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List of all Event assertions around a specific date

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
2885

During the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman allegedly responsible for causing a young fourteen year old girl to experience fits after threatening her, Mary Glover is brought forward to give evidence on a day she was not expected to have a fit "of the horrible cryme of Witchcraft." The girl was placed facing the bench (Anonymous 450), where she could not see "the old woman who was among the Prisoners in the docke," when she "felt a commanding power seaze upon her." This causes Mary Glover to cry out, "where is shee? where is she?" Some in the bench believed Mary Glover to be counterfeiting. Mary Glover was then prompted to give her evidence, but the girl cast "her hand about withall, and so, with faltering speech, sunke downe," before she could speak any words at all. She enters a fit, where she is described as "being so much writhed, as a with is writhen, that the right huckle bone was turned forward, so far over to the left side, as that it wanted not the bredth of a hand, of the place, where the lefte should stand." These symptoms were typical of Mary Glover's fits, whether or not she was aware of her surroundings. During these fits, should any pray and come to the line "deliver us from evill," her body would rebound. It was also heard during the trial, that a voice came from Mary Glover's nostrils, saying, "hang her."(Fol. 30r - Fol. 31r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 30r - Fol. 31r

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2887

During the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman believed to be the cause of the fits a fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover, experiences, the girl Mary Glover falls into a fit in the presence of Elizabeth Jackson. She is carried away from the trial "by three strong men," (Anonymous 451) who confess "that they never caryed a heavyer burthen."(Fol. 31r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 31r

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2888

During the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman accused of bewitching Mary Glover so that the young girl experiences regular fits, the fourteen year old Mary Glover falls into a fit. The trial lasts all day, so that the Justices went to dinner, and Elizabeth Jackson was led out to Newgate prison. During this time, the voice coming from Mary Glover's nostrils, which repeats, "hang her," ceases. However, once Elizabeth Jackson is brought out again in an hour, "the voyce also returned." During the whole time, Mary Glover remains in her fit, "without any change."(Fol. 31r - Fol. 31v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 31r - Fol. 31v

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2891

The Justices presiding over the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman allegedly responsible for causing regular fits in the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover, gather to see Mary Glover in a private chamber after she falls into a fit at the trial, in the presence of Elizabeth Jackson. These Justices include Lord Anderson, Sir John Crook (Recorder of London), Sir William Cornwallis, Sir Jerome Bowes, among others (Anonymous 452). The bench believes Mary Glover to be counterfeiting her symptoms, and cry out in "thundring voyces; bring the fyre, and hot Irons, for this Counterfett; Come wee will marke her, on the Cheeke, for a Counterfett." Mary Glover, being "senseles," was not aware of any of these happenings. The Justices observe Mary Glover's body to be stiff, and Sir John Crook burns a paper against her hand, "untill it blistered," with no visible reaction from the girl. As soon as Elizabeth Jackson was sent for, however, and the old woman entered the chamber, the "sound in the maides nostrills," increased in volume, until it could be clearly heard to say "Hang her," both in the chamber and the courtroom. (Fol. 31v - Fol. 32r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 31v - Fol. 32r

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2894

During the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman allegedly responsible for causing regular fits in the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover, Mary Glover falls into a fit in the presence of Elizabeth Jackson, and is taken to a separate chamber by the Justices presiding over the case. There, Lord Anderson commands Elizabeth Jackson to come to the bed, where Mary Glover lies "senseles," and to "lay her hand upon the maide." As soon as Elizabeth Jackson touches Mary Glover, the girl was "presently throwen, and casted with great violence."(Fol. 32r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 32r

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2895

Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover, so that she suffers from fits every second day, is brought forth at her trial by the Judge to say the Lord's Prayer while Mary Glover suffers from a fit brought on by being in the same room as Elizabeth Jackson. Elizabeth Jackson could not finish the prayer, although she often tried, being unable to say "forgeve us our trespasses," nor "Leade us not into temptation." The Judge then bids Elizabeth Jackson to say the Christian belief, which she began "leaving out our Lord," which she could not be forced to say. She also changed the phrases "the Communion of Saincts," and "the forgivenes of Sinnes," to "The communion of saincts," and "the Comission of sinnes." When she is finally made to say "Leade us not into temptation," Mary Glover's body "was tossed," which also happened when Elizabeth Jackson managed to utter "Deliver us from evill." Likewise, Mary Glover was tossed, when Elizabeth Jackson came to the phrase, "he descended into hell."(Fol. 32r - Fol. 33r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 32r - Fol. 33r

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2896

The Justices (Anonymous 452) presiding over the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old Mary Glover, gather to discuss the evidence against Elizabeth Jackson, including the manner in which Mary Glover became ill, the "Curses that this woman gave her," the fit Mary Glover experienced while eating bread when Elizabeth Jackson visited her house and that thereafter "the mayd, ever had a fitt, upon any taking of sustenance," the curses and "prophesing threatenings," which Judge Anderson believes to be "a notable propertie of a Witch," the regularity of Mary Glover's ordinary fits, as well as the young girls succumbing to fits whenever in the presence of Elizabeth Jackson.(Fol. 33r - Fol. 33v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 33r - Fol. 33v

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2897

A witness, Mr. Lewis Hughes, comes forth at Elizabeth Jackson's trial, a woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old girl Mary Glover, in order to provide evidence against Elizabeth Jackson. Hughes is a preacher, who admitted he was "willing to admonish the said Elizabeth Jackson of her lewde tongue," and so went to visit the old woman at her house. As soon as he entered her abode, she "very intentively fixt her eyes upon him," facing him. As the Preacher prepared to speak with her, he "had suddenly his speech taken from him, his necke became stiffe, and his Chin borne inwards into his bosome, his knees (withall) yeelding under him, as though he should fall." Calling upon God, the Preacher finds the strength to prevail, and is able to depart from Elizabeth Jackson's house. However, he is not able to speak for two hours afterward.(Fol. 33v - Fol. 34r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 33v - Fol. 34r

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2898

A witness, M. Lewis Hughes, comes forth at Elizabeth Jackson's trial, a woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old girl Mary Glover, in order to provide evidence against Elizabeth Jackson. This is the second piece of evidence this witness provides. Hughes is a preacher, who went to speak with Elizabeth Jackson while she was in prison, but he could "by no meanes cause her, to rehearse the beliefe," of God and Jesus Christ. Further, she refused of her own accord to say, "Deliver us from evill."(Fol. 34r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 34r

1602, December 1 London (Newgate Prison)    London, City of  London  England 
2899

During the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover, the old woman is searched "under the hands of the women (Anonymous 454)," and "markes were found in divers places of her body." These marks were determined to be unlikely "to grow of any disease," but rather more "like the markes which are described to be in Witches bodyes."(Fol. 34r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 34r

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2900

Elizabeth Burges comes forward as a witness at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old Mary Glover. Elizabeth Burges admits to having seen Elizabeth Jackson threaten Mary Glover, but also tells how she "had ben therefore threatned by her," so that one day while eating prunes, the old woman visits her and Elizabeth Burges is "not able to swallow one downe, but also fell on vomiting." This continues for some three weeks after being visited by Elizabeth Jackson, "upon all sustenance of meat receaved." At another visit of Elizabeth Jackson while Elizabeth Burges was vomiting, Elizabeth Jackson allegedly wishes "that she might cast up her heart, gutts and all," adding "Thou shortly, shalt have in thee an evill spirit too." The following night, Elizabeth Burges is visited by a vision in the shape of a fox; the night after that a vision in the shape of "an ougly black man, with a bounch of keyes in his hand, intysing her to go with him, and those keyes would bring her to gould enough"; and a final third night, Elizabeth Burges is visited by the vision in "the likenes of a mouse." However, by "faithfull praier," aided by her Master and Mistress, Elizabeth Burges was delivered from these visions. While recounting this tale at the trial, Elizabeth Jackson interrupts Elizabeth Burges, saying "thow wilt be sicke, and cast againe anon," causing Elizabeth Burges to lose her power of speech. She was led into a chamber after, where she fell ill as Elizabeth Jackson had predicted, "and after that, was led home weake, faynte and Casting, benummed in all her body, hardly able to stand, and never yet to this day recovered her perfect libertie againe."(Fol. 34r - Fol. 35r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 34r - Fol. 35r

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2901

Evidence is brought forth at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old girl Mary Glover, that Elizabeth Jackson's "cursing, long before this time, had ben observed to have a mischevous consequent." Once, while washing clothes for one of Lady Bond's men (Anonymous 455), Elizabeth Jackson came to collect her earnings. However, he was out of town, at which time Elizabeth Jackson said, "is he gone? I pray god he may breake his necke, or his legge, before he com againe." The man (Anonymous 455) breaks his leg during his journey, accordingly.(Fol. 35r - Fol. 35v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 35r - Fol. 35v

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2902

During the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover, evidence surfaces that Elizabeth Jackson "hath accustomed, to go with others, to fortune tellers." Elizabeth Jackson further confesses that she went once with her daughter, and another time with her friend Elizabeth Cooke, and that she paid to have her fortune told. This is believed to tie her in with witchcraft.(Fol. 35v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 35v

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2903

Testimony is given at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old girl Mary Glover, that once in a "dead senseles fitt," brought on by the presence of Elizabeth Jackson, Mary Glover is so heavy , that "two could scarsly lift up her head," but "upon a suddaine," Mary Glover was found to be "more light then a naturall body." This was proved when a "godly honest gentleman" (Anonymous 456) lifted her from the bed with ease and then "turning himselfe about, with her, lying upon his armes, made a shew of her," affirming to all that she was "as a curten throwen overthwart his armes." He lay Mary Glover down upon the bed again, and shortly after, the girl was found to be incredibly heavy again. These symptoms are in line with possession or bewitchment, and not of natural causes.(Fol. 35v - Fol. 36r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 35v - Fol. 36r

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2905

Two Physicians are called upon by the court at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old Mary Glover. These two physicians, Dr. Francis Herring and Dr. Spencer, were asked to provide their opinions, "touching Mary Glovers case." They both agreed that the girl's case "proceeded of som cause supernaturall; having stranger effects, than either the mother or any other naturall disease hath ever ben observed to bring forth." The motion of Mary Glover's hands to her mouth, it's opening and shutting "at so strickt a measure of time," that she would fall into fits in the presence of Elizabeth Jackson, the voice from Mary Glover's nostrils, and the casting about of Mary Glover's body upon being touched by Elizabeth Jackson are all cited as evidence of the supernatural. Further, the "varietie of the fitts," and the shape of the belly "did not truly resemble the mother," further supporting their conclusions.(Fol. 36r - Fol. 37r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 36r - Fol. 37r

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2908

Two physicians, Dr. Argent and Dr. Jorden, testify at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old Mary Glover. These two doctors come forth without being called by the court, in order to "purge Elizabeth Jackson, of being any cause of Mary Glovers harme." They were summoned by Bishop Bancroft, who first attested that Mary Glover was counterfeiting her symptoms. These physicians were also supported by a noted divine, James Meadowes, who sought to prove that Jackson had not practiced witchcraft. The two doctors "sought earnestly to make the case a meere naturall disease," by citing certain symptoms of Mary Glover's fits as in resemblance of "certen affects of the mother." However, this seems to leave the jury without "any satisfaction at all."(Fol. 37r - Fol. 37v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 37r - Fol. 37v

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2909

At the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman accused of bewitching Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl from London, Lord Anderson, the judge, presses Dr. Jorden to provide a name for the disease he believes Mary Glover to be suffering from, as Dr. Jorden protests that the girl's symptoms are natural and not supernatural. Dr. Jorden labels the disease, "Passio Hysterica." However, the doctor admits he cannot cure the disease, and that he will not try to. Dr. Jorden further swears that he believes Mary Glover is not counterfeiting her symptoms. Lord Anderson then answers, "Then in my conscience, it is not naturall: for if you tell me neither a Naturall cause, of it, nor a naturall remedy, I will tell you, that it is not naturall." (Fol. 37v - Fol. 38r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 37v - Fol. 38r

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2910

Judge Anderson and Sir John Crook, the Recorder of London, present themselves in front of the Jury (Anonymous 450) of the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the young girl Mary Glover. They seek to have the jury reach a verdict, cautioning that "the Land is full of Witches," who have "on their bodies divers strange marks," as Elizabeth Jackson is reported to have. Further, Judge Anderson declares that "you shall hardly finde any direct proofes in such a case," as the Devil is devious in his dealings. He reminds the Jury that Elizabeth Jackson is not afraid to threaten others, "She is full of Cursings, she threatens and prophesies, and still it takes effect." Judge Anderson also points out how illogical it is to believe that the cause of Mary Glover's fits is natural, considering the nature of her fits. The Recorder of London follows up by describing the trials he put both women through, and his conclusions that neither fear nor counterfeiting were responsible for Mary Glover's symptoms. He believes that it is "in dede through witchcraft." The Jury gather, and decide that Elizabeth Jackson is "guilty of witchcraft."(Fol. 38r - Fol. 39v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 38r - Fol. 39v

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2911

Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old Mary Glover, is sentenced to "a yeeres imprisonment," after being found guilty by the Jury (Anonymous 450) at the end of her trial. During this time, she is also expected to "stand on the pillory" four times, and confess to her crime.(Fol. 39r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 39r

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2912

At the end of the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman accused and found guilty of bewitching the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover, Elizabeth Jackson is taken out of the courtroom. As soon as she is gone, Mary Glover, who was in a fit for the duration of the trial, during which time a voice came from her nostrils saying "hang her," rises from the fit, and "the voyce in the mayds nostrills ceased." Her fit had lasted over eight hours.(Fol. 39v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 39v

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2915

After the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old Mary Glover, the fits of Mary Glover are even worse, being "augmented, both in length and strength, above measure." (Fol. 40r - Fol. 40v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 40r - Fol. 40v

1602, December 1 London   London  London, City of  London  England