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List of all events occurring in the personshorttitle of a given text

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
1926

A man from St. Andrew's parish in Dublin, who was one of two Roman Catholic priests (with Anonymous 360) allegedly involved in the plot to convert James Day from Protestant to Catholic. He helps fabricate a story about James Day's signing of his soul to the Devil, and swears "by the Mass Book to relate and stand by it," so that others might never "discover the secret." The justice Sir Humphrey Jervise issues warrants for their arrest, but the priests are never discovered. It is believed that even if the priests are identified, they will "legitimate a false Oath."(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 361 Co-conspirator
1926

A man from St. Andrew's parish in Dublin, who was one of two Roman Catholic priests (with Anonymous 360) allegedly involved in the plot to convert James Day from Protestant to Catholic. He helps fabricate a story about James Day's signing of his soul to the Devil, and swears "by the Mass Book to relate and stand by it," so that others might never "discover the secret." The justice Sir Humphrey Jervise issues warrants for their arrest, but the priests are never discovered. It is believed that even if the priests are identified, they will "legitimate a false Oath."(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 361 Suspect
1926

A man from St. Andrew's parish in Dublin, who was one of two Roman Catholic priests (with Anonymous 360) allegedly involved in the plot to convert James Day from Protestant to Catholic. He helps fabricate a story about James Day's signing of his soul to the Devil, and swears "by the Mass Book to relate and stand by it," so that others might never "discover the secret." The justice Sir Humphrey Jervise issues warrants for their arrest, but the priests are never discovered. It is believed that even if the priests are identified, they will "legitimate a false Oath."(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 361 Preacher/Minister
1961

A man from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who is a journey-man smith working under Master Roger Day, a master shared by the apprentice, James Day. He confesses to telling James day to "shake hands with the Old Gentleman, tho in Jest." James Day claims he took these words to heart, and sought out the Devil and almost signed his soul over, although this story is later revealed to be false.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 1

Anonymous 353 Witness
1956

A man from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who is the uncle of James Day, and of the Roman Catholic religion, and therefore a papist. James Tuit spend much time pressuring his nephew James Day "to leave his Master Roger Dav's service and live with him, promising him that he should never be without pence in his Pocket." James Tuit comes up with the story of James Day's encounter with the Devi, and instructs his nephew "to leave a torn Paper written in blood," for other people to find. James Tuit is arrested by order of the justice Sir Humphrey Jervise, along with his wife, Joan Tuit.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

James Tuit James Tuit Suspect
1956

A man from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who is the uncle of James Day, and of the Roman Catholic religion, and therefore a papist. James Tuit spend much time pressuring his nephew James Day "to leave his Master Roger Dav's service and live with him, promising him that he should never be without pence in his Pocket." James Tuit comes up with the story of James Day's encounter with the Devi, and instructs his nephew "to leave a torn Paper written in blood," for other people to find. James Tuit is arrested by order of the justice Sir Humphrey Jervise, along with his wife, Joan Tuit.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

James Tuit James Tuit Co-conspirator
1927

A man from St. Andrew's parish in Dublin, who was one of two Roman Catholic priests (with Anonymous 361) allegedly involved in the plot to convert James Day from Protestant to Catholic. He helps fabricate a story about James Day's signing of his soul to the Devil, and swears "by the Mass Book to relate and stand by it," so that others might never "discover the secret." The justice Sir Humphrey Jervise issues warrants for their arrest, but the priests are never discovered. It is believed that even if the priests are identified, they will "legitimate a false Oath."(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 360 Suspect
1927

A man from St. Andrew's parish in Dublin, who was one of two Roman Catholic priests (with Anonymous 361) allegedly involved in the plot to convert James Day from Protestant to Catholic. He helps fabricate a story about James Day's signing of his soul to the Devil, and swears "by the Mass Book to relate and stand by it," so that others might never "discover the secret." The justice Sir Humphrey Jervise issues warrants for their arrest, but the priests are never discovered. It is believed that even if the priests are identified, they will "legitimate a false Oath."(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 360 Co-conspirator
1927

A man from St. Andrew's parish in Dublin, who was one of two Roman Catholic priests (with Anonymous 361) allegedly involved in the plot to convert James Day from Protestant to Catholic. He helps fabricate a story about James Day's signing of his soul to the Devil, and swears "by the Mass Book to relate and stand by it," so that others might never "discover the secret." The justice Sir Humphrey Jervise issues warrants for their arrest, but the priests are never discovered. It is believed that even if the priests are identified, they will "legitimate a false Oath."(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 360 Preacher/Minister
1929

A man from St. Andrew's Parish in Dublin, who allegedly served as witness to the the plot to convert James Day from Protestant to Catholic. The con is accomplished by fabricating a story about James Day's signing of his soul to the Devil, and this man swears "by the Mass Book to relate and stand by" the story, so that others might never "discover the secret."(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 359 Witness
1929

A man from St. Andrew's Parish in Dublin, who allegedly served as witness to the the plot to convert James Day from Protestant to Catholic. The con is accomplished by fabricating a story about James Day's signing of his soul to the Devil, and this man swears "by the Mass Book to relate and stand by" the story, so that others might never "discover the secret."(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 359 Co-conspirator
1944

A woman from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who is allegedly involved in the plot to help her nephew, James Day, change from the Protestant religion to the Roman Catholic religion. Joan Tuit takes her nephew to "the Popish Chappel at St. Audoen's Arch," and swears to keep the fabricated story of James Day's encounter with the Devil a secret. When James Day confesses, Sir Humphrey Jervise sends a warrant for her arrest, and she is accordingly apprehended. Joan Tuit herself confesses that she intended on helping with the fabricated story, by taking her nephew to a well, where is was to claim being miraculously cured.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Joan Tuit Joan Tuit Suspect
1944

A woman from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who is allegedly involved in the plot to help her nephew, James Day, change from the Protestant religion to the Roman Catholic religion. Joan Tuit takes her nephew to "the Popish Chappel at St. Audoen's Arch," and swears to keep the fabricated story of James Day's encounter with the Devil a secret. When James Day confesses, Sir Humphrey Jervise sends a warrant for her arrest, and she is accordingly apprehended. Joan Tuit herself confesses that she intended on helping with the fabricated story, by taking her nephew to a well, where is was to claim being miraculously cured.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Joan Tuit Joan Tuit Co-conspirator
1945

A man from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who serves as justice to James Day's confession to forging a story about encountering the Devil, so that James Day might join the Roman Catholic religion. "Upon this Declaration of the Boy, Sir Humphery Jervise issued his Warrants immediately that same day," arresting Patrick Dawson, his wife, James Tuit, and Joan Tuit. Sir Humphrey Jervise also seeks the arrest of an Old Woman (Anonymous 358) and two priests (Anonymous 360 and Anonymous 361), although they cannot be found. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Humphrey Jervise Sir Humphrey Jervise Examiner/Justice
1946

A woman from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who allegedly dressed "with a Friar's Mantle like a Fryars Habit," and tells James Day at his Uncle Dawson's house that she had died and gone to Heaven, only to rise from the dead again. She tries to persuade James Day to change his religion, for "Mass was Celebrated in as good English as was used, either in Church or Meeting." When the minister Mr. Travers investigates, it is revealed that the old woman "lived in the end of the Town," and that she was simply "a begger Woman that came in by accident"; she is part of a fraud to get James Day to change religions. When a warrant is issued for her arrest by the justice Sir Humphrey Jervise, the old woman is unable to be located. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 358 Suspect
1946

A woman from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who allegedly dressed "with a Friar's Mantle like a Fryars Habit," and tells James Day at his Uncle Dawson's house that she had died and gone to Heaven, only to rise from the dead again. She tries to persuade James Day to change his religion, for "Mass was Celebrated in as good English as was used, either in Church or Meeting." When the minister Mr. Travers investigates, it is revealed that the old woman "lived in the end of the Town," and that she was simply "a begger Woman that came in by accident"; she is part of a fraud to get James Day to change religions. When a warrant is issued for her arrest by the justice Sir Humphrey Jervise, the old woman is unable to be located. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 358 Co-conspirator
1947

A man from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who serves as a Roman Catholic priest to the Richard Dawson and his family. Dawson (Aunt) allegedly sends a little girl (Anonymous 357) run to fetch Father Barnwell, to talk with the servant James Day.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Barnwell Father Barnwell Preacher/Minister
1954

A young girl from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who is sent by James Day's aunt to find Father Branwell, to help James Day change from the Protestant religion to the Roman Catholic religion.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 357 Co-conspirator
1955

A woman from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who was the aunt of James Day, of the Roman Catholic church and therefore a papist. James Day visits his uncle, Patrick Dawson, and his Aunt Dawson sends a little girl (Anonymous 357) to fetch Father Barnwell. She "frequently Advis'd and Press'd this Boy their Nephew, to come over to their Religion," and she was in on the fabricated story where James Day encounters the Devil. She is arrested with her husband by order of Sir Humphrey Jervise when the fabricated story is revealed.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Dawson Dawson (Aunt) Suspect
1955

A woman from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who was the aunt of James Day, of the Roman Catholic church and therefore a papist. James Day visits his uncle, Patrick Dawson, and his Aunt Dawson sends a little girl (Anonymous 357) to fetch Father Barnwell. She "frequently Advis'd and Press'd this Boy their Nephew, to come over to their Religion," and she was in on the fabricated story where James Day encounters the Devil. She is arrested with her husband by order of Sir Humphrey Jervise when the fabricated story is revealed.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Dawson Dawson (Aunt) Co-conspirator
1957

A man from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who is the uncle of James Day, as well as a Roman Catholic and therefore a papist. Patrick Dawson sends a coach for his nephew, so that James Day might visit him. This is all part of an elaborate plot Patrick Dawson help devise, surrounding a fabricated encounter between James Day and the Devil, intended to help James Day change from the Protestant religion to the Roman Catholic religion. Once the fabrication is revealed, Patrick Dawson is arrested under the orders of Sir Humphrey Jervise, along with his wife. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Patrick Dawson Patrick Dawson Co-conspirator
1957

A man from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who is the uncle of James Day, as well as a Roman Catholic and therefore a papist. Patrick Dawson sends a coach for his nephew, so that James Day might visit him. This is all part of an elaborate plot Patrick Dawson help devise, surrounding a fabricated encounter between James Day and the Devil, intended to help James Day change from the Protestant religion to the Roman Catholic religion. Once the fabrication is revealed, Patrick Dawson is arrested under the orders of Sir Humphrey Jervise, along with his wife. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Patrick Dawson Patrick Dawson Suspect
1958

A number of people from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who are witness on June 16, 1686, to the discovery of "torn Paper written in blood," that James Day confesses is a torn contract between him and the Devil. When the paper is put together again, "they could read the date of the Months and Year, and the words Promise and Law." The discovery of this evidence lends credibility to the story of James Day's encounter with the Devil, which is later revealed to be a fabrication to aid James Day in changing from the Protestant religion to the Roman Catholic.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 1

Anonymous 356 Witness
1958

A number of people from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who are witness on June 16, 1686, to the discovery of "torn Paper written in blood," that James Day confesses is a torn contract between him and the Devil. When the paper is put together again, "they could read the date of the Months and Year, and the words Promise and Law." The discovery of this evidence lends credibility to the story of James Day's encounter with the Devil, which is later revealed to be a fabrication to aid James Day in changing from the Protestant religion to the Roman Catholic.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 1

Anonymous 356 Neighbor
1959

A number of people from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who are witness to the false confession of James Day to his encounter with the Devil. They advise James Day that there is nothing he can do if he promised to meet the Devil, except to uphold his agreement.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 1

Anonymous 355 (Plural) Witness
1960

A man from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who approaches James Day on June 15, 1686 while James Day is collecting water from a well. The unrecognized man, described as being "in colour'd Cloths," allegedly tells James Day that a "Gentleman," likely the Devil, is waiting for James Day in the fields, and bids him bring a knife, a piece of paper, and a pen to the field with him. (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 1

Anonymous 354 Co-conspirator
1962

A man from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who is a smith and the master of James Day. James Day tells his master about his alleged encounter with the Devil, and Roger Day advises him that he must meet again with the Devil the following week if he promised. When James Day returns from a visit to his Uncle Patrick Dawson's house, and claims he will no longer serve Roger Day, but rather his uncle, James Tuit, and that he would not trouble himself with the Protestant minister Mr. Travers any longer, Roger Day goes to Mr. Travers, and "prevail'd upon him to discover what had happen'd to him." This leads to James Day revealing that his encounter with the Devil was fabricated, and James Day swears to serve Roger Day faithfully thereafter.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 1

Roger Day Roger Day Witness
1962

A man from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who is a smith and the master of James Day. James Day tells his master about his alleged encounter with the Devil, and Roger Day advises him that he must meet again with the Devil the following week if he promised. When James Day returns from a visit to his Uncle Patrick Dawson's house, and claims he will no longer serve Roger Day, but rather his uncle, James Tuit, and that he would not trouble himself with the Protestant minister Mr. Travers any longer, Roger Day goes to Mr. Travers, and "prevail'd upon him to discover what had happen'd to him." This leads to James Day revealing that his encounter with the Devil was fabricated, and James Day swears to serve Roger Day faithfully thereafter.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 1

Roger Day Roger Day Accuser
1965

A man from St. Andrew's in Dublin who is the local Protestant minister. He investigates James Day's sudden decision to join the Roman Catholic religion after visiting his uncle, Patrick Dawson, and reveals the fabrication of James Day's encounter with the Devil. Mr. Travers receives James Day's confession in writing.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Travers Mr. Travers Examiner/Justice
1965

A man from St. Andrew's in Dublin who is the local Protestant minister. He investigates James Day's sudden decision to join the Roman Catholic religion after visiting his uncle, Patrick Dawson, and reveals the fabrication of James Day's encounter with the Devil. Mr. Travers receives James Day's confession in writing.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Travers Mr. Travers Preacher/Minister
1968

A young man from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who allegedly encountered the Devil in a field, and discussed the signing over his soul. James Day allegedly begins to write a lease in blood, but the Devil bids him tear it up, and rewrites a lease using words James Day does not recognize. James Day refuses to sign the lease, and the Devil allegedly takes him to an unknown Tavern, without barkeeps, and where drinks magically filled themselves. Upon returning home, James Day recounts his story to his master, the smith Roger Day. He visits his uncle, Patrick Dawson, and upon returning to his master, claims that he will become Roman Catholic and that he is leaving his master to work for his uncle James Day. When Mr. Travers, the local Protestant minister, investigates, it is found that James Day fabricated the entire story with the help of his uncles, in order to help him change religions to Roman Catholic, and to leave the service of his master. After repenting these actions, James Day "promises amendment of life and diligence in his Masters service for the future."(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 1

James Day James Day Suspect
1968

A young man from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who allegedly encountered the Devil in a field, and discussed the signing over his soul. James Day allegedly begins to write a lease in blood, but the Devil bids him tear it up, and rewrites a lease using words James Day does not recognize. James Day refuses to sign the lease, and the Devil allegedly takes him to an unknown Tavern, without barkeeps, and where drinks magically filled themselves. Upon returning home, James Day recounts his story to his master, the smith Roger Day. He visits his uncle, Patrick Dawson, and upon returning to his master, claims that he will become Roman Catholic and that he is leaving his master to work for his uncle James Day. When Mr. Travers, the local Protestant minister, investigates, it is found that James Day fabricated the entire story with the help of his uncles, in order to help him change religions to Roman Catholic, and to leave the service of his master. After repenting these actions, James Day "promises amendment of life and diligence in his Masters service for the future."(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 1

James Day James Day Co-conspirator