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List of all events occurring in the persontype of

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
235

A man from Nottingham in the county of Nottinghamshire, known to be clerk vicar of Saint Maries in Nottingham, who gives deposition alleging that he saw William Sommers naked with something the size of a mouse running up his right leg, then into his left leg, and then entering his belly. Sommers' belly swelled massively, then the swelling reduced to the size of a fist and moved to his breast, and moved from there to his neck and under his ear, where it remained at the size of a French walnut for a quarter hour. Aldridge heard a strange hollow voice insisting he belong to it, which he called a liar and replied that he was God's. Aldridge also said that Sommers acted strangely the rest of the day, and, when restrained, proved to have the strength of five men. Sommers' bed was also seen to shake and move, and a shape like five kittens moved under the coverlet.(Image 13)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 13

Robert Aldridge Robert Aldridge Preacher/Minister
358

A man from London, who witnesses and publishes on Mary Glover's alleged bewitchment by Elizabeth Jackson. John Swan, a student of divinity, is witness to the dispossession of Mary Glover, during which time he consults with one of the preachers performing the dispossession, and comforts the father of Mary Glover, Tim Glover, when he breaks down in tears over the torment his daughter is in. John Swan also believes he sees something "creeping" out of Mary Glover's eye when she is dispossessed. He comforts the girl himself, and "bidd her grow in comforte and courage, & strength to resist." He also consults with her, and she tells him that although "she saw nothinge, but she did feele somewhat depart." In his publications, John Swan makes it clear that he believes Mary Glover to have subject to supernatural forces, and was not suffering from the suffocation of the mother, or some other disease. (21)

Appears in:
Swan, John . A True and Breife Report, of Mary Glover's Vexation and Her Deliverance. London: 1603, 21

John Swan John Swan Preacher/Minister
359

A man from London, who is employed as a minister to guide fasting and prayer for Mary Glover's dispossession. Mr. Barber takes turns with other preachers in leading a group of witnesses and neighbours (Anonymous 437) through prayer for the girl, while she is in a violent fit. Mr. Barber is aided by five other preachers: Mr. Bridger, Mr. Lewis Hughes, Mr. Skelton, Mr. Swan, and Mr. Evans.(19)

Appears in:
Swan, John . A True and Breife Report, of Mary Glover's Vexation and Her Deliverance. London: 1603, 19

M. Barber M. Barber Preacher/Minister
362

A man from London, who is employed as a preacher in fasting and praying for Mary Glover's dispossession. Mr. Skelton takes turns with other preachers in leading a group of witnesses and neighbours (Anonymous 437) through prayer for the girl, while she is in a violent fit. It is Mr. Skelton who preaches when Mary Glover is released from her possession, by first falling still as if dead. Mr. Skelton is aided by five other preachers: Mr. Bridger, Mr. Lewis Hughes, Mr. Barber, Mr. Swan, and Mr. Evans.(4-5)

Appears in:
Swan, John . A True and Breife Report, of Mary Glover's Vexation and Her Deliverance. London: 1603, 4-5

Skelton M. Skelton Preacher/Minister
363

A man from London, who is employed as a minister to guide fasting and prayer for Mary Glover's dispossession. Mr. Bridger takes turns with other preachers in leading a group of witnesses and neighbours (Anonymous 437) through prayer for the girl, while she is in a violent fit. Mr. Bridger is aided by five other preachers: Mr. Skelton, Mr. Lewis Hughes, Mr. Barber, Mr. Swan, and Mr. Evans. During Mary Glover's worst fit of the dispossession, Mr. Bridger prays on one side of her bed, "mentioninge the seed of the woman that should breake the Serpents head."(4)

Appears in:
Swan, John . A True and Breife Report, of Mary Glover's Vexation and Her Deliverance. London: 1603, 4

Bridger M. Bridger Preacher/Minister
375

A man from Pendle Hill in the county of Lancaster who was visited by Richard Dugdale. Jolly prays and reads the Bible and Dugdale responds by flying into a preternatural rage. Mr. Jolly believes that Richard Dugdale is possessed by the Devil, and stays with Richard Dugdale throughout many of his fits. Mr. Jolly also writes in response to Mr. Zach Taylour's accusations that the demoniac Richard Dugdale was not real, but rather the result of disease. (image 5-6)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, image 5-6

Jolly Mr. Jolly Preacher/Minister
418

A man from Luyck in Brussels, known to be a preacher. He comes to help the young maid, Anonymous 11, who is suffering from convulsive fits. However, his prayers only cause her to contort violently and begin to vomit horse dung, pins, hair, feathers, knots of thread, nails, pieces of broken glass, eggshells and more.(5-6)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-6

Anonymous 318 Preacher/Minister
521

A minister from Westwall who assisted in the dispossession of Mildred Norrington()

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651,

Roger Newman Roger Newman Preacher/Minister
522

A minister from Kinington, who came to assist in Mildred Norrington's dispossession(71)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 71

John Brainford John Brainford Preacher/Minister
549

A Minister who is successfully able to ward off a physical attack from Joan Cunny's familiars by means of a strong religious faith.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, 2

Master Kitchin Master Kitchin Preacher/Minister
568

A man who Margaret Cunny curses after the two have a falling out.(2-3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, 2-3

Father Hurrill Father Hurrill Preacher/Minister
580

A man from the county of Leicestershire, known to be a Doctor of Divinity and a Justice of the Peace for the county of Leicestershire. He examined Anne Baker, Joan Willimott and Ellen Greene, and witnessed their testimonies.(D4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D4

Samuel Fleming Samuel Fleming Preacher/Minister
614

A vicar in the county of Kent who accuses Margaret Simons of bewitching his son (Anonymous 74) after his son attacks Simons' dog with a knife.(3-4)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 3-4

John Ferrel John Ferrall Preacher/Minister
624

A parson of Slangham in Sussex who T. E. entrusts to keep safe an Anglo-Saxon book written by Sir John Malborne, a divine of Oxenford. Reginald Scot writes to the parson asking him to send the book, but the parson will not allow it leave his company.(337-338)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 337-338

Anonymous 78 Preacher/Minister
629

A man from Clerkenwell in the London Borough of Islington, known to be a Minister associated with Newgate Prison, who took Elizabeth Sawyer's confession of witchcraft and published an account of her trial and confession. He claimed to be Sawyer's constant visitor in Newgate Prison, and that his account was put to print to lay to rest all the stories that had been circulation. He had been harassed continually since it became known that he recorded the confession. The confession is presented in question-and-answer dialogue form, allegedly from his transcription. Goodcole also provides a transcription of her confirmation of the confession on the day of her execution, including her contrition and prayers to God and Christ for forgiveness. In his conclusion, he presents Sawyer as a cautionary example, and makes particular note that it was her cursing, swearing and blaspheming that drew the Devil's attention to her. His primary success in life was as the author of numerous crime pamphlets, each emphasizing a particular sin and its fit punishment.(Title Page)

Appears in:
Goodcole, Henry. The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton. London: 1621, Title Page

Henry Goodcole Henry Goodcole Preacher/Minister
666

A man from Hatfield in the county of Hertfordshire, known to be a minister, who gave sermons at the Elizabeth Weed attended. Weed alleged that he and his sermons were influential both to her regular attendance at the church and her desire to be rid of her "unhappy burden." (2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 2

Richard Poole Richard Poole Preacher/Minister
711

A man who tries to hold down Christian Shaw during a fit and who examines her at home during her possession.(11)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 11

The Minister Preacher/Minister
712

A neighbouring minister who comes to see Christian Shaw. (12-13)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 12-13

Patrick Simpson Patrick Simpson Preacher/Minister
716

A man from Renfrewshire in the county of Renfrew, described as a minister who tries to help Christian Shaw during a fit. He pulls her as he claims she is being drawn forcibly down.(13)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 13

Alexander King Alexander King Preacher/Minister
741

A man from Ashbie de la zouche in the County of Leicestershire, known to be a priest and traveling exorcist. He is the author "A brief apologie prouing the possession of William Sommers," which was allegedly published without his consent. Darrell came Nottingham so that he may cure William Sommers of his possession, and has Sommers pray and fast to effect his dispossession. After this, Darrell was retained as preacher in Nottingham and used his position to discover witches in the town. Darrell took the names of threescore persons willing to give deposition when Sommers claimed to have fakes his possession and named him as a co-consipirator; of these, seventeen were sworn, examined and their depositions taken. Sommers insisted that he had known Mr. Darrell some four years, that Darrell had hired him to counterfeit possession in Ashbie Park, and that when Darrell arrived in Nottingham, Sommers had received instruction from him on how to behave when being dispossessed. Darrell denied these accusations, but was nonetheless imprisoned for a week thereafter. Once the depositions taken against Sommers were heard, they were taken as proof of true possession, and Darrell redeemed. in 1598, Darrell was summoned to Lancashire by Nicholas Starchie to dispossess his children and others of his household, and claimed to have successfully dispossessed six of them in one day, and the seventh on the following day. In 1599, Darrell faced charges of instructing Sommers, Katherine Wright, Thomas Darling, Mary Couper and others to fake their possessions and dispossessions to bolster his own reputation.(Images 4, 6, 7, 12)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Images 4, 6, 7, 12

John Darrell John Darrell Preacher/Minister
770

A man from Colwick in the county of Nottinghamshire, known to be a clerk and a preasher, who gave deposition against William Sommers alleging that he was among the 150 people who witnessed the exorcism performed on Sommers by John Darrell. Aldred says that he gave a prayer, during which Sommers was tormented by fits. John Darrell gave the next prayer, and Sommers' fits doubled in intensity. Sommers menaced Darrell and had to be restrained. At the end of the exorcism, Aldred saw Sommers thrown grovelling onto a bed, and lay there as if dead. Darrell praised God and willed the watchers to be thankful, at which time Sommers was seen to thank God for his delivery from possession.(Image 13-14)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 13-14

William Aldred William Aldred Preacher/Minister
792

A man for Burton Agnes in the county of York, described as a minister who is called upon to witness Faith Corbet's possession when she appears to move past hysteria, and claims to be near death.(55-56)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 55-56

Tim Wellset Tim Wellset Preacher/Minister
834

A minister in Fuystone, York whose sermon is determined to be the first cause of Elizabeth Fairfax's fits. He bacame a spiritual protector to her.(37, 40)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 37, 40

Cooke Mr. Cooke Preacher/Minister
874

A Vicar in Fuystone, York who witnessed the strange reapperance of a cursed penny, but would not support Fairfax's witch hunt.(45, 50)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 45, 50

Smithson Mr. Smithson Preacher/Minister
900

A man from Bideford in the county of Devon, the local parish rector, who, along with the mayor, Thomas Gist and the Alderman, John Davie Alderman, questions Temperance Lloyd in 1682. Ogilby asked Lloyd a series of three questions designed to determine her damnation. He first asked: "how long since the Devil did tempt her to do evil?" Lloyd confessed that she had become a witch circa 1670; her first maelfic act that of murder had been against William Herbert, an act committed at the prompting of the devil who promised she "would do well." Ogilby also asked Lloyd if she "had prickt any Pins in the said Puppit or Baby-picture," she had grab from Thomas Eastchurch's shop, an act of thievery done while she was in the shape of a cat. Lloyd would not confess to any more then laying the puppet on Grace Thomas' bed. Finally, Ogilby asked Lloyd to "say the Lords Prayer and her Creed; which she imperfectly performing, the said Mr. Ogilby did give her many good Exhortations, and so departed from her." (17-20)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 17-20

Michael Ogibly Michael Ogibly Preacher/Minister
945

A man from Burton upon Trent in the county of Staffordshire, described as the Pastor of Burton who encourages Thomas Darling to not answer the Devil when he speaks to him, because the devil is a liar and is possibly making Darling ill.(16)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 16

Master Eccarshall Preacher/Minister
970

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, who attempts to cure James Barrow of his bewitchment and possession. The gentleman (Anonymosu 146) uses holy water, ribbon, a candle, brimstone, and latin prayers in his curing efforts. None of these methods cure the boy of his possession.(9-10)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 9-10

Anonymous 146 Preacher/Minister
972

A group of friars from the London Borough of Southwark, who attempt to cure James Barrow of his bewitchment and possession by making him pray to St. James. John Barrow does not believe this cure is in accordance with scripture, and therefore asks the friars if they would keep to scripture when curing his son (James Barrow). When the friars do not listen, John Barrow ceases the prayers.(10)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 10

Anonymous 328 (Plural) Preacher/Minister
989

A man from Salmesbury in the county of Lancashire, known to be a Jesuit and a seminary priest, who also goes by the alias Christopher Southworth. He was accused and found guilty of instructing Grace Sowerbuts to accuse Jane Southworth, her grandmother Jennet Bierly, and aunt Ellen Bierly of bewitching her and attending meeting of witches in which they ate strange meat and allowed four things like men to abuse their bodies and Grace's. He is also said to have coached Grace into accusing Jennet and Ellen of driving a nail into the navel of Thomas Walshman's child to suck from the hole, and, after the child died, stealing it from the churchyard to cannibalizing it and render the fat from its bones. He was convicted on the strength of Grace's retraction of her accusations and confession of Thompson's involvement. According to Grace, "one Master Thompson, which she taketh to be Master Christopher Southworth, to whom shee was sent to learne her prayers, did perswade, counsell, and aduise her, to deale as formerly hath beene said against her said Grand-mother, Aunt, and Southworths wife." Jane Southworth said "shee saw Master Thompson, alias Southworth, the Priest, a month or sixe weekes before she was committed to the Gaole; and had conference with him in a place called Barne-hey-lane, where and when shee challenged him for slandering her to bee a Witch." (K3-K3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K3-K3v

Thompson Master Thompson Preacher/Minister
1016

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a minister. Margaret Muschamp, when first afflicted by her fits, called for Mr. Huet to return from his pilgrimage to the Holy Island (Lindisfarne) as "that faithfull man may helpe my soule forward in praying with me, and for me." Mr. Huet came to pray, thus witnessing the latter part of her first fit. He continued to come and pray with her, along with fellow ministers Mr. Balsom and Mr. Strother, for the first 16 weeks of her torments.(1-2)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 1-2

Huet Mr. Huet Preacher/Minister
1024

An unknown number of men from Spittal in the county of Northumberland, known to be physicians "both of soule and body." Mary Moore sent for them when her daughter, Margaret Muschamp, first became afflicted with tormenting fits. They were unable to help: "her signes from the beginning were, away with these Doctors Drugs, God had layd it on her, and God would take it off her."(3)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 3

Anonymous 150 Preacher/Minister
1028

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a minister, whom Margaret Muschamp begged to pray for her in her tormenting fits. Margaret attributes her first recovery to him, and is well and able to eat again for seven or eight weeks.(3-4)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 3-4

Balsom Mr. Balsom Preacher/Minister
1029

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a minister, whom Margaret Muschamp begged to pray for her in her tormenting fits. Margaret attributes her first recovery to him, and is well and able to eat again for seven or eight weeks.(3-4)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 3-4

Strother Mr. Strother Preacher/Minister
1059

A man from London, who describes various witch testing techniques; who claims that normal animals can become possessed and become witches familiars; and who suggests that imps might approach witches. Thomas Addy accuses John Gaule of having allowed himself to be seduced into believing false information about witches. John Gaule is also a minister.(79-80)

Appears in:
Gaule, John. Select Cases of Conscience Touching Witches and Witchcrafts. London: 1646, 79-80

John Gaule John Gaule Preacher/Minister
1098

A man from Bythorn in the County of Huntingdon, known to be a Minister, who claimed to have heard Anne Desborough confess that a brown spirit somewhat larger than a mouse had appeared to her 30 years before and nipped her to awaken her out of a dream. The spirit then demanded her soul; she prayed to God and it left. Five or six days later, the same mouse-spirit came to her again, this time in the company of another mouse-spirit, and demanded that she permit them to suck her blood. She accepted, forsook God and Christ and agreed to allow them to take her soul when she died. She named the mouse which promised to hurt men Tib, and the one that promised to hurt cattle Jone. They would visit her daily thereafter to suck on her body.(11-12)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 11-12

Joseph Coysh Joseph Coysh Preacher/Minister
1266

A minister (and exorcist) then preaching in the village of Tarporley in the county of Cheshire, described as a "late fellow of Christs Colledge in the University of Cambridge, & now a famous and godly Preacher of the Gospell of Jesus Christ." Lane, witnessing one of Mylner's fits during which she is contorts her body, "demaunded of her that kepte this cruell handled creature, whether shee coulde not keepe her downe?" He decided to test this theory himself, by taking her by the hand and "pluckt down her feete, and wyth more ado kept them downe, holdinge her handes, sytting vpon her legs, in whom he found such strength and vehement panges, that he was fully perswaded." In another attempt to put a stop to Mylner's fits, Lane blew vinegar into Mylner's nostrils again and again, instructing her to call on god for mercy, until she cried: "No, no, no more for Gods sake." Afterwards he leads them all in the lord's prayer and Mylner is proclaimed delivered. Lane preaches a sermon the next day at Saint Marie's (i.e. Church of St Mary-on-the-Hill, now St. Mary's Centre), a sermon Anne Mylner herself attends. Mylner becomes a celebrity in the city and, by extension, so must have John Lane.(15)

Appears in:
Fisher, John. The Copy of a Letter Describing the Wonderful Woorke of God in Deliuering a Mayden within the City of Chester. London: 1565, 15

John Lane John Lane Preacher/Minister
1380

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a minister. He heard John Hutton's accusation that Dorothy Swinow, Anonymous 234 and Anonymous 235 had killed John Custerd and Mrs. Custerd. He witnessed Margaret Muschamp talking to her angels and make the claim that justice was required for her torments and her brother George Muschamp Jr.'s return to health. Francis Broad was also present when Margaret vomited strange objects, accused Swinow of consuming Mary Moore's unborn child, and cry out that "the Grand Witch Meg is come to the doore with a lighted Candle in each hand" followed by the smell of brimstone. He stood as a formal witness to Margaret's final fit and the speech she made in it.(9-10)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9-10

Francis Broad Francis Broad Preacher/Minister
1430

A man from Pinner in the county of Middlesex, described as the parson of the town. P. Smith cures the servant Richard Burt of his inability to speak by touching the underside of the victim's tongue and fetches the witch Mother Atkins on the victim's behalf.(5)

Appears in:
B., G.. A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England) . London: 1592, 5

P. Smith P. Smith Preacher/Minister
1464

A man from Coven-Garden in London and the county of Greater London, who allegedly ordained the seven women living at Queen-Street in Coven-Garden to give confession as a minister. This was false, and an anti-Catholic activity, as well as a con. It is not clear if Father Ciprian was falsely accused of ordaining the seven women, who may have possibly also opened a prostitution racket. (3-5)

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Seven Women Confessors or a Discovery of the Seven White Divels which Lived at Queen-Street in Coven-Garden. London: 1641, 3-5

Father Ciprian Preacher/Minister
1485

A priest from "Godstone besides Croydon" who allegedly uses divination tools such as crystals to find treasure and other stolen goods. This information comes from William Whycherly during his 1597 examination by Sir Thomas Smith. (334)

Appears in:
Foxe, Thomas Cranmer, John Gough Nichols, John. Narratives of the Days of the Reformation. Unknown: 1859, 334

John Lloyd Sir John Lloyd Preacher/Minister
1487

A priest from the village of Highgate (now in Greater London) who is allegedly "a conjureth with a syve and a pair of sheeres [divination tools], invocating saint Paule and Saint Peter. And he also useth the psalter [book of psalms] and the key with a psalme." This information comes from William Whycherly during his 1597 examination by Sir Thomas Smith.(334)

Appears in:
Foxe, Thomas Cranmer, John Gough Nichols, John. Narratives of the Days of the Reformation. Unknown: 1859, 334

Robert Brian Sir Robert Brian Preacher/Minister
1513

A man from Chester in the county of Worcheshire, described as "one of the Canons of the Cathedrall churche of Chester, and Reader of the Divinity Lecture" who comes to visit Anne Mylner, along with diverse persons of good reputation from the area. He is so moved by the visit, that at the end of his sermon given circa December 30, 1564, he asks the congregants to kneel upon "their knees [to make] made speciall prayers unto God" for Mylner's deliverance from her possession.()

Appears in:
Dalton, James. A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey. London: 1647,

John Pierce John Pierce Preacher/Minister
1562

A minister from Exeter in the county of Devonshire who believes that the youth Nathan Crab is one who is "very hopeful for Religion." Robert Atkins hosts a religious meeting, after which Nathan Crab allegedly experiences being pushed and "tript at the heels" by an unknown force.(47)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 47

Robert Atkins Robert Atkins Preacher/Minister
1580

A minister from Morchard in the county of Devonshire who attempt to cure Nathan Crab of his unexplained falling-fits and foaming at the mouth by administering pills and by ordering a Vomit to be taken. After observing the vomiting, Mr. Pridham decides there is something extraordinary about Nathan Crabs case, but that he could do him no good. Mr. Pridham fears that, because he is a minister, he should lose his Benefice by Peoples saying he was a White-Witch were he to continue interacting with Nathan Crab.(47-52)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 47-52

Pridham Mr. Pridham Preacher/Minister
1702

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is minister to Mr. Pigeon and his wife, Mrs. Pigeon, an alleged wicked woman. Mr. Knowles draws up a bill of divorce for Mr. Jones, who threatens Mr. Knowles upon its presentation. Mr. Knowles is also consulted when Mr. Pigeon is afflicted with gout, during which he engages in a heated argument with Mrs. Pigeon over the nature of the illness, and Mr. Pigeon when he is told by Mr. Knowles to leave his wife. Mr. Knowles draws up a bill of divorce for Mrs. Pigeon, the sister of Mrs. Jones, which he prevails upon Mr. Pigeon to sign. (4, 7, 16, 17)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 4, 7, 16, 17

Knowles Mr. Knowles Preacher/Minister
1735

A man from Sudbury in the county of Suffolk, described as a witness to the fits of alleged demoniac Thomas Spatchet and the author of "A faithful narrative of the wonderful and extraordinary fits." Samuel Petto provided a lengthy account of Thomas Spatchet's affliction, which he claims to have seen himself as someone who often visited Dunwich and Cokely. Petto attributes Spatchet's preservation from life-threatening injury to the Works of God, and the cause of his fits to alleged witch Aubrey Grinset. Petto was a clergyman and an ejected minister, husband to Mary and father to Samuel. After his ejection from Sandcroft, he began his long association with Sudbury. He was a firm believer in witchcraft.(Advertisement)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, Advertisement

Samuel Petto Samuel Petto Preacher/Minister
1796

A man from St. Paul's Cross in London who served as examiner with Roger Dogeson and John Kent Percer to the Agnes Brigges, and who also heard her confession to the pretense of being possessed by Satan. He was a minister and person of Saint Margaret's in Lothberry of John Taylor.(14)

Appears in:
Chrysostom, John. The Disclosing of a Late Counterfeyted Possession by the Deuyl in Two Maydens within the Citie of London. London: 1574, 14

James Style James Style Preacher/Minister
1799

A man from an area in Canterbury who served as an examiner and confessor to Agnes Brigges, who admitted to having fabricated her possession. He is a minister and Archbishop of Canterbury.(16)

Appears in:
Chrysostom, John. The Disclosing of a Late Counterfeyted Possession by the Deuyl in Two Maydens within the Citie of London. London: 1574, 16

Matthew L Matthew L Preacher/Minister
1843

A man from near Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who stays with Richard Dugdale at his request overnight, as a junior minister. The junior minister is witness to one of Richard Dugdale's fits, during which the Devil speaks through him, claiming that Richard Dugdale was in a contract with him, "That he might excel all others in Dancing: That the Contract was for 18 months." (75)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 75

Anonymous 338 Preacher/Minister
1851

A man from Cawlke in Darbyshire, known to be a pastor, who accompanied John Darrell to Cleworth in Lancashire to assist in exorcising the seven possessed people in Nicholas Starchie's household.(8)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, 8

George More George More Preacher/Minister
1918

A man from Wimbish in Essex, known to be the VIcar, whose wife was allegedly asked for alms by Mother Staunton while the Vicar was out and denied the request; while visiting the house Staunton is said to have touched their little son causing him to become violently sick nearly unto death while Staunton sat by. Within an hour of the Vicar's return, his son recovered perfectly and resumed playing.(14)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 14

Anonymous 364 Preacher/Minister
1926

A man from St. Andrew's parish in Dublin, who was one of two Roman Catholic priests (with Anonymous 360) allegedly involved in the plot to convert James Day from Protestant to Catholic. He helps fabricate a story about James Day's signing of his soul to the Devil, and swears "by the Mass Book to relate and stand by it," so that others might never "discover the secret." The justice Sir Humphrey Jervise issues warrants for their arrest, but the priests are never discovered. It is believed that even if the priests are identified, they will "legitimate a false Oath."(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 361 Preacher/Minister
1927

A man from St. Andrew's parish in Dublin, who was one of two Roman Catholic priests (with Anonymous 361) allegedly involved in the plot to convert James Day from Protestant to Catholic. He helps fabricate a story about James Day's signing of his soul to the Devil, and swears "by the Mass Book to relate and stand by it," so that others might never "discover the secret." The justice Sir Humphrey Jervise issues warrants for their arrest, but the priests are never discovered. It is believed that even if the priests are identified, they will "legitimate a false Oath."(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 360 Preacher/Minister
1947

A man from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who serves as a Roman Catholic priest to the Richard Dawson and his family. Dawson (Aunt) allegedly sends a little girl (Anonymous 357) run to fetch Father Barnwell, to talk with the servant James Day.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Barnwell Father Barnwell Preacher/Minister
1965

A man from St. Andrew's in Dublin who is the local Protestant minister. He investigates James Day's sudden decision to join the Roman Catholic religion after visiting his uncle, Patrick Dawson, and reveals the fabrication of James Day's encounter with the Devil. Mr. Travers receives James Day's confession in writing.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Travers Mr. Travers Preacher/Minister
1977

A man of Lawrack (Landrake) in the County of Cornwall, known to be a minister, to whom John Roberts appealed for help after Thomas Sawdie confessed to making a compact with the Devil. Teag presided over a day of prayers for Sawdie, along with fellow ministers Mr. Toms, Mr. Travers and Mr. Lydston, and discovered he had a great effect on the boy when touching his hand or making eye contact with his face. Though unable to end the possession, their efforts succeeded in weakening the Devil's hold on Sawdie.(7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Return of Prayer: or A Faithful Relation of Some Remarkable Passages of Providence concerning Thomas Sawdie. London: 1664, 7

Nicholas Teag Nicholas Teag Preacher/Minister
1978

A man of Lawrack (Landrake) in the County of Cornwall, known to be a minister, to whom John Roberts appealed for help after Thomas Sawdie confessed to making a compact with the Devil. He prayed over the boy for a day along with fellow ministers Mr. Teag, Mr. Travers and Mr. Lydston. Though unable to end the possession, their efforts succeeded in weakening the Devil's hold on Sawdie.(7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Return of Prayer: or A Faithful Relation of Some Remarkable Passages of Providence concerning Thomas Sawdie. London: 1664, 7

Toms Mr. Toms Preacher/Minister
1979

A man of Lawrack (Landrake) in the County of Cornwall, known to be a minister, to whom John Roberts appealed for help after Thomas Sawdie confessed to making a compact with the Devil. He prayed over the boy for a day along with fellow ministers Mr. Teag, Mr. Toms and Mr. Lydston. Though unable to end the possession, their efforts succeeded in weakening the Devil's hold on Sawdie.(7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Return of Prayer: or A Faithful Relation of Some Remarkable Passages of Providence concerning Thomas Sawdie. London: 1664, 7

Travers Mr. Travers (2) Preacher/Minister
1980

A man of Lawrack (Landrake) in the County of Cornwall, known to be a minister, to whom John Roberts appealed for help after Thomas Sawdie confessed to making a compact with the Devil. He prayed over the boy for a day along with fellow ministers Mr. Teag, Mr. Travers and Mr. Toms. Though unable to end the possession, their efforts succeeded in weakening the Devil's hold on Sawdie.(7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Return of Prayer: or A Faithful Relation of Some Remarkable Passages of Providence concerning Thomas Sawdie. London: 1664, 7

Lydston Mr. Lydston Preacher/Minister
2011

A man from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who serves as a minister watching over Richard Dugdale's alleged fits. Richard Dugdale is so thankful to Mr. Carrington, that a year after being cured of his fits, that he embraces Mr. Carrington, exclaiming his thanks. During one of his alleged fits, Richard Dugdale foretells the coming of Richard Dugdale.(51)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 51

Carrington Mr. Carrington Preacher/Minister
2012

A number of Roman Catholic ministers from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who attempt to aid Richard Dugdale with his fits, allegedly believed to be the work of the Devil. This includes the reading of a paper which was thought to cure Richard Dugdale but did not. Two of these ministers fled during one of Richard Dugdale's fits; a third was "strong and old, but was thrown down, and in great danger of being kill'd by the Demoniack."(21-22)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 21-22

Anonymous 379 (Plural) Preacher/Minister
2051

A man from an unknown area of Devon, who serves as the minister of the parish. Mr. Jonathan Gainwell is "very zealous and godly," and upon hearing the story Joseph Buxford, who allegedly apprenticed himself to the Devil for eight days in Hell, the minister "tooke speciall notice thereof," and visited the boy to give him "very pious admonitions of obedience." These apparently took such good effect that Joseph Buxford was "truely penitent of his former lewd courses and there reconciled himselfe to his father, with whom he now liveth and is almost cured of that distortion of his members." Upon verifying the story of Joseph Buxford, Justice Cullum and the minister Mr. Gainwell, write "a true information" to Major General Massie, in Tiverton, relating the entire story.(5)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 5

Jonathan Gainwell Mr. Jonathan Gainwell Preacher/Minister
2058

A man and self-described preacher from Beaumont in the county of Essex, then living in Little Oakley on his wife, Mrs. Harrison's property. Harrison is residing in London when his wife becomes convinced she has been bewitched by Annis Heard. As she grew increasingly frantic, the "said Richard, said to his wife, I pray you be content and thinke not so, but trust in God and put your trust in him onely, and he will defend you from her, and from the Diuell himselfe also: and said moreouer, what will the people say, that I beeing a Preacher shoulde haue my wife so weake in faith." But his wife did not get better. Harrison swore that he would see Heard hanged if she had in fact bewitched his wife. However, the next encounter between Harrison and Heard wad rather one sided, and entirely verbal, despite all this bravado. They saw one another in an orchard, and to Heard's request for some plums, he answered "I am glad you are here you vield strumpet, saying, I do think you haue bewitched my wife, and as truly as God doth liue, if I can perceiue y^ she be troubled any more as she hath been, I will not leaue a whole bone about thee, & besides I will seeke to haue thee hanged." He continues threatening her, claiming his father in law would also see her hang, and rehearsing all the crimes he attributed to her. Despite verbally berating her, he seemed surprised when Annis "did sodenly depart from him without having any plummes," taking her departure as a sign of guilt. Two days before his wife died, and with John Pollin and Bret's wife as witnesses, she claimed "I must depart from you, for now I am utterly consumed with yonder wicked Creature, meaning Annis Herd [...] repeating these wordes. Oh Annis Herd, Annis Herd she hath consumed me." (F2-F3v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, F2-F3v

Richard Harrison Richard Harrison Preacher/Minister
2087

A man from Brightling in the county of Sussex, who comes to Joseph Cruttenden and his wife as a minister, to help them with their troubles. Mr. Bennett is accompanied by Mr. Bradshaw, also a minister, and they pray with Joseph Cruttenden and his wife after two houses their goods reside in burn down, and after their goods are "thrown upside down" on their own. While they pray, their goods are "quiet." However, when Mr. Bennett comes to visit, "a knife glanced by [his] Breast," and "a Bowl or Dish [is] thrown at his Back," both of their own accord. Mr. Bennett is also one of four ministers who gather to keep "a Fast," for the Cruttendens, after which time the Cruttendens have "not of any trouble."(56)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 56

Bennet Mr. Bennett Preacher/Minister
2088

A man from Brightling in the county of Sussex, who comes to Joseph Cruttenden and his wife as a minister, to help them with their troubles. Mr. Bradshaw is accompanied by Mr. Bennett, also a minister, and they pray with Joseph Cruttenden and his wife after two houses their goods reside in burn down, and after their goods are "thrown upside down" on their own. While they pray, their goods are "quiet." Mr. Bradshaw is also one of four ministers who gather to keep "a Fast," for the Cruttendens, after which time the Cruttendens have "not of any trouble."(56)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 56

Bradshaw Mr. Bradshaw Preacher/Minister
2092

A man from Brightling in the county of Sussex, who gathers with three other ministers: Mr. Gold, Mr. Bradshaw, and Mr. Bennett, to "keep a fast" in order to help the Cruttendens who are the victims of witchcraft when their house burns down and their goods fly of their own accord and hit people. After a fast is kept for a day, the Cruttendens have "not of any trouble."(56)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 56

Weller Mr. Weller Preacher/Minister
2093

A man from Brightling in the county of Sussex, who gathers with three other ministers: Mr. Weller, Mr. Bradshaw, and Mr. Bennett, to "keep a fast" in order to help the Cruttendens who are the victims of witchcraft when their house burns down and their goods fly of their own accord and hit people. After a fast is kept for a day, the Cruttendens have "not of any trouble."(56)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 56

Gold Mr. Gold (2) Preacher/Minister
2112

A man from Beckington in the county of Somerset, who serves as the local minister. Mr. John Humphreys is brought to court to testify his "Knowledge on the matter" of Mary Hill's alleged fits, which are characterized by the vomiting of crooked nails. Mr. John Humphreys verifies that "I had seen her at several times, after having given her a little small Beer, Vomit up Crooked Pins, Nails, and Pieces of Brass." Further, he admits to having inspected her as a cheat, by "having lookt into his Mouth, I searcht it with my Finger, as I did the Beer before she drank it." Mr. John Humphreys spends some time wondering "how it was possible for all that Trumpery to be conveyed into [Mary Hill's] bBody." Observing her, Mr. John Humphreys concludes that those things she brought up "were conveyed into her Body by some Diabolical Power," when she "was in Bed at Night." Mr. John Humphreys believes this to be true, as Mary Hill only vomits in the morning, and "scarce did any thing in the Afternoon." Further, Mary Hill always sleeps with her mouth open, and when she sleeps with it closed, she experiences no fits. Once, Mary Hill comes to Mr. John Humphrey's house, and within two hours she falls ill. Mr. John Humphreys provides her with "some Beer," and she vomited "a great board Nail," and a "great piece of Brass," followed by a great deal of blood. Being "extreamly weakened," Mr. John Humphreys gets a woman (Anonymous 406) to take out "as much Blood, as she could hold in the hollow of her hand." After the assizes are ended, Mary Hill's fits are much more violent, and characterized by the vomiting of glass as well as nails. This culminates in a fit where "she was swelled to an extraordinary bigness," and she threw up"several Pieces of Bread and Butter, besmeared with a Poysonous matter." Upon examining this, Mr. John Humphreys judges the substance "to be white Mercury." Mr. John Humphreys goes to pray with Mary Hill, as her neighbours will "come no more near her." He ends up "compassionating the Deplorableness of her Condition," and takes Mary Hill into his own home, "where in some short time, the Vomiting ceased, though for some space her Distorting Fits followed her." Mr. John Humphreys, in essence, seems to cure her, and Mary Hill remains "for a considerable time last past in very good health."(76)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 76

John Humphreys Mr. John Humphreys Preacher/Minister
2127

A man from Colne, in the county of Essex, who visits Mr. Harlakenden upon hearing about a mysterious bell that rings in one of his chambers built above a Tomb-House, every night at "Two of the Clock in the Morning." Mr. Thomas Shepherd, "with some other Ministers, and good People, spent a Night in Prayer," and by doing so cast out the Devil. "And from that time, never was any such noise heard in the Chamber."(158)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 158

Thomas Shepheard Mr. Thomas Shepherd Preacher/Minister
2128

A number of ministers and "good people" from Colne, in the county of Essex, who come with Mr. Thomas Shepherd to pray at Colne's Priory. In Colne's Priory is built a chamber above a "Tomb-House," and every night "At Two of the Clock in the Morning there was always the sound of a great Bell tolling," After praying and giving "some respect to the place, serving to God," the Devil is cast out, and "from that time, never was any such noise heard in the Chamber."(158)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 158

Anonymous 408 Preacher/Minister
2130

A man from Bewdley in the county of Worcestershire, who help treat "a Sanguine strong maid" (Anonymous 409) for her "strange Histerical Fits." Mr. Robert Morton is the father of Dr. Morton, and the pastor and physician of the parish. When Mr. Robert Morton is taken away to Coventry," Anonymous 409 who was at first healing, "grew worse than ever." Her fits culminated in a "suror uterinus ex corruptione Seminis," and she seemed possessed by a devil. Mr. Robert Morton never returns to Bewdley.(193-194)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 193-194

Robert Morton Mr. Robert Morton Preacher/Minister
2133

A man from Kidderminster in the county of Worcestershire, who sits and prays with a "Sanguine strong maid" afflicted by a number of "strange Histerical Fits," caused by a devil and "a suror uterinus." After several days of fasting and praying on the part of many neighbours, Mr. Thomas Ware prays with the maid (Anonymous 409), "in the midst of the Day." During this prayer, the maid "fell on the Floor like a Block, and having lain so a while, cryed out, He is gone, He is gone; The Black Dog is gone." After this time, "she never had a Fit."(194)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 194

Thomas Ware Mr. Thomas Ware Preacher/Minister
2139

A man from the city of Bristol in the county of Bristol, who is a minister called upon by Peter Pain, a shoemaker, when "surprizing and unaccountable noises" in his house were accompanied by "so great a light" it seemed "as if every Room had been full of burning Tapers, or Torches." This minister agrees to visit Peter Pain's house, and upon arriving, "he became an Ear-witness of the most dreadful, and accustomed noises." He gathers the Pain family into a chamber in a gallery, where at one end was "a large bulky Trunk," that was "so heavy, that four or five men were not able to lift it." The minister shuts the door, and begins praying, when suddenly "something was flung against the Chamber door, with extraordinary violence." Immediately after this, the noises within the house ceased. When Peter Pain and the minister attempted to open the door, they could not do so, but had to call for neighbours to help. They found "the door barr'd close with the great Trunk aforesaid." It was concluded that it was cast there when they heard "that mighty shock against the door."(165-166)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 165-166

Toogood Mr. Toogood Preacher/Minister
2204

A man from Great Gadson in the County of Buckinghamshire, known to be one of four ministers who prayed and fasted over alleged demoniac Anonymous 28 at the request of her father, Anonymous 429. A fifth was supposed to have joined them, but was prevented by an unexpected accident, as predicted by the evil spirits possessing the girl. The ministers' efforts succeeded in driving out one of the two spirits, and in forcing the girl to read from the Bible despite the best efforts of the remaining spirit.(5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire. London: 1677, 5-6

Anonymous 436 Preacher/Minister
2205

A man from Great Gadson in the County of Buckinghamshire, known to be one of four ministers who prayed and fasted over alleged demoniac Anonymous 28 at the request of her father, Anonymous 429. A fifth was supposed to have joined them, but was prevented by an unexpected accident, as predicted by the evil spirits possessing the girl. The ministers' efforts succeeded in driving out one of the two spirits, and in forcing the girl to read from the Bible despite the best efforts of the remaining spirit.(5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire. London: 1677, 5-6

Anonymous 435 Preacher/Minister
2206

A man from Great Gadson in the County of Buckinghamshire, known to be one of four ministers who prayed and fasted over alleged demoniac Anonymous 28 at the request of her father, Anonymous 429. A fifth was supposed to have joined them, but was prevented by an unexpected accident, as predicted by the evil spirits possessing the girl. The ministers' efforts succeeded in driving out one of the two spirits, and in forcing the girl to read from the Bible despite the best efforts of the remaining spirit.(5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire. London: 1677, 5-6

Anonymous 434 Preacher/Minister
2207

A man from Great Gadson in the County of Buckinghamshire, known to be one of four ministers who prayed and fasted over alleged demoniac Anonymous 28 at the request of her father, Anonymous 429. A fifth was supposed to have joined them, but was prevented by an unexpected accident, as predicted by the evil spirits possessing the girl. The ministers' efforts succeeded in driving out one of the two spirits, and in forcing the girl to read from the Bible despite the best efforts of the remaining spirit.(5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire. London: 1677, 5-6

Anonymous 433 Preacher/Minister
2209

A man from Barrow in the county of Suffolk, who comes to visit the child William Withers in Walsham-le-Willows as "a learned preacher," after the boy allegedly woke from a ten day trance, able to "declareth most straunge and rare things, which are to come." After speaking to the boy, he found him "perfect in the Scriptures." He supports all the counsel the boy gives, to "rouze vs vp from our sinnes."(9-10)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The wonderful worke of God shewed vpon a chylde. London: 1581, 9-10

Gatton Mr. Gatton Preacher/Minister
2237

A man from Warboys in Hampshire, known to be a Doctor of Divinity, the parish parson or town minister and brother in law to Robert Throckmorton. Dr. Dorington visited the Throckmorton house and prayed for them, but while he did all five of the Throckmorton daughters fell into fits of shrieking and sneezing. When he paused, their fits ended, and when he resumed, their fits started once more. When Mother Alice Samuel confesses to bewitching and causing the possessions of the Throckmorton girls and displays repentance, Robert Throckmorton sends for Dr. Dorington to give comfort to her and pray for her. He hears a second confession in which she begs all the neighbours to pray for her and forgive her. He convinced Throckmorton to give her leave to return home to her husband John Samuel and counseled her to reconcile with him. However, Mother Samuel retracted her confession immediately upon returning home, and Dr. Dorington assisted Throckmorton in convincing her to confess again. He interviewed her at length while Throckmorton gathered numerous witnesses to listen outside the room, and put her words to paper for posterity, leaving her no further room to deny being a witch. After Robert Throckmorton bailed Agnes Samuel from her imprisonment alongside Mother Samuel in Huntingdon Gaol, Dr. Dorington witnessed the children's cessation of fits for a time, and also the resumption, which they blamed on Agnes picking up where her mother left off. He also witnessed Elizabeth Throckmorton accuse John Samuel of being a witch as well, including John's refusal to say a self-accusing "charm" to bring the child out of her fits. He assisted Throckmorton in questioning John during this encounter. He also witnessed Joan Throckmorton thrash and groan whenever Agnes named God or Jesus Christ, and was present when Joan scratched Agnes. After the scratching, he told Agnes that she must be in some way complicit in the children's bewitching, or else God would not allow her to suffer scratchings and accusations. HIs deposition at the Huntingdon Assizes was instrumental in sentencing Mother Samuel, Agnes Samuel and John Samuel to death.(11-12)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 11-12

Dorington Dr. Dorington Preacher/Minister
2242

A man from Buckden in the county of Huntingdon, known to be Bishop of Lincoln. Mother Alice Samuel was brought before him by Robert Throckmorton and Dr. Dorington to make her official confession. She confessed before him twice, first on December 26, 1592, and again on December 29, 1592.(59)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59

William William, Bishop of Lincoln Preacher/Minister
2254

A man from Brampton in the county of Huntingdon, known to be the vicar and curate of Brampton. He gave a deposition before the Huntingdon Assizes on behalf of his parishoner, John Langley, who was too sick to come to court himself; Langley claimed to Mother Alice Samuel bewitched various of his livestock to death, and caused him to become sick.(110)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 110

Robert Poulter Robert Poulter Preacher/Minister
2259

A man from Huntingdon in the county of Huntingdon, known to be a Doctor of Divinity. He heard Mother Alice Samuel's final confession on the day of her execution.(112-113)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 112-113

Chamberin Master Doctor Chamberlin Preacher/Minister
2313

A man from London, who is both a doctor, and Bishop of London. Richard Bancroft believes that Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of witchcraft against the young girl, Mary Glover, is innocent. To this end, he petitions the court to examine Mary Glover for counterfeit symptoms, which the Lord Chief Justice Anderson agrees to, appointing the Recorder of London to examine the girl. Bishop Bancroft is a powerful man, who also manages to pull many strings, including helping Elizabeth Jackson plan a petition to the College of Physicians in November, 1602; and arranging for Dr. Jorden and Dr. Argent to testify that Mary Glover suffers from natural causes at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson. Despite his input, Elizabeth Jackson is found guilty of witchcraft. However, some months later, Bishop Bancroft is approached by the minister Mr. Lewis Hughes, who wishes to tell the Bishop of his success in dispossessing Mary Glover. However, Mr. Lewis is never granted an audience with the Bishop, and called "Rascall and varlot," for his stories. He is imprisoned for four months, and named along with the five other preachers present during Mary Glover's dispossession "Devil finders, Devil puffers, and Devill prayers," by the Bishop Bancroft. (12)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 12

Richard Bancroft Bishop Richard Bancroft Preacher/Minister
2315

A man from London, who was keenly involved in the Mary Glover case on many levels, as both a minister and a witness. Mr. Lewis Hughes was witness to the testing the Recorder of London of the young girl, including a series of tests such as bringing Elizabeth Jackson to Mary Glover in disguise, and burning the young girl when she is in a fit. Mr. Lewis Hughes further advises the Recorder, Sir John Crook, to test Elizabeth Jackson by bidding her saying the Lord's Prayer. Sir John Crook takes this advice, and has Elizabeth Jackson recite the prayer, and she is unable to utter the line, "Deliver us from evil." Mr. Lewis Hughes confirms that when he had frequented Elizabeth Jackson before, he had found it to be the case that she could never utter that line. Some months later, on December 1, 1602, Mr. Lewis Hughes testifies at the trial of Elizabeth Glover, against the old woman. Mr. Lewis Hughes admits in court that he was "willing to admonish the said Elizabeth Jackson of her lewde tongue," and so went to visit the old woman at her house. As soon as he entered her abode, she "very intentively fixt her eyes upon him," facing him. As the Preacher prepared to speak with her, he "had suddenly his speech taken from him, his necke became stiffe, and his Chin borne inwards into his bosome, his knees (withall) yeelding under him, as though he should fall." Calling upon God, the Preacher finds the strength to prevail, and is able to depart from Elizabeth Jackson's house. However, he is not able to speak for two hours afterward. He further confesses in court to visiting Elizabeth Jackson while she was in Newgate Prison, but he could "by no meanes cause her, to rehearse the beliefe," of God and Jesus Christ. Further, she refused of her own accord to say, "Deliver us from evil," once again. This evidence is heavily weighed in court. After Elizabeth Jackson is found guilty of witchcraft, Mr. Lewis Hughes is ordered by Sir John Crook to perform an exorcism on Mary Glover, as she still experiences fits. Leading a group of witnesses (Anonymous 437) in fasting and prayer with five other preachers: Mr. Swan, Mr. Bridger, Mr. Evans, Mr. Barber and Mr. Skelton; Mr. Lewis Hughes aids in the dispossession of Mary Glover, and takes the girl and her family includings Gawthren Glover, and Anne Glover, into his house at St. Helen's Bishopsgate in London for a year in order to watch over her and prevent the girl from being possessed again. It is also during this time that Mr. Lewis Hughes visits Bishop Bancroft on the advice of Sir John Crook, in order to report the success of Mary Glover's dispossession. Bishop Bancroft, however, is not pleased to hear this news, having been the first to accuse Mary Glover of counterfeit. He grants no audience to Mr. Lewis Hughes, and calls the man "Rascall and varlot," for his stories. Mr. Lewis Hughes is imprisoned for four months, and named along with the five other preachers present during Mary Glover's dispossession "Devil finders, Devil puffers, and Devill prayers." Some forty years after all these events, Mr. Lewis Hughes records them in a text he authors, named, "Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open." The text for the most part is dialogue between ministers. Often, Mr. Lewis Hughes is referenced as a very divine minister.(12-13)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 12-13

Lewis Hughes M. Lewis Hughes Preacher/Minister
2316

A man from London, who is employed as a minister to guide fasting and prayer for Mary Glover's dispossession. Mr. Evans is described as an "auncient preacher," who takes turns with other preachers in leading a group of witnesses and neighbours (Anonymous 437) through prayer for the girl, while she is in a violent fit. Mr. Evans is aided by five other preachers: Mr. Skelton, Mr. Lewis Hughes, Mr. Barber, Mr. Swan, and Mr. Bridger. Mr. Evan's prayers as described as "sweete, mylde (according to his disposition) long earnest, and powerfull." Also of "charitably disposed minde," Mr. Evans takes notice of the condition of Mary Glover, and is the first to call for a "little pawse," in the midst of prayers, when the maid is "wax pale coloured, weepinge, and answeringe faintly." He often prays even when Mary Glover herself is prayer, in order to aid with her deliverance. On one occasion, while Mr. Evans prayed "God to rebuke this foule malstious Devill," Mary Glover turns towards him in a fit, and "did barke out froth at him." However, he continued to pray for her regardless. (13-14)

Appears in:
Swan, John . A True and Breife Report, of Mary Glover's Vexation and Her Deliverance. London: 1603, 13-14

Evans M. Evans Preacher/Minister
2322

A man from London, who encounters at an inn a young Cambridge scholar (Anonymous 468). Anonymous 467 is a minister, and falls into discussions about witches and their power with the young scholar. The minister affirms that "Witches do truly conjure up the Devil in several shapes." The scholar, however, disagrees with him, and declares he will demonstrate to the minister how to conjure up the devil in a number of shapes. The scholar employs a local boy (Anonymous 477) to imitate the crowing of a cock, the neighing of a horse, the barking of a dog and the quacking of ducks. The minister believes that these imitations are real, however, even after the boy reveals himself. This "true relation" is an example of how reports are often false, for men are easily deluded, even ministers.(63 - 65)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 63 - 65

Anonymous 467 Preacher/Minister
2331

A man from Framingham in the county of Suffolk, who is executed for witchcraft alongside a hundred innocent people at the Berry Assizes by a "wicked inquisitor" (Anonymous 472). He is allegedly innocent, and a minister.(101 - 102)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 101 - 102

Anonymous 473 Preacher/Minister
2334

A man from Suffolk, who serves as a minister. He affirms that "one of the poor women that was hanged for a VVitch (Anonymous 476) at Berry Assizes, in the year 1645" sent her imps (Anonymous 235) into the army in order to kill "Parliament Souldiers," and others to kill "King's Souldiers." This man's "habit and garb might seem to claim the title of Rabbi, Rabbi."(114)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 114

Anonymous 474 Preacher/Minister
2337

A man from London, who is executed at Barry in Wales, in the year 1645, as a minister accused of witchcraft. Allegedly, however, he suffers from a disease "called Hemorroids or Piles," which results in swelling and the pouring of blood, which was mistaken for witchcraft.(128)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 128

Lewis Master Lewis Preacher/Minister
2341

A man from Maldon in the county of Essex, who was both "an able Minister of Gods Word," and an author of near twenty-two published works. These include _A discourse of the subtill practises of deuilles by witches and sorcerers_ (1587) and _A Dialogue Concerning Witches and Witchcrafts_ (1593). George Gifford is considered a moderate in the witchcraft debate, believing in the existence of witches, and that they should be severely punished. Thomas Addy, author of _A Candle in the Dark_, writes that among a number of other English writers, George Gifford allowed himself to be seduced into believing false information about witches.(166)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 166

George Gifford George Gifford Preacher/Minister
2350

A number of men and women, from Old Gravel Lane in an unknown area of England, who including "Ministers and others." These people visit a woman (Anonymous 19) who is allegedly possessed by a spirit (Anonymous 240) that speaks through her. When questioned by Anonymous 483, the spirit admits to being sent to possess Anonymous 19 by "a Woman below" (Anonymous 239), and that he was sent to prevent the woman from convincing her husband (Anonymous 482) to be baptized. The ministers and others also ask the spirit how long he intends the possess the woman, to which he replied "As long as he could." Anonymous 483 collectively seem to agree that the spirit is probably the Devil.(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. News from Old-Gravel Lane. London: 1675, 3

Anonymous 483 (Plural) Preacher/Minister