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12 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific date

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
1009

Matthew Hopkins claims that a witch's mark is defined by three criteria: first, the mark is found in an unusual place on the body, second, no pain is felt when a pin or needle is thrust through it, and third, the mark is dry and close to the flesh (this indicates that a familiar has been sucking from it).(3-4)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 3-4

1647 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1010

Matthew Hopkins claims that the devil does not desire witch's blood for nourishment, but to further her damnation. Hopkins believes that in drawing blood out of teats (witch' marks) the devil is able to physically enter a witch's body, and then become another creature such as a cat, rat, or mouse.(4-5)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 4-5

1647 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1011

Matthew Hopkins asserts that an early form of testing for witchcraft in Essex and Suffolk was to keep the accused witch awake for several days on end. The thought was that, if kept awake, the witch would call on her familiars, thus proving her guilty.(5)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 5

1647 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1012

Matthew Hopkins asserts that one way to test for witchcraft is to make the accused witch walk continuously until she is so tired and sore that she must sit down. If the woman is indeed a witch, her familiars will come to her as soon as she stops walking.(5)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 5

1647 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1013

Matthew Hopkins claims that the devil often tricks witches when they are facing persecution. He will tell a witch that her identifying marks are so small they will not be noticed, yet they are often noticed and the witch is, as a consequence, hanged. He will also tell a witch that if she sinks during a swimming test then her name will be cleared, but a witch will often float and thus be executed.(6)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 6

1647 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
1014

Matthew Hopkins claims that he denies the confession of a witch if: it is drawn from her by torture, violence, or flattery. Under those circumstances, she will confess to improbable acts such as flying in the air or riding a broom; words are put in her mouth. (7)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 7

1647 Manningtree  Manningtree  Essex  Essex  England 
2394

When Richard Baxter returns to Bewdley, after having left "a Sanguine strong maid," who was experiencing violent fits, he "went to see her, and Prayed once by her." After, praying neighbours were encouraged by this, and "resolved to joyn with some of Bewdley, to Fast and Pray by her, till she was recovered." During prayers, "she was usually in violent Rage, and after thankt them." This culminates on a day, when Mr. Thomas Ware was praying, and "she fell on the Floor like a Block, and having lain so a while, cryed out, He is gone, He is gone; The Black Dog is gone." After, she never experienced her fits again.(194)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 194

1647 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
2395

Many "good People in Charity" looked after a "Sanguine strong Maid"(Anonymous 409) during her violent fits, believed to be caused by a devil (Anonymous 165). However, "one young Man" (Anonymous 411) in particular "was more with her than the rest." During her fits, the maid often "toss[ed] her naked Body about, she being strong and comely." Upon seeing this, the young man's "Lust was provoked, which he exercised on her." After "praeterjiciendo semen," the maid seemed eased for a time, "enticing him the more to do it oft," in what he felt was "an Act of (Wicked) Compassion." This did only, however, "Enrage her Disease."(195)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 195

1647 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
2396

A young man (Anonymous 411) who took advantage of a "Sanguine strong maid" (Anonymous 409) during her fits, where she "tossed her naked Body about," in order to satisfy his lust, confesses to his sins "after her Deliverance" for these fits. Many were sad for the maid, and "prayed for her." Richard Baxter believes that the maid's illness must have begun with "the furor uterinus," but because a "Real possession," after the young man took advantage of her, "in punishment of their Sin." The young man and the maid marry, and "professed deep Repentance."(195)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 195

1647 Bewdley  Bewdley  Worcestershire  Worcestershire  England 
2599

Mary Moore begs for Dorothy Swinow to be extradited to Northumberland for trial a second time before a judge (Anonymous 237) and is refused once more. Margaret Muschamp allegedly falls into a fit in which she details the torments Swinow has visited upon her family and her hand in Lady Hambleton's death, concluding with a plea for justice lest their torments be increased. The judge declares Margaret's fit to be feigned. The onlookers are convinced, however, seeing "onely an innocent bashfull Girle, without any confidence at all when she was out of her fits."(15-16)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 15-16

1647 Durham    Durham  Dvrham  England 
2601

Margaret Muschamp, the evening after appearing a second time before a judge, allegedly has a fit in which she vomits a fir stick full of crooked pins and is visited by her angels. She then cries out that the enemy sees there is to be no justice and is trying to choke her, while vomiting "stones, coles, brick, Lead, straw, quills full of pins, with straw full of pins, tow, and Virginall wire, all full of pins." For three weeks, a large stone is seen to come "alwayes to her throat and went back again, till at the last the Lord brought it up."(16-17)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 16-17

1647 Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England 
2602

Margaret Muschamp allegedly bids the household watch over her brother George Muschamp Jr., convinced that his throat will be cut or he will be burnt with fire. She claims to hear the sound of knives being sharpened from the stairs, and numerous times fire is found in his room.(16-17)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 16-17

1647 Spittle    Northumberland  Northumberland  England