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List of all events occurring in the personshorttitle of a given text

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
2040

A man from Bow in the county of Devon, who tells his son when he runs away to the army and refuses to apprentice himself to a weaver in Crediton that "he would bin him Apprentice to the Devill, which rash and in considerate threatenings, he often times used and repeated." When his son still refuses to apprentice himself to the weaver, John Buxford "did fall a beating of him, so that by meere force compelled him along," in order to take him to Crediton. Along the road, the two encounter a carrier and his horses, that John Buxford "had often observed to frequend the Roade." The carrier inquires after their behaviour, and John Buxford explains his son's current predicament. The carrier offers to apprentice the boy, to which John Buxford "being very desirous to provide for his sons good, (as the naturall affection of all Parents towards Children doth greatly oblige) was content that he should goe a long with the Carrier, who condtioned with him to bring or send backe the Boy in eight daies time at the furthest." He leaves his son in the carrier's care. In eight days, however, he is called to Cannon Lee in Devon by the Justice Cullum, to verify his son's story that Joseph Buxford was apprenticed to the Devil and went to Hell. John Buxford verified that the boy Justice Cullum found was in fact his son, as well as the "manner of his departure, with other circumstances above rehearsed," lending credence to his son's confession.(2)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 2

John Buxford John Buxford Relative of Victim
2041

A fifteen year old boy from Bow in the county of Devon, who was "stubborne and untowardly." His father would like him to apprentice himself to Simon Culsver, a weaver in Crediton. Opposed to this, Joseph Buxford "secretly departed away to the Kings Army," but was forced to return home to his father when "the Cavaliers received at Langport-Moore," were defeated. His father "would have him returne to the Weaver again," but the boy refused. The old man, John Buxford, was "so incensed" that he "would bind him Apprentice to the Devill, which rash and in considerate threatenings, he often times used and repeated." On November 5, 1645, Joseph Buxford's father beats him into going on the road to Crediton, although Joseph Buxford still exclaims "he would rather go to the Devill." They encounter a carrier and four horses on the road to Crediton, who asks after their strange behaviour. Once John Buxford explains "the circumstances of his Sonnes refractory behaviour in running from his Master, and his unwillingnes to take any good course of life, or honest vocation for his future maintainance," the carrier offers to find a master for the boy, if the boy and the father agrees to it. The carrier offers to find employment for the boy that "would put him in the way so gaine a compleat estate to maintaine himself and helpe his friends." John Buxford agrees to these conditions, as long as the carrier "send backe the Boy in eight daies time at the furthest, if he should not take likeing of the promised service." Joseph Buxford agrees to these conditions as well, "being more inclined to any service then to live with his old Master the Weaver." Once his father leaves, however, the carrier transforms into "a flying Hourse in a black and ugly shape and colour." The flying horse takes Joseph Buxford onto his back, "with violence and motion swifter then imagination," and they fly through the air. Through this flight, Joseph Buxford begins a most "stupendious Miracle." Joseph Buxford and the horse see Earth so that it is "of a very small proportion, London and other magnificent Cities on greater than small cottages." They also pass the moon, and are plunged into "watrie dominions," where the boy "observed the most strange and unutterable wonders of the deepe diversified." These sights are beyond what astrologers and "the wisest Phoylosophers," are capable of understanding. The horse and Joseph Buxford eventually land in "a profound Cell or Cave, (the earth seeming to open it selfe.)" Here, the Joseph Buxford descends the horse, which turns into "a more terrible shape," and reveals itself to be the Devill. Joseph Buxford has landed in Hell. The Devil explains to him, "Bee not dismayed, thy employment here shall be onely to take a view of divers men, who thou hast formerly seene or knowne in the Malignant Army, whose base course of life have occasioned their suddaine and unexpected deaths, and now are sent to me to receive their due recompence for the same." Joseph Buxford witnesses the torment of a number of apparitions, who are familiar to him from his time in the "Malignant Army," as they wail, "Woe, Woe unto us that ever we undertooke the devence of such an unjust Cause." Joseph Buxford is further witness to the torment of Sir Peter Ball, "one of the Commissioners of Excester lately deceased," which "made the greatest impression" on him. Joseph Buxford also witnesses the torments of Greenvile, Goring, Lady Scot, and Lady Dolkeat. Their "waylings were too tedious here to relate but were in fine so full of dread and horrour to this wretched Boy, that he earnestly wished himselfe out of this place," and agreed to undergo any service that would not lead to something "so miserable and deplorable." At the end of eight days in Hell, the Devil releases Joseph Buxford to Cannon Lee in Devon, "where he was found by two honest Labourers," under a Hedge. The circumstances in which Joseph Buxford was found were strange, as he "was speechlesse, and his hands and legs strangely distorted, his haire of his head singyd, his cloathes all be smeared with pitch and rosin, and other sulfurous matter." Joseph Buxford is taken to Justice Cullum's household, where being provided with a bed and food, Joseph Buxford confesses "his name, birth-place, and his strange journey with the Devill." At first, this story is not believed, but upon reflection of the strange manner of the finding of Joseph Buxford, and the verification of his father in the manner which he left, it thought the story is true. Mr. Jonathan Gainwell, a minister, takes interest in the stor, and "gave the Boy very pious admonitions of obedience," which take such effect that Joseph Buxford is "truely penitent of his former lewd courses and there reconciled himselfe to his father, with whom he now liveth and is almost cured of that distortion of his members."(2)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 2

Joseph Buxford Joseph Buxford Victim
2041

A fifteen year old boy from Bow in the county of Devon, who was "stubborne and untowardly." His father would like him to apprentice himself to Simon Culsver, a weaver in Crediton. Opposed to this, Joseph Buxford "secretly departed away to the Kings Army," but was forced to return home to his father when "the Cavaliers received at Langport-Moore," were defeated. His father "would have him returne to the Weaver again," but the boy refused. The old man, John Buxford, was "so incensed" that he "would bind him Apprentice to the Devill, which rash and in considerate threatenings, he often times used and repeated." On November 5, 1645, Joseph Buxford's father beats him into going on the road to Crediton, although Joseph Buxford still exclaims "he would rather go to the Devill." They encounter a carrier and four horses on the road to Crediton, who asks after their strange behaviour. Once John Buxford explains "the circumstances of his Sonnes refractory behaviour in running from his Master, and his unwillingnes to take any good course of life, or honest vocation for his future maintainance," the carrier offers to find a master for the boy, if the boy and the father agrees to it. The carrier offers to find employment for the boy that "would put him in the way so gaine a compleat estate to maintaine himself and helpe his friends." John Buxford agrees to these conditions, as long as the carrier "send backe the Boy in eight daies time at the furthest, if he should not take likeing of the promised service." Joseph Buxford agrees to these conditions as well, "being more inclined to any service then to live with his old Master the Weaver." Once his father leaves, however, the carrier transforms into "a flying Hourse in a black and ugly shape and colour." The flying horse takes Joseph Buxford onto his back, "with violence and motion swifter then imagination," and they fly through the air. Through this flight, Joseph Buxford begins a most "stupendious Miracle." Joseph Buxford and the horse see Earth so that it is "of a very small proportion, London and other magnificent Cities on greater than small cottages." They also pass the moon, and are plunged into "watrie dominions," where the boy "observed the most strange and unutterable wonders of the deepe diversified." These sights are beyond what astrologers and "the wisest Phoylosophers," are capable of understanding. The horse and Joseph Buxford eventually land in "a profound Cell or Cave, (the earth seeming to open it selfe.)" Here, the Joseph Buxford descends the horse, which turns into "a more terrible shape," and reveals itself to be the Devill. Joseph Buxford has landed in Hell. The Devil explains to him, "Bee not dismayed, thy employment here shall be onely to take a view of divers men, who thou hast formerly seene or knowne in the Malignant Army, whose base course of life have occasioned their suddaine and unexpected deaths, and now are sent to me to receive their due recompence for the same." Joseph Buxford witnesses the torment of a number of apparitions, who are familiar to him from his time in the "Malignant Army," as they wail, "Woe, Woe unto us that ever we undertooke the devence of such an unjust Cause." Joseph Buxford is further witness to the torment of Sir Peter Ball, "one of the Commissioners of Excester lately deceased," which "made the greatest impression" on him. Joseph Buxford also witnesses the torments of Greenvile, Goring, Lady Scot, and Lady Dolkeat. Their "waylings were too tedious here to relate but were in fine so full of dread and horrour to this wretched Boy, that he earnestly wished himselfe out of this place," and agreed to undergo any service that would not lead to something "so miserable and deplorable." At the end of eight days in Hell, the Devil releases Joseph Buxford to Cannon Lee in Devon, "where he was found by two honest Labourers," under a Hedge. The circumstances in which Joseph Buxford was found were strange, as he "was speechlesse, and his hands and legs strangely distorted, his haire of his head singyd, his cloathes all be smeared with pitch and rosin, and other sulfurous matter." Joseph Buxford is taken to Justice Cullum's household, where being provided with a bed and food, Joseph Buxford confesses "his name, birth-place, and his strange journey with the Devill." At first, this story is not believed, but upon reflection of the strange manner of the finding of Joseph Buxford, and the verification of his father in the manner which he left, it thought the story is true. Mr. Jonathan Gainwell, a minister, takes interest in the stor, and "gave the Boy very pious admonitions of obedience," which take such effect that Joseph Buxford is "truely penitent of his former lewd courses and there reconciled himselfe to his father, with whom he now liveth and is almost cured of that distortion of his members."(2)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 2

Joseph Buxford Joseph Buxford Demoniac
2042

A man from Crediton in the county of Devon, who is allegedly the Devil disguised as a carrier with four horses. The carrier is "one whom [John Buxford] had often observed to frequend the Roade." Happening upon John Buxford using "meere force" to compel his son on the road to Crediton on November 5, 1645, the carrier "very courtiously demanded of him why he used such severitie towards the boy." John Buxford explains his son's "unwillingnes to take any good course of life, or honest vocation for his future maintainance." The carrier placates the father, agree that "it was a pitty the Boy should miscarry by undertaking a forced service upon him." He offers to take the boy, if the boy is willing, to find him a master, "and such employment as would put him in the way so gaine a compleat estate to maintaine himself and helpe his friends." The father and son agree to these terms, as long as the boy should be sent "backe [...] in eight daies time at the furthest, if he should not take likeing of the promised service." As soon as John Buxford leaves, however, "the Hourses and Packes vanished," and the carrier "metamorphosed in a trice from a man to a flying Hourse in a black and ugly shape and colour." The carrier is revealed to be the Devil in disguise. At a later date, on November 13, 1645, the Devil resumes his disguise as a carrier, and comes "upon the way by stragling Troopers of the Malignant Party." When the troopers attempt to rob him of his horses, "the Carrier and his Horses suddainely vanished away in the flames of fire," killing three troopers, and leaving the rest "so terribly shaken and almost stifled with the noisome sent of Brimstone," that they were barely able to escape and share their story.(2-3)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 2-3

Anonymous 390 Demoniac
2043

A man from Exeter in the county of Devon, who is allegedly tortured in Hell upon his death, as he was once a commissioner of a "Malignant Army." His torture makes "the greatest impression" on young Joseph Buxford who is shown Hell by the Devil, and was once part of the same army. Sir Peter Ball is described as "lying all along after a strange manner, his Legs and Feet schorching in furious flames, his Buttockes upon a Crediton, his Backe and Shoulders in a frying pan, his Head in a boyling kettle of pitch, bellowing and roaring out in grievous sort, and cursing the hour of activity, with his extorting, coveteousnesse, and cheating of the Country."(4)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 4

Peter Ball Sir Peter Ball Victim
2044

A man from an unknown area of the county of Devon, who is allegedly tortured in Hell upon his death, as witnessed by the young apprentice, Joseph Buxford. Greenvile is tortured with his companion Goring, for both were in the "Malignant Army" that Joseph Buxford was once part of. These two are located in Hell, close to Sir Peter Ball. They are attended by "three furies" also known as the "Ladies of Scalding," who pour "Acomite downe their belching throats." (4)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 4

Caytiffe Greenvile Caytiffe Greenvile Victim
2047

A woman from Exeter in the county of Devon, who is allegedly tortured in Hell upon her death, as witnessed by the young apprentice, Joseph Buxford. She was once the nurse to "the young Princesse lying at Bedford House in Excester." The form of her torture is unknown.(4)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 4

Dolkeat Lady Dolkeat Victim
2045

A man from an unknown area of the county of Devon, who is allegedly tortured in Hell upon his death, as witnessed by the young apprentice, Joseph Buxford. Goring is tortured with his companion Castiffe Greenvile, for both were in the "Malignant Army" that Joseph Buxford was once part of. These two are located in Hell, close to Sir Peter Ball. They are attended by "three furies" also known as the "Ladies of Scalding," who pour "Acomite downe their belching throats." The sister of Goring is also in Hell, Lady Scot.(4)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 4

Goring Goring Victim
2046

A woman from some unknown area of the county of Devon, who is allegedly tortured in Hell upon her death, as witnessed by the young apprentice, Joseph Buxford. Lady Scot is the sister of Goring, and is ushered by Caytiffe Greenvile. She is "to behung up by the tongue upon hot burning tender hooks."(4)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 4

Scot Lady Scot Victim
2048

A man from Cannon Lee in the county of Devon, who found with his coworker, another labourer (Anonymous 392), the young Joseph Buxford under a Hedge. Upon finding him, they "demanded what he was," but the boy was unable to answer them as "he was speechlesse." They find "his hands and legs strangely distorted, his haire of his head singyd, his cloathes all be smeared with pitch and rosin, and other sulfurous matter, which yeelded an odious stench." The two men "commiserating his miserable condition," take the boy to their master's house, Mr. Justice Cullum. There, they provide him with clothes, a bed, and food.(5)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 391 Neighbor
2048

A man from Cannon Lee in the county of Devon, who found with his coworker, another labourer (Anonymous 392), the young Joseph Buxford under a Hedge. Upon finding him, they "demanded what he was," but the boy was unable to answer them as "he was speechlesse." They find "his hands and legs strangely distorted, his haire of his head singyd, his cloathes all be smeared with pitch and rosin, and other sulfurous matter, which yeelded an odious stench." The two men "commiserating his miserable condition," take the boy to their master's house, Mr. Justice Cullum. There, they provide him with clothes, a bed, and food.(5)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 391 Witness
2049

A man from Cannon Lee in the county of Devon, who found with his coworker, another labourer (Anonymous 391), the young Joseph Buxford under a Hedge. Upon finding him, they "demanded what he was," but the boy was unable to answer them as "he was speechlesse." They find "his hands and legs strangely distorted, his haire of his head singyd, his cloathes all be smeared with pitch and rosin, and other sulfurous matter, which yeelded an odious stench." The two men "commiserating his miserable condition," take the boy to their master's house, Mr. Justice Cullum. There, they provide him with clothes, a bed, and food.(5)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 392 Witness
2049

A man from Cannon Lee in the county of Devon, who found with his coworker, another labourer (Anonymous 391), the young Joseph Buxford under a Hedge. Upon finding him, they "demanded what he was," but the boy was unable to answer them as "he was speechlesse." They find "his hands and legs strangely distorted, his haire of his head singyd, his cloathes all be smeared with pitch and rosin, and other sulfurous matter, which yeelded an odious stench." The two men "commiserating his miserable condition," take the boy to their master's house, Mr. Justice Cullum. There, they provide him with clothes, a bed, and food.(5)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 392 Neighbor
2050

A man from Cannon Lee in the county of Devon, whose two labourers find Joseph Buxford on his property. When Joseph Buxford is found, "his hands and legs strangely distorted, his haire of his head singyd, his cloathes all be smeared with pitch and rosin, and other sulfurous matter, which yeelded an odious stench." As he is unable to speak, and found in such a condition, the boy is brought to Justice Cullum's house, where he is given clothing, a bed, and "some nourishing broth." Upon receiving these things, Joseph Buxford is so restored, he immediately confesses "his name, birth-place, and his strange journey with the Devill," which at first seemed "rediculous" to the Justice. But, upon "a little better pondering in what manner he was found and brought to the house," the Justice decides the story might be true, and sends for the boy's father, John Buxford. The father verifies his son's story, by first acknowledging that the boy is his son, and the "manner of his departure, with other circumstances above rehearsed." Upon verifying the story, Justice Cullum and the minister Mr. Gainwell, write "a true information" to Major General Massie, in Tiverton, relating the entire story.(5)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 5

Justice Cullum Mr. Justice Cullum Witness
2050

A man from Cannon Lee in the county of Devon, whose two labourers find Joseph Buxford on his property. When Joseph Buxford is found, "his hands and legs strangely distorted, his haire of his head singyd, his cloathes all be smeared with pitch and rosin, and other sulfurous matter, which yeelded an odious stench." As he is unable to speak, and found in such a condition, the boy is brought to Justice Cullum's house, where he is given clothing, a bed, and "some nourishing broth." Upon receiving these things, Joseph Buxford is so restored, he immediately confesses "his name, birth-place, and his strange journey with the Devill," which at first seemed "rediculous" to the Justice. But, upon "a little better pondering in what manner he was found and brought to the house," the Justice decides the story might be true, and sends for the boy's father, John Buxford. The father verifies his son's story, by first acknowledging that the boy is his son, and the "manner of his departure, with other circumstances above rehearsed." Upon verifying the story, Justice Cullum and the minister Mr. Gainwell, write "a true information" to Major General Massie, in Tiverton, relating the entire story.(5)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 5

Justice Cullum Mr. Justice Cullum Examiner/Justice
2051

A man from an unknown area of Devon, who serves as the minister of the parish. Mr. Jonathan Gainwell is "very zealous and godly," and upon hearing the story Joseph Buxford, who allegedly apprenticed himself to the Devil for eight days in Hell, the minister "tooke speciall notice thereof," and visited the boy to give him "very pious admonitions of obedience." These apparently took such good effect that Joseph Buxford was "truely penitent of his former lewd courses and there reconciled himselfe to his father, with whom he now liveth and is almost cured of that distortion of his members." Upon verifying the story of Joseph Buxford, Justice Cullum and the minister Mr. Gainwell, write "a true information" to Major General Massie, in Tiverton, relating the entire story.(5)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 5

Jonathan Gainwell Mr. Jonathan Gainwell Preacher/Minister
2052

A man from Tiverton in Devon, who receives "a true information" in written form from Justice Cullum and Mr. Gainwell the Minister, relating the story of Joseph Buxford, who allegedly apprenticed himself to the Devil with his father's consent for eight days, during which time he viewed many torments in Hell. Following, Major General Edward Massie sends his own letter relating the information to Mr. Davenports Chesire, a gentleman in London, wherein he included "a Box of Reliques with a great Crucifix found in Tiverton Church in the wall which the Cavaliers had there built for the strengthning of the proch," as further evidence.(5-6)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 5-6

Edward Massie Edward Massie Examiner/Justice
2052

A man from Tiverton in Devon, who receives "a true information" in written form from Justice Cullum and Mr. Gainwell the Minister, relating the story of Joseph Buxford, who allegedly apprenticed himself to the Devil with his father's consent for eight days, during which time he viewed many torments in Hell. Following, Major General Edward Massie sends his own letter relating the information to Mr. Davenports Chesire, a gentleman in London, wherein he included "a Box of Reliques with a great Crucifix found in Tiverton Church in the wall which the Cavaliers had there built for the strengthning of the proch," as further evidence.(5-6)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 5-6

Edward Massie Edward Massie Witness
2053

A number of men from an unknown area of Devon, who are "stragling Troopers of the Malignant Party." They encounter the Devil disguised as a carrier with four horses, which were so "faire" they "made themselves sure of rich purchase, and presently addressed themselves to plunder." But as they made to attack the carrier, he and his horses "suddainely vanished away in the flames of fire," killing three of them, and leaving the rest "so shaken and almost stifled with the noisome sent of Brimstone," they barely escaped to retell the news.(6)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 6

Anonymous 393 (Plural) Victim