Go back
17 records returned.

List of all events occurring in the personshorttitle of a given text

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
1588

A twelve or thirteen year old boy from Husbands Bosworth in Leicestershire, described as John Smyth, son of Roger Smith, who would soon after be knighted. Smyth is described as having "had dyvars wonderful straunge fyts in the sight of all Is i all the greatest parsons here, as dyvars knights and ladies, and many othars of the bettar sort, most tereble to be tolld." He allegedly could not he held down or held still in his fits, but would "stryke himfellfe suche bls on his brest, being in his shirt, that you myght here the sound of yt the length of a long chamber, soumtvmes 50 bloes, soumtyms 100, yea soumtymes 2 or 300 bloes, that the least of them was able to stryke doune a strong man." He was often possessed by the spirits of the accused witches, possessions which manifest by acting like the animal spirit which filled him; "whom evary one of them tormented him: he woolld make soom syne according to the sperit; as, when the hors tormented him, he woold whinny; when the cat tormented him, he would cry like a cat, &c." Nine women would allegedly be executed based on these fits. Symth's claims were later investigated by King James himself, who believed the boy to be a fraud. Symth recanted and evidently perpetuated this fraud "to prevent a present Whipping, and avoyd going to School." He was not new to pranking his peers, "amongst other Prancks, he lived in an Orchard a Week, upon Apples onely." Although no women were executed the second time around because of Smyth's folly, six women were imprisoned; one woman died before the rest would be released. (6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

John Symth John Smyth Demoniac
1610

A man from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as the brother to famed speaker and writer of at St. Clement Danes Henry Smith and father of famed demoniac John Symth. His son's fits would first found to be bewitchment, and cause the legal execution of nine witches. Although six more women would be imprisoned for his ongoing sufferings, five would be released from jail after John recanted before King James. Despite all this bad blood, Roger Smith would later be knighted. (271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

Roger Smyth Roger Smyth Witness
1611

A woman (Anonymous 269) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of nine women accused of causing the long, violent, and troubling fits suffered by John Smyth. Six of the alleged witches had familiar spirits; Anonymous 269 has been alotted a spirit in the likenes of a horse, which made John Smyth "whinny" when it tormented him. The alleged witch would be brought before John Smyth and made to unwitch him by calling their spirits off. Anonymous 269 would, for instance, be made to say "I such a one chardge the hors, yf I be a wiche, that thou com forthe of the chilld." Anonymous 269 is executed on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth. (6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 269 Witch
1613

A woman (Anonymous 293) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of nine women accused of causing the long, violent, and troubling fits suffered by John Smyth. Six of the alleged witches had familiar spirits; Anonymous 293 has a familiar spirit in the shape of a cat. As with the other nine witches, Anonymous 293 is asked to identify herself as a witch, and one able to call her own spirit out of John Smyth. If she complies, Smyth is able to rest; if she refuses to unwitch him in this way, he would "be myghtyly tormented." Anonymous 293 is executed on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth.(6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 293 Witch
1612

A woman (Anonymous 292) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of nine women accused of causing the long, violent, and troubling fits suffered by John Smyth. Six of the alleged witches had familiar spirits; Anonymous 292 has a familiar spirit in the shape of a dog. As with the other nine witches, Anonymous 292 is asked to identify herself as a witch, and one able to call her own spirit out of John Smyth. If she complies, Smyth is able to rest; if she refuses to unwitch him in this way, he would "be myghtyly tormented." Anonymous 292 is executed on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth.(6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 292 Witch
1614

A woman (Anonymous 294) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of nine women accused of causing the long, violent, and troubling fits suffered by John Smyth. Six of the alleged witches had familiar spirits; Anonymous 294 has a familiar spirit in the shape of a pullemar (fullmart?). As with the other nine witches, Anonymous 294 is asked to identify herself as a witch, and one able to call her own spirit out of John Smyth. If she complies, Smyth is able to rest; if she refuses to unwitch him in this way, he would "be myghtyly tormented." Anonymous 294 is executed on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth.(6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 294 Witch
1615

A woman (Anonymous 295) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of nine women accused of causing the long, violent, and troubling fits suffered by John Smyth. Six of the alleged witches had familiar spirits; Anonymous 295 has a familiar spirit in the shape of a fish. As with the other nine witches, Anonymous 295 is asked to identify herself as a witch, and one able to call her own spirit out of John Smyth. If she complies, Smyth is able to rest; if she refuses to unwitch him in this way, he would "be myghtyly tormented." Anonymous 295 is executed on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth.(6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 295 Witch
1620

A woman (Anonymous 298) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of nine women accused of causing the long, violent, and troubling fits suffered by John Smyth. Anonymous 298 is executed on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth.(6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 298 Witch
1619

A woman (Anonymous 297) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of nine women accused of causing the long, violent, and troubling fits suffered by John Smyth. Six of the alleged witches had familiar spirits; Anonymous 297 has a familiar spirit in the shape of a code (cod?). As with the other nine witches, Anonymous 295 is asked to identify herself as a witch, and one able to call her own spirit out of John Smyth. If she complies, Smyth is able to rest; if she refuses to unwitch him in this way, he would "be myghtyly tormented." Anonymous 297 is executed on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth.(6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 297 Witch
1621

A woman (Anonymous 299) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of nine women accused of causing the long, violent, and troubling fits suffered by John Smyth. Anonymous 299 is executed on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth.(6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 299 Witch
1622

A woman (Anonymous 300) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of nine women accused of causing the long, violent, and troubling fits suffered by John Smyth. Anonymous 300 is executed on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth.(6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 300 Witch
1623

A woman (Anonymous 301) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of six women imprisoned and examined before Mr. Mair, the Justices (including Sir Humphry Winch and Serjeant Crew) and a Dr. Lambe, in the town hall on October 16, 1616. One woman, allegedly admitted to the jailer that she was working in concert with her familiar, and with the other accused witches, to bewitch Smyth. She begged him not to reveal her secret, lest the other women torment her for speaking against them. In very short order, five of these women were released after James I's examination of John Smyth prompted him to retract his accusations. One woman, however, Anonymous 301, died in jail before this happened, evidently within hours of confessing her crimes.(271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

Anonymous 301 Witch
1624

A woman (Anonymous 302) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of six women imprisoned and examined before Mr. Mair, the Justices (including Sir Humphry Winch and Serjeant Crew) and a Dr. Lambe, in the town hall on October 16, 1616. One woman died in jail before the other five were released after James I's examination of John Smyth prompted him to retract his accusations. Anonymous 302 was one of the women who was released.(271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

Anonymous 302 Witch
1625

A woman (Anonymous 303) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of six women imprisoned and examined before Mr. Mair, the Justices (including Sir Humphry Winch and Serjeant Crew) and a Dr. Lambe, in the town hall on October 16, 1616. One woman died in jail before the other five were released after James I's examination of John Smyth prompted him to retract his accusations. Anonymous 303 was one of the women who was released.(271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

Anonymous 303 Witch
1626

A woman (Anonymous 304) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of six women imprisoned and examined before Mr. Mair, the Justices (including Sir Humphry Winch and Serjeant Crew) and a Dr. Lambe, in the town hall on October 16, 1616. One woman died in jail before the other five were released after James I's examination of John Smyth prompted him to retract his accusations. Anonymous 304 was one of the women who was released.(271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

Anonymous 304 Witch
1627

A woman (Anonymous 305) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of six women imprisoned and examined before Mr. Mair, the Justices (including Sir Humphry Winch and Serjeant Crew) and a Dr. Lambe, in the town hall on October 16, 1616. One woman died in jail before the other five were released after James I's examination of John Smyth prompted him to retract his accusations. Anonymous 304 was one of the women who was released.(271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

Anonymous 305 Witch
1628

A woman (Anonymous 306) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of six women imprisoned and examined before Mr. Mair, the Justices (including Sir Humphry Winch and Serjeant Crew) and a Dr. Lambe, in the town hall on October 16, 1616. One woman died in jail before the other five were released after James I's examination of John Smyth prompted him to retract his accusations. Anonymous 306 was one of the women who was released.(271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

Anonymous 306 Witch