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6 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific date

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
984

Joan Peterson delivers a paper of witnesses to defend her during her trial; this results in the calling of physicians Dr. Bates and Dr. Colledon, and surgeons Mr. Stamford, and Mr. Page to give evidence. They describe Lady Powel's severe and lengthy sickness from "Dropsie, the Scurvey, and the yellow Jaundies," and express wonder that she lived as long as she did. Their testimony vindicates Mrs. Levingston and Joan Peterson on the charge bewitching Lady Powel to death. Lady Powel is said to have been 80 years of age at the time of her death.(6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 6-7

1652, April 7 London (Hicks Hall)     London, City of  Middlesex  England 
986

The confederation of Abraham Vandenbemde, Thomas Collet and Anonymous 139, and their agents, repeatedly promise Jane Peterson a reprieve or pardon if she will confess that Anne Levingston had employed her to kill Lady Powel; Peterson refuses to make a false confession, going so far as to punch one member of the confederation in the nose and declare him a rogue.(8-9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 8-9

1652, April 7 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England 
987

Joan Peterson is found not guilty of bewitching Lady Powel to death, but is found guilty of bewitching Christopher Wilson; she is condemned to die as a witch.(8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 8

1652, April 7 London (Hicks Hall)     London, City of  Middlesex  England 
2055

Joan Peterson is indicted for bewitching Christopher Wilson, as alleged by Margaret Austin and two other witnesses; Peterson is said to have first cured Wilson then caused him to become ill again after he was unable to pay for her services. Notably, Wilson himself does not claim any such thing, though he is alleged to suffer fits and "rot as he lies". Numerous witnesses are called against her, but give only hearsay; Peterson is able to produce only a few witnesses, and those who do appear to support her are mocked and sent away by the Officer of the Court. (7-8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 7-8

1652, April 7 London (Hicks Hall)     London, City of  Middlesex  England 
2056

A stranger offers to depose in court that Thomas Southwick, a servant of Thomas Cromton's, has been standing in the sessions yard proclaiming Peterson a witch and offering money to anyone who will swear the same in court; when the Justices on the Bench is call for Southwick, he cannot be found. The Recorder is made to take note of it, and an Order given that Southwick is to be brought before the court.(8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 8

1652, April 7 London (Hicks Hall)     London, City of  Middlesex  England 
2058

Joan Peterson, at her trial, allegedly renounces all witchcraft and confesses that "she administer'd not any thing to the Lady, but what was comfortable and nourishing."(8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Tryall and Examination of Mrs. Joan Peterson. London: 1652, 8

1652, April 7 Wapping    London, Greater  London  England