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List of all Event assertions around a specific city

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
1267

Margaret Muschamp, eleven years old, allegedly falls into a trance around five o'clock in the afternoon. Her mother Mary Moore calls for help and they are able to recover her from this state. Margaret tries to reassure a distraught Mary, telling her "deare Mother, weepe not for me; for I have seene a happy Sight, and heard a blessed sound; for the Lord hath loved my poore soule, that he hath caused his blessed Trumpet to sound in my eares, and hath sent two blessed Angels to receive my sinfull soule."(1)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 1

1645, July Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1268

Margaret Muschamp allegedly continues having visions throughout the night while the minister Mr. Huot prays with and for her. She finally falls to sleep, and awakens claiming to be without memory of anything she had said or done.(1-2)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 1-2

1645, July Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1270

Margaret Muschamp is at home on the afternoon of Candlemas Eve while Mary Moore and most of the household are at church and is allegedly "suddainely striken with a great deale of torment, called for a little beere, but ere they could come with it, the use of her tongue was gone, with all her limbs, pressing to vomit, and such torments, that no eyes could looke on her without compassion." When Moore returns, she is unable to ease Muschamp's suffering.(2-3)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 2-3

1646, February 1 Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1271

Margaret Muschamp recovers from her first fit, a trance of religious rapture in which she claimed to talk to angels, and allegedly enjoys good health for the next seven months. She will not suffer her next fit until Candlemas.(1-2)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 1-2

1645, July Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1273

Mary Moore sends for physicians from Berwick the morning of Candlemas, who come along Lady Selby, Widow Fenwich and other friends to witness Mary Muschamp's fits. Muschamp, after suffering torments until late the previous night, awakens early to find she still lacks the use of her limbs, tongue and stomach. She signs to the onlookers that her senses are intact, but her jaws are closed to both speech and nourishment. The doctors are unable to assist, and Muschamp insists through gestures that "God had layd it on her, and God would take it off her."(2-3)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 2-3

1646, February 2 Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1274

Margaret Muschamp begs Mr. Balsom, Mr. Strother and Mr. Huet to pray for her while Mary Moore "to her great expences neglected no lawfull meanes that could be used" to help her daughter. Muschamp nevertheless has another tormenting fit around noon, lasting an hour.(3)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 3

1646, February 2 Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1275

Margaret Muschamp allegedly suffers from tormenting fits for the 16 weeks between Candlemas and Whitson (Pentecost) Eve. During this time, she sleeps soundly at night, but her torments begin anew upon waking. At first, the fits last three or four hours, but over time this increases to eight hours a day. The fits are described as "every houre a severall torment, such strong cruell ones that cannot be exprest, as many with weping eyes beheld it." Ministers pray over the girl, but expect only her death to end her suffering. Sir William Selby, Lady Selby, Countess Lendrik, Lady Haggarston and others all observe at various times.(3)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 3

1646, February 2 Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1276

Margaret Muschamp, during the 16 weeks between Candlemas and Whitson (Pentecost) Eve, is often seen to smile and sign that she feels no pain as soon as her tormenting fits have ended for the day. She habitually sits quietly for the remainder of the day.(3)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 3

1646, February 2 Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1277

Margaret Muschamp allegedly fasts during the 16 weeks between Candlemas and Whitson (Pentecost) Eve. After her fits have ended each day, "she onely we wet her lips with a little milke and water; for nothing she would let come within her jawes." Muschamp claims, through signing, that "God fed her with Angels food" and she is not seen to lose any weight for the duration.(3)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 3

1646, February 2 Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1278

Margaret Muschamp allegedly has a fit of bitter torment lasting eight hours on the morning of Whitson (Pentecost) Eve. In the afternoon, her mother Mary Moore leaves to go abroad for a time, entrusting Muschamp to the care of Muschamp's cousin, Elizabeth Muschamp.(3-4)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 3-4

1646, February 3 Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1279

Margaret Muschamp, in the care of her cousin Elizabeth Muschamp on the afternoon of Whiston Eve, signs for Elizabeth to carry her into the garden. Elizabeth does so, and sits with Margaret on her knee. Margaret allegedly sits there limply for 15 minutes, then suddenly jumps up and runs three times around the garden while making a shrill, wordless yell. She climbs the stairs back into the house by herself and runs into Elizabeth's arms. This miraculous recovery is witnessed by Captain Falset, Mrs. Falset and their daughter, who send for Mary Moore to return from Berwick, three miles away. Margaret runs to meet her mother, calling "Mother, Mother welcome home."(3-4)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 3-4

1646, May 19 Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1457

George Muschamp Jr., Margaret Muschamp's eldest brother, is allegedly stricken by illness in the night to such a degree "it was thought he would not live." He is slightly improved the next morning, but cannot eat or use his legs and requires assistance to dress. He must be lifted into a chair, and sits there throughout the day. He begins to consume away, unable to tolerate anything but a little milk, water or sour milk, but maintains good spirits.(4-5)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 4-5

1646, December 25 Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1469

Mary Moore calls for doctors from Newcastle, Durham and Edenborough to examine her eldest son, George Muschamp Jr., who began wasting away and lost the use of his legs at Christmas. They are allegedly unable to determine the cause of George Jr.'s illness, but agree that "by the course of nature he could not live a month to an end."(4-5)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 4-5

1647, January Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1470

Margaret Muschamp's fits allegedly resume once more two or three weeks after her brother, George Jr., begins wasting away. This continues for three or four weeks, during which she cries out against something she calls the Rogue, and is seen shielding herself with her hands and bedclothes as if someone is striking her. She claims this Rogue is fighting her, sometimes in the shape of a dragon, bear, horse or cow, and sometimes with a club, staff, sword or dagger. She also claims that her Good Things, or angels, are fighting in her defense.(5)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 5

1647, January Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1508

Margaret Muschamp, after fighting off the Rogue during her fits, allegedly writes with her hand on her breast while her eyes are fixed on her angels. When given a pen and paper, she will write "Jo Hu. Do. Swo. have beene the death of one deare friend, consume another, and torment mee" while shrinking back as if anticipating a blow. She falls into a convulsive fit if someone takes the paper from her, lasting until she can burn it or chew it into illegibility.(5)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 5

1647, January Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1509

Mary Moore speaks to her niece, Elizabeth Muschamp, about Margaret Muschamp's writing. They both agree that "Jo Hu. Do. Swo. have beene the death of one deare friend, consume another, and torment mee" can only mean that Dorothy Swinow is responsible for Margaret's torments and George Muschamp Jr.'s consumption. Elizabeth claims that Swinow came to visit Margaret once when Moore was away, and spoke harshly of Moore to the child.(8)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 8

1647, February Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1511

Margaret Muschamp, at home while Mary Moore journeyed to Newcastle, allegedly runs "up and downe with a staffe in her hand, saying she would kill the Rogue." She claims to have apprehended her good things while they are in the form of a dove and a partridge. She sings "Judgo and revenge my cause O Lord: Next, How long wilt thou forget me Lord; shall I never be remembred? And concluded, Behold and have regard, ye servants of the Lord," and on completion of her song emerges from her fit, claiming not to remember anything she had said or done while in it. She also claims that she did not know any of the psalms she recited prior to her fit. This is witnessed by numerous neighbors and relatives.(6)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 6

1647, February Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1520

Margaret Muschamp allegedly has a fit upon Mary Moore's return from Newcastle, in which she claims that "if she had two drops of his blood or hers, within ten dayes, it would save her life; if not death long comming, but torment perpetually." These fits occur daily, with Muschamp counting down the days as they progress. When she reaches three days, she writes again, weeping all the while, "JO. HU. DO. SVVI. hath been the death of one deare friend, consumes mother deare friend, and torments me," this time adding "two drops of his or her bloud would save my life, if I have it not I am undone, for seven yeares to be tormented before death come."(6-7)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 6-7

1647, February Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1532

Mary Muschamp allegedly falls into a rapture in which she claims that her angels have bid her to speak out. Echoing John Hutton, she accuses Dorothy Swinow of causing the death of her aunt the Lady Margery Hambleton, consuming her brother George Muschamp Jr. and her own torments. Muschamp also accuses Swinow of causing James Fauset, whose sister had married Hambeton's son, to suffer unnatural fits in an attempt to kill him so that his sister would inherit instead. She claims Swinow stopped tormenting Fauset when Swinow turned her attention to Muschamp and her family.(9)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9

1647, February Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1533

Margaret Muschamp claims that the two drops of blood taken from John Hutton saved her from "seaven yeares in torment without any ease, or death had come." She allegedly falls into a two-hour rapture in which she converses with her angels, and emerges from this conversation with the insistence that her brother George Muschamp Jr. also required two drops of John Hutton's blood in order to live. Her stepfather Edward Moore and Moore's seven children witness this, as does her cousin Elizabeth Muschamp and numerous neighbours and friends of the family.(9)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9

1647, February Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1539

Mary Moore fetches John Hutton back to Spital after Margaret Muschamp insists that Hutton's blood will save her brother George Muschamp Jr. Hutton comes quietly and allows Moore to take his blood; she holds Hutton in her custody after.(9-10)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9-10

1647, February Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1541

John Hutton, in Mary Moore's custody, alleges to Edward Moore that Dorothy Swinow has "two bad women about her, the Millers and the Websters Wives, who had beene the death of Jo. CUSTERD and his Wife, with many other things of their wickednesse." He refuses to give any more information to either Edward or Mary Moore when they try to question him further.(9-10)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9-10

1647, February Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
1542

Margaret Muschamp allegedly has a fit soon after John Hutton is allowed to leave the Moore household; she is said to have been free of them for the entire duration of Hutton's stay. In this fit, she echos Hutton's claims once more, saying "DOROTHT SVVINOVV with two Witches more were come to torment her worse then ever HUTTON did, and the one was a yong woman, and the other an old: So that till they had Justice of DOROTHY SVVINOVV, her mother and they should never be at peace."(10)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 10

1647, February Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
2587

Margaret Muschamp allegedly has numerous tormenting fits after John Hutton's imprisonment, which she claims are caused by two witches; she relates the details of the witches to Mary Moore so Moore can copy them down on paper. Her fits end when her angels banish the witches.(11)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 11

1647, February Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
2588

Margaret Muschamp allegedly predicts John Hutton's death in prison during one of her tormenting fits. She claims that, had he lived, he would have revealed the identities of the two witches that have been tormenting her, and makes numerous other predictions thereafter.(11)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 11

1647, February Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
2589

Margaret Muschamp has a fit in which she claims that "there were some strange Angels besides her owne to meet her" under a specific tree in the garden. However, when she gets there, she discovers that "ere she came, a wicked creature set on by the enemies instigation, had been looking after her, and her childe wringing her hands, weeping bitterly, as if she could have torne her flesh from the bones, or haire off her head, saying who was here? what wicked creature had stayd her blessed Angels from her?"(11-12)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 11-12

1647, March Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
2590

Margaret Muschamp allegedly has a conversation with her angels in which they tell her that they will not appear to her for 12 weeks. Bereft, she spends three days describing them to her brothers, sisters and the household. She claims they are "bodyed like Birds, as big as Turkies, and faces like Christians, but the sweetest creatures that ever eyes beheld," and insists that if the Justices and Judges of the Assizes won't do give her justice for her torments, her angels will "appear like a man and a woman, and justifie the truth." Before they depart, her angels allegedly tell her to avoid being frightened or angered for the 12 weeks, or they won't reappear, and that in the mean time her every third fit would be a terrible one.(11-12)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 11-12

1647, March Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
2595

Margaret Muschamp's 12 weeks of separation from her angels comes to an end, eagerly attended by numerous spectators. The spectators, who include neighbours and Margaret's cousin Elizabeth Muschamp, hear her "expresse much joy to meete with those long absent deare friends" and engage in a two-hour long "divinely and heavenly discourse." Margaret is seen to pray for her enemy, Dorothy Swinow, with tears streaming down her face. She also prays for justice, and that the hardheartedness against her mother at the assizes cease.(13-14)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 13-14

1647, June Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
2597

Margaret Muschamp, the day after the Judge refuses to extradite Dorothy Swinow and the Counsellor refuses to take the case, allegedly has a tormenting fit that concluded with her angels appearing to her. She complains to them that there is "no Justice abroad, no Peace at home, what should become of her mother? for that Godlesse thiefe DOROTHY SVVINOVV, by the instigation of the Divell, had hardned the heart of both Judges and Justices against her." Margaret also claims that Edward Moore's heart has been hardened against Mary Moore, and that her eldest sister, Betty Muschamp, will soon begin to consume too. Margaret says that she will go again that night or the next day to again beg for justice, and that if it were denied, her brother George Muschamp Jr.'s illness would get worse. Dr. Genison and Mrs. Clether are among the audience during this fit.(13-15)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 13-15

1647, June Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
2601

Margaret Muschamp, the evening after appearing a second time before a judge, allegedly has a fit in which she vomits a fir stick full of crooked pins and is visited by her angels. She then cries out that the enemy sees there is to be no justice and is trying to choke her, while vomiting "stones, coles, brick, Lead, straw, quills full of pins, with straw full of pins, tow, and Virginall wire, all full of pins." For three weeks, a large stone is seen to come "alwayes to her throat and went back again, till at the last the Lord brought it up."(16-17)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 16-17

1647 Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
2602

Margaret Muschamp allegedly bids the household watch over her brother George Muschamp Jr., convinced that his throat will be cut or he will be burnt with fire. She claims to hear the sound of knives being sharpened from the stairs, and numerous times fire is found in his room.(16-17)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 16-17

1647 Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
2603

Margaret Muschamp claims that Dorothy Swinow is "seeking a new way to take away her mothers life" and is "consuming the child within her," and warns that George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp will begin to torment that night, St. John's Day, early in the morning. If they were not watched and prayed for diligently, "they" would seek to take George's life, and the use of Betty's legs. After conveying this warning, Margaret falls into a fit in which she cries out that the "Grand Witch Meg is come to the doore with a lighted Candle in each hand" and begs the company, which includes Edward Moore and his seven children, to pray a half hour longer. They do, and there is a sudden smell of brimstone in the air.(16-17)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 16-17

1647, June 24 Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
2604

Mary Moore sends the strange objects Margaret Muschamp has allegedly been vomiting during her fits to the assizes at Durham on the hope of convincing a judge to issue a warrant for Dorothy Swinow's apprehension. Her tactic succeeds, and a warrant is granted. (17-18)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 17-18

1647, June Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
2605

Dorothy Swinow is arrested on a warrant, but permitted to be released on bail. Margaret Muschamp falls into a fit when she hears this, but insists that all is not lost. She invites the onlookers to attend her on Candlemas Eve, when she claims "the glory of God should appear."(17-18)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 17-18

1647, Fall Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
2607

Margaret Muschamp has her final extreme fit on Candlemas Eve, as predicted when Dorothy Swinow was released on bail. During this fit, she gives a lengthy address to her angels in which she restates her accusations against John Hutton, Dorothy Swinow and the two unnamed witches assisting Swinow (Anonymous 234 and Anonymous 235). She also implies that she will soon die: "Now after this time shall I never have more torment by any Witch, nor none I hope. Shall I meet you in such a place, at such a time? I will. Seeing you have set mee that time of appoyntment, I hope you will put me in minde of it: I will, if it be Gods will to make me do it." The entire address is observed by over 100 people and recorded for posterity by Edward Orde.(18-24)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 18-24

1648, February Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
2611

Margaret White alleges in her confession that she, Dorothy Swinow and Jane Martin came to Edward Moore's home in Spital to take Margaret Muschamp's and Mary Moore's lives, and were the cause of the torments Margaret, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp endured. She claimed that they tried numerous times to take their lives, particularly on St. John's Day the previous year, but that "God was above the Divell, for they could not get their desires perfected."(24-25)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 24-25

1648 Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
2612

Margaret White alleges in her confession that Dorothy Swinow tried to consume the child Sibilla Moore while in Mary Moore's womb, but that God prevented her. White claimed that, after Sibilla was born, she, Jane Martin and Swinow rode to Spital and "had a hand in the death of the sayd child."(24-25)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 24-25

1648 Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England