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41 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific date

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
1831

Mr. Goodwin of London Borough of Southwark is ensnared by music for many years, so much so that he treasured music above his family and "fel to his musick" upon his wife's death bed against her wishes. Mr. Goodwin's obsession is allegedly the fault of Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones.(1 - 2, 26)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 1 - 2, 26

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1835

Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones of London Borough of Southwark allegedly "cast a net of pretended piety and fained extraordinary holyness" over Mr. Goodwin, despite being wicked women in reality.(4, 26)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 4, 26

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1836

Upon her deathbed, Mrs. Eleanor Armstrong, the wife of Mr. Wessell Goodwin of London Borough of Southwark, implores her children to take their husband away from music and "especially the frequentation of Mr. Edward Jones; and that not so much out of dislike to him as to his wife, whom shee saw to be a subtil undermining woman, that would be ready to make her own advantage of old Mr. Goodwins weakness." (2-3)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 2-3

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1840

Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones allegedly bewitch Mr. Goodwin of London Borough of Southwark, so that he tells his son-in-law and Daughter Vernon that the passion he claims for a future wife is placed upon a woman "so eminent in Piety and wisdome, that his former wife deserved not to be named the same day." Although he refuses to identify this woman, "yet his daily converse and familiarity with Mrs. Jones put them in strange thoughts."(3-4)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 3-4

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1841

Mrs. Pigeon allegedly "woried [her husband Mr. Starkey an Apothecarie] out of the world with her wicked imperious usage." Shortly after, she marries Mr. Pigeon a lieutenant in the regiment. Her "old imperious carriage" continues in this marriage.(4)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 4

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1842

Mrs. Pigeon of London Borough of Southwark allegedly urged her husband, Mr. Pigeon to partake in meat and drinks "compounded" of provocative drugs to convince him to leave her everything in his estate. Mr. Pigeon refuses to consent.(5)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 5

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1843

Mrs. Pigeon of London Borough of Southwark allegedly practices behaviour that causes her husband Mr. Pigeon to fly "into such a passion, and was so transported, that he became altogether senselesse, feeble, and irrationall."(6)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 6

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1844

Mrs. Pigeon of London Borough of Southwark sends for Doctor Burges, a Physician, to attend to her husband after she causes him to fly into a rage. Mr. Pigeon is healed of his rage by being vomitted twice in one day, and thus restored to a feeble state by Doctor Burges. (6)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 6

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1845

Mrs. Pigeon allegedly confesses to her husband, Mr. Pigeon that she behaved in such a wicked manner to her first husband, Mr. Starky, that he "committed a sin, for which he was tormented in his conscience, and fell into such an agony that as she then said, she thought he would have dyed." She promises Mr. Pigeon to never act so again.(6)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 6

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1846

Despite promising to behave, Mrs. Pigeon allegedly "returnes to her old practises, and so wrought with Mr. Pigeon at the last, to part with his estate to her." (6)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 6

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1848

Mrs. Jones leaves her husband for Mr. Goodwin, allegedly turning him into a "poore deluded old man" and Mr. Goodwin promises to provide for her.(8)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 8

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1849

Mr. Goodwin is quite sick for ten days after being attacked by Mr. Pigeon, but Mrs. Jones "made him forget his paine, and speeded the cure, which else might have been dangerous." Mrs. Jones and Mr. Goodwin lie, a most un-Christian act, and say that Mr. Goodwin had been thrown from a horse, "to salve his reputation."(9)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 9

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1850

Mr. Goodwin, who has been allegedly seduced by Mrs. Jones, is made to believe his relationship with her is lawful as Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon "work [him] to believe."(10, 26)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 10, 26

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1851

Mr. Goodwin's children attempt to draw their father out of his bewitchment daily, and try to "perswade him against these women." But is is all in vaine, for "he is so bewitched with her." (11 - 12)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 11 - 12

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1852

The minister Mr. Cooper, at the urging of neighbours, justices, and ministers, allegedly attempts to break Mr. Goodwin's bewitchment, caused by Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon. Mr. Goodwin is thus suspended from the Sacrament, which he cares little about being restored to.(12)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 12

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1853

Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon allegedly "possesse him [Mr. Goodwin] at their pleasure, and plye him daily to beware of his children" so that he will refuse his own children's advice. Further, Mr. Goodwin "can scarce speak for joy" upon seeing Mrs. Jones and Mrs Pigeon, and dotes them with goods and presents, at the ruin of his family's accounts. (12)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 12

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1854

Mr. Goodwin is allegedly so bewitched with Mrs. Jones that it causes him to "fall a dancing, and capering, that he protested he thought he had been distraught."(13)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 13

1654 London  St. Paul  London, City of  Surrey  England 
1855

Roger Crey, Mr. Goodwin's eldest apprentice who allegedly spoke out against Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon fell sick, and the two women "physick him, he growes worse." When Mr. Goodwin's son asks a doctor be sent for, but "the old man refuses to give his consent, boasting highly of the great skill of those two she."(13-14)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 13-14

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1856

Mr. Goodwin's son privately caries some of the ill Roger Crey's water to Doctor Burnet and Mr. Clarke, an apothecary, suspecting foul play on Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon's part. "At the first sight of the water he tells him, the party was a dead man, past all recovery; and that if good help had been sought in time, in all probability he might have done well," confirming Mr. Goodwin's son's suspicions.(14)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1857

Roger Crey is allegedly continually "plye(d) with druggs" by both Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones during his illness despite his pleadings for them to stop, so that "he lies raging in the violence of a burning feaver, in all probability caused by the contrary medicines they had administred to hime." He dies under these ministration. (14)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1858

After Roger Crey's death, Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon "tooke coach and departed, though in the dead of the night," allegedly "terrified with the guilt of what they've done."(14)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1859

The parents (Anonymous 308 and Anonymous 309) of a "vertuous young woman" (Anonymous 307) who is also visited by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones during her illness allegedly "watc'ht diligently that she should take nothing from them" after the death of Roger Crey.(14-15)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14-15

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1860

A "vertuous young woman" (Anonymous 307) who is attended in her sickness by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones "dyed of griefe, having her heart broke by the occasion of the practises of these women."(15)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 15

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1861

Mrs. Pigeon allegedly attempts to get her husband Mr. Pigeon to "draw up a declaration" against the present Governors, but he refuses, "for which she vowes to be revenged of him."(16)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 16

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1862

Mr. Pigeon allegedly "got cold by his carefull tending of the childe," and tells his wife Mrs. Pigeon that he fears he has gout. She "presently with violence affirmes, that it was the Pox."(16)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 16

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1863

Mr. Pigeon sends for Mr. Knowles to come and examine him in his sickness, in order to persuade his wife, Mrs. Pigeon. (16 - 17)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 16 - 17

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1864

Upon examining Mr. Pigeon, Mr. Knowles is confronted by Mrs. Pigeon. The two argue over the nature of his sickness, which Mrs. Pigeon maintains is the pox despite having no grounds for knowing his sickness.(17)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 17

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1865

Mr. Pigeon, in his sickness, recommends to Mr. Knowles and Mrs. Pigeon that he should send for "two able Physicians," and he "will submit to a search."(17)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 17

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1866

Mr. Knowles pleads with Mr. Pigeon to leave his wife when she insists that Mr. Pigeon is afflicted with the Pox, "to avoyd evill." Mr. Pigeon refuses. (17)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 17

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1867

Mr. Pigeon becomes violent with Mr. Knowles upon being told to leave his wife, causing him to be strangely "transported by this strange provocation, that he can scarce give account of what he did." Mrs. Pigeon may have allegedly been responsible for causing such a strange rage.(17 - 18)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 17 - 18

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1868

During the strange rage visited on Mr. Pigeon, Mrs. Pigeon "hath got a strange black face, which by her art she yet makes more visible."(18)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 18

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1869

Mrs. Pigeon indulges in unnatural acts when she "so endeavoured with her smooth tongue, that she procured to have her said husband dismist the Army" as an appeal to the Lord General (Anonymous 310), causing her to live in separation from Mr. Pigeon. (18)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 18

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1870

The young son of Mr. Goodwin, James Goodwin, is made "maillable" by the labours of Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones.(18)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 18

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1871

The bewitched son of Mr. Goodwin, James Goodwin is married to Mrs. Jones' daughter, making Mr. Goodwin and Mrs. Jones to "become brothers and sisters," rendering their own relationship unnatural in the eyes of God. This further allows Mrs. Jones to move into Mr. Goodwin's estate.(18 - 19)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 18 - 19

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1872

Mr. Goodwin becomes "so evill spoken of for his shamefull scandalous frequentation of these wicked women [Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon], unable to beare up under such a burden, he gave up himselfe to melancholly and carelesse stupidity, that he let his bookes run into some disorder."(20)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 20

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1873

Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon allegedly fetch two bailiffs (Anonymous 311 and Anonymous 312) to arrest the eldest son of Mr. Goodwin, Andrew Goodwin in his own home, "in the dead of the night." This is a "Divelish action" that the women were afraid to do in the light of day for fear of their neighbour's reactions.(21)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 21

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1874

Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon are directed by Mr. Colbourne, who is "the man midwife" that helps them bring about the "the monster" of a judgment seizing all of Mr. Goodwin's estates. (22)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 22

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England 
1875

Mr. Goodwin's hildren, allegedly ruined by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, and seeing "that their father is now captivated more than ever to these women" presented a petition to the Justices of the County and Borough of South-wark, which brings Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones to St. Margarets Hill.(22-23)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 22-23

1654 London Borough of Southwark (St. Margarets Hill)  Southwark  London, Greater  London  England 
1876

Upon meeting with the Justices of Southwark, Mr. Goodwin is "seriously reproved and admonished to forsake the scandalous company of these women," Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones. A witness, Mr. Gold of Clapham appears and testifies that Mrs. Pigeon in particular is "a most Angelical woman."(23)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 23

1654 London Borough of Southwark (St. Margarets Hill)  Southwark  London, Greater  London  England 
1877

The Justices of Southwark request that Mr. Goodwin's children produce proof against Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon for what they alleged in their petition, which they would not do "should they incurr trouble from these Litigious women." The justices dismiss the case with only an admonition to Mr. Goodwin.(23)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 23

1654 London Borough of Southwark (St. Margarets Hill)  Southwark  London, Greater  London  England 
1878

Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon are cast out of their churches, "and all communion with them," because of their scandalous nature. They spend Sabbath "at the Dye house," instead.(23)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 23

1654 London Borough of Southwark  Southwark  London, Greater  London   England