed Bunne told her that Elizabeth Harris had cursed John Woodcott's boat several years before. This familiar is said to have come to her twice while she was in prison to suck from her in the form of a mouse. Harris claimed that Williford told her that Bunne told her that "though the Boate, (she not knowing what Boat,) went chearfully out, it should not come so chearfully home." (1-2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott. London: 1645, 1-2

Bunne
Devil
200

A devil that appears to Alice Gooderidge, the Witch of Stapen Hill, in the form of "a little partie-colored dog red and white" that she calls Minny. Gooderidge confesses to using Minny for revenge purposes, specifically to torment Thomas Darling "in euerie part of his bodie" after he called Gooderidge a witch. Gooderidge also confesses that Minny "followed the boy [Thomas Darling] to Burton" and told Gooderidge that he had fulfilled her request for revenge. Minny also allegedly stayed with Gooderidge "two nights at Burton Hall," where he continually scratched her head and "scrapeth in the straw." John Darrell, who allegedly dispossessed Darling, also claims that Gooderidge sent Minny to torment the boy. (26)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 26

Minny
Devil
296

An evil spirit familiar which is allegedly the Devil, who spoke through Richard Dugdale during one of his fits in front of the minister, Mr. Jolly. The spirit claims that Richard Dugdale is "his own." (76)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 76

Anonymous 109
Devil
346

A devil that allegedly possesses Richard Dugdale on September 26, 1689, causing him to become deaf and dumb for the time period of a month. This is confessed to the minister Mr. Jolly through writing on a piece of paper. (22)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 22

Anonymous 128
Devil
349

A spirit known by the name of Aubon who claims to be from Ireland, allegedly possessed Alexander Nyndge, and was said to be driven out by prayers led by Edward Nyndge. Aubon tormented Alexander Nyndge for six months, in which his body swelled, eyes bulged, lumps moved under his skin, he behaved and gestured oddly, flapping noises were heard from his body, he flung himself from the bed against the floor an bedstead, and his face and body were deformed. Edward Nyndge conjured Aubon forth to converse with him on multiple occasions, in which the spirit gave his name, origins and claimed to be tormenting Alexander Nyndge in order to claim his soul. Aubon is said to have a hollow voice when speaking through Alexander. (Title Page, A3, A4, A5, A7)

Appears in:
Nyndge, Edward. A True and Fearefull Vexation of one Alexander Nyndge being Most Horribly Tormented with the Deuill. London: 1615, Title Page, A3, A4, A5, A7

Aubon
Devil
372

A devil that possesses "a Sanguine strong Maid," (Anonymous 409), causing in her alongside "a suror uterinus ex corruptione Seminis," a number of "strange Histerical Fits," over the course of five years between 1642 and 1647. These fits are characterized by: her increase in strength far above her own, so that "many could not hold her" ; her requests for "Needles and Pins, and Cords," so that she might kill herself; her ability to foretell that a papist would come to cure her, and her laughter "at his Holy Water" ; her "Swear[ing], Curs[ing], and Rage against any that were Religious, and Hugg[ing] of those that were Vicious, and be merry with them." However, once Richard Baxter returns to Bewdley, he prays by her side one night, which encourages the neighbours to pray for her as well. While "they were Praying, she was usually in violent Rage, and after thankt them." One day, Mr. Thomas Ware prayed for her, and the maid "fell on the Floor like a Block, and having lain so a while, cryed out, He is gone, He is gone." She also says, "The Black Dog is gone," suggesting that the devil appears to her in the shape of a black dog. After this, she "never had a Fit." Richard Baxter further believes that the devil managed to gain "a Real possession" of the maid alongside her "suror uterinus," after a young man and her sin together during her fits, when "his Lust was provoked" by her "naked Body [tossed] about, she being strong and comely." (193-194)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 193-194

Anonymous 165
Devil
396

A devil or familiar from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, said to take the form of a black dog with fiery eyes and large teeth with a "terrible countenance," allegedly belonging to Alison Device. According to Device's confession, her grandmother Elizabeth Southerns convinced her to accept a familiar, and when Anonymous 186 appeared to her, agreed to give it her soul and allow it to suck from her breasts just under her nipples. The spot where Anonymous 186 sucked remained blue for six months. Device bid her familiar to lame John Law, a pedlar, when he refused to sell or give her pins. Law fell down in the road and lay in great pain, unable to move, and claimed to be tormented day and night thereafter. (R3v-R4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, R3v-R4

Anonymous 186
Devil
399

A devil or spirit from Great Gadston in the County of Buckinghamshire, one of two that allegedly possessed the girl Anonymous 28 at the bidding of Anonymous 430 and Anonymous 431 after Anonymous 430 had a falling out with the girl's father, Anonymous 429. This sprit was originally intended to possess Anonymous 429, but failed when it found him at prayer; it was sent to Anonymous 28 instead. This spirit, along with fellow spirit Anonymous 190, caused two lumps like eggs to rise in Anonymous 28's throat, and would speak through her in a rough voice. It caused her to blaspheme, and was known to converse with bystanders. When Anonymous 429 had his daughter exorcised, this spirit remained in her, taking the use of her legs, flinging her about in her chair, and attempting to prevent girl from reading from the Bible. It also caused her to ride home facing the rear of her horse. At other times, it was known to levitate her or make her bark like a dog, bellow like a bull or roar. It also prevented her from drinking at a party, and tried to get her to drown herself in the well in the host's yard. It continued to possess her until the time of the account's publication. (2-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire. London: 1677, 2-4

Anonymous 189
Devil
400

A devil or spirit from Great Gadston in the County of Buckinghamshire, one of two that allegedly possessed the girl Anonymous 28 at the bidding of Anonymous 430 and Anonymous 431 after Anonymous 430 had a falling out with the girl's father, Anonymous 429. This sprit was originally intended to possess Anonymous 429, but failed when it found him at prayer; it was sent to Anonymous 28 instead. This spirit, along with fellow spirit Anonymous 189, caused two lumps like eggs to rise in Anonymous 28's throat, and would speak through her in a rough voice. It caused her to blaspheme, and was known to converse with bystanders. When Anonymous 429 had his daughter exorcised, this spirit was successfully ejected. (2-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire. London: 1677, 2-4

Anonymous 190
Devil
429

Possibly Satan in the form of a devil, who in London, possesses the fourteen year old girl Mary Glover after the girl was cursed and threatened by the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson. During the dispossession of Mary Glover, some witnesses, including John Swan, a student of divinity, believe they see " that ther was a thing creeping under one of her eye liddes, of the bignes of a peason," which then departs the body of the young girl when she is dispossessed. Mary Glover, herself, admits that she never saw the devil leave her, "but she did feele somewhat depart," and upon the leaving of the devil, she "felt such a fredome of all the powers and faculties of soule and body," which brought her great joy. (46-47)

Appears in:
Swan, John . A True and Breife Report, of Mary Glover's Vexation and Her Deliverance. London: 1603, 46-47

Anonymous 234
Devil
445

A devil know to be from Hertfordshire. When a farmer, Anon 489, disagreed with the mower Anon 490 on the matter of Anon 490's wage to mow three half-acres of oats, Anon 489 allegedly proclaimed that "the Devil himself should Mow his Oats before [Anon 490] should have anything to do with them." That night, Anon 490's field burned. In the morning, Anon 490 went to see the extent of the damages, and instead found his oats neatly mowed in precise circles. Anon 489 "is as yet afraid to remove them." (Title page)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Mowing-Devil. Unknown: 1678, Title page

Anonymous 249
Devil