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14 records returned.

List of all Event assertions around a specific date

ID Short Description Date City Parish Current County Old county Nation
1072

Thomas Spatchet is allegedly cured of his violent fits and inability to travel when Aubrey Grinset dies in prison. This is seen as confirmation that she is a witch.(28)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 28

1667   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
1930

Thomas Spatchet continues to suffer fits for the rest of his life, as Aubrey Grinset had warned. The fits are infrequent, often weeks in between. He continues to have difficulty praying.(28, Postscript)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 28, Postscript

1667   Dunwich  Suffolk  Cookly  England 
2422

A schoolmistress (Anonymous 418) in Winchester, who "had been very honestly and well educated," was foretold by a woman (Anonymous 419) "that had been of evil fame among the neighbours, and suspected of divers ill practices." This began when the suspected women came to the house of the schoolmistress, and asked her to lend some "small changing money," which the schoolmistress refused to do. This caused the suspected woman to tell her "she had such a piece about it her, and it should be better if she had lent it to her." The suspected woman then "departed from the house muttering."(189 - 190)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 189 - 190

1667 Winchester    Hampshire  Hampshire  England 
2423

A schoolmistress (Anonymous 418) from Winchester saw one evening "a monstrous great Toad walking upon all four like a Cat" coming from the house of a woman (Anonymous 419) who had forespoken her for not giving coin, "directly towards her." The schoolmistress goes into her house, and "desired her husband to get some Instrument, wherewithal to dispatch that monstrous vermin." When her husband (Anonymous 420) met with the toad in the entrance of the house, "and before he had the power to strike at it," the toad "rusht suddenly into another room, and was never seen afterwards."(190)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 190

1667 Winchester    Hampshire  Hampshire  England 
2424

A schoolmistress (Anonymous 418) from Winchester is taken with "most Tormenting Fits," beginning the night she was visited by a familiar in the shape of a toad, belonging to a woman (Anonymous 419) who "muttered" to her when she refused to share coin. Although the schoolmistress had been a "brisk healthy woman," she was taken with "violent prickings and pains," which made her feel as if "her inside had been stuck with pins, needles, or thorns." Her urine was lined with "an abundance of blood" because of it. This was the beginning of frequent fits.(190-191)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 190-191

1667 Winchester    Hampshire  Hampshire  England 
2425

When a schoolmistress (Anonymous 418) from Winchester experiences numerous fits, "sometimes twice or thrice in one day, sometimes whole days together," these were always preceded by the coming "into the Room a vast large Cat," and "after that another," until there were somewhere between seven or nine cats in the room. These would "crawl about, and stick against the walls," and they would make "dreadful yelling, hideous noises," for near a quarter of an hour. After the cats would suddenly disappear, and instead, a great light, "like a flash of lightning," would strike at the window, and light would hand off the walls in different rooms for between an hour and the entire night, "shining through the Windows into the Street, and visible to the Neighbours." During the light, the schoolmistress was "in the highest extremity of Misery," and would cry out the name of the "suspected party" responsible for her fits, a woman of "evil fame" (Anonymous 419). The schoolmistress experiences fits for near 17 years, from the age of forty, and they "reduced [her] strait well proportioned body to a very crooked deformity."(191 - 192)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 191 - 192

1667 Winchester    Hampshire  Hampshire  England 
2426

A number of physicians (Anonymous 420) who examine a schoolmistress (Anonymous 419) in Winchester afflicted by a number of fits, were "all of the opinion that the inner parts of her body were wounded by some Diabolical Art." They asked her to move houses, which she did, "but it proved no purpose, for the evil Instrument followed her there also." Further, the chickens she attempted to keep in both places for many years would "suddenly turn round, twisting their Necks several times about, until they were dead," further proving that the "Diabolical Art" followed her.(192)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 192

1667 Winchester    Hampshire  Hampshire  England 
2427

A schoolmistress (Anonymous 418) from Winchester, afflicted by fits, "kept two Cats of her own." However, if the cats (Anonymous 171) which appeared when the schoolmistress experienced her fits appeared, believed to be the familiars of a woman of "evil fame" (Anonymous 419), then the schoolmistress' cats "would fly as if they were Devil-drove," including into the fire, the oven, and the chimney, "any way to avoid the room." Afterwards, these cats could never "be brought to enjoy themselves," but instead, "starved, and pin'd away after a piteous manner."(192)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 192

1667 Winchester    Hampshire  Hampshire  England 
2428

A seventeen year old man (Anonymous 421) from Winchester, who is the son of a schoolmistress suffering from fits, was a "strong and healthful youth for his years," but upon visiting his mother (Anonymous 418), he was "taken after a most dreadful manner, in raving, and frantick Fits." During these fits, "five or six men could not old him," and he could leap so high his head would be "against the Cieling." He would also "catch up a Knife, Pen-knife, or Razor," and attempt to "cut his own. Throat" or some other "mischief." During his fits, he would cry out in a "frightful manner" that the woman suspected of bewitching his mother (Anonymous 419) was close to him, and commanded him to do these things, "or else she would strangle him, or choke him with pins." In order to protect him during his fits, all sharp objects and his pockets had to be constantly cleared.(192 - 193)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 192 - 193

1667 Winchester    Hampshire  Hampshire  England 
2429

When a young man from Winchester (Anonymous 421) suffers from fits, afterwards, he allegedly vomits "Pins, and Needles, in great abundance," a classic sign of possession. The young man is believed to be bewitched by a woman "of evil fame" (Anonymous 419). The young man afterwards is very weak, and "forced to keep his Bed several days."(193)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 193

1667 Winchester    Hampshire  Hampshire  England 
2431

One day, when a young man from Winchester (Anonymous 421) was "in the height of one of his Fits," his mother (Anonymous 418) saw the woman believed responsible for causing the fits (Anonymous 419) to be "scrambling against the wall of the room." She immediately called out to her husband, "John, John! There is the Witch (naming of the Party) run her through with your Sword!" Upon hearing this, John "darted his Sword at the place she directed him." His wife observed that he had cut the hand of the suspected woman. It was observed by others that the woman (Anonymous 419) "had a lame hand for a considerable time after."(194)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 194

1667 Winchester    Hampshire  Hampshire  England 
2432

A schoolmistress from Winchester (Anonymous 418) who finds herself suffering from a number of fits, would "often repair to the Church." However, if the "Malevolent" woman (Anonymous 419) was there, who was suspected to be responsible for causing those fits as an act of witchcraft, then the schoolmistress "had not the power to enter," but could only stay on the porch, or by the window.(194)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 194

1667 Winchester    Hampshire  Hampshire  England 
2433

A young man from Winchester (Anonymous 421), and the son of a schoolmistress (Anonymous 418), suffered from "amazing Fits" for five years. During one of these fits, the young man "ran away," and was never seen "nor heard of since." It is believed that a woman of "evil fame" (Anonymous 419) was responsible for causing these fits.(194)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 194

1667 Winchester    Hampshire  Hampshire  England 
2434

A schoolmistress from Winchester (Anonymous 418) who suffered from violent fits, thought to be caused by a woman of "evil fame" (Anonymous 419) continued to experience fits for seventeen years, from the age of 40 to 57. After seventeen years "in that languished state," she "died of pain and grief," but still with her "vigorous Faculties." The suspected woman (Anonymous 419) died some five years after. The schoolmistress believed that others than the suspected woman (Anonymous 419) "contributed to her misery." (194)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 194

1667 Winchester    Hampshire  Hampshire  England