Go back
12 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific date

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
749

William Searle gives a statement before Justice Robert Bernard alleging that, three or four years before, Francis Moore had requested to bake a loaf of bread at his home, and he refused her. In retribution, she set her familiar Pretty on his chickens, causing them to flutter, refuse to eat and die.(7)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 7

1642 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
750

William Searle gives a statement alleging that, three or four years before, Francis Moore had caused one of his hogs to die in retribution for some of his servants setting a dog on one of her hogs.(7)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 7

1642 Catworth  Catworth  Cambridgeshire  Huntingdonshire  England 
1652

After the hearing of a Sermon, Joyce Dovey begins to feel "much wrought upon and dejected," a depression which leads her to fall "into some passions, and (as was conceived by her friends) Convulsion fits," which in time grew stronger and stronger, especially during prayer. (1-2)

Appears in:
Dalton, James. A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey. London: 1647, 1-2

1642 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
1685

Joyce Dovey's Keeper (Anonymous 265), wanting a divine consultation on the possibility of her possession, silently prayed that if she were possessed, that a sign would manifest. The Devil, in a voice described as "bigger and grosser tone then her ordinary speech," began with "swearing, Wounds, Blood, &c.," behavior he would resume any time there was talk of divine matters around her. (2)

Appears in:
Dalton, James. A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey. London: 1647, 2

1642 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
1686

Religious symbols, in the form of "crucifixes, and crosses," allegedly appeared on Joce Dovey's "breast or throat" after three soldiers near her speak of Catholicism around her. The Devil cries out "haw, haw, haw, sayes," as they react in fear.(3)

Appears in:
Dalton, James. A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey. London: 1647, 3

1642 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
1688

Joyce Dovey, returning from the "House of an honest religious man," where she was a spectacle or a kind of oracle, "she began to be so distempered," that she could barely return home. Upon returning, she attempted to throw herself out of the window, and made it more than half way through, before her Keeper caught "by the coats, and took her in again."(3)

Appears in:
Dalton, James. A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey. London: 1647, 3

1642 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
1690

Joyce Dovey is "oft thrown against the walls, and into the fire, but all without any hurt." One one occasion, she was "cast into a great fire, some would have taken her out, but her Keeper said, let her alone, and observe the providence of God. She was magically "snatched out without humane help, not having any hurt, or so much as the smell of fire on her clothes." She did the same to a bible, throwing it into the fire, and it too would not burn.(3, 4)

Appears in:
Dalton, James. A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey. London: 1647, 3, 4

1642 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
1692

Joyce Dovey attempts to slice her own jugular to kill herself. She evidently "snatched a paire of Cizzers from a womans girdle, and applyed them to her throat; and another time a knife from another, in an admirable quick way, and strook her breast, yet both without so much as a scarre in either place."(3)

Appears in:
Dalton, James. A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey. London: 1647, 3

1642 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
1774

Elizabeth Gooding sends an imp "to vex and torment Mary the wife of John Tayler of Manningtree."(8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 8

1642 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1775

Mary Tayler, the wife of John Tayler of Manningtree, refuses to give Elizabeth Gooding "some Beergood," resulting in Elizabeth Gooding's "malice" and sending of an imp to torment Mary Tayler. (8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 8

1642 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
2392

A "Sanguine strong Maid" from Bewdley "fell into strange Histerical Fits," which began "by Stoppage of the Menstrua." She is treated by Richard Baxter, who provides her with "Castory and Rad. Ostrutii, and Sem. Dauci on Forestus Commendation." After she begins taking this, "she began to be better." However, when Richard Baxter is "driven out of the Country by War," and Mr. Robert Morton, the Pastor and physician left for Coventry, "she was left without help, and grew worse than ever." Richard Baxter concludes that "at last [...] by a suror uterinus ex corruptione Seminis, she seemed possest by a Devil." (193)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 193

1642 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
2393

A "Sanguine strong Maid," (Anonymous 409) from Bewdley experiences a number of fits from between 1642 until 1646 or 1647. These fits are characterized by: the fact that "many could not hold her," and "she would be cast off her Bed and upon it again, by a force far above her strength"; she asked for "needles and pins, and cords brought to her," to kill herself; her ability to predict events, such as the coming of a Papist to cure her "their way,"; laughing at Holy Water; and that she "would Swear, Curse, nd Rage against any that were Religious, and Hugg those that were Vicious, and be merry with them."(194)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 194

1642 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England