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List of all Event assertions around a specific city

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
821

Dorothy Durent gives deposition alleging that Amy Denny bewitched her infant son William, causing him to be afflicted with strange fits. She says that she had argued with Denny after leaving William in Denny's care with explicit instructions not to give him suck, only to return home and find out that Denny had done so. Denny threatened Durent, and told her "she had as good to have done otherwise than to have found fault with her." That same night, William had his first fit.(5-8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 5-8

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
823

Dorothy Durent gives deposition stating that she followed Dr. Jacob's advice to hang William's blanket in the chimney corner. She alleges that when she went to wrap William in the blanket that night, a great toad fell out and ran up and down the hearth. She had a youth of her household catch the toad and hold it in the fire with tongs. As soon as the toad was in the fire, it made a "made a great and horrible Noise, and after a space there was a flashing in the Fire like Gun-powder, making a noise like the discharge of a Pistol, and thereupon the Toad was no more seen nor heard." When the Court asked whether there was any residue of the toad left in the fire, Dorothy said that after the flash and noise, not a thing remained of the creature.(8-10)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 8-10

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
824

Dorothy Durent alleges in her deposition that the day after the toad fell out of William's blanket and she had it burnt, Amy Denny's niece (Anonymous 389), a neighbor of Durent's, told her that Denny was "in a most lamentable condition having her face all scorched with fire, and that she was sitting alone in her House, in her smock without any fire." Durent says that she called on Denny herself, and found her exactly as Denny's niece had said - "her Face, her Leggs, and Thighs, which this Deponent saw, seemed very much scorched and burnt with Fire." When asked how she came by the burns, Denny replied that she must thank Durent for her condition, and that Durent would live to see some of her children dead.(10-11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 10-11

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
825

Dorothy Durent alleges in her deposition that, after her son William recovered from his fits, her ten-year-old daughter Elizabeth became afflicted with similar fits. Dorothy reports that Elizabeth complained she had seen apparitions of Amy Denny during her fits, and that Denny was the cause of her afflictions.(11-12)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 11-12

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
826

Dorothy Durent reports in her deposition that her daughter Elizabeth died following her illness, and claims it came to pass two days after Denny predicted Elizabeth's demise. Durent accuses Denny of having bewitched Elizabeth to death, alleging that Denny "hath been long reputed to be a Witch, and a person of very evil behaviour, whose Kindred and Relations have been many of them accused for Witchcraft, and some of them have been Condemned."(11-13)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 11-13

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
827

Dorothy Durent alleges in her deposition that she became strangely lame soon after her daughter Elizabeth died. When questioned about it in court, she claimed that she had not needed crutches prior to that time save for when she was pregnant.(13-14)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 13-14

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
831

Samuel Pacy gives deposition in court alleging that, the previous October, his younger daughter Deborah suddenly became lame, and remained so for seven days. On the seventh day, Amy Denny came to the Pacy home and attempted to buy herrings. She was sent away three times; the third time she left grumbling discontentedly. At the same moment, Pacy claims Deborah was taken with violent fits of extreme pain in her stomach, as if pricked by pins, and shrieked dreadfully. (18-20)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 18-20

1661, October 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
832

Samuel Pacy alleges in his deposition that he consulted with a local physician, Dr. Feavor, on the matter of Deborah's fits. He reports that Dr. Feavor observed Deborah in her fits but could not diagnose her affliction. Dr. Feavor corroborates Pacy's report in his own deposition.(20)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 20

1661, October 30 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
833

Samuel Pacy alleges in his deposition that Deborah cried out during her fits that Amy Denny appeared to her as an apparition, and that Denny was responsible for her affliction; Pacy used this to have Denny thrown in the stocks.(20-21)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 20-21

1661, October 28 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
834

Samuel Pacy gives deposition that his older daughter, Elizabeth Pacy, began to have fits two days after Amy Denny was thrown in the stocks. Elizabeth's mouth could not be opened to let her breathe, and Pacy is forced to have one of her teeth broken out so she can get air. Not long after, Deborah Pacy is similarly afflicted, and must also have a tooth tapped out. Both girls claim to have seen apparitions of Amy Denny, accompanied by an unknown woman whose appearance and clothes they describe, during their fits.(22-23)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 22-23

1661, November 2 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
846

Samuel Pacy gives deposition alleging that his daughters Elizabeth and Deborah Pacy have numerous violent fits over a two month period. During these fits, their bodies become so sore they cannot be touched, go lame on one side, or lose sight or hearing. At the end of each fit, they each were said to cough up phlegm intermixed with pins and nails.(23-25)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 23-25

1661, November 2 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
847

Samuel Pacy alleges in his deposition that he would have his daughters Elizabeth and Deborah read from the New Testament in between fits and observed that "they would read till they came to the Name of Lord, or Jesus, or Christ; and then before they could pronounce either of the said Words they would suddenly fall into their fits. But when they came to the Name of Satan, or Devil, they would clap their Fingers upon the Book, crying out, This bites, but makes me speak right well." The girls claim that Amy Denny has told them they must not name the Lord or Jesus, and claim that Denny appeared to them along with Rose Cullender during their fits, threatening them with torments ten times worse if they told what they had seen or heard.(25-26)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 25-26

1661, Fall Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
854

Margaret Arnold, Samual Pacy's sister, gives deposition stating that she had the care of Elizabeth and Deborah Pacy for a time during their bewitchment. She alleges that she thought they had been faking the vomiting of pins and nails, and had all pins removed from their clothing upon their arrival at her home, but that they had nevertheless vomited pins several times in her presence. She said the girls had claimed to have the pins forced on them by bees and flies.(27-31)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 27-31

1661, November 30 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
855

Margaret Arnold gives deposition alleging that, while her nieces Elizabeth and Deborah Pacy were in her care, they would claim to see mice, and once a duck, catch them and throw them into the fire. Though Arnold could not see the creatures herself, she heard one screech like a rat when it hit the fire, and saw another make a flash like gunpowder.(29, 31-32)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 29, 31-32

1651, Fall Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
856

Edmund Durent gives deposition in court alleging that, after his wife refused to sell Rose Cullender herrings, his daughter Ann Durent became afflicted with pain like the pricking of pins in her stomach, and had swooning fits. In between fits, Ann claimed to have seen Cullender's apparition threaten to torment her. Ann is also said to have vomited pins, which Edward presented in court as evidence. Ann's fits continued until the trial.(33-35)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 33-35

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
858

Diana Bocking gives deposition alleging that her daughter Jane Bocking has suffered fits since February, in which she has stomach pains like the pricking of pins, swoons, can eat little or no food, and daily vomits crooked pins. Diana claims that she has found more pins and a lath-nail clenched in Jane's fists after Jane is seen to catch at the air with her hands. Jane is also said to talk to unseen persons, complain that Rose Cullender and Amy Denny appeared to her, and be stricken dumb. Diana produced the pins and lath-nail as evidence in court.(35-38)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 35-38

1662, February 1 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
862

Mary Chandler alleges in her deposition that the morning after she had searched Rose Cullender, her daughter Susan Chandler saw an apparition of Cullender take her hand. Susan is said to have fallen sick to her stomach shortly thereafter, having fits in which she saw apparitions of Rose Cullender with a large dog, vomited pins and was stricken with blindness or dumbness. (40-42)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 40-42

1662, February 2 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
864

Mary Chandler gives deposition stating that she, along with five other women, were hired to search Rose Cullender after Sir Edmund Bacon, Justice of the Peace for Suffolk, granted a warrant at the request of Samuel Pacy. Mary says that Cullender cooperated with the search, and alleges that once Cullender had been stripped naked she was found to have four teats: A large one about an inch long on her lower belly, and three smaller ones on her privy parts. Mary reports that the larger teat looked recently sucked, had a hole in its tip, and exuded a milky substance when handled. (38-40)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 38-40

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
866

John Soam gives deposition in court that one day during the harvest, he drove three carts past Rose Cullender's home and one hit her window. He says that Cullender was irate at the damage, and alleges that she threatened him. He claims that the offending cart overturned two or three times that day and stuck in the town gate despite having more than enough clearance, forcing Soam to have a gatepost cut down to free it. Once he managed to get the cart into the yard, he could not get it near the place where he needed to unload his corn. When he and others tried to unload it well away from the place, it proved to be a great and tiring labour. They were forced to stop when people who came to help all developed sudden nosebleeds. The next morning, Soam returned to the cart and was able to unload it without any trouble at all.(51-54)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 51-54

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
867

Robert Sherringham gives deposition in court that his cart had smashed into Rose Cullender's home, breaking part of the house; he claims that that she threatened him when she saw the damage and told him his horses would suffer for it. Sure enough, all four died a short time later.(54-55)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 54-55

1662, March 12 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
868

Robert Sherringham gives deposition alleging that Rose Cullender is responsible for the death of all his all his piglets, a persistent lameness in his limbs, and for plaguing him with "a great Number of Lice of an extraordinary bigness." He says that he was forced to burn all his clothes to be rid of the lice.(54-55)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 54-55

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
880

Ann Sandeswell gives deposition in court alleging that, seven or eight years ago, she had bought a number of geese from Amy Denny but had not yet brought them home, and that Denny threatened to destroy them if she didn't come pick them up. A few days later, all the geese were dead.(55-56)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 55-56

1655 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
881

Ann Sandeswell gives deposition that shortly after Amy Denny destroys some geese Sandeswell had bought from her, Denny became a tenant of Sandeswell's husband Cornelius. Sandeswell alleges that Denny told Cornelius that the chimney on the house would fall if it wasn't looked after, to which he replied that the chimney was new and payed her no heed. Not long after, the chimney fell as predicted.(55-56)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 55-56

1665 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
882

Ann Sandeswell gives deposition alleging that a quarter-barrel of fish she had ordered from her brother was discovered to have fallen into the ocean when Sandeswell went to collect it. She had requested Amy Denny's company, and Denny rebuffed her. Her brother told her that he had been unable to keep the fish in the boat, that he had never before seen the like, and that no-one else's goods had been lost.(56-57)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 56-57

1655 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
2325

Dorothy Durent gives deposition alleging that, despite Amy Denny's dire prediction that she would live to see some of her children dead, baby William recovered immediately after the toad was burnt, and was still living at the time of the assizes.(11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 11

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
2326

Dorothy Durent alleges in her deposition that she went to the apothecary one day to get something to help her daughter Elizabeth with her fits and returned to find Amy Denny in her house. When she asked Denny what she was doing there, Denny claimed to be checking on Elizabeth to give her water. Durent, angry to have Denny in her house, thrust her out, at which time Denny said to her "You need not be so angry, for your Child will not live long."(11-12)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 11-12

1662, March 10 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
2327

Samuel Pacy alleges in his deposition that, while Amy Denny was in the stocks, Alice Letteridge and Jane Buxton approached her, demanded to know the cause of Deborah Pacy's affliction, and told Denny that she was suspected to be the cause herself. Denny replied that Pacy was making a great deal of fuss over his daughter, and that when her child had suffered a similar affliction, she had tapped out a tooth to feed it. Letteridge and Buxton confirmed this account in their own depositions.(21-22)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 21-22

1661, October 28 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
2328

Margaret Arnold gave deposition in court that Elizabeth and Deborah Pacy claimed to see Rose Cullender and Amy Denny after their fits. On one occasion, Deborah said that Amy Denny had tried to convince her to commit suicide. At another, both girls cried out complaining that Cullender and Denny had set their imps on them, and demanded to know why they didn't torment them themselves.(32-33)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 32-33

1661, Fall Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England