Go back
22 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific date

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
880

Ann Sandeswell gives deposition in court alleging that, seven or eight years ago, she had bought a number of geese from Amy Denny but had not yet brought them home, and that Denny threatened to destroy them if she didn't come pick them up. A few days later, all the geese were dead.(55-56)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 55-56

1655 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
882

Ann Sandeswell gives deposition alleging that a quarter-barrel of fish she had ordered from her brother was discovered to have fallen into the ocean when Sandeswell went to collect it. She had requested Amy Denny's company, and Denny rebuffed her. Her brother told her that he had been unable to keep the fish in the boat, that he had never before seen the like, and that no-one else's goods had been lost.(56-57)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 56-57

1655 Leystoff    Suffolk  Suffolk  England 
1415

Thomas Addy claims that physicians must be inculcated in the production of witch beliefs, because when faced by their inability to diagnose a natural cause of illness, they are willing to accept the patient's belief that it might be witchcraft causing their (or their livestock's) disease.(114-115)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 114-115

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1416

Thomas Addy accuses 'ignorant' physicians of diagnosing natural disease as bewitchment, making sick children into demoniacs.(169)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 169

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1506

Thomas Addy, in _A Candle in The Dark_ (1655) claims that an old woman (Anonymous 228) taught her neighbor the following charm when the butter would not churn: Come butter come, come butter come, Peter stands at the gate, waiting for a butterd cake, Come butter come. The same charm also appears in George Sinclair's _Satan's Invisible World Discovered_ (1685).(59)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 59

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
1600

A charm, which according to Thomas Addy, was a bit of "popish" superstition, taught by the clergy to their congregants: "Matthew, Mark, Luke, and Iohn,/ The Bed be blest that I lye on." This was passed on to an old woman (Anonymous 244), who still recites it before sleep.(58-59)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 58-59

1655     Essex  Essex  England 
1601

A butcher (Anonymous 245) visits a local cunning-man (Anonymous 247) who promises him, with the help of the devil, to help him find his missing cattle. The cunning-man instructs the butcher to look in a glass, and to look "East and West, North and South to finde his Cattel," but not turn around, as the cunning-man's partner(Anonymous 248), dressed in a hide and horns supposedly meant to exemplify the Devil, is reflected. The butcher does not find his cattle and returns later with his son (Anonymous 246) to expose the con, by releasing a mastiff dog on the disguised man.(62)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 62

1655     Essex  Essex  England 
2940

Thomas Addy writes in _A Candle in the Dark_ (1655) that the Bible contains no written statements that witches are murderers and capable of spreading disease, that imps suck off the body of witches, that the bodies of witches contain "privy marks" assigned by the Devil, that an appropriate trial for a witch is "by sinking or swimming in the water," that witches have the ability to hurt corn, cattle, or to fly through the air. Instead, Thomas Addy calls attention to the fact that Bible does say that woe will be delivered "unto such as devour widdows houses," that "the Lord hateth the hand that sheddeth innocent blood, and the fals witness that speaketh lies," and that the Lord forbids false reports. He then condemns ministers that "teach for doctrin, the traditions of Antichrist that are not written in the Book of God?"(6 - 8)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 6 - 8

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2941

Thomas Addy writes in _A Candle in the Dark_ (1655) that within the Scriptures "there is not any kind of Witch spoken of," except those mentioned in two verses in Deuteronomy. In these passages, witches are referred to as "a user of divinations, a planetarian, or a Conjecturer, or a Jugler," either male or female who cannot "passe thorow the fire." Witches are also described as "a user of charmes, or one that seeketh an Oracle, or a South-sayer, or one that asketh counsell of the dead." Thomas Addy also identifies the word "Hartumim" in Exodus 4.17, and Genesis 41.8, which is synonymous with magician. Likewise, the word Ariolus is synonymous with "Magi," which Thomas Addy counsels were the wise men, and so one must be careful when defining a witch.(9 - 11)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 9 - 11

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2942

Thomas Addy identifies in _A Candle in the Dark_ (1655), nine sorts of witches, or deceivers, or false prophets, or seducers of the people from God and his prophets, "nominated by God unto the people." These include men or women who cannot pass through fire, or who "set up an Idol" in place of God or who "falsly pretend themselves to be Gods Prophets." Further, men or women who use "divination" are considered witches and sorcerers. A third category of witches include those men or women who were "Planetarius," or believed they could read the stars and "draw People after their uncertain Predictions," which were false in the eyes of God. The fourth category included Conjurers who "had some particular pretence or colour whereupon he grounded his Divinations, making the people beleeve that thereby he could Divine or Prophesie." The fifth description of witches included "Jugglers" who engage in slight of hands, confederacy and "the abuse of Natural Magick." The six type of witch are described as "Charmers," or "Inchanter" who use charms, which are "only a strange composure of words to blinde the understandings of the people." These are often used with "juggling tricks." The seventh description of a witch includes men or women who seek "Oracles" or soothsayers, and the eighth are soothsayers themselves. The final type of witch is a "Necromancer," meaning "one that seeketh counsel of the dead."(11 - 12)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 11 - 12

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2944

A man (Anonymous 464) from England "went about in King Iames his time," as a Jugler who abused "Natural Magick," which according to Thomas Addy is the fifth description in the Bible of a witch. This man called himself, "The Kings Majesties most excellent Hocus Pocus," as whenever he performed, he would chant, "Hoc[...] pocus, tontus talontus, vade celeriter jueo," which was a "dark composure of words," meant to allow him to perform tricks without being discovered. These men are dangerous, according to Thomas Addy, as they pretend to have "the great power of God," but instead only use tricks, making them "cheating Imposters," and workers of "jugling witchcraft."(29)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 29

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2945

A Master of Arts (Anonymous 465), formerly the Lord of Leicester, is condemned "only for using himself to the study and practise of the Jugling craft." Thomas Addy argues that this is unjust for simply studying witchcraft is not the same as being a Witch, for "the essence of a Witch is not in doing false Miracles, or any other Witchcraft by demonstration or discovery, but in seducing people from God, and his Truth." (41 - 42)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 41 - 42

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2946

Thomas Addy describes in his text _A Candle in the Dark_ (1655) how a man is "an absolute Witch" if he "seduce the people to idolatry," but if a man "acteth the same part," but "cometh out and sheweth people the imposture, and sheweth them the Wyers and secret delusions," he is not a Witch but a "discoverer of a Witch," as well as a teacher and "illuminator of the people."(42)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 42

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2947

Thomas Addy, author of _A Candle in the Dark_ (1655), tells of a "brief tenent in the Universities" (Anonymous 466), who "did but study and contemplate upon this subject of Witchcraft," and discovered a "Popish Idol" at Cheapside Cross, "which for many years," which few had known was there, until it was pulled down "at the command of the Parliament," and the where it falsely was made with pipes to shed tears, "bewitching the people." Such trends were common according to Addy under the reign of Queen Elizabeth, which caused "images and instruments were openly burnt together, by the authority and command of the Queen." (42 - 43)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 42 - 43

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2949

Thomas Addy, author of _A Candle in the Dark_ (1655) notes that men are "easily deceived by iugling Confederacy in Conjuration," describing a tale where a Minister (Anonymous 467) believed that a Cambridge Scholar (Anonymous 468) had summoned the Devil in several shapes, including horses and ducks, and thus performed witchcraft. However, the Scholar had simply hired a boy (Anonymous 478) to create such noises as those animals made. Addy questions "how little credit ought Ministers or other men to give to flying Reports, when they themselves may so easily be deluded?"(63 - 65)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 63 - 65

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2950

A woman (Anonymous 469) at Westwell in Kent, "had so perfectly this imposture of speaking in the Belly," an act of pretending to have been possessed by the Devil, "that many Ministers were deceived by her." These ministers "came and talked so long with that Devil, and charged him in the name of God to go out of her." The woman claimed some "poor people for Witches," responsible for her alleged possession. However, two Justices of the Peace, Mr. Thomas Wooton, and Mr. George Darrel exposed her con.(78 - 79)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 78 - 79

1655 Westwall  Westwell  Kent  Kent  England 
2951

A maid (Anonymous 470) from Brantree in Essex, practised the imposture of "the belly," claiming to be bewitched and possessed when she was not. Doing so, the maid "gained money from the deceived beholders," until the store grew old, when the "Devil did easily leave her." (79)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 79

1655 Braintree    Essex  Essex  England 
2952

A man (Anonymous 471) at King James' court performed witchcraft through his ability to perform as an Oracle. He would "call the King by name, and cause the King to look round about him, wondring who it was that called him." However, the King discovers this con, and would "sometimes take occasion by this impostor to make sport upon some of his Courtiers," most notably, Sir John. Anonymous 471 would call out Sir John's name, without revealing himself, in order to get Sir John "to stamp with madness," and find himself unable to ever begin discourse with the King due to constant interruption.(81 - 82)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 81 - 82

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2953

Thomas Addy, author of _A Candle in the Dark_ (1655) admonishes England for being one of many countries who believed that "the Art of swimming in the water," was a method of discovering witches, claiming that the poor country was "bewitched and deceived." He names Essex and Suffolk of being at fault, when "a wicked inquisitor" (Anonymous 472) was allegedly responsible for "cutting off of fourteen innocent people at Chelm ford Assizes,and about an hundred at Berry Assizes," including a minister (Anonymous 473) from Framingham.(101 - 102)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 101 - 102

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2954

A gaoler, Hoy, is "brought in for a Witness" against a number of people condemned for witchcraft. However, the man is allegedly "not fit to bear the Office of a Gaoler," as he believed "the more Prisoners were executed, the more he should gain." However, his testimony is taken as evidence against these innocent people, resulting in "the shedding of innocent bloud."(102)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 102

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2955

Atheism is at some point "so great, even at the very Court of England," that it is believed witches are responsible for it. This results in the "great slaughter of Men and Women (Anonymous 474) called Witches, at the Assizes at -erry, and at Chelmsford, those poor accused people," who were exposed to much cruelty, until "they would confess what their inquisitors would have them, although it were a thing impossible."(104 - 105)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 104 - 105

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England 
2958

Thomas Addy, author of _A Candle in the Dark_ (1655) writes that a number of authors in England have allowed themselves to be seduced into believing false information about witches. Among these authors, he includes: James Bishop, author of _Daemonology_; Thomas Cooper, a minister; M. Perkins, author of a treatise of witchcraft; M. John Gaule, a minister; and M. George Gifford, a minister.(139 - 140)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 139 - 140

1655 London   London  London, City of  London  England