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36 records returned.

List of all assertions around a specific beingtype

ID Short Description & Text Name Being Type
94

A headless and tail-less bear that allegedly appears to Stephen and Margaret Hooper. Anonymous 17 evidently came up on to the bed, stroked Margaret Hooper's feet three times, took her out of the bed, rolled her around the floor of the bed chamber, and then rolled her under the bed. Stephen Hooper attempted to strike Anonymous 17 with a stool, but it felt as if he was stroking a featherbed. (Image 5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Most Dreadfull Discourse of a Woman Possessed with the Deuill who in the Likenesse of a Headlesse Beare Fetched her out of her Bedd. London: 1584, Image 5-6

Anonymous 17
Apparition
103

An entity that appears to Anonymous 25 in the form of a beautiful young man wearing "a long white robe." Anonymous 25 had been praying by her bed when suddenly "the chamber shined as bright within, as if it had beene sun-shine [...] and spake vnto her with a soft and sweet voyce, saying, Arise in the name of God, and placed her on a chayre." After this visitation, Anonymous 25 fell to the ground and "recouered her spirits." ()

Appears in:
Anonymous. Two Remarkable and True Histories, which Happened this Present Year, 1619. London: 1620,

Anonymous 197
Apparition
107

A being that appears in several forms to both Thomas Lipeat and John Mowlin. When appearing before Mowlin, the apparition pretends to be sent by God to do God's work. These apparitions to John Mowlin continue for some five weeks, and appear as a man in a coloured coat with "holes in [his] hands and feet," as well as through Voices. These same apparitions visit Thomas Lipeat, who suspects that they are not from God, but from the Devil. These apparitions appear before Thomas Lipeat over the course of several nights, starting out as a ball of fire, followed by a moon, followed by a "strange form," and last of all, as a gentleman offering money. When Anonymous 22 presents itself to Thomas Lipeat, he says "The peace of him is at hand." Through prayer, however, Thomas Lipeat discovers that the apparition is actually sent from the Devil. Anonymous continually counsels Lipeat to speak with John Mowlin. Lipeat's beliefs are confirmed when the Apparition asks Lipeat to omit that he heard the Voice of God, but rather just tell others that he had a Vision. When Anonymous 22 offers Thomas Lipeat money, but having been warned by God in a dream that the Devil would tempt him in this fashion, Thomas Lipeat refuses, saying that the grace of God is sufficient. Anonymous 22 leaves after Thomas Lipeat's refusal, and no longer returns. (1 - 3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Divell in Kent. London: 1647, 1 - 3

Anonymous 22
Apparition
109

A "Black grim Man" who appeared to Elizabeth Anderson while she was "playing about the door" of her Grandmother's house. Elizabeth saw the "Black grim Man go into the House to her Grandmother," at which time her Grandmother "desired her to take the Gentleman (as she named him) by the Hand," after which Elizabeth would receive a "Bon[n]y Black new Coat," which she did. Following this, the man "immediatly [...] vanished and went away," but returned a month later. At this second appearence of the man, Elizabeth is again told to hold his hand, but she "would not be perswaded to do it," and she quoted the Lord. After this, Elizabeth was not troubled by the black grim man again. (9-11)

Appears in:
P., T.. A Relation of the Diabolical Practices of above Twenty Wizards and Witches of the Sheriffdom of Renfrew in the Kingdom of Scotland. London: 1697, 9-11

Anonymous 198
Apparition
121

The disembodied spirit of a man named Everard, who is described as a "Reputed Conjurer" that allegedly appears to Dr. John Pordage in August of 1649 at his home in Bradfield in the county of Berkshire. "Everard is the first of three apparitions which appear to Pordage: the second is a giant and the third is a dragon. The apparition of Everard is seen to be wearing his normal "Apparel, Band, Cuffs, Hat, &c." When Pordage pulled back the curtains, this being "seemed to walk once through the Chamber very easily, and so Disappeared" (11)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 11

Everard
Apparition
122

An apparition of a dead woman named Anne Walker, who appears to James Graham and recalls how she was murdered by Mark Sharp. Anne had allegedly become pregnant, and after being sent away with Mark Sharp, was never heard from again until appearing before James Graham. Graham recalled that at "one a clock at night he came down the stairs [and] there stood a Woman upon the midst of the Floor with her hair about her head handing down, and all bloody, with 5. large wounds on her head." The apparition of Anne Walker allegedly told Graham that Sharp "slew [her] with a Pick (such as men dig Coals withal)" and stated that he must reveal her story or else she would continue to haunt him. (19-20)

Appears in:
Sinclair, George. Satan's Invisible World Discovered. Edinburgh: 1685, 19-20

Anne Walker
Apparition
126

An apparition who appears in the form of Captain Brown before two gentlewomen, after he is murdered by his servant. Captain Brown had recently been given some money and his servant, being a greedy individual, "knokt him off his Horse, cut his Skull, cut off his Head, and put it into a Sack," after which the body was buried in a hole in the ground. Although the servant denied the murder, he was arrested on suspicion and "sent to Shrewsbury Prison." When Captain Brown appeared to the two gentlewomen, he smiled at them with "Countenance, and then walked to the Window, and opened the Casement." (1-2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. An Account of a Most Horrid and Barbarous Murder and Robbery Committed on the Body of Captain Brown. Edinburgh: 1694, 1-2

Captain Brown
Apparition
146

An apparition in the form of a human wearing a dark habit that appears to Anne Arthur as she is out walking one night. Arthur believes the apparition might be male, but after "observing his countenance to be stern and dreadful," she begins to suspect that it is the Devil. Arthur grows fearful of Anonymous 25, as it continues to follow her while she walks. After following her for a while, the apparition offers Arthur a bag of silver for her poverty. It then offers her a bag of gold after her initial refusal. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange and Dreadful News from the Town of Deptford, in the County of Kent. London: 1685, 2

Anonymous 25
Apparition
165

A number of apparitions that allegedly appear to Christian Shaw while she is having a fit. Shaw claims that "she met with Apparitions of strange and unaccountable things," however, she also believes that she was carried "in a swing by six Women and four Men" to the gate of her parent's home. When Shaw and "her Tormentors" arrived at the gate, however, they "could [not] open it so that they left her there as usual." This is somewhat surprising for Shaw, as the gate "was not bolted nor lock'd." (11-12)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 11-12

Anonymous 26
Apparition
166

An angel "with Wings in a flaming Light" that appears to Sarah Bower, a fourteen year old girl suffering from fits. He appears before her during a time period she is rendered speechless. Sarah Bower refers to Anonymous 27 as "the Man of God," and he councils her to place her trust in God, and not yield to Satan. He also predicts that she will shortly die, and gave her a message to pass on to "the People of London and England, [that] if they did not speedily repent from their Sins, especially that of Pride in Apparrel, and turn from the Evil of their Ways, God Almighty would give them up as a Prey to their Enemies." The angel continues to pull Sarah Bower "one way, and the Devil another." (4-5)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 4-5

Anonymous 27
Apparition
198

A green angel that appears to Thomas Darling, along with a green cat, while he is having a violent fit. Darling claims the green angel troubled him, a statement that lead his friends to believe a "lightnes in his head" was causing him to say such things. (1)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 1

Anonymous 193
Apparition
199

A green cat that appears to Thomas Darling, along with green angels in the window, while he is having a violent fit. Darling claims the green cat troubled him, a statement that lead his friends to believe a "lightnes in his head" was causing him to say such things. (1)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 1

Anonymous 192
Apparition
202

A group of rats that appear to James Barrow during his fits and tempt him with food and wine. When Barrow will not eat or drink the temptations the rats demand his soul. (5)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 5

Anonymous 207 (plural)
Apparition
203

A group of cats that appear to James Barrow during his fits and tempt him with food and wine. When Barrow does not eat or drink the temptations the cats demand his soul. (5)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 5

Anonymous 206 (plural)
Apparition
210

An apparition alleged to have appeared in Richard Galis' room at midnight, taking the form of a large, shadowy black cat approaching his bed. The cat is only seen by Galis; he believes it to be a transformed witch due to his brother James' encounter with Mother Dutton at the age of fifteen. Galis claims to be visited numerous times by this apparition, adding later in the account that it may instead be the Devil himself in the cat's likeness. (5-6)

Appears in:
Galis, Richard. A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates. London: 1572, 5-6

Anonymous 208
Apparition
218

A spirit from Spital in the County of Northumberland, that allegedly appeared to Margaret Muschamp in various forms, such as a dragon, bear, horse or cow. during one of her fits. She was seen in her bed to shield herself from blows, which she claimed came from "a Club, a Staffe, a Sword, and Dagger." Her "good things" (Anonymous 157 and Anonymous 158) fought for her and defeated this sprit. When the fit began, Muschamp was heard to cry out "the Rogue," a term later used to refer to John Hutton and implying that this spirit was either acting on Hutton's behalf, or Hutton himself. (5)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 5

The Rogue
Apparition
247

An apparition "in an affrightening shape" that charges towards, and knocks to the ground, a soldier (Anonymous 291) stationed on watch in London "near the Chappel of St. James's House." (57-58)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 57-58

Apparition 1
Apparition
248

The apparition of a giant which appears to Dr. John Pordage in August of 1649 at his home in Bradfield in the county of Berkshire. It is the second apparition which comes into his bed chamber at night, the first was the spectral appearance of a known conjurer named Everard, and the third was that of a dragon. This apparition has a "great Sword in his Hand without a Scabbard," which he appeared to flourish against Pordage, and appeared to have "the figurative similitude of a green Tree lying by him." This haunting lasted approximately a half hour, before the apparition vanished. (11)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 11

Gyant
Apparition
249

The apparition of a dragon which appears to Dr. John Pordage in August of 1649 at his home in Bradfield in the county of Berkshire. It is the third apparition which comes into his bed chamber at night, the first was the spectral appearance of a known conjurer named Everard, and the second was the figure of a giant. The Dragon which appears to Poradge, was described as "very Terrible," and very large, taking up most of his bed chamber, with "great Teeth and open Jaws, whence he often ejected Fire against [him]. (11)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 11

Dragon
Apparition
272

The apparition of Mary Johnson which appears to Annaball Durrant. After seeing this apparition, in the rather inauspicious location of an outhouse, Durrant is struck stiff, lame, and mute. She remains in this condition for around two weeks before regaining her health. (24)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 24

Mary Johnson Apparition
Apparition
284

Several Apparitions which appear to Richard Dugdale after a night of drinking, on his road home to his Master's house the following morning. Richard Dugdale finds himself unable to "tell the resemblance thereof." (62)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 62

Apparition 3 (plural)
Apparition
285

An apparition which allegedly appears to Richard Dugdale, in the form of "smoke or mist." Richard Dugdale had been feeling "some heaviness," so came in to rest from the fields. When lying in the bedchamber after drinking, an apparition appears to him; this leaves way for "a fear upon him." (62-63)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 62-63

Apparition 4
Apparition
286

An apparition which allegedly appears to Richard Dugdale while he is resting from the fields in his bedchamber, on a morning he was feeling "some heaviness," and took a drink. At first, Richard Dugdale mistakes this apparition for a fellow servant, Hindle, who is a "hard-favoured man," whose hair had been clut very close to his ears. This apparition is also described as a "Black Man." The apparition presses down upon Richard Dugdale's chest, and turns into a naked child, which then turns into a "Filmert, and went away with a shrill shriek." It is believed that these Apparitions danced before Richard Dugdale as well, before disappearing in a flame of fire. (62-63)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 62-63

Apparition 5
Apparition
294

A snake which mysteriously appears coiled on a shelf in the Stock household after Francis Stock has a disagreement with William Hatting, calling his wife, accused witch Sara Hatting, a "scolder." Mrs. Stock attempt to cut or smash the serpent to death with a spade, but discovers that it disappears when she administers a blow. Mrs. Stock grow ill and dies within seven days of this incident; her daughter dies within ten, and soon after a third child grows sick with the same kind of "extraordinary fits, pains and burnings all over her body" that has plagued its sister and mother, and dies. (31-32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31-32

Anonymous 60
Apparition
305

A being that appears in the form of a black dog, and allegedly appears in Joan Peterson's home in Wapping, in the Greater London region. Anonymous 63 evidently "went directly to Peterson, and put his head under her arm-pits," an act that astonished and frightened the man who was present in Peterson's house. (7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 7

Anonymous 63
Apparition
343

A group of "several Apparitions" who present themselves to Richard Dugdale. RIchard had been "sitting with some Company [when] his Side was suddenly seiz'd as with a burning pain, as if it had been whipt and stung with Nettles, or stab'd with Needles." It is after this, in the evening, that the apparitions appear, but soon "after Vanish'd before him. (2)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 2

Apparition 6 (Plural)
Apparition
354

A familiar from Lowestoft in the County of Suffolk, known to belong to Rose Cullender and take the form of a dog. According to Mary Chandler's deposition against Cullender, Susan Chandler saw an apparition of Cullender accompanied by the dog during her fits of vomiting pins, blindness and dumbness. (40-41)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 40-41

Anonymous 143
Apparition
355

An unknown number of familiars from Lowestoft in the County of Suffolk, known to belong to Rose Cullender and Amy Denny. According to Margaret Arnold's deposition against Cullender and Denny, her nieces Elizabeth and Deborah Pacy cried out "Why do not you come your selves, but send your Imps to Torment us?" during one of their fits. (32-33)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 32-33

Anonymous 144
Apparition
357

An unknown number of apparitions who appear before Joseph Buxford in Hell. They are "divers men, who [Joseph Buxford] has formerly seene or knowne in the Malignant Army, whose base course of life have occasioned their suddaine and unexpected deaths, and now are sent to [the Devil] to receive their due recompense for the same." These apparitions howl fiercely, and many are of people Joseph Buxford recognizes from "before the Langport fight." As they wail out of "insupportable paine," they say, "Woe, Woe, unto us that ever we undertooke the defence of such an unjust Cause." (4)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 4

Apparition 7 (Plural)
Apparition
382

A monster in the form of a "huge Bear," with "very large flaming Eyes," who appears before Mr. Edmund Ansty one night, as he rode to his home in South Petherton, in the county of Somerset. The bear appears when Mr. Edmund Ansty's horse acts oddly some "dozen miles from home," by rushing "very violently with him against one side of the Bank," and pressing them into the bushes. Then, the "Hedges cracked with a dismal noise," and along the road, approaching Mr. Edmund Ansty was "a large Circle of duskish light, about the bigness of a very large Wheel," within was the "proportion of a huge Bear." The bear passes by Mr. Edmund Ansty, and as he did so, the "horrid Monster looked very gashfully at him, shewing a pair of very large flaming Eyes." When the monster is gone, the horse spurs home with Mr. Edmund Ansty. (200-201)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 200-201

Anonymous 173
Apparition
383

An apparition of Fairies, who seem to keep a Fair in Blackdown Hills every summer. These fairies appear "like Men and Women of a stature, generally, near the smaller size of Men." They often wear the colours "red, ble, or green, according to the old way of Country Garb, with high crown'd hats." They appear before a man riding to Combe St. Nicholas (Anonymous 425), in Blackdown Hills, as a "great company of People, that seemed to him like Country Folks, Assembled, as at a Fair." The Fair of these fairies includes unusual goods, and "all sorts of Commodities," including "Pewterers, Shoe-makers, Pedlars, and all kind of Trinkets, Fruit, and drinking Booths," as seen at usual fairs. However, whenever the man tried to get close to the fair, "he could discern nothing at all, only seemed to be crouded, and thrust, as when one passes through a throng of people." They all became invisible, but at a distance, he could see them again. Following this encounter, the man (Anonymous 425) had a "lameness [seize] him all on one side," which stayed with him until his death twenty years later. A full fifty years after these events, a man, his wife, and "divers of the Neighbours" (Anonymous 426) still claimed they could see the Fair-keeping in the summer, although none dared "adventure in amongst them, for that every one that had done so, had received great damage by it." (208-209)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 208-209

Anonymous 174
Apparition
390

A spirit known to be covered in a white sheet that appeared at Two Bridges on the road between Preston and Salmesbury, which Grace Sowerbutts claimed rescued her from Jennet Bierley. Bierley had taken the shape of a dog with two legs, and tried to convince Sowerbutts to drown herself. Bierley disappeared when Anonymous 180 came. It carried Sowerbutts away and then vanished. (K4v-L)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K4v-L

Anonymous 180
Apparition
407

An apparition from Titchmarsh in the county of Huntingdon, known to appear in the shape of a black child and to belong to Mother Alice Samuel. Elizabeth Throckmorton claimed to see Mother Samuel standing before her with Anonymous 220 on her shoulder. She begged to be saved from this apparition, and when the fit ended she was rendered unable to speak or eat. (22-23)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 22-23

Anonymous 220
Apparition
408

An apparition from Ramsey in the county of Huntingdon, known to belong to Mother Alice Samuel. According to Lady Cromwell, Anonymous 221 appeared to her in a nightmare and was sent by Mother Samuel to "pulcke of all the skin and flesh from her armes & body." Lady Cromwell became sick soon after with fits similar to those suffered by the Throckmorton children, and died of them 15 months later. (32-33)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 32-33

Anonymous 221
Apparition
410

An apparition from Warboys in the County of Huntingdon, known to belong to Mother Alice Samuel. The Throckmorton children, Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Mary and Grace, claim to see it once Mother Samuel is living in the household. They allege that Mother Samuel sent it, and is only pretending not to see or hear its capers. They tell their father that this spirit is one of several at her command, and that she feeds them with her blood. Robert Throckmorton demands Mother Samuel to confess to this, but she denies it vehemently. (42-44)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 42-44

Anonymous 223
Apparition
426

An evil spirit from London, believed to be sent by Elizabeth Jackson to torment Elizabeth Burges, a witness who came forth at the trial of Mary Glover, a young girl believed to be bewitched by Elizabeth Jackson. The spirit was sent to torment Elizabeth Burges, after she aided Mary Glover "against this old woman." One day, when Elizabeth Bruges was eating prunes, she was "suddenly so taken, that she was not able to swallow one down," and fell to vomiting for some three weeks whenever presented with meat. The old woman came to visit Elizabeth Burges once and cursed her, saying, "Thou shortly, shalt have in thee an evill spirit too." The next night, Anonymous 232 visits Elizabeth Burges as a vision, "in likenes of a fox." It returns a second night "in likenes of an ougly black man, with a bounch of keyes in his hand, intysing her to go with him, and those keyes would bring her gould enough." Elizabeth Burges still refuses, and so Anonymous 232 visits her a third night "in the likenes of a mouse," which allegedly "troubled her more then any of the former." By praying with her master and mistress, Elizabeth Burges was delivered from the spirit, however. (Fol. 34r - Fol. 35r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 34r - Fol. 35r

Anonymous 232
Apparition