Go back
14 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific city

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
630

Joan Flower, en route to Lincoln Gaol, dies before she can be convicted. She had allegedly called for bread and butter, and her last words were that she "wished it might neuer goe through her if she were guilty of that wherevpon shee was examined." Her body is buried at Ancaster.(D2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D2v

1618 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England 
631

Sir Francis Manners, upon hearing that Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower had been apprehended, hurried to Lincoln Gaol with his brother Sir George Manners. Both participate in the examinations.(D2v-D3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D2v-D3

1618 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England 
632

Margaret and Phillip Flower are convicted of murder and sentenced to death. Their executions are carried out at Lincoln on March 11, 1618.(D2v-D3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D2v-D3

1618, March 11 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England 
633

Anne Baker is examined before Sir Francis Manners, Sir George Manners, both Justices of the Peace for the County of Lincoln, and Samuel Fleming, Doctor of Divinity and Justice of the Peace for the County of Leicester.(D3v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D3v

1618, March 1 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England 
634

Anne Baker alleges during her examination that she has visions of planets, and that she had one such vision in which a blue planet struck Thomas Fairebarne, the eldest son of William Fairebarne, causing him to experience an unspecified affliction. William, thinking she was the cause, beat her and broke her head, after which Thomas mended. When asked who sent the planet, if not her, Baker merely insisted it was not her.(D4-D4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D4-D4v

1618, March 1 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England 
635

Anne Baker alleges in her examination that she had a vision of a hand appear to her, and heard a voice say from the air "Anne Baker, saue thy selfe, for to morrow thou and thy maister must be slaine." The next day, she and her master were riding a cart, and she saw a flash of fire; the fire went away when she said her prayers. A short time later, a crow came and picked at her clothes, and was also driven off by prayers. The crow went next to her master and beat him to death, but she was able to bring him back with more prayers, though he lay sick for a fortnight. Baker claims that, if she had not had the foreknowledge, she, her master and all the cattle would have been slain.(D4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D4v

1618, March 1 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England 
639

Anne Baker is accused during her examination of bewitching Anne Stannidge's daughter to death. Baker alleges that Stannidge brought the child to her, and that she took the girl into her skirt, but did her no harm. Stannidge claimed that she had to burn some hair and nail-parings taken from her daughter in order to get Baker to give the child back; Stannidge said that when she did so, "the said Anne Baker came in and set her downe, and for one houres space could speake nothing." Baker said that she came to Stannidge's home in great pain, but knew nothing of burning hair and nail-parings, and had been so sick at the time that she could not recall why she had gone there in the first place.(D4v-E)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D4v-E

1618, March 1 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England 
640

Anne Baker is accused during her examination of bewitching Elizabeth Hough to death. Baker admits to having been angry with Hough, for Hough "angred her in giuing her almes of her second bread" and felt that Hough "might haue giuen her of her better bread, for she had gone too often on her errands." She neither confirms nor denies any involvement in Hough's demise, however.(E)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E

1618, March 1 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England 
641

Anne Baker alleges during her examination that Joan Gylles had asked her to look at her sick child, for Gylles suspected the child was bewitched. Baker confirmed that the child had been forespoken, but could do nothing for it, and the child died.(E-Ev)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E-Ev

1618, March 1 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England 
642

Anne Baker alleges during her examination that she spoke to a man named Nortley in his home, where he was carrying his child, and asked him "who gaue the said Child that loafe, he told her Anthony Gill, to whom this Examinate said, he might haue had a Child of his owne if hee would haue sought in time for it."(Ev)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Ev

1618, March 1 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England 
643

Henry Milles accuses Anne Baker of causing him "two or three ill nights" during her examination. She replies "you should haue let me alone then," implying that he had been harassing her in some capacity.(Ev)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Ev

1618, March 1 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England 
644

Anne Baker alleges during her examination that, three years before, she traveled to Northhamptonshire, and that on her return she met up with Mrs. Peakes and Mrs. Dennis, who informed her that Henry Lord Rosse had died. She claims that they told her "there was a gloue of the said Lord buried in the ground; and as that gloue did rot and wast, so did the liuer of the said Lord rot and wast."(Ev)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Ev

1618, March 2 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England 
645

Anne Baker alleges during her examination that she has a familiar spirit in the shape of a white dog. She calls it her "good Spirit."(E2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E2

1618, March 3 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England 
2463

Margaret Flower confesses during her examination alleging that on the 30th of January, while she was imprisoned in Lincoln Gaol, four devils appeared to her. She recalls that one, a spirit with a black head like an ape, stood at the foot of her bed and spoke to her, but that he would not speak plainly and she could not recall what he had told her. She recognized the other three as Little Robin, Spirit, and her mother Joan's familiar Rutterkin. She adds that "shee neuer mistrusted them, nor suspected her selfe, till then."(G)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, G

1618, January 30 Lincoln    Lincolnshire  Lincolnshire  England