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List of all events occurring in the personshorttitle of a given text

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
1672

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who was married at age 26 to a most goodly woman, Mrs. Eleanor Armstrong, with whom he had at least four children: three sons and a daughter. Mr. Wessell Goodwin is much given to music of all sorts, often choosing music above his family, even on his wife's deathbed. This is allegedly thought to be the faults of Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. James. Upon his wife's death (when he is already aged), he is seduced and bewitched by Mrs. James, still a married woman, causing him to engage in publicly lewd acts, and to act strangely himself including dancing, and violence. Mr. Goodwin is convinced to grant Mrs. Jones his estate and to estrange his children. Through his relationship with Mrs. Jones, which becomes incestuous in the eyes of God upon the marriage of his youngest son to one of Mrs. Jones' daughters, his family and himself are ruined. (1 - 26)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 1 - 26

Wessell Goodwin Mr. Goodwin Co-conspirator
1672

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who was married at age 26 to a most goodly woman, Mrs. Eleanor Armstrong, with whom he had at least four children: three sons and a daughter. Mr. Wessell Goodwin is much given to music of all sorts, often choosing music above his family, even on his wife's deathbed. This is allegedly thought to be the faults of Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. James. Upon his wife's death (when he is already aged), he is seduced and bewitched by Mrs. James, still a married woman, causing him to engage in publicly lewd acts, and to act strangely himself including dancing, and violence. Mr. Goodwin is convinced to grant Mrs. Jones his estate and to estrange his children. Through his relationship with Mrs. Jones, which becomes incestuous in the eyes of God upon the marriage of his youngest son to one of Mrs. Jones' daughters, his family and himself are ruined. (1 - 26)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 1 - 26

Wessell Goodwin Mr. Goodwin Victim
1673

A woman from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is wife to Mr. Pigeon. Mrs. Pigeon is compared to a siren, being not a woman but "charming with the musick of their fained speeches, a silly old man, and suddenly seising and devouring both him and all his family." She is the chief contriver in the downfall of the Goodwin family, including plotting the arrest of Mr. Goodwin's eldest son. She is described as being able to "transforme her self into an Angell of light," and passing off false Gospel. She was married to Mr. Starkey, and apothecary, but she "woried him out of the world with her wicked imperious usage." By Mr. Starkey, she had one child, and a fair estate. Upon his death, she married a lieutenant, Mr. Pigeon. She is also sister to Mrs. Jones and helps set up Mrs. Jones' relationship with Mr. Goodwin despite Mrs. Jones being already married, including setting up a marriage between the youngest Goodwin child and one of Mrs. Jones' daughters, making Mr. Goodwin's and Mrs. Jones' relationship incestuous in the eyes of God. Mrs. Pigeon is also allegedly involved with making an apprentice of Mr. Goodwin's "maillable," and takes a share of Mr. Goodwin's estate. Mrs. Pigeon is a woman "to whom no villainy is difficult," and allegedly drugs the servant Roger Cray, a young lady (Anonymous 307) to their own deaths. In her own marriage, Mrs. Pigeon is a wicked woman. Her constant "imperious carriage" by denying herself to her husband but bewitching him with amorous ways in order to gain his estate causes her husband at times to become ill and to fly into rages. She also becomes the mistress of a merchant while still married. She argues with Mr. Hansard Knowles, who leads her congregations, over the sickness of her husband, causing him to fly into a strange rage. She has the ability to change her appearance, making bruises on her face "by her art... yet more visible." She uses her charm and lies to separate from her husband. Mrs. Pigeon as a wicked woman engaged in unnatural practices is taken to the Justices by Mr. Goodwin's children, but she dismissed without punishment. Mr. Knowles eventually bans her from his Congregation, so that she must spend Sabbath at the Dye house. (1 - 26)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 1 - 26

Elizabeth Pigeon Mrs. Pigeon Witch
1674

A woman from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who used to be a schoolmistress before being wife to Mr. Jones. Mrs. Jones is compared to a siren, being not a woman but "charming with the musick of their fained speeches, a silly old man, and suddenly seising and devouring both him and all his family." She is sister of Mrs. Pigeon. She bewitches Mr. Goodwin upon the death of his wife so that he falls madly in love with her and acts strangely by dancing and violence, eventually leading to his family's ruin. She was disfavoured by the deceased Mrs. Goodwin. Mrs. Jones also engages in lewd behaviour, even while still married to Mr. Jones. She is falsely pious and bewitches Mr. Goodwin into think she is so and he can legally engage in relations with her. By a trick of words, she divorces her husband Mr. Jones, and steals his linens and more upon their separation. Mrs. Jones and her sister Mrs. Pigeon are involved in the sickness and death of Roger Crey, and a young woman (Anonymous 307). Her relationship with Mr. Goodwin becomes incestuous in the eyes of God when her daughter marries Mr. Goodwin's youngest son; she proceeds by this alliance to take Mr. Goodwin's estate. Mr. Goodwin's children take her to trial at St. Margarets' Hill, but she is dismissed by the justices there. She is eventually banned from Congregation, and must take Sabbath at the Dye house.(1 - 26)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 1 - 26

Mehetabell Jones Mrs. Jones Witch
1675

A woman from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who married Mr. Wessell Goodwin in his youth. A Gentlewoman, she is a woman of "most excellent frame of spirit," and a very religious woman. She has four children with her husband: three sons and one daughter. She falls sick in her husband's old age, "contracted by melancholy, of which in a few moneths she died." Before her death, she begs her husband to give up his music, which he refuses. She also pleads with her children to help Mr. Goodwin avoid Mrs. Jones, "whom shee saw to be a subtil undermining woman."(1-3)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 1-3

Eleanor Armstrong Eleanor Armstrong Accuser
1676

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the eldest son of Mr. Goodwin. He cares for the Goodwin family accounts, and is married to a most virtuous woman. He suspects Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones of unnatural proceedings, both with his father and Roger Crey. He is also taken away by two bailiffs at the request of Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon, from his own home. His siblings and he file a petition with the Justices of Southwark against the two women, and he is witness to all their trickery. He does not come to the trial, for fear of "these Litigious women."(3)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 3

Andrew Goodwin Andrew Goodwin Victim
1677

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who marries the only daughter of Mr. Goodwin. He is witness along with his wife to the ruin of the Goodwin family.(2)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 2

Vernon Vernon (Son-in-Law) Witness
1677

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who marries the only daughter of Mr. Goodwin. He is witness along with his wife to the ruin of the Goodwin family.(2)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 2

Vernon Vernon (Son-in-Law) Victim
1678

A woman from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the only daughter of Mr. Goodwin and his first wife. She is witness to the ruin of the Goodwin family, along with her husband. She implores her father to leave Mrs. Jones, and helps to file a petition against Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon, although she does not come to the trial for fear of "the Litigious women."(2)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 2

Vernon Vernon (Daughter) Witness
1678

A woman from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the only daughter of Mr. Goodwin and his first wife. She is witness to the ruin of the Goodwin family, along with her husband. She implores her father to leave Mrs. Jones, and helps to file a petition against Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon, although she does not come to the trial for fear of "the Litigious women."(2)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 2

Vernon Vernon (Daughter) Victim
1679

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the first husband of Mrs. Pigeon. He was an apothecary. Mrs. Pigeon allegedly "woried him out of the world with her wicked imperious usage." He left his wife with one child and an estate.(4-5)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 4-5

Starkey Mr. Starkey Victim
1693

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is married to the alleged wicked woman, Mrs. Pigeon. He is a lieutenant in Mr. General Cromwell's regiment. Mrs. Pigeon convinces Mr. Pigeon by "this carriage of hers" to give her all his estate. She eventually has an affair with a merchant in Clapham. Mr. Pigeon is also witness to the wicked deeds of Mrs. Jones and Mr. Goodwin. Mr. Pigeon and Mr. Knowles are also strangely provoked into fighting, when Mr. Knowles suggests Mr. Pigeon leave his wife during a sickness. Through these violent acts, Mrs. Pigeon eventually leaves Mr. Pigeon. (4)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 4

Pigeon Mr. Pigeon Victim
1693

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is married to the alleged wicked woman, Mrs. Pigeon. He is a lieutenant in Mr. General Cromwell's regiment. Mrs. Pigeon convinces Mr. Pigeon by "this carriage of hers" to give her all his estate. She eventually has an affair with a merchant in Clapham. Mr. Pigeon is also witness to the wicked deeds of Mrs. Jones and Mr. Goodwin. Mr. Pigeon and Mr. Knowles are also strangely provoked into fighting, when Mr. Knowles suggests Mr. Pigeon leave his wife during a sickness. Through these violent acts, Mrs. Pigeon eventually leaves Mr. Pigeon. (4)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 4

Pigeon Mr. Pigeon Witness
1694

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is called upon as a physician by Mrs. Pigeon to treat her husband, Mr. Pigeon, after she drugs him and he "became altogether senselesse, feeble and irrationall, so that she feared he would never returne to his reason againe." He vomits Mr. Pigeon twice, bringing him close to death, but Mr. Pigeon eventually recovers.(5)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 5

Burges Dr. Burges Physician
1695

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the minister of Mr. Goodwin. Mr. Cooper "labours much with him," in an attempt to show him the scandal he has wrecked upon his family through his associations with Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones. When these attempts fail, Mr. Cooper suspends Mr. Goodwin from the Sacrament, to which Mr. Goodwin shows no desire to be restored. (4, 12)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 4, 12

Cooper Mr. Cooper Accuser
1695

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the minister of Mr. Goodwin. Mr. Cooper "labours much with him," in an attempt to show him the scandal he has wrecked upon his family through his associations with Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones. When these attempts fail, Mr. Cooper suspends Mr. Goodwin from the Sacrament, to which Mr. Goodwin shows no desire to be restored. (4, 12)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 4, 12

Cooper Mr. Cooper Witness
1696

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the eldest apprentice of Mr. Goodwin's family. He speaks out often against the practices of Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, "professing that these women would ruine the family." When he falls sick, the two women care for him, and he grows worse. When his water is secretly taken by Andrew Goodwin, Mr. Goodwin's son, to Dr. Burnet and Mr. Clarke, men of medicine, they both agree if help had been sought in time, he might have been cured. However, these women still "plye him with their druggs," despite Roger Crey's objections to having them treat him. He eventually dies of their administrations.(13-14)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 13-14

Roger Crey Roger Crey Victim
1697

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is consulted as a physician in secret by Andrew Goodwin, Mr. Goodwin's son. Andrew Goodwin brings the water of an ailing apprentice, Roger Crey, to Dr. Burnet after his father refuses to allow a doctor to see Roger Crey instead of Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones. Roger Crey's condigion is continually declining, but Dr. Burnet "at the first sight of the water he tells him, the party was a dead man, past all recovery; and that if good help had been sought in time, in all probability he might have done well."(14)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14

Burnet Dr. Burnet Physician
1698

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is an apothecary consulted in secret by Andrew Goodwin, the son of Mr. Goodwin. Mr. Clarke agrees upon seeing the water of Roger Crey, a man who is sick and being cared for Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, that that man is beyond recovery but "that if good help had been sought in time, in all probability he might have done well." (14)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14

Clarke Mr. Clarke Apothecary
1699

A woman from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is visited in her sickness by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, two allegedly wicked women. After the death of Roger Crey, widely believed to have been caused by the administrations of these two women, the parents of the virtuous young woman (Anonymous 307) refuse that their daughter should take anything from them. Anonymous 207 dies of grief, "having her heart broke by the occasion of the practices of these women."(14-15)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14-15

Anonymous 307 Victim
1700

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the father of a virtuous young woman (Anonymous 307), being treated in her sickness by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, two alleged wicked women believed to be responsible for the death of Roger Crey. His wife and him "wat'cht diligently that she [their daughter] should take nothing from them [Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones]." Their daughter passes away from grief.(14-15)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14-15

Anonymous 308 Victim
1700

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the father of a virtuous young woman (Anonymous 307), being treated in her sickness by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, two alleged wicked women believed to be responsible for the death of Roger Crey. His wife and him "wat'cht diligently that she [their daughter] should take nothing from them [Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones]." Their daughter passes away from grief.(14-15)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14-15

Anonymous 308 Witness
1701

A woman from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the mother of a virtuous young woman (Anonymous 307), being treated in her sickness by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, two alleged wicked women believed to be responsible for the death of Roger Crey. Her husband and her "wat'cht diligently that she [their daughter] should take nothing from them [Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones]." Their daughter passes away from grief.(14-15)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14-15

Anonymous 309 Victim
1701

A woman from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the mother of a virtuous young woman (Anonymous 307), being treated in her sickness by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, two alleged wicked women believed to be responsible for the death of Roger Crey. Her husband and her "wat'cht diligently that she [their daughter] should take nothing from them [Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones]." Their daughter passes away from grief.(14-15)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14-15

Anonymous 309 Witness
1702

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is minister to Mr. Pigeon and his wife, Mrs. Pigeon, an alleged wicked woman. Mr. Knowles draws up a bill of divorce for Mr. Jones, who threatens Mr. Knowles upon its presentation. Mr. Knowles is also consulted when Mr. Pigeon is afflicted with gout, during which he engages in a heated argument with Mrs. Pigeon over the nature of the illness, and Mr. Pigeon when he is told by Mr. Knowles to leave his wife. Mr. Knowles draws up a bill of divorce for Mrs. Pigeon, the sister of Mrs. Jones, which he prevails upon Mr. Pigeon to sign. (4, 7, 16, 17)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 4, 7, 16, 17

Knowles Mr. Knowles Preacher/Minister
1703

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is Lord General. Mrs. Pigeon "applyes her self" to him, and "with her smooth tongue, that she procured to have her said husband dismist the Army," allowing her to live in separation from Mr. Pigeon. (18)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 18

Anonymous 310 Witness
1703

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is Lord General. Mrs. Pigeon "applyes her self" to him, and "with her smooth tongue, that she procured to have her said husband dismist the Army," allowing her to live in separation from Mr. Pigeon. (18)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 18

Anonymous 310 Victim
1704

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the youngest son of Mr. Goodwin. At seventeen years of age, Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones arrange for him to marry Mrs. Jones' daughter by first making him "maillable." The marriage between these two cause Mrs. Jones and Mr. Goodwin's relationship to appear incestuous in the eyes of God.(18 - 19)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 18 - 19

James Goodwin James Goodwin Victim
1704

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the youngest son of Mr. Goodwin. At seventeen years of age, Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones arrange for him to marry Mrs. Jones' daughter by first making him "maillable." The marriage between these two cause Mrs. Jones and Mr. Goodwin's relationship to appear incestuous in the eyes of God.(18 - 19)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 18 - 19

James Goodwin James Goodwin Co-conspirator
1705

A woman from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the daughter of the alleged wicked woman, Mrs. Jones. At fifteen years of age, she is married to Mr. Goodwin's youngest son, James Goodwin. This causes her mother's relationship with Mr. Goodwin to become incestuous in the eyes of God. (18 - 19)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 18 - 19

Jones Jones (Daughter) Victim
1705

A woman from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the daughter of the alleged wicked woman, Mrs. Jones. At fifteen years of age, she is married to Mr. Goodwin's youngest son, James Goodwin. This causes her mother's relationship with Mr. Goodwin to become incestuous in the eyes of God. (18 - 19)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 18 - 19

Jones Jones (Daughter) Co-conspirator
1706

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is sent for by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, two alleged wicked women, along with his colleague, Anonymous 312, to arrest the eldest son of Mr. Goodwin, Andrew Goodwin, in the dead of night from his own home. Using an iron crow, he forces the bedchamber doors of Andrew Goodwin's room open in order to retrieve him. (20 - 21)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 20 - 21

Anonymous 310 Examiner/Justice
1707

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is sent for by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, two alleged wicked women, along with his colleague, Anonymous 311, to arrest the eldest son of Mr. Goodwin, Andrew Goodwin, in the dead of night from his own home. Using an iron crow, he forces the bedchamber doors of Andrew Goodwin's room open in order to retrieve him. (20 - 21)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 20 - 21

Anonymous 312 Examiner/Justice
1708

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the "sure friend" of the alleged wicked women, Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones. He helps them secure the estates and goods of their husbands and the Goodwin family. He is believed to be the leader behind their designs, as "this monster could not be brought forth by women."(21 - 22)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 21 - 22

Colborne Mr. Colborne Co-conspirator
1709

A man from Clapham in the county of Greater London, who testifies at the trial of Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones "in the vindication of these women, especially of Mrs. Pigeon, whome he sales was a most Angelical woman." He claims the Goodwin children called for a trial out of "a rage of jealousie for matter of estate." (23)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 23

Gold Mr. Gold Witness
1710

A number of men from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who preside over the trials of Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones at the request of the Goodwin children. As none of the Goodwin children come forth as witnesses to the alleged wicked deeds of Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, the case is dismissed "with only an admonition to old Mr. Goodwin, to forsake the company of these women so prejudicial to his reputation."(22 - 23)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 22 - 23

Justices (2) Examiner/Justice