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List of all events occurring in the personshorttitle of a given text

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
357

A woman accused of bewitching the girl, Mary Glover. Mary Glover visits Elizabeth Jackson one day on an errand for her mother. The "old woman" Elizabeth Jackson holds a grudge against Mary Glover, "for discovering to one of her Mistresses a certaine fashion of her subtile and importunat begging." Elizabeth Jackson traps the young girl in the house, and utters a threat against her, "It had byn better that you had never medled with my daughters apparrell." These continue for an hour, as Elizabeth Jackson wishes "an evill death to light upon her." Elizabeth Jackson is heard to utter many threats against Mary Glover, by many witnesses, including her neighbour Elizabeth Burges, and the Sheriff Glover, Mary Glover's uncle. Almost immediately after Eventually, rumour of these threats reaches Gawthren Glover, the mother of Mary Glover, who seeks out Elizabeth Jackson and confront her on these accounts. This enrages Elizabeth Jackson, who denies having given threats, but threatens Gawthren Glover there and then, saying, "You have not crosses ynow, but I hope you shall have as many crosses, as ever fell upon woman and Children." Mary Glover's fits persist for over three months, during which time several events unfold. The first of these is when Elizabeth Jackson visits Mary Glover's house, allegedly searching for Gawthren Glover. Mary Glover informs the old woman that her mother is away, and immediately finds when returning to her food that she cannot eat for her throat is so swollen. At another time, Elizabeth Jackson sends an orange to Mary Glover, who interprets this as a gesture of good will. Mary Glover keeps the orange with her for the length of the day, smelling it often. However, at the end of the day, the "same hand, arme and whole side," which Mary Glover held the orange with were "deprived of feeling and moving in all her long fitts, and not before." Elizabeth Jackson also happens upon Mary Glover, once in the city, and once in Church, both times causing the young girl to fall into a fit, and required to be taken to her father's house. Eventually, word spreads of Mary Glover's illness, and how she falls into fits in the presence of Elizabeth Jackson. This causes for "shows" to arise, where numerous witnesses gather and bring Elizabeth Jackson into the same room as Mary Glover, making the young girl fall into a fit, where a voice often came out of her nostrils saying "hang her, hang her." As well, when Elizabeth Jackson touches Mary Glover, the girl is "cast" towards her. Such episodes are performed in front of Sir John Harte, Alderman Glover, and Lady Brunckard. During one of these episodes, Elizabeth Jackson expresses amazement at the condition of Mary Glover, and all present believe she is lying. Directed by Bishop Bancroft, who was sympathetic to Elizabeth Jackson's case, on November 13, 1602, the old woman petitions the College of Physicians, naming Dr. Bradwell, Dr. Mounford, and Dr. Herring as her accusers. These men are examined by fellows of the College as a consequence, and Elizabeth Jackson gains many supports amongst them. When the Recorder of London, Sir John Crook, is ordered to validate Mary Glover's fits, he does so in the presence of Elizabeth Jackson. Elizabeth Jackson dresses up as an anonymous woman, and yet, when she presents herself to Mary Glover, Mary Glover still falls into a fit. The Recorder of London, Sir John Crook, attempts to burn Elizabeth Jackson, who cries out when Mary Glover did not. She further subjected to testing, when the Recorder of London bids her repeat the Lord's Prayer, and she is unable to say the line, "Deliver us from evil." Elizabeth Jackson is then thrown into Newgate Prison until her trial can be held, with Sir John Crook convinced she is responsible for the bewitching of Mary Glover. At the trial, Elizabeth Jackson is placed in the prisoner's bench, and simply by being in the same room as her, Mary Glover falls into another fit. Many testimonies are heard against Elizabeth Jackson, including those of two doctors, Dr. Herring and Dr. Spencer, who claim that Mary Glover is bewitched. Other witnesses that spoke against Elizabeth Jackson include the young preacher, Mr. Lewis Hughes, who claims that when he went to admonish Elizabeth Jackson for her hateful words, she sent him such a menacing glance, that he was unable to speak for a full two hours after his visit. Elizabeth Burges also testifies against Elizabeth Jackson, once her neighbour. Allegedly, Elizabeth Burges falls ill when recounting how Elizabeth Jackson caused her to be unable to eat meat when she sided with Mary Glover in an argument. Further, the results of Elizabeth Jackson's cursings, including against one of Lady Bond's men whose leg was broken when Elizabeth Jackson wished it would be; as well as the fact that marks "not likely caused by dissease" were found on her body seemed to suggest Elizabeth Jackson was a witch. However, Elizabeth Jackson is supported by many important figures as well, including the Bishop Bancroft, who claims that Mary Glover counterfeit her symptoms. Two doctors from the College of Physicians also testify in support of Elizabeth Jackson, including Dr. Edward Jorden and Dr. John Argent. They are supported also by the noted divine, James Meadowes. However, Lord Chief Justice Anderson is strongly against Jackson, and counsels the jury to judge Elizabeth Jackson a witch. The jury do so, and Elizabeth Jackson is sentenced to a year's imprisonment, "during which she was several times to stand in the pillory and endure the abuse of the crowd." This was the maximum penalty for witchcraft at the time. It is likely Elizabeth Jackson was quickly released from prison due to her powerful supporters, and she "probably received a royal pardon; she certainly escaped punishment." (Fol. 3r - Fol. 8r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 3r - Fol. 8r

Elizabeth Jackson Elizabeth Jackson Witch
2280

A man from London, who is present at one of the fits of Mary Glover, brought on by being in the presence of the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson. While Mary Glover was in "a dead senseles fitt," it was found that she was too heavy to be lifted. However, "upon a suddaine," she was found to be incredibly light, a fact which was proved by Anonymous 456, when he "putting his armes under her body, not only lifted her up from the bed, easily, but also turning himselfe about with her, lying upon his armes." Later, Anonymous 456 testifies in the trial against Elizabeth Jackson, stating that during the above described episode, Mary Glover was "but as a curten throwen overthward his armes." However, after she was laid down, she became quite heavy again. These are signs of possession.(Fol. 35v - Fol. 36r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 35v - Fol. 36r

Anonymous 456 Witness
364

A man from the parish of Little All Hallows in Thames street, London, husband of Grawthern, and the father of demoniac, Mary Glover. Timothy Glover is also the father of Anne Glover, a sister of Mary Glover; as well as the brother of the alderman and Sheriff Glover. When his daughter is taken ill, Tim Glover and his wife fear for their daughter's life as she is sickly, and so have the bells tolled, "the customary announcement of death or approaching death." When Mary Glover is assessed by Dr. Shereman, who believes the girl is afflicted by supernatural causes, Tim Glover and his wife, Gawthren Glover, seek out the help of another doctor, Dr. Mounford. All the while, he attempts to keep news of his daughter's sickness secret, even as her resistance to her fits give her parents hope that she will be cured. Eventually, Tim Glover and his wife seek out a group of ministers to perform a dispossession. During the dispossession of Mary Glover, Mr. Glover is visibly shaken, crying for his daughter "with abundance of teares in the disquietnes of this minde, and anguish of his hart." As soon as Mary Glover is dispossessed, Tim Glover "cryed out and saide (as well as his weepinge would giue him leaue) this was the crye of her grandfather goeing to be burned," comparing the words of his daughter to Dr. Taylor, her grandfather, an Anglican who was burned in the days of Queen Mary. Upon the dispossession of their daughter, the Glovers' reputation is restored. (Fol. 3r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 3r

Tim Glover Tim Glover Relative of Victim
364

A man from the parish of Little All Hallows in Thames street, London, husband of Grawthern, and the father of demoniac, Mary Glover. Timothy Glover is also the father of Anne Glover, a sister of Mary Glover; as well as the brother of the alderman and Sheriff Glover. When his daughter is taken ill, Tim Glover and his wife fear for their daughter's life as she is sickly, and so have the bells tolled, "the customary announcement of death or approaching death." When Mary Glover is assessed by Dr. Shereman, who believes the girl is afflicted by supernatural causes, Tim Glover and his wife, Gawthren Glover, seek out the help of another doctor, Dr. Mounford. All the while, he attempts to keep news of his daughter's sickness secret, even as her resistance to her fits give her parents hope that she will be cured. Eventually, Tim Glover and his wife seek out a group of ministers to perform a dispossession. During the dispossession of Mary Glover, Mr. Glover is visibly shaken, crying for his daughter "with abundance of teares in the disquietnes of this minde, and anguish of his hart." As soon as Mary Glover is dispossessed, Tim Glover "cryed out and saide (as well as his weepinge would giue him leaue) this was the crye of her grandfather goeing to be burned," comparing the words of his daughter to Dr. Taylor, her grandfather, an Anglican who was burned in the days of Queen Mary. Upon the dispossession of their daughter, the Glovers' reputation is restored. (Fol. 3r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 3r

Tim Glover Tim Glover Witness
365

A woman from the parish of Little All Hallows in Thames street, London, and the mother of demoniac, Mary Glover. Gawthren Glover is married to Tim Glover, and they share another daughter, Anne Glover. It is Gawthren Glover who sends her daughter initially on an errand to Elizabeth Jackson's house, the old woman accused of bewitching Mary Glover. While her daughter is at the house, Elizabeth Jackson curses and threatens the girl. A similar situation arises later, when Elizabeth Jackson stops by the Glover household, claiming to be seeking Gawthren Glover, and cursing the young Mary Glover again upon finding her. Upon hearing rumours of these threats and curses against her daughter, Gawthren Glover confronts Elizabeth Jackson herself in person. Elizabeth Jackson denies everything, "yet could not forbeare but speake these wordes to her face; You have not crosses ynow, but I hope you shall have as many crosses, as ever fell upon woman and Children." Mary Glover continues to suffer from mysterious fits, however, and her affliction becomes so severe that both Gawthren Glover and her husband, Tim Glover, have the bells tolled in anticipation of their daughter's death. Mary Glover is treated at this time by Dr. Shereman, who proves unable to cure the girl, and suggests she is afflicted by supernatural causes. However, the parents of Mary Glover decide to pursue the help of a second doctor, Dr. Mounford. During this, Gawthren and Tim Glover seek to keep their daughter's illness a secret. One day, Gawthren takes her daughter for a walk through the city, when they accidentally run into Elizabeth Jackson. Mary Glover is immediately taken ill, and Gawthren Glover must return home with her daughter. During these early fits, Mary Glover sometimes has her mouth open exceedingly wide, "during the which, there did flie out of her mouth a great venemous and stinking blast." When she breathes upon her mother's face, Gawthren Glover's face is swollen and blistered for many days, as well as Gawthren Glover's arm. Mary Glover attempts to fight off these fits, giving some hope to her parents that she will be cured. However, Mary Glover's symptoms persist. Eventually, Elizabeth Jackson is taken to court, where Mary Glover is accused by Bishop Bancroft of counterfeiting her symptoms. In order to prove this, Sir John Crook, the Recorder of London, is appointed to test Mary Glover. Gawthren Glover accompanies her daughter to these tests, which include being exposed to Elizabeth Jackson in disguise, and burning the inside of Mary Glover's hand. At the end of the tests, Sir John Crook is convinced that Mary Glover is bewitched, and imprisons Elizabeth Jackson. Gawthren Glover departs home with her daughter. Some months later, after Elizabeth Jackson has been convicted of witchcraft, Gawthren Glover is witness to her daughter's dispossession, performed by six preachers in front of numerous witnesses. After this dispossession, Gawthren Glover accompanies her daughter to live for the period of a year, along with Anne Glover, at the house of the preacher, Mr. Lewis Hughes, in order to help prevent a recurrence of Mary Glover's possession.(Fol. 3r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 3r

Gawthren Glover Gawthren Glover Witness
365

A woman from the parish of Little All Hallows in Thames street, London, and the mother of demoniac, Mary Glover. Gawthren Glover is married to Tim Glover, and they share another daughter, Anne Glover. It is Gawthren Glover who sends her daughter initially on an errand to Elizabeth Jackson's house, the old woman accused of bewitching Mary Glover. While her daughter is at the house, Elizabeth Jackson curses and threatens the girl. A similar situation arises later, when Elizabeth Jackson stops by the Glover household, claiming to be seeking Gawthren Glover, and cursing the young Mary Glover again upon finding her. Upon hearing rumours of these threats and curses against her daughter, Gawthren Glover confronts Elizabeth Jackson herself in person. Elizabeth Jackson denies everything, "yet could not forbeare but speake these wordes to her face; You have not crosses ynow, but I hope you shall have as many crosses, as ever fell upon woman and Children." Mary Glover continues to suffer from mysterious fits, however, and her affliction becomes so severe that both Gawthren Glover and her husband, Tim Glover, have the bells tolled in anticipation of their daughter's death. Mary Glover is treated at this time by Dr. Shereman, who proves unable to cure the girl, and suggests she is afflicted by supernatural causes. However, the parents of Mary Glover decide to pursue the help of a second doctor, Dr. Mounford. During this, Gawthren and Tim Glover seek to keep their daughter's illness a secret. One day, Gawthren takes her daughter for a walk through the city, when they accidentally run into Elizabeth Jackson. Mary Glover is immediately taken ill, and Gawthren Glover must return home with her daughter. During these early fits, Mary Glover sometimes has her mouth open exceedingly wide, "during the which, there did flie out of her mouth a great venemous and stinking blast." When she breathes upon her mother's face, Gawthren Glover's face is swollen and blistered for many days, as well as Gawthren Glover's arm. Mary Glover attempts to fight off these fits, giving some hope to her parents that she will be cured. However, Mary Glover's symptoms persist. Eventually, Elizabeth Jackson is taken to court, where Mary Glover is accused by Bishop Bancroft of counterfeiting her symptoms. In order to prove this, Sir John Crook, the Recorder of London, is appointed to test Mary Glover. Gawthren Glover accompanies her daughter to these tests, which include being exposed to Elizabeth Jackson in disguise, and burning the inside of Mary Glover's hand. At the end of the tests, Sir John Crook is convinced that Mary Glover is bewitched, and imprisons Elizabeth Jackson. Gawthren Glover departs home with her daughter. Some months later, after Elizabeth Jackson has been convicted of witchcraft, Gawthren Glover is witness to her daughter's dispossession, performed by six preachers in front of numerous witnesses. After this dispossession, Gawthren Glover accompanies her daughter to live for the period of a year, along with Anne Glover, at the house of the preacher, Mr. Lewis Hughes, in order to help prevent a recurrence of Mary Glover's possession.(Fol. 3r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 3r

Gawthren Glover Gawthren Glover Relative of Victim
2279

A woman from London, who is a neighbour of the young girl, Mary Glover. Mary Glover visits her when her throat and neck swell after a visit from Elizabeth Jackson. At Anonymous 441's house, Mary Glover is struck blind and dumb, and so Anonymous 441 brings Mary Glover back to her father's house.(Fol. 4r - Fol. 4v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 4r - Fol. 4v

Anonymous 441 Neighbor
2281

A man from London, who is allegedly cursed by Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman believed to be responsible for bewitching the young girl, Mary Glover. Anonymous 455 words for Lady Bond, and at one time asked Elizabeth Jackson to wash his clothes. When Elizabeth Jackson came "to his lodging for money," she found that he was out of town, and cried, "Is he gone? I pray god he may breake his necke, or his legge, before he com again." Accordingly, during his journey, Anonymous 455 broke his leg. This account is given at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, as proof that her cursing "had ben observed to have a mischevous consequent."(Fol. 35r - Fol. 35v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 35r - Fol. 35v

Anonymous 455 Accuser
2281

A man from London, who is allegedly cursed by Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman believed to be responsible for bewitching the young girl, Mary Glover. Anonymous 455 words for Lady Bond, and at one time asked Elizabeth Jackson to wash his clothes. When Elizabeth Jackson came "to his lodging for money," she found that he was out of town, and cried, "Is he gone? I pray god he may breake his necke, or his legge, before he com again." Accordingly, during his journey, Anonymous 455 broke his leg. This account is given at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, as proof that her cursing "had ben observed to have a mischevous consequent."(Fol. 35r - Fol. 35v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 35r - Fol. 35v

Anonymous 455 Witness
2281

A man from London, who is allegedly cursed by Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman believed to be responsible for bewitching the young girl, Mary Glover. Anonymous 455 words for Lady Bond, and at one time asked Elizabeth Jackson to wash his clothes. When Elizabeth Jackson came "to his lodging for money," she found that he was out of town, and cried, "Is he gone? I pray god he may breake his necke, or his legge, before he com again." Accordingly, during his journey, Anonymous 455 broke his leg. This account is given at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, as proof that her cursing "had ben observed to have a mischevous consequent."(Fol. 35r - Fol. 35v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 35r - Fol. 35v

Anonymous 455 Victim
2282

A number of women from London, who are responsible for examining the body of Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman accused of bewitching the young girl, Mary Glover. These women, employed by the court, discover marks on Elizabeth Jackson "in divers places of her body." These women attest that the marks are "not likely to grow of any disease," but rather are "like the markes which are described to be in Witches bodyes." This evidence is produced at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson.(Fol. 34r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 34r

Anonymous 454 (Plural) Witch-Searcher
2283

A woman from London, who allegedly accompanies Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman accused of bewitching the young girl Mary Glover, to visit fortune tellers. Elizabeth Jackson confesses that Elizabeth Cook "did at that time geve xl to have her fortune tould her." The act of visiting fortune tellers is considered associated with witchcraft.(Fol. 35v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 35v

Elizabeth Cook Elizabeth Cook Co-conspirator
2284

A woman likely from the parish of Little All Hallows in Thames street, London, and the daughter of Elizabeth Jackson, a charwoman accused of bewitching the young girl, Mary Glover. Elizabeth Jackson's daughter is known to have accompanied her mother at once to fortune tellers. This behaviour places her mother further under suspicion of witchcraft when this evidence is presented at Elizabeth Jackson's trial.(Fol. 35v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 35v

Jackson Jackson (Daughter) Co-conspirator
2285

A number of men from London, who serve as the judges and justices of Elizabeth Jackson at her trial. These men include the Lord Chief Justice, Sir Edmund Anderson; the Recorder of London, Sir John Crook; Sir William Cornwallis, Sir Jerome Bowes, and "divers others." They preside over the 12 hour trial, which include an examination of Mary Glover in one of her fits, where they observe the "stiffenes of her body," the voice coming from her nostrils saying "Hang her" and her lack of reaction to being burned, and they also weigh the numerous points of evidence presented them, including the testimonies of diverse witnesses, the manner that Mary Glover fell ill, the curses of Elizabeth Jackson, and the nature of Mary Glover's fits. The judges seem to unanimously feel that Mary Glover was bewitched, and impart this viewpoint onto the jury.(Fol. 31v - Fol. 32r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 31v - Fol. 32r

Anonymous 452 (Plural) Examiner/Justice
2286

Three men from London, who although being described as "strong" felt that "they never caryed a heavyer burthen," then the fourteen year old Mary Glover when she fell into a fit at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, after being in the same room as the old woman. The extreme weight of a person in a fit is a classic sign of possession. These three men carried Mary Glover after she collapses at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson into a "Convenyent chamber," as asked by the court justices.(Fol. 31r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 31r

Anonymous 451 (Plural) Witness
2287

A woman from London, who is known to be a woman of high rank. She participates in the "shows" surrounding Mary Glover, which consist of bringing the unwilling old woman, Elizabeth Jackson, into the same room as the young girl, in order to force a fit. One such event occurs before the Lady Brunckard, "in the presence of many Divines and Phisitions." The body of Mary Glover is cast "with great violence" toward Elizabeth Jackson when the old woman touches the girl during her fit, and "towards her only." Although Elizabeth Jackson claims amazement at this, Lady Brunckard and her company believe that the old woman is lying, with "nothing els but notes of a ruyned conscience."(Fol. 27v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 27v

Brunckard Lady Brunckard Witness
2288

A number of men, from London, who are "Divines and Phisitions" called upon to witness one of the many "shows" of Mary Glover's fits. During these "shows," the unwilling old woman, Elizabeth Jackson, is brought into the presence of the young girl, Mary Glover, inducing a fit. In one such case, Anonymous 463 are present with Lady Brunckard, and witness the casting of Mary Glover's body towards Elizabeth Jackson "when she touched her, and towards her only." These men believe that Elizabeth Jackson is lying when she admits amazement to this event, and all believe that Mary Glover is bewitched. These men are all "eminent" divines and physicians, making them important people in London. (Fol. 27v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 27v

Anonymous 463 (Plural) Witness
2289

A man from London, who was a former Lord Mayor and long a leader in City government. He becomes interested in the Mary Glover case, and stages a meeting between the fourteen year old girl and the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson, believed to be responsible for the bewitching of Mary Glover. On one of Mary Glover's "better days," during which she experienced no fits, Elizabeth Jackson is brought in, and Mary Glover immediately falls into a fit. When Elizabeth Jackson is made to touch the girl, "the senseles body was cast (very strangely) upon her," and this continued no matter from where Elizabeth Jackson touched the girl. This confirms among many that Mary Glover is bewitched, and that Elizabeth Jackson is the "wicked mediatrice" of the affair.(Fol. 27r - Fol. 27v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 27r - Fol. 27v

John Harte Sir John Harte Witness
2290

A woman from London, who is allegedly breathed upon by the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover during the early days of her fits. Mary Glover is described as having "exceeding wyde gapings, with her mouth, during the which, there did flie out of her mouth a great venemous and stinking blast." When she breathes upon people in this state, they are usually injured; in the case of Mistress Lumas, Mary Glover breathed upon her face, "and caused it to be very sore." This leaves Mistress Lumas quite sick, and "held a noysome impression in her a great while after."(Fol. 7r - Fol. 7v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 7r - Fol. 7v

Lumas Mistress Lumas Witness
2290

A woman from London, who is allegedly breathed upon by the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover during the early days of her fits. Mary Glover is described as having "exceeding wyde gapings, with her mouth, during the which, there did flie out of her mouth a great venemous and stinking blast." When she breathes upon people in this state, they are usually injured; in the case of Mistress Lumas, Mary Glover breathed upon her face, "and caused it to be very sore." This leaves Mistress Lumas quite sick, and "held a noysome impression in her a great while after."(Fol. 7r - Fol. 7v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 7r - Fol. 7v

Lumas Mistress Lumas Victim
2291

A girl from the parish of Little All Hallows in Thames street, London, daughter of Tim and Gawthren Glover, and the who sister of Mary Glover, a fourteen year demoniac. Her sister Mary was allegedly bewitched by the Elizabeth Jackson, a local charwoman. Although Anne was not herself a demoniac, at one time, Mary breathes on her during one of her fits. Mary Glover is described as having "exceeding wyde gapings, with her mouth, during the which, there did flie out of her mouth a great venemous and stinking blast." When she "did smyte her sister Anne upon the face," with this breath, it caused Anne's face to "blister and swell." When Mary is dispossessed, Anne accompanies her sister and the rest of her family to live at the house of the preacher, Mr. Lewis Hughes in St. Helen's Bishopsgate in London, for a year, a move made to protect Mary from further possession and bewitchment. (Fol. 7v - Fol. 8r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 7v - Fol. 8r

Anne Glover Anne Glover Relative of Victim
2291

A girl from the parish of Little All Hallows in Thames street, London, daughter of Tim and Gawthren Glover, and the who sister of Mary Glover, a fourteen year demoniac. Her sister Mary was allegedly bewitched by the Elizabeth Jackson, a local charwoman. Although Anne was not herself a demoniac, at one time, Mary breathes on her during one of her fits. Mary Glover is described as having "exceeding wyde gapings, with her mouth, during the which, there did flie out of her mouth a great venemous and stinking blast." When she "did smyte her sister Anne upon the face," with this breath, it caused Anne's face to "blister and swell." When Mary is dispossessed, Anne accompanies her sister and the rest of her family to live at the house of the preacher, Mr. Lewis Hughes in St. Helen's Bishopsgate in London, for a year, a move made to protect Mary from further possession and bewitchment. (Fol. 7v - Fol. 8r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 7v - Fol. 8r

Anne Glover Anne Glover Witness
2291

A girl from the parish of Little All Hallows in Thames street, London, daughter of Tim and Gawthren Glover, and the who sister of Mary Glover, a fourteen year demoniac. Her sister Mary was allegedly bewitched by the Elizabeth Jackson, a local charwoman. Although Anne was not herself a demoniac, at one time, Mary breathes on her during one of her fits. Mary Glover is described as having "exceeding wyde gapings, with her mouth, during the which, there did flie out of her mouth a great venemous and stinking blast." When she "did smyte her sister Anne upon the face," with this breath, it caused Anne's face to "blister and swell." When Mary is dispossessed, Anne accompanies her sister and the rest of her family to live at the house of the preacher, Mr. Lewis Hughes in St. Helen's Bishopsgate in London, for a year, a move made to protect Mary from further possession and bewitchment. (Fol. 7v - Fol. 8r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 7v - Fol. 8r

Anne Glover Anne Glover Victim
2292

A man from London, who assists Dr. Shereman in treating the fourteen year old Mary Glover for her fits. Anonymous 442 is a surgeon, and both men treat Mary Glover for quincy (or supperative tonsilitis). However, the girl still has difficulty swallowing, and it seems nothing helps except "by thrusting som finger or instrument lowe into her throte." The doctor and the surgeon are unable to cure the girl, and conclude that the cause of her illness must be supernatural. (Fol. 5r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 5r

Anonymous 442 Physician
2292

A man from London, who assists Dr. Shereman in treating the fourteen year old Mary Glover for her fits. Anonymous 442 is a surgeon, and both men treat Mary Glover for quincy (or supperative tonsilitis). However, the girl still has difficulty swallowing, and it seems nothing helps except "by thrusting som finger or instrument lowe into her throte." The doctor and the surgeon are unable to cure the girl, and conclude that the cause of her illness must be supernatural. (Fol. 5r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 5r

Anonymous 442 Witness
2293

A woman from London, who is chosen amongst a larger group by the Recorder of London, Sir John Crook, to disguise herself as Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover. This woman is described as "aged, homely, grosse bodyed, and of lowe stature," apparently making her "very comparable to Elizabeth Jackson." In order to test whether or not Mary Glover is counterfeiting her fits, Sir John Crook bids the two women to dress like each other, in order to fool the young girl. When Anonymous 460 is brought before Mary Glover, dressed up like Elizabeth Jackson, the girl is made to touch the woman, and has no reaction. Sir John Crook is pleased, and tells Mary Glover that she was suffering merely from fear. However, when Elizabeth Jackson is brought out, disguised as the old woman, wearing "the other womans hat, with a Cloak and muffler," Mary Glover instantly falls into a fit, dismissing fear as the culprit behind Mary Glover's fits, and affirming suspicions that Mary Glover is actually bewitched.(Fol. 27v - Fol. 28v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 27v - Fol. 28v

Anonymous 460 Witness
2295

A man from London, who attends to the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover, as her first physician and a fellow of the College of Physicians, "and as such a member of the country's medical elite." He works with a surgeon (Anonymous 442), at first to cure Mary Glover of her swollen throat and neck. However, although he administers "sundry remedies, for the squinacy," (tonsilitis), nothing seemed to work, and the only thing that brought the girl ease was "by thrusting som finger, or instrument lowe into her throte." Mary Glover suffers from these symptoms some eighteen days, before she is able to eat again. However, at the end of that time, "her belly was swelled, and shewed in it, and in the brest, certaine movings," as well as her previous symptoms of dumbness, blindness, and swelling of the throat. At this point, Dr. Shereman begins to suspect that Mary Glover is suffering from "som supernaturall cause." However, he attempts to treat the girl for "hystericall passions," and the disease known as the suffocation of the mother, which was believed to share many traits with possession. However, any attempts to cure the girl "prooved in vaine," and he concluded that she was afflicted by supernatural beings. The parents of Mary Glover decide to pursue the help of a different doctor after that time. (Fol. 5r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 5r

Robert Shereman Dr. Robert Shereman Physician
2300

A man from London, who is known as a "noted divine." James Meadowes testifies at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover. A doctor of divinity, Meadowes presents himself with the physicians, Dr. Edward Jorden and Dr. John Argent, although none were officially summoned to testify. As a government witness, James Meadowes attempts to "purge Elizabeth Jackson, of being any cause of Mary Glovers harme."(Fol. 37r - Fol. 37v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 37r - Fol. 37v

James Meadowes James Meadowes Divine
2300

A man from London, who is known as a "noted divine." James Meadowes testifies at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover. A doctor of divinity, Meadowes presents himself with the physicians, Dr. Edward Jorden and Dr. John Argent, although none were officially summoned to testify. As a government witness, James Meadowes attempts to "purge Elizabeth Jackson, of being any cause of Mary Glovers harme."(Fol. 37r - Fol. 37v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 37r - Fol. 37v

James Meadowes James Meadowes Witness
2301

A man from London, who serves as a government witness at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover. Dr. Argent was a Censor and eight times President of the College of Physicians in the 1620s and 1630s, and therefore a notable figure in the trial. He came to support Jackson, denying that Mary Glover suffered from the supernatural. Dr. Argent "sought earnestly, to make the case a meere naturall disease." The support of such an eminent doctor to Elizabeth Jackson was important and demonstrated the division of opinions among medical doctors as the cause of Mary Glover's disease. He was opposed in court by Dr. Francis Herring, and Dr. Spencer.(Fol. 37r - Fol. 37v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 37r - Fol. 37v

John Argent Dr. John Argent Witness
2301

A man from London, who serves as a government witness at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover. Dr. Argent was a Censor and eight times President of the College of Physicians in the 1620s and 1630s, and therefore a notable figure in the trial. He came to support Jackson, denying that Mary Glover suffered from the supernatural. Dr. Argent "sought earnestly, to make the case a meere naturall disease." The support of such an eminent doctor to Elizabeth Jackson was important and demonstrated the division of opinions among medical doctors as the cause of Mary Glover's disease. He was opposed in court by Dr. Francis Herring, and Dr. Spencer.(Fol. 37r - Fol. 37v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 37r - Fol. 37v

John Argent Dr. John Argent Physician
2302

A man from London, who testified on behalf on Mary Glover at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, the old woman believed to have bewitched the young girl. Summoned by the court along with fellow physician, Dr. Herring, Dr. Spencer is called upon to examine Mary Glover's case, and determine the cause of her affliction. Dr. Spencer firmly believes that Mary Glover is afflicted "of som cause supernaturall," as her symptoms are "strange effects, then either the mother, or any other naturall disease hath ever ben observed to bring forth." He further argues that it is unlikely that "so young a mayde" should suffer from the suffocation of the mother, and that the "disproportioned moving in her belly, which was not so uniformely a rising or bearing upward, but in a rounder and narrower compasse, playing up and downe, as with a kind of easie swiftenes, that certainly it did not truly resemble the mother." He cites also the variety of fits that Mary Glover experiences, only the company of the Elizabeth Jackson, as evidence of the supernatural. Dr. Spencer is possibly Dr. Ethelbert Spencer, who would have been "hardly an unalloyed asset to Mary Glover's team." Dr. Ethelbert Spencer had failed his examinations for fellowship at the College of Physicians twice, the second time after receiving his MD.(Fol. 36r - Fol. 37r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 36r - Fol. 37r

Spencer Dr. Spencer Physician
2302

A man from London, who testified on behalf on Mary Glover at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, the old woman believed to have bewitched the young girl. Summoned by the court along with fellow physician, Dr. Herring, Dr. Spencer is called upon to examine Mary Glover's case, and determine the cause of her affliction. Dr. Spencer firmly believes that Mary Glover is afflicted "of som cause supernaturall," as her symptoms are "strange effects, then either the mother, or any other naturall disease hath ever ben observed to bring forth." He further argues that it is unlikely that "so young a mayde" should suffer from the suffocation of the mother, and that the "disproportioned moving in her belly, which was not so uniformely a rising or bearing upward, but in a rounder and narrower compasse, playing up and downe, as with a kind of easie swiftenes, that certainly it did not truly resemble the mother." He cites also the variety of fits that Mary Glover experiences, only the company of the Elizabeth Jackson, as evidence of the supernatural. Dr. Spencer is possibly Dr. Ethelbert Spencer, who would have been "hardly an unalloyed asset to Mary Glover's team." Dr. Ethelbert Spencer had failed his examinations for fellowship at the College of Physicians twice, the second time after receiving his MD.(Fol. 36r - Fol. 37r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 36r - Fol. 37r

Spencer Dr. Spencer Witness
2303

A man from London, who is summoned by the court to Elizabeth Jackson's trial, a woman accused of bewitching the young Mary Glover. Dr. Herring, "a highly successful" doctor from the College of Physicians, and a "medical author," had been petitioned before the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, by the old woman herself. Dr. Herring, Dr. Bradwell, and Dr. Mounford were all listed as her accusers, and Dr. Herring was examined by a dozen fellows from the College (Anonymous 462). Dr. Herring "explained that he had accompanied the girl during her first test by the Recorder, at her parents' request." He had been convinced during this trial by stages (which included being exposed to Elizabeth Jackson in disguise, as well as being burned by hot pins and paper to prove that Mary Glover experienced real fits in the presence of Elizabeth Jackson), that Mary Glover was truly bewitched, and that Jackson was the culprit. Nonetheless, many at the College opposed his views and supported Elizabeth Jackson, including Dr. Edward Jorden and Dr. John Argent. At the trial, Dr. Herring testifies with Dr. Spencer, and he concludes that Mary Glover is afflicted "of som cause supernaturall; having stranger effects, then either the mother, or any other naturall disease hath ever ben observed to bring forth." Dr. Herring cites the strange motions of Mary Glover's hands to her mouth, the strict timing of the opening and shutting of Mary Glover's mouth, the voice from her nostrils, and Mary Glover's falling into fits int he presence of Elizabeth Jackson as evidence of the supernatural. Dr. Herring also believes the casting of Mary Glover's body towards Elizabeth Jackson during the reciting of the Lord's Prayer to be further evidence of the involvement of the supernatural. (Fol. 36r - Fol. 37r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 36r - Fol. 37r

Francis Herring Dr. Francis Herring Witness
2303

A man from London, who is summoned by the court to Elizabeth Jackson's trial, a woman accused of bewitching the young Mary Glover. Dr. Herring, "a highly successful" doctor from the College of Physicians, and a "medical author," had been petitioned before the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, by the old woman herself. Dr. Herring, Dr. Bradwell, and Dr. Mounford were all listed as her accusers, and Dr. Herring was examined by a dozen fellows from the College (Anonymous 462). Dr. Herring "explained that he had accompanied the girl during her first test by the Recorder, at her parents' request." He had been convinced during this trial by stages (which included being exposed to Elizabeth Jackson in disguise, as well as being burned by hot pins and paper to prove that Mary Glover experienced real fits in the presence of Elizabeth Jackson), that Mary Glover was truly bewitched, and that Jackson was the culprit. Nonetheless, many at the College opposed his views and supported Elizabeth Jackson, including Dr. Edward Jorden and Dr. John Argent. At the trial, Dr. Herring testifies with Dr. Spencer, and he concludes that Mary Glover is afflicted "of som cause supernaturall; having stranger effects, then either the mother, or any other naturall disease hath ever ben observed to bring forth." Dr. Herring cites the strange motions of Mary Glover's hands to her mouth, the strict timing of the opening and shutting of Mary Glover's mouth, the voice from her nostrils, and Mary Glover's falling into fits int he presence of Elizabeth Jackson as evidence of the supernatural. Dr. Herring also believes the casting of Mary Glover's body towards Elizabeth Jackson during the reciting of the Lord's Prayer to be further evidence of the involvement of the supernatural. (Fol. 36r - Fol. 37r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 36r - Fol. 37r

Francis Herring Dr. Francis Herring Physician
2304

A man from London, who served as a justice at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old Mary Glover. Sir Jerome Bowes was an eminent man in London society, famous for being the ambassador of Queen Elizabeth I to Russia. As a justice, Sir Jerome Bowes helps others evaluate the evidence presented, proving that Mary Glover is neither a counterfeit, and is quite possibly bewitched. This is furthered by the inability of Elizabeth Jackson to repeat the Lord's Prayer, or the Apostle's Creed. He also is involved in examining the stiffness of Mary Glover's body during a fit brought on in court, by being in the same chamber as Elizabeth Jackson. (Fol. 31v - Fol. 32r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 31v - Fol. 32r

Jerome Bowes Sir Jerome Bowes Examiner/Justice
2305

A man from London, who serves as a justice at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old Mary Glover. Sir William Cornwallis is an "eminent man," and as a justice, helps to review evidence against Elizabeth Jackson, and evaluates the stiffness of Mary Glover's body during a fit brought on in court by being in the same room as Elizabeth Jackson. (Fol. 31v - Fol. 32r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 31v - Fol. 32r

William Cornwallis Sir William Cornwallis Examiner/Justice
2306

A number of men and women from London, who serve as the jury or "bench" at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the young fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover. When Mary Glover is first brought in front of the bench to testify against Elizabeth Jackson, on December 1, 1602, even though she cannot see Elizabeth Jackson who was in the prisoner's dock, she cries out, "Where is she?" Upon hearing this, the jury is initially convinced that Mary Glover counterfeits her affliction, and accuses her of such, and "bad her proceede in her evidence." Mary Glover eventually collapses in a "senseles fitt," however. Towards the end of the trial, the jury is counselled by the Lord Chief Justice Anderson, and Sir John Crook, the Recorder of London, that "the Land is full of Witches," who have "on their bodies divers strange marks," as Elizabeth Jackson is reported to have. Further, Judge Anderson declares that "you shall hardly finde any direct proofes in such a case," as the Devil is devious in his dealings. He reminds the Jury that Elizabeth Jackson is not afraid to threaten others, "She is full of Cursings, she threatens and prophesies, and still it takes effect." Judge Anderson also points out how illogical it is to believe that the cause of Mary Glover's fits is natural, considering the nature of her fits. The Recorder of London follows up by describing the trials he put both women through, and his conclusions that neither fear nor counterfeiting were responsible for Mary Glover's symptoms. He believes that it is "in dede through witchcraft." The Jury gather, and decide that Elizabeth Jackson is "guilty of witchcraft." She is sentenced to "a yeeres imprisonment," after being found guilty by the Jury (Anonymous 450) at the end of her trial. During this time, she is also expected to "stand on the pillory" four times, and confess to her crime.(Fol. 30r - Fol. 30v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 30r - Fol. 30v

Anonymous 450 (Plural) Witness
2306

A number of men and women from London, who serve as the jury or "bench" at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the young fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover. When Mary Glover is first brought in front of the bench to testify against Elizabeth Jackson, on December 1, 1602, even though she cannot see Elizabeth Jackson who was in the prisoner's dock, she cries out, "Where is she?" Upon hearing this, the jury is initially convinced that Mary Glover counterfeits her affliction, and accuses her of such, and "bad her proceede in her evidence." Mary Glover eventually collapses in a "senseles fitt," however. Towards the end of the trial, the jury is counselled by the Lord Chief Justice Anderson, and Sir John Crook, the Recorder of London, that "the Land is full of Witches," who have "on their bodies divers strange marks," as Elizabeth Jackson is reported to have. Further, Judge Anderson declares that "you shall hardly finde any direct proofes in such a case," as the Devil is devious in his dealings. He reminds the Jury that Elizabeth Jackson is not afraid to threaten others, "She is full of Cursings, she threatens and prophesies, and still it takes effect." Judge Anderson also points out how illogical it is to believe that the cause of Mary Glover's fits is natural, considering the nature of her fits. The Recorder of London follows up by describing the trials he put both women through, and his conclusions that neither fear nor counterfeiting were responsible for Mary Glover's symptoms. He believes that it is "in dede through witchcraft." The Jury gather, and decide that Elizabeth Jackson is "guilty of witchcraft." She is sentenced to "a yeeres imprisonment," after being found guilty by the Jury (Anonymous 450) at the end of her trial. During this time, she is also expected to "stand on the pillory" four times, and confess to her crime.(Fol. 30r - Fol. 30v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 30r - Fol. 30v

Anonymous 450 (Plural) Examiner/Justice
2307

A man from London, who serves as the second physician of Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl mysteriously afflicted with fits after being cursed by the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson. Dr. Mounford takes over Dr. Shereman in the caretaking of Mary Glover early in her fits, after Dr. Shereman proved unable to cure or identify Mary Glover's illness, instead stating "that som cause beyond naturall was in it." The parents of Mary Glover then seek Dr. Mounford, who treated the girl for "the space of almost three monthes." Dr. Thomas Mounford was a very distinguished doctor, "seven times President of the College of Physicians, and an expert on melancholy, which was another natural disease widely believed like hysteria to produce apparently supernatural symptoms." However, Dr. Mounford is also unable to identify the cause of Mary Glover's illness, or to cure it. He concludes that the disease is not hysteria, but another natural illness, which he cannot identify. This differing opinion from Dr. Shereman began a "division of medical opinion," that lasted throughout the rest of Mary Glover's case. However, interestingly enough, on November 13, 1602, Dr. Mounford is among the doctors that Elizabeth Jackson petitions the College to confront. However, Dr. Mounford is away during that time, and unable to account for his alleged accusations against the old woman.(Fol. 5v - Fol. 6r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 5v - Fol. 6r

Thomas Mounford Dr. Thomas Mounford Physician
2308

A man from London, who is both a sheriff and an alderman. William Glover is the uncle of Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl believed to be bewitched by the old woman, Elizabeth Jenkins, after being cursed and threatened. Elizabeth Jackson herself utters such a threat upon first hearing of the young girl's affliction, at the house of Alderman Glover, saying "I thanck my God he hath heard my prayer, and stopped the mouth and tyed the tongue of one of myne enemies." She repeats similar threats at other houses, including Elizabeth Burges. She is also heard to speak in the presence of Alderman Glover, saying, "The vengeance of God on her, and on all generation of them, I hope the Devill will stop her mouth." At another incident, Mary Glover is brought to her uncle's house, "to meet face to face with Elizabeth Jackson," on a day she was not expecting a fit. When in the presence of Elizabeth Jackson, "before she could speak six words," Mary Glover fell into a violent fit, worse than her expected fits. (Fol. 12r - Fol. 13r.)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 12r - Fol. 13r.

William Glover William Glover Witness
2308

A man from London, who is both a sheriff and an alderman. William Glover is the uncle of Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl believed to be bewitched by the old woman, Elizabeth Jenkins, after being cursed and threatened. Elizabeth Jackson herself utters such a threat upon first hearing of the young girl's affliction, at the house of Alderman Glover, saying "I thanck my God he hath heard my prayer, and stopped the mouth and tyed the tongue of one of myne enemies." She repeats similar threats at other houses, including Elizabeth Burges. She is also heard to speak in the presence of Alderman Glover, saying, "The vengeance of God on her, and on all generation of them, I hope the Devill will stop her mouth." At another incident, Mary Glover is brought to her uncle's house, "to meet face to face with Elizabeth Jackson," on a day she was not expecting a fit. When in the presence of Elizabeth Jackson, "before she could speak six words," Mary Glover fell into a violent fit, worse than her expected fits. (Fol. 12r - Fol. 13r.)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 12r - Fol. 13r.

William Glover William Glover Relative of Victim
2309

A woman from London, who is a neighbor of the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson. Elizabeth Jackson is believed to have cursed the young girl Mary Glover, so that she experiences violent fits. On the first day that Elizabeth Jackson threatens Mary Glover, the young girl stops at Elizabeth Burges' house, as she felt ill. Elizabeth Burges immediately notices that something is wrong with Mary Glover, as her "contenance and colour had much altered." After Mary Glover leaves the house of Elizabeth Burges, Elizabeth Jackson who had apparently overheard the conversation, comes running over to Elizabeth Burges' house, and exclaims, "I have ratled up one of the Gossips that medled with my daughters apparrell, and I hope an evill death will come unto her." This is the first threat Elizabeth Jackson utters against Mary Glover in front of a witness. Similar threats are uttered in the house of Alderman Glover, the uncle of Mary Glover. At the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, Elizabeth Burges also comes forward as a witness to testify against the old woman. She confesses to having seen Elizabeth Jackson threaten Mary Glover, but also tells how she "had ben therefore threatned by her," so that one day while eating prunes, the old woman visits her and Elizabeth Burges is "not able to swallow one downe, but also fell on vomiting." This continues for some three weeks after being visited by Elizabeth Jackson, "upon all sustenance of meat receaved." At another visit of Elizabeth Jackson while Elizabeth Burges was vomiting, Elizabeth Jackson allegedly wishes "that she might cast up her heart, gutts and all," adding "Thou shortly, shalt have in thee an evill spirit too." The following night, Elizabeth Burges is visited by a vision in the shape of a fox; the night after that a vision in the shape of "an ougly black man, with a bounch of keyes in his hand, intysing her to go with him, and those keyes would bring her to gould enough"; and a final third night, Elizabeth Burges is visited by the vision in the "likenes of a mouse." However, by "faithfull praier," aided by her Master and Mistress, Elizabeth Burges was delivered from these visions. While recounting this tale at the trial, Elizabeth Jackson interrupts Elizabeth Burges, saying "thow wilt be sicke, and cast againe anon," causing Elizabeth Burges to lose her power of speech. She was led into a chamber after, where she fell ill as Elizabeth Jackson had predicted, "and after that, was led home weake, faynte and Casting, benummed in all her body, hardly able to stand, and never yet to this day recovered her perfect libertie againe."(Fol. 3v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 3v

Elizabeth Burges Elizabeth Burges Victim
2309

A woman from London, who is a neighbor of the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson. Elizabeth Jackson is believed to have cursed the young girl Mary Glover, so that she experiences violent fits. On the first day that Elizabeth Jackson threatens Mary Glover, the young girl stops at Elizabeth Burges' house, as she felt ill. Elizabeth Burges immediately notices that something is wrong with Mary Glover, as her "contenance and colour had much altered." After Mary Glover leaves the house of Elizabeth Burges, Elizabeth Jackson who had apparently overheard the conversation, comes running over to Elizabeth Burges' house, and exclaims, "I have ratled up one of the Gossips that medled with my daughters apparrell, and I hope an evill death will come unto her." This is the first threat Elizabeth Jackson utters against Mary Glover in front of a witness. Similar threats are uttered in the house of Alderman Glover, the uncle of Mary Glover. At the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, Elizabeth Burges also comes forward as a witness to testify against the old woman. She confesses to having seen Elizabeth Jackson threaten Mary Glover, but also tells how she "had ben therefore threatned by her," so that one day while eating prunes, the old woman visits her and Elizabeth Burges is "not able to swallow one downe, but also fell on vomiting." This continues for some three weeks after being visited by Elizabeth Jackson, "upon all sustenance of meat receaved." At another visit of Elizabeth Jackson while Elizabeth Burges was vomiting, Elizabeth Jackson allegedly wishes "that she might cast up her heart, gutts and all," adding "Thou shortly, shalt have in thee an evill spirit too." The following night, Elizabeth Burges is visited by a vision in the shape of a fox; the night after that a vision in the shape of "an ougly black man, with a bounch of keyes in his hand, intysing her to go with him, and those keyes would bring her to gould enough"; and a final third night, Elizabeth Burges is visited by the vision in the "likenes of a mouse." However, by "faithfull praier," aided by her Master and Mistress, Elizabeth Burges was delivered from these visions. While recounting this tale at the trial, Elizabeth Jackson interrupts Elizabeth Burges, saying "thow wilt be sicke, and cast againe anon," causing Elizabeth Burges to lose her power of speech. She was led into a chamber after, where she fell ill as Elizabeth Jackson had predicted, "and after that, was led home weake, faynte and Casting, benummed in all her body, hardly able to stand, and never yet to this day recovered her perfect libertie againe."(Fol. 3v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 3v

Elizabeth Burges Elizabeth Burges Neighbor
2309

A woman from London, who is a neighbor of the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson. Elizabeth Jackson is believed to have cursed the young girl Mary Glover, so that she experiences violent fits. On the first day that Elizabeth Jackson threatens Mary Glover, the young girl stops at Elizabeth Burges' house, as she felt ill. Elizabeth Burges immediately notices that something is wrong with Mary Glover, as her "contenance and colour had much altered." After Mary Glover leaves the house of Elizabeth Burges, Elizabeth Jackson who had apparently overheard the conversation, comes running over to Elizabeth Burges' house, and exclaims, "I have ratled up one of the Gossips that medled with my daughters apparrell, and I hope an evill death will come unto her." This is the first threat Elizabeth Jackson utters against Mary Glover in front of a witness. Similar threats are uttered in the house of Alderman Glover, the uncle of Mary Glover. At the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, Elizabeth Burges also comes forward as a witness to testify against the old woman. She confesses to having seen Elizabeth Jackson threaten Mary Glover, but also tells how she "had ben therefore threatned by her," so that one day while eating prunes, the old woman visits her and Elizabeth Burges is "not able to swallow one downe, but also fell on vomiting." This continues for some three weeks after being visited by Elizabeth Jackson, "upon all sustenance of meat receaved." At another visit of Elizabeth Jackson while Elizabeth Burges was vomiting, Elizabeth Jackson allegedly wishes "that she might cast up her heart, gutts and all," adding "Thou shortly, shalt have in thee an evill spirit too." The following night, Elizabeth Burges is visited by a vision in the shape of a fox; the night after that a vision in the shape of "an ougly black man, with a bounch of keyes in his hand, intysing her to go with him, and those keyes would bring her to gould enough"; and a final third night, Elizabeth Burges is visited by the vision in the "likenes of a mouse." However, by "faithfull praier," aided by her Master and Mistress, Elizabeth Burges was delivered from these visions. While recounting this tale at the trial, Elizabeth Jackson interrupts Elizabeth Burges, saying "thow wilt be sicke, and cast againe anon," causing Elizabeth Burges to lose her power of speech. She was led into a chamber after, where she fell ill as Elizabeth Jackson had predicted, "and after that, was led home weake, faynte and Casting, benummed in all her body, hardly able to stand, and never yet to this day recovered her perfect libertie againe."(Fol. 3v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 3v

Elizabeth Burges Elizabeth Burges Witness
2311

A man from London, who is one of the city's chief civil officers, and serves as the Recorder of London. Sir John Crook becomes involved in October 1602 with the case of Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl believed to be bewitched by the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson, when Mary Glover is accused of counterfeiting her symptoms by Bishop Bancroft in court. Lord Chief Justice Sir Edmund Anderson orders Sir John Crook to validate and test Mary Glover's symptoms. In order to do so, Sir John Crook arranges a series of trials for Mary Glover and Elizabeth Jackson. The two are brought together in front of numerous witnesses (Anonymous 439), with Elizabeth Jackson disguised. Sir John Crook initially believes that Mary Glover does not suffer from bewitchment, but rather from "fear." He brings the girl to a woman disguised as Elizabeth Jackson, but she does not react to seeing her. Satisfied, Sir John Crook then brings in the disguised Elizabeth Jackson, and Mary Glover immediately falls into a fit. In order to validate this fit, Sir John Crook heats up a pin and presses it against the girl's face, as well as burns paper against the inside of Mary Glover's hand until it blisters. However, Mary Glover shows no reaction at all to these tests. At this point, Sir John Crook turns to Elizabeth Jackson, and submits her to the same tests. However, the old woman cries out, and begs Sir John Crook not to burn her. The old woman further confesses that she does not believe Mary Glover is counterfeiting her symptoms. Sir John Crook is advised by the minister, Mr. Lewis Hughes, to have Elizabeth Jackson repeat the Lord's Prayers, and the Apostle's Creed. When Sir John Crook has Elizabeth Jackson do so, she is unable to say the line "Deliver us from evil," nor admit that Jesus is God. Sir John Crook believes that Mary Glover is bewitched, and that it is the fault of Elizabeth Jackson. He sends the old woman to Newgate Prison, saying "Lord have mercy upon thee woman." On December 1, 1602, Sir John Crook serves as one of the justices at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, alongside Sir Edmund Anderson, Sir Jerome Bowes, and Sir William Cornwallis. At this trial, he subjects Mary Glover to similar tests at the bidding of the jury (Anonymous 450), who initially believe Mary Glover is counterfeiting her symptoms when she falls into a fit at the trial in the presence of Elizabeth Jackson. While the young girl's body is "senseles," Sir John Crook presses a burning paper against the inside of her hand, with no reaction from the girl. Later, the Recorder of London presents himself with Judge Anderson to the jury, and advises them by describing the trials he put both women through, and his conclusions that neither fear nor counterfeiting were responsible for Mary Glover's symptoms. He believes that it is "in dede through witchcraft." The Jury gather and decide that Elizabeth Jackson is "guilty of witchcraft." Almost a month after Elizabeth Jackson was found guilty, Sir John Crook hears that Mary Glover still suffers from fits, and orders the minister, Mr. Lewis Hughes to perform an exorcism through fasting and prayer for the girl, as he "did blame me (Mr. Lewis Hughes) and all the Ministers of London [...] that we might all be of us be ashamed, to see a child of God in the clawes of Sathan." When Mary Glover is successfully dispossessed, Mr. Lewis reports back to Sir John Crook, who advises him to inform Bishop Bancroft of these events.(Fol. 28v - Fol. 30r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 28v - Fol. 30r

John Crook Sir John Crook Examiner/Justice
2311

A man from London, who is one of the city's chief civil officers, and serves as the Recorder of London. Sir John Crook becomes involved in October 1602 with the case of Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl believed to be bewitched by the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson, when Mary Glover is accused of counterfeiting her symptoms by Bishop Bancroft in court. Lord Chief Justice Sir Edmund Anderson orders Sir John Crook to validate and test Mary Glover's symptoms. In order to do so, Sir John Crook arranges a series of trials for Mary Glover and Elizabeth Jackson. The two are brought together in front of numerous witnesses (Anonymous 439), with Elizabeth Jackson disguised. Sir John Crook initially believes that Mary Glover does not suffer from bewitchment, but rather from "fear." He brings the girl to a woman disguised as Elizabeth Jackson, but she does not react to seeing her. Satisfied, Sir John Crook then brings in the disguised Elizabeth Jackson, and Mary Glover immediately falls into a fit. In order to validate this fit, Sir John Crook heats up a pin and presses it against the girl's face, as well as burns paper against the inside of Mary Glover's hand until it blisters. However, Mary Glover shows no reaction at all to these tests. At this point, Sir John Crook turns to Elizabeth Jackson, and submits her to the same tests. However, the old woman cries out, and begs Sir John Crook not to burn her. The old woman further confesses that she does not believe Mary Glover is counterfeiting her symptoms. Sir John Crook is advised by the minister, Mr. Lewis Hughes, to have Elizabeth Jackson repeat the Lord's Prayers, and the Apostle's Creed. When Sir John Crook has Elizabeth Jackson do so, she is unable to say the line "Deliver us from evil," nor admit that Jesus is God. Sir John Crook believes that Mary Glover is bewitched, and that it is the fault of Elizabeth Jackson. He sends the old woman to Newgate Prison, saying "Lord have mercy upon thee woman." On December 1, 1602, Sir John Crook serves as one of the justices at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, alongside Sir Edmund Anderson, Sir Jerome Bowes, and Sir William Cornwallis. At this trial, he subjects Mary Glover to similar tests at the bidding of the jury (Anonymous 450), who initially believe Mary Glover is counterfeiting her symptoms when she falls into a fit at the trial in the presence of Elizabeth Jackson. While the young girl's body is "senseles," Sir John Crook presses a burning paper against the inside of her hand, with no reaction from the girl. Later, the Recorder of London presents himself with Judge Anderson to the jury, and advises them by describing the trials he put both women through, and his conclusions that neither fear nor counterfeiting were responsible for Mary Glover's symptoms. He believes that it is "in dede through witchcraft." The Jury gather and decide that Elizabeth Jackson is "guilty of witchcraft." Almost a month after Elizabeth Jackson was found guilty, Sir John Crook hears that Mary Glover still suffers from fits, and orders the minister, Mr. Lewis Hughes to perform an exorcism through fasting and prayer for the girl, as he "did blame me (Mr. Lewis Hughes) and all the Ministers of London [...] that we might all be of us be ashamed, to see a child of God in the clawes of Sathan." When Mary Glover is successfully dispossessed, Mr. Lewis reports back to Sir John Crook, who advises him to inform Bishop Bancroft of these events.(Fol. 28v - Fol. 30r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 28v - Fol. 30r

John Crook Sir John Crook Witness