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List of all events occurring in the persontype of

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
221

A man from Netherbury, Dorset, a magician, physician, witch, and wizard, John Walsh represents himself as having all kind of occult and practical powers, learned from Robert of Dreiton. He has access to fairies, familiars, and can do image magic, but can not heal. ()

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination of John Walsh before Master Thomas Williams. London: 1566,

John Walsh John Walsh Physician
396

A man from Luyck in Brussels, known to be a physician and the author of the account of a young girl's bewitchment and cure which was translated from Latin and inserted into "The most true and wonderfull narration of two women bewitched in Yorkshire." He takes Anonymous 11, a nine-year-old girl who suffers convulsive fits and vomits a variety of strange objects, as a patient. He witnessed her vomiting, monitored her while she was unable to eat for 15 days at a time, and recorded her strange swellings and convulsions. de Heer claimed to pull a pin, a threaded needle, straws and more directly from her throat with his hand, disproving claims that she faked her bewitchment. He has her drink a decoction of various herbs and makes an ointment for her joints, both of which he provides the recipe for, which he claims cured her affliction and would be effective in other cases of bewitchment.(Title Page)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, Title Page

Henri de Heer Henri de Heer Physician
412

A man from Yowell in the county of Surrey, known to be a doctor and a cunning-person, whom the parents of Mary Farmer allegedly consulted on the matter of her bewitchment. He is said to have confirmed that Mary was "under an ill tongue" and advised Mr. and Mrs. Farmer to save Mary's urine, close it in a bottle and bury it in the earth, then burn Mary's clothes, and that this would draw out the witch who had afflicted her.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. An Account of the Tryal and Examination of Joan Buts, for being a Common Witch and Inchantress. London: 1682, 1

Bourn Dr. Bourn Physician
416

An unknown number of men from Luyck in Brussels, known to be physicians. They, along with an unknown number of female physicians, came to examine the young maid, Anonymous 11, after she began to suffer convulsive fits. Though they tried numerous remedies, none had any effect on the girl.(5-6)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-6

Anonymous 47 Physician
417

An unknown number of women from Luyck in Brussels, known to be physicians. They, along with an unknown number of male physicians, came to examine the young maid, Anonymous 11, after she began to suffer convulsive fits. Though they tried numerous remedies, none had any effect on the girl.(5-6)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-6

Anonymous 48 Physician
558

A man who observes Christian Shaw vomit "coal-finders" the size of chesnuts.(4)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 4

Brisbane Dr. Brisbane Physician
616

A professor of Physic and Surgery, presumably from Rochester in the county of Kent, who allegedly taught Mother Bungy about human anatomy and surgery(341-342)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 341-342

Heron Dr. Heron Physician
621

A Master of Art and practitioner of Physick who learns his craft from a three-hundred year old book written by Sir John Malborne, a divine of Oxenford. (337-338)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 337-338

T. E. T. E. Physician
635

A famous physician and alchemist in England who infamously sold purgatives. Likely Queen Elizabeth's German physician, Burchard Kranich, who was often referred to by contemporaries as Dr. Burcot. The same Burcot who also appears in Henry Chettle's Kind Harts Dream. Burcot allegedly 'bought' a familiar spirit from Thomas Hilles (aka Feats), with which he "thought to have wrought miracles, or rather to have gained good store of money." The combination of his purgatives and his move into magics make one think he may have practiced exorcisms. (107)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 107

Burcot Dr. Burcot Physician
691

A man from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be a Doctor of Physick, whom Samuel Pacy consulted for advice when his daughter Deborah Pacy began having strange fits. Dr. Feavor gave deposition in court stating that he had examined Deborah and observed her in her fits, but could not diagnose their cause.(20)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 20

Feavor Dr. Feavor Physician
706

A man from Norwich in the County of Suffolk, known to be a physician and a well-known author, who was called on as an expert witness at the trial of Amy Denny and Rose Cullender. Dr. Brown opined that their victims had indeed been bewitched, and suggested that the fits experienced by Jane Bocking, Susan Chandler, Elizabeth Durent, Elizabeth Pacy and Deborah Pacy were menstrual hysteria amplified by the devil with the cooperation of witches.(44-45)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 44-45

Thomas Browne Sir Thomas Browne Physician
728

An astrologer and medical practitioner, living at Mr. Loft's, in King-Street, St. Ann's, Westminster, Richard Kirby allegedly helped cure Jane Walter of East-Basham near Feaknam in Norfolk, a young man in Suffolk, the daughter of John Ballard of Ditchingham-Dam, near Bungy in Norfolk, Ann Burgess in St. Edmunds Parish, near Five Bridge, in Norwich, and Sarah Bower.(3)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 3

Richard Kirby Richard Kirby Physician
751

A man from Maidstone in the county of Kent, described as the doctor of Ann Ashby. Dr. Gresham is imprisoned and not allowed to speak with anyone. (4-5)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 4-5

Gresham Dr. Gresham Physician
789

The primary care physician to Faith Corbet. Dr. Taylor first provided Henry Corbet medical advice by post in 1660. He took Faith Corbet in and she lived in his care from some time in 1662 until May 21 1663. On April 3 1664 sent 'Cordials and other Physick.' On April 24 1663, Dr. Taylor met with Dr. Whitty and Dr. Corbet about Faith, and then spoke with her.(53-54, 55-56)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 53-54, 55-56

Taylor Dr. Taylor Physician
790

A man from Beverley in the county of York, described as a physician who Henry Corbet hired him to help treat his daughter Faith's fits. Dr. Whitty was consulted in 1660, when he stayed the night in the Corbet home, where he 'admiring' Faith's fits and gave her 'one thing or another' as treatment. He was called on again, along with Dr. Taylor and Dr. Whitty, on April 24th, where the three physicians consulted one another and then spoke with Faith herself.(54, 56)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 54, 56

Whitty Dr. Whitty Physician
791

A man from Hull in the county of York, described as a physician who Henry Corbet hired in 1660 to help treat his daughter Faith's fits. Dr. York would appear again on April 24, 1663, when he consulted with Drs. Taylor and Whitty about Faith's health and then spoke with the girl themselves.(54, 56)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 54, 56

Corbet Dr. Corbet Physician
814

A man from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be a physician, who gives evidence that Lady Powell's sickness and death was due to "Dropsie, the Scurvey, and the yellow Jaundies" and therefore altogether natural. Together with fellow examining physicians Dr. Colladen, Dr. Goddard and Dr. Chabrey, and surgeons Mr. Stamford and Mr. Page, he "wondered how she was able to live so long, having most of those diseases growing on her for many years before." His testimony helps prove Anne Levingstone innocent in her aunt's death, and by extension, that Joan Peterson cannot have used witchcraft to assist in Lady Powell's death.(6-7, 10-11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 6-7, 10-11

George Bates Dr. Bates Physician
815

A man from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be a physician, who gives evidence that Lady Mary Powell's sickness and death was due to "Dropsie, the Scurvey, and the yellow Jaundies" and therefore altogether natural. Together with fellow examining physicians Dr. Bates, Dr. Goddard and Dr. Chabrey, and surgeons Mr. Stamford and Mr. Page, he "wondered how she was able to live so long, having most of those diseases growing on her for many years before." His testimony helps prove Anne Levingstone innocent in her aunt's death, and by extension, that Joan Peterson cannot have used witchcraft to assist in Lady Powell's death.(6-7, 10-11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 6-7, 10-11

Colledon Dr. Colledon Physician
827

A physician who determines that John Hart was murdered by witchcraft.(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches. London: 1690, 3

Anonymous 119 Physician
836

A physician who prescribed Katheren Malpas some kind of drink to treat her fits.()

Appears in:
Anonymous. Examinat[i]o . . . Attorn[atus] gen[er]alis quer[ens] v[e]r[su]s Tho[mas] Saunders et Kathere[n] Malpas senior def[endan]tes. The National Archives (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), Star Chamber (STAC) 8 32/13, fol. 1v.: 1622,

Theodore Gulston Dr. Theodore Gulston Physician
855

A man who is the master of John Walsh. Dreiton allegedly teaches Walsh the art of physic and surgery.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination of John Walsh before Master Thomas Williams. London: 1566, 2

Robert Dreiton Robert Dreiton Physician
878

A Doctor whom Dorcas Coleman appeals to for a remedy for her physical pains. Beare cannot heal Coleman and informs her that she has been bewitched.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 2

George Beare Dr. George Beare Physician
883

A man from Marseille, France, described as a doctor of divinity who observes Magdalen of the Marish's fits over a period of five weeks.(19)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Life and Death of Lewis Gaufredy. London: 1612, 19

Frier Sebastian Michell Dr. Frier Sebastian Michell Physician
922

A London physician who brought Elizabeth Jennings to London in 1622 to administer treatment for her fits and convulsions. Dr. Fox in one of at least two physicians who treated Jennings. ()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

Fox Dr. Fox Physician
923

A man (Anonymous 140) from London described as a physician who administered treatment to Elizabeth Jennings for her fits and convulsions, the "medicines rather producing contrary effects." Anonymous 140 is one of at least two physicians who treated Jennings. ()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

Anonymous 140 Physician
925

A woman in London, wife of Henry Goodcole, and appears to have been a "female physician" in her own right. She claimed under oath to have visited Lady Jennings' daughter, in the company of Lady Fowler, leaving medicine for Elizabeth, but her advise and treatment appear to have been unheeded. ()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

Anne Goodcole Anne Goodcole Physician
960

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, described as a physician and astrologer employed by John Barrow to help cure his son, James Barrow. Hubbard states he is familiar with these sorts of conditions and believes that James Barrow has been bewitched.(8)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 8

John Hubbard John Hubbard Physician
996

A Doctor who, in his book, accuses Dr. Dees of "having familiarity with Devils for many years in his life time."(8)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 8

Dr. Casaubon Physician
1024

An unknown number of men from Spittal in the county of Northumberland, known to be physicians "both of soule and body." Mary Moore sent for them when her daughter, Margaret Muschamp, first became afflicted with tormenting fits. They were unable to help: "her signes from the beginning were, away with these Doctors Drugs, God had layd it on her, and God would take it off her."(3)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 3

Anonymous 150 Physician
1052

A physician/ surgeon who dissects a familiar in an attempt to prove that witchcraft does not exists.(282-285)

Appears in:
Bickley et al., A.C.. The Gentleman's Magazine Library. London: 1884, 282-285

William Harvey Dr. William Harvey Physician
1167

A man from Warwick in the county of Warwickshire, described as a physician who allegedly treats Hanna Crump for the symptoms of possession.(18)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 18

Anonymous 161 Anonymous 161 Physician
1196

A man from Burton upon Trent in the county of Staffordshire, described as a physician who examined Thomas Darling's urine and "saw no signes of anie natural disease in the Child, vnles it were the wormes." Asked to reconsider his diagnosis when Darling failed to thrive, he again "judged as before, saying further, he doubted that the Childe was be witched."(2)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 2

Anonymous 180 Physician
1233

A man from Windsor in the county of Berkshire, known to be a student of physic, who participates in the brutal intimidation of alleged witches Mistress Audrey, Elizabeth Stile, Mother Dutton and Mother Devell, by "holding a good cudgel over their backs" as Richard Galis demanded they not attempt to lie, but rather tell what ailed Robert Handley and ease his grief.(Image 6)

Appears in:
Galis, Richard. A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates. London: 1572, Image 6

Henry Bust Henry Bust Physician
1244

A man from Bristol in the county of Bristol, described as one of the physicians consulted about the alleged bewitchment of the Merideth children. The physic provided by the doctor (as well as others) is recorded as having contributed to their admirable recovery.(167-169)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 167-169

Anonymous 199 Physician
1249

A number of physicians from Norwich in the county of Norfolk, described as being consulted to treat and diagnose Thomas Younges' mysterious wasting illness (allegedly caused by Henry Smith's curse).(58-59)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 58-59

Anonymous 202 Physician
1265

A man from High Halden in the county of Kent, described as an doctor and chemist. Dr. Jorden is most famously known for having been chief doctor in the cases of Mary Glover and Anne Gunter, two demoniacs. In both cases, Dr. Jorden refuted witchcraft as being the cause of their symptoms. During the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, the woman accused of bewitching Mary Glover, he came forward with another doctor, Dr. Argent, despite not having been asked to appear by the court. This was likely devised by Bishop Bancroft, a man who believed Mary Glover was counterfeiting her symptoms. Dr. Jorden testified during the trial, attempting to provide evidence with Dr. Argent that Glover's "ailment was not supernatural." Dr. Jorden claimed that the girl was likely afflicted with "passio hysterica." However, when pressed by the judge, Jorden "would not confirm that the disease could be cured," and further declined to treat the girl. He admitted during the trial that he did not thing Mary Glover was counterfeiting, prompting the judge, Lord Anderson to reply, "Then in my conscience, it is not naturall; for if you tell me neither a Naturall cause of it, nor a naturall remedy, I will tell you, that it is not naturall." Elizabeth Jorden was found guilty of witchcraft despite his attempt to intervene. This prompted Dr. Jorden to write his first text, "A Briefe Discourse of a Disease Called the Suffocation of the Mother." (1603) The text was written to show how "diuers strange actions and passions of the body of a man, which in the common opinion, are imputed to the Diuell, haue their true naturall causes, and do accompanie this disease." This text spurred a huge controversy, prompting fellows from both the College of Physicians such as Dr. Stephen Bradwell, and students of divinity, such as John Swan, to write their own texts, accusing Dr. Jorden of being a fearful scholar, unwilling to identify Mary Glover in his works, and dividing the opinion of physicians with "misconceipts." Dr. Bradwell further explains that Dr. Jorden "found, that neither all his books, observations, nor friends, were able to drawe out, the just limitts of that dissease." Yet, the first text he published, "A Briefe Discourse," was "the first book by an English physician which reclaimed the demoniacally possessed for medicine." Because of this, it was a notable text, that was responsible for dividing opinions at the College in London. Historically, the text has also been noted for its "transfer of the seat of all hysterical manifestations from the uterus to the brain," which was a "major turning point in the history of hysteria." Despite the trying of Elizabeth Jackson as a witch, and the response to his first published text, Dr. Jorden "played a major part in events that began the decline of witchcraft." The King came to value his opinion; the impression that Dr. Jorden left claiming that "much apparent witchcraft and possession was caused by hysteria," was strong. King James would call upon Dr. Jorden in 1605, when a young woman in Berkshire named Anne Gunter claimed to be bewitched. Her symptoms were similar to those of Mary Glover, save that Anne Gunter was thought to vomit pins - a classical sign of possession. Dr. Jorden immediately suspected that Gunter was conterfeit, giving her "neutral potions" that he claimed were powerful medicine. When Gunter reported that these "greatly relieved her symptoms," Dr. Jorden was more convinced. He next tested the woman using a test that was performed on Mary Glover: reciting the Lord's Prayer and the Apostle's Creed. Anne Gunter reacted with "expected convulsions," but only when the prayers were spoken in English, not Latin. This confirmed Anne Gunter's counterfeit, as the Devil was believed to be "an expert Latinist," resulting in Anne Gunter's confession. Dr. Jorden would publish a second text in his lifetime, "A Discourse of Naturall Bathes, and Minerall Waters" (1631). "A Discourse of Naturall Bathes" was a much more successful book than the former, going through five editions in the seventeenth century. Dr. Jorden was in fact a Fellow at the College of Physicians at the time of the publishing of both his texts, although he spent much of his practice in Bath. During his work, he gained the confidence of King James, and was allowed the treat the Queen on her visits to Bath, although he was never a Royal Physician. The physician married into the gentry, and wed his daughter to a mayor of Bath. (12-13)

Appears in:
Jorden, Edward. A Discourse of Natural Bathes, and Mineral Waters. London: 1669, 12-13

Edward Jorden Dr. Edward Jorden Physician
1270

A man who gives Grace Matthew "physical directions" (medical advice) to help her husband who has been ill for the past three years and whom she believes has been bewitched.(149-150)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 149-150

Browne Dr. Browne Physician
1351

One of several physicians who treat Israel Amyce for a mysterious and alleged malefic illness. They "could not tell what to make of it, the manner of it was so strange unto them." They do not provide a cure for Amyce. ()

Appears in:
Roberts, R. A.. Calendar of the Cecil Papers in Hatfield House, Volume 10: 1600. Unknown: 1904,

Anonymous 226 Physician
1389

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a physician. He stayed with Margaret Muschamp during the last of her tormenting fits, and witnessed her final speech.(18, 24)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 18, 24

Stephens Dr. Stephens Physician
1396

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a physician and the husband of Mrs. Clether. Dr. Clether, with Mrs. Clether, was present as a witness in the Judge's chamber when Mary Moore begged justice against Dorothy Swinow on behalf of her family. While Moore was arguing her case, Margaret Muschamp fell into a fit, related "before them all DOROTHY SVVINOVVS malice from the beginning," and begged too for justice. The judge denied Moore and Muschamp, and declared Muschamp's fit to be feigned. (15-16)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 15-16

Clether Dr. Clether Physician
1400

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a physician and the husband of Mrs. Genison. Dr. Genison witnessed Mary Moore's plea to remove Dorothy Swinow to Northumberland, which was met with denial and the Counsellor's refusal to meddle in the matter. She heard Margaret Muschamp claim that Swinow had hardened the hearts of the judges and justices against Moore, and her statement of determination to take up the matter with the judge again the next day. Dr. Genison invited Moore and her children to his house, which was next door to the Judge's chamber to wait for another appointment. He, along with Mrs. Genison, was also present as a witness in the Judge's chamber when Moore again begged justice against Dorothy Swinow on behalf of her family. While Moore was arguing her case, Muschamp fell into a fit, related "before them all DOROTHY SVVINOVVS malice from the beginning," and begged too for justice. The judge denied Moore and Muschamp, and declared Muschamp's fit to be feigned. (14-16)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 14-16

Genison Dr. Genison Physician
1466

A physician from Berkhamstead in the county of Hertfordshire, known as a man "famous in curing bewitched persons," who spent the better part of a year attempting to cure Mary Hall from a bewitchment by two spirits which belonged to Goodwife Harod and Goodwife Young. Throughout the course of her bewitchment, Hall was plagued by shaking limbs, convulsions, and startling speech acts; Woodhouse treated her with a myriad of different techniques. He administered an emetic, in the form of "stinking suffumigations," (used in exorcisms) he cut off her fingernails and hung them by the fireplace (as a form of coutermagic), administered her "some Liquor" which made her faint (medical / exorcism), restrained her "in her Chair" (exorcism), and gave her opium (medical). He remained convinced that Hall was possessed, a conviction based, at least in part on the erudite agreement of two medical colleagues who had visited the Nuns at Loudan.(32, 34, 36, 37, 38-39)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 32, 34, 36, 37, 38-39

Woodhouse Dr. Woodhouse Physician
1468

A man from Amersham in the county of Buckinghamshire, described as "Conjurer," or an "honest and able Physician," Redman appears to be an untrained, but practicing physician / cunningman, who was "once sent to Prison" for either practicing medicine without a license, or witchcraft. Mary Hall's possessing spirits suggest Redman could help heal her. Redman instructs her parents to "take the length of the Child with a Stick, and measure so much ground in the Churchyard, and there dig, and bury the Stick of the Childs length, and the Child suddenly recovered." Although Redman appears to heal, in part with the aid of astrology, his pratice seems based on sympathetic magic. He once advised a client to urinate in a hole in the crossroads to cure himself of Ague and another to boil an egg in urine and bury it in an ant hill to cure his distemper. Although his practice crosses magic, medicine, and folklore, it is not actually witchcraft. (39-40)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 39-40

Redman Dr. Redman Physician
1478

A man from Hitchin in the county of Hertfordshire (baptized at Raunds, in the county of Northamptonshire), an author, physician, and apothecary, who published a medical compendium, _A Physical Nosonomy (1664)_ and _ Daimonomageia_ (1665) a description of the symptoms of and treatments for witchcraft. Drage provides, in this tract, eye witness testimony about the possession of Mary Hall, and second hand accounts of numerous other bewitchments. Drage's interest in possession and bewitchment may not have been completely academic; he allegedly suffered (not unlike Mart Hall herself) from "poor health throughout his life, being subject to dropsy and convulsions."()

Appears in:
Capp, Bernard. Drage, William (bap. 1636, d. 1668)". Online: http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/8016: 2004,

William Drage William Drage Physician
1655

A doctor from Hoo in the county of Kent who, along with 18 other people, accuses Thomas Whiteing of having bewitched Sarah Curtis so that her body was "greatly wasted, pined, and consumed."(150-157)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 150-157

Faber Dr. Faber Physician
1656

A doctor from Hoo in the county of Kent who, along with 18 other people, accuses Thomas Whiteing of having bewitched Sarah Curtis so that her body was "greatly wasted, pined, and consumed."(150-157)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 150-157

Hooker Dr. Hooker Physician
1657

A doctor from Hoo in the county of Kent who, along with 18 other people, accuses Thomas Whiteing of having bewitched Sarah Curtis so that her body was "greatly wasted, pined, and consumed."(150-157)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 150-157

Robinson Dr. Robinson Physician
1671

A man from Thetford in the county of Norfolk, and possibly to son of Augstine Steward, alderman of Norfolk, Styward acts as a physician and examines alleged demoniac Joan Harvey. Harvey attributed her "divers fits" to being bewitched by Margaret Fraunces, however Styward concludes that she suffers from "nothing else but a disease called the Mother commonly, or as Phisicke calleth it uteri suffocatio or strangulatio which hath her natural cause. After this examination Styward writes to Sir Gawry and beseeches him to release Mother Fraunces from jail. (71)

Appears in:
Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, . Report on the manuscripts of the family of Gawdy, formerly of Norfolk. . London: 1885, 71

Augustine Styward Augustine Styward Physician
1694

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is called upon as a physician by Mrs. Pigeon to treat her husband, Mr. Pigeon, after she drugs him and he "became altogether senselesse, feeble and irrationall, so that she feared he would never returne to his reason againe." He vomits Mr. Pigeon twice, bringing him close to death, but Mr. Pigeon eventually recovers.(5)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 5

Burges Dr. Burges Physician
1697

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is consulted as a physician in secret by Andrew Goodwin, Mr. Goodwin's son. Andrew Goodwin brings the water of an ailing apprentice, Roger Crey, to Dr. Burnet after his father refuses to allow a doctor to see Roger Crey instead of Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones. Roger Crey's condigion is continually declining, but Dr. Burnet "at the first sight of the water he tells him, the party was a dead man, past all recovery; and that if good help had been sought in time, in all probability he might have done well."(14)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14

Burnet Dr. Burnet Physician
1719

A surgeon from Wivenhow in the county of Essex who examines Annaball Durrant's two year old child after she had allegedly been bewitched by Mary Johnson. Although Dawber does not diagnose the little girl with bewitchment, he claims he "could find no naturall cause of its lamenesse." The child dies eight days later in torment. (24)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 24

Dawber Mr. Dawber Physician
1733

A man from Dunwich in the county of Suffolk, described as a Professing Physick, treated alleged demoniac Thomas Spatchet for his fits. From his observations of Spatchet's fits, he concluded that they were no ordinary contraction of nerves, but rather a continual motion. When the fits wore off, he observed that Spatchet would sometimes be left stretched out like a dead man.(26)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 26

Anonymous 320 Physician
1844

A man from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who refuses to treat Richard Dugdale as a doctor, and who believes that Richard Dugdale's fits are "more than a Natural Distemper."(65)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 65

Whittaker Dr. Whittaker Physician
1879

A man from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who treats Richard Dugdale's fits as his doctor for some time. Dr. Crabtree is sought out by Richard Dugdale's father, but after his attentions, Richard Dugdale's fits become more violent. Dr. Crabtree concludes that, "if the Spirit in Richard Dugdale was a Water-Spirit, there was no cure for it." (59)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 59

Crabtree Dr. Crabtree Physician
1880

A man from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who Richard Dugdale visits with his father, Thomas Dugdale, and his uncle. Dr. Chew administers "physicks" to Richard Dugdale for his violent fits. When no effect is had, Richard Dugdale seeks out another doctor, Dr. Crabtree, and eventually a minister, Mr. Jolly. However, Richard Dugdale then returns to Dr. Chew, "And says likewise that he had a Fit on the 24th of March, at Evening, and on the 25th of March, in the Morning, he took Physick from Dr. Chew, and says, that the Physick worked well with him, and since that time, he says, he never had any fit: But says that the strange things that befel him, occasions him to believe that the Disease was not ordinary. "(63)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 63

Chew Dr. Chew Physician
1885

A man from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be a physician, who gives evidence that Lady Powell's sickness and death was due to "Dropsie, the Scurvey, and the yellow Jaundies" and therefore altogether natural. Together with fellow examining physicians Dr. Colladen, Dr. Bates and Dr. Chabrey, and surgeons Mr. Stamford and Mr. Page, he "wondered how she was able to live so long, having most of those diseases growing on her for many years before." His testimony helps prove Anne Levingstone innocent in her aunt's death, and by extension, that Joan Peterson cannot have used witchcraft to assist in Lady Powell's death.(6-7,10-11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 6-7,10-11

Goddard Dr. Goddard Physician
1930

An unknown number of doctors and surgeons from the London Borough of Southwark, known to practice in St. Thomas' Hospital, under whose care Richard Hathaway stayed while allegedly afflicted by Mrs. Sarah Morduck. They were unable to cure him of his blindness nor his inability to eat and drink.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 1

Anonymous 369 Physician
1948

A man from Spitalfields in the borough of Greater London, known to be a doctor, to whom Mr. Chamblet came for advice on un-witching his wife Mrs. Chamblet after the death of their daughter Elizabeth; Dr. Ha[w]ks advises that Mr. Chamblet boil a quart of Mrs. Chamblet's urine with parings from her nails and some of her hair.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Proceedings at the Sessions of Oyer and Terminer. London: 1682, 4

Ha[...]ks Dr. Ha[w]ks Physician
1976

A man from Lawrack in the County of Cornwall, known to be a physician, whom John Roberts consulted to discover the cause of alleged demoniac Thomas Sawdie's illness. Sawdie's urine was found to be full of black dust and something that looked like rags of brown paper, which Carey proclaimed bewitched. He prescribed a julep, a plaster, a cordial of Alchermes and some other things, but none of it helped.(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Return of Prayer: or A Faithful Relation of Some Remarkable Passages of Providence concerning Thomas Sawdie. London: 1664, 3

Cary Mr. Cary Physician
2015

A man from the country of Holland, who visits Lancaster in the county of Lancashire as a stranger. He touches a lump which appears on Richard Dugdale's body, and the lump allegedly speaks to him, warning him that as a Doctor of Physick, there is nothing he can do for Richard Dugdale, who can only be attended by Doctors of Divinity. It is revealed that the stranger is a physician.(42)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, 42

Anonymous 381 Physician
2027

A number of doctors from areas around the county of Kent, who attempt to treat Susan Woldredge for her mysterious illness, but who never find a cure.(14)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 14

Anonymous 387 (Plural) Physician
2038

A man from Westram in the county of Kent, who is a "Student of Physick and Astrology." He writes about his "marvelous cures" accomplished in Kent, Sussex, and Surrey. Dr. Skinner attends to Margaret Gurr who is "afflicted with Devils," which "entred into her, and spake in her, and tempted her to Kill her self;" as well as flown through the air by these devils and a witch. Dr. Skinner allegedly "cast out the Devils and Witch," essentially exorcising the demons from Margaret Gurr and curing her "of the scurvy and gout," she suffered from, within "the compass of twelve days, in which time with a Physical, Natural, and other means used, [she] was perfectly restored to [her] former health." The devils and witch never "attempted to meddle with [her] since." As well, as a result of Dr. Skinner's administrations, Margaret Gurr was granted the miracle of being able to read the Bible, "which before [she] could not." Dr. Skinner is also responsible for curing a young male servant of Henry Chowning, in Kent. The boy was allegedly visited by a spirit in the form of a greyhound, and came home "in a great fright" and "amazed." When the boy turns ill, he "grew worse and worse," and his speech began to fail, causing people around him to "resolve to look out for help, for the fear'd the Boy would make away with himself," as he suffered from an "extream melancholy." It was believed that the boy was "under an evil Tongue or bewitcht." It was upon this decision to seek help that Henry Chowning called upon Dr. Skinner, "hearing of the many Cures I have done," and Dr. Skinner "examined the business and well consider'd of it." He decides the boy is "possest with the Devil," as his eyes were fixed, and the boy confesses to Dr. Skinner "that he was tempted in his mind, and was led on and tempted to strange things, as to go to Sea." The boy also "seemed to ammend while he was in the room with" Dr. Skinner, and Dr. Skinner fells he "understood what the means must be that must relieve him, and gave order for the putting up of Medicines." These are administered quickly, and the doctor tells the boy's mother to visit him in a week. When she does, she tells him that the boy was "much ammended, to the admiration of many that heard how it was." Dr. Skinner provides more medicine for the boy when the boy complains of "a pain in his belly," and the boy is made well in "18 days time," so that "neither hath any thing attempted to trouble him since in the least." This is the second dispossession Dr. Skinner successfully treated with medicine. Dr. Skinner also treats Susan Woldredge in Sussex, who suffered from "the Evil in her Eyes, and a great Rheum and inflammation." Her father, Mr. Woldredge seeks out Dr. Skinner after several other doctors failed to help her, and upon finding Dr. Skinner, he is advised "she would be well and [to] go home." Mr. Woldredge did so, and at first, his daughter was "in extream misery with swelling and raging pain in her Eyes," but miraculously "on a sudden it began to mend." Her father visits the doctor again, and the doctor "send her a purge with some other matter," and she was made "perfectly well and continued every since." Her friends reward Dr. Skinner. Dr. Skinner is also responsible for the miraculous cure of a woman in West Groustead in Sussex, who suffered from an "Evil in her Throat." She encounters Dr. Skinner at a fair, and although he had "nought to give her," he bids her to come over. She promises to, and fails to show. Dr. Skinner sends inquiry as to why she never visited him, and finds that from the moment she met Dr. Skinner "she found her self begin to mend," and was cured. Dr. Skinner is also responsible for the miraculous cure of Goody Halle in Sevenoaks, Kent, who suffered from "the most lamentable pain in her head," which was so severe, she could not sleep. Several doctors fail to treat her, yet when she visited Dr. Skinner, "she was at ease immediately, and [...] Cured from that time," by the use of medicines Dr. Skinner provided. She remained afterward "in vivide and perfect health."(Cover)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, Cover

Iohn Skinner Dr. John Skinner Physician
2130

A man from Bewdley in the county of Worcestershire, who help treat "a Sanguine strong maid" (Anonymous 409) for her "strange Histerical Fits." Mr. Robert Morton is the father of Dr. Morton, and the pastor and physician of the parish. When Mr. Robert Morton is taken away to Coventry," Anonymous 409 who was at first healing, "grew worse than ever." Her fits culminated in a "suror uterinus ex corruptione Seminis," and she seemed possessed by a devil. Mr. Robert Morton never returns to Bewdley.(193-194)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 193-194

Robert Morton Mr. Robert Morton Physician
2131

A man from Bridgnorth in the county of Shropshire, who is the author of the text, "The certainty of the worlds of spirits and, consequently, of the immortality of souls of the malice and misery of the devils and the damned : and of the blessedness of the justified, fully evinced by the unquestionable histories of apparitions, operations, witchcrafts, voices &c. / written, as an addition to many other treatises for the conviction of Sadduces and infidels." While in Bewdley, he treats a "Sanguine strong maid," (Anonymous 409) for her "strange Histerical fits" by giving her "Castory and Rad. Ostrutii, and Sem. Dauci," which seems to help her for a time. After, Richard Baxter is "driven out of the Country by War," which causes Anonymous 409 to "grew worse than ever." Richard Baxter believes that "by a suror uterinus ex corruptione Seminis," she appeared to be "possest by a Devil." Five years later, in 1647, Richard Baxter comes back to Bewdley, and "went to see her, and Prayed once by her, and came to her no more." However, his actions encourage the neighbours to pray for Anonymous 409, resulting in her cure one day, when she cries out during a fit caused by prayers, "He is gone, He is gone; The Black Dog is gone!" Upon hearing the tale of how a young man (Anonymous 411) succumbed to his lust during several of Anonymous 409's fits, as she "toss[ed] her naked Body about, she being strong and comely." The young man claims that after they sinned together, she was eased for a time, "enticing him the more to do it," as an "Act of (Wicked) Compassion." Richard Baxter feels that this did not but "Enrage her Disease," and that "a Real possession was added to the furor uterinius" of the young maid, "in punishment of their Sin." Although the young man and the maid marry, and professed deep Repentance, Richard Baxter "advised them for all that, not to receive him to Church-Communion."(193-194)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 193-194

Richard Baxter Richard Baxter Physician
2153

A number of people from Winchester in the county of Hampshire, who act as physicians for a schoolmistress (Anonymous 418), suffering from a number of violent fits. They advise her that the "inner parts of her body were wounded by some Diabolical Art," and ordered her to move houses. This did not work, however, as the schoolmistress (Anonymous 418) still suffered from fits in her new house.(192)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 192

Anonymous 420 (Plural) Physician
2227

A man from Cambridge in the county of Cambridgeshire, known to be a doctor and "a man well knowne to be excellent skilfull in Phisicke." Robert Throckmorton consulted with him when his daughter Jane, the first of the Throckmorton children to become sick, initially became afflicted with fits. The first time he concluded there was nothing wrong with Elizabeth (unless she was troubled with worms); the second time, her declared her free from the falling sickness and sent her a prescription, but it is not clear disorder the medicine was meant to treat; the third time in, he inquired as to whether there was no sorcery or witchcraft suspected in the childe. Although the answere was made no, her concluded that he could find no natural cause for Janes malady and suggested Robert Throckmorton consult Dr. Philip Butler for a second opinion. Butler prescribed the same medicines to Jane as Barrow had; the Throckmortons did not bother administering, nor any other medicines. Doctor Barrow had said that "if Master Throckmorton (to whome hee wished very well as he then said, by reason of auncient acquaintance with him) woulde follow his advice, he should not striue any more there with by Physicke, nor spend any more money about it: for he himselfe said, that he had some experience of the mallice of some witches, and he verily thought that there was some kind of sorcerie & witchcraft wrought towards his childe." (3-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3-6

Philip Barrow Dr. Philip Barrow Physician
2265

A doctor from Arpington in the county of Kent, and an acquaintance of Anonymous 32, the maid from Bexly near Arpington who is allegedly possessed by two spirits. He prays next to her often as onlookers (Anonymous 449) come to see Anonymous 32 as her condition deteriorates as a result of the spirits/devils that are in her cause her teeth begin to "squeeze" and her eyes begin to sink into her head. He allegedly hears one of the spirits (Anonymous 18 and Anonymous 88) on one occasion (along with Mrs. Hopper) who barked twice through the maid. He is said to be the maid's most frequent visitant and her state allegedly improved in his presence. On one occasion, while praying over the maid in front of many witnesses, a spirit (Anonymous 18) leaves the maid, and flies towards Doctor Boreman in the form of a snake. It remains wrapped around his neck for some time before some people come forward and try to remove it, causing the snake to vanish and never appear again.(3-4)

Appears in:
Hopper, Mrs. Strange News from Arpington near Bexly in Kent being a True Narrative of a Young Maid who was Possest with Several Devils or Evil Spirits. London: 1679, 3-4

Boreman Doctor Boreman Physician
2278

A dozen men from the Physician's College in London, who are called together to evaluate the petition Elizabeth Jackson presents the College on November 13, 1602. The old woman, Elizabeth Jackson, petitions the College, specifically against Dr. Mounford, Dr. Herring, and Dr. Bradwell, who accused her of being involved in the bewitchment of Mary Glover, a young girl suffering from mysterious fits. These men consider the case, asking the doctors to come forward and explain themselves. Dr. Mounford was away, but the other two doctors explain how they were persuaded by Mary Glover's symptoms, and the voice that says 'hang her, hang her' that comes through her nostrils. Many of the fellows favour Elizabeth Jackson, "maintaining that Mary Glover was not bewitched by afflicted with some natural disease." These men are described as "men of great learning," including the most eminent members of the College.(xv)

Appears in:
McDonald, Michael. Witchcraft and Hysteria in Elizabethan London: Edward Jorden and the Mary Glover Case. London: 1990, xv

Anonymous 462 (Plural) Physician
2292

A man from London, who assists Dr. Shereman in treating the fourteen year old Mary Glover for her fits. Anonymous 442 is a surgeon, and both men treat Mary Glover for quincy (or supperative tonsilitis). However, the girl still has difficulty swallowing, and it seems nothing helps except "by thrusting som finger or instrument lowe into her throte." The doctor and the surgeon are unable to cure the girl, and conclude that the cause of her illness must be supernatural. (Fol. 5r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 5r

Anonymous 442 Physician
2295

A man from London, who attends to the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover, as her first physician and a fellow of the College of Physicians, "and as such a member of the country's medical elite." He works with a surgeon (Anonymous 442), at first to cure Mary Glover of her swollen throat and neck. However, although he administers "sundry remedies, for the squinacy," (tonsilitis), nothing seemed to work, and the only thing that brought the girl ease was "by thrusting som finger, or instrument lowe into her throte." Mary Glover suffers from these symptoms some eighteen days, before she is able to eat again. However, at the end of that time, "her belly was swelled, and shewed in it, and in the brest, certaine movings," as well as her previous symptoms of dumbness, blindness, and swelling of the throat. At this point, Dr. Shereman begins to suspect that Mary Glover is suffering from "som supernaturall cause." However, he attempts to treat the girl for "hystericall passions," and the disease known as the suffocation of the mother, which was believed to share many traits with possession. However, any attempts to cure the girl "prooved in vaine," and he concluded that she was afflicted by supernatural beings. The parents of Mary Glover decide to pursue the help of a different doctor after that time. (Fol. 5r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 5r

Robert Shereman Dr. Robert Shereman Physician
2299

A man from London, who was admitted to the College of Physicians in 1594, despite lacking his MD. Dr. Bradwell was noted for his "courageous service," during an epidemic of the plague. He gained "considerable influence and intellectual ability." The son-in-law of the distinguished physician, John Banister, Dr. Bradwell nevertheless found himself often at odds with the College, as well as his notorious "insolence, alleged ignorance, and unseemly advertising." Dr. Bradwell published numerous religious and scientific works, including "Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case" (1603). Involved in the Mary Glover case quite early on, Dr. Bradwell was one among many physicians that "perpetuated a division," as to the cause of Mary Glover's symptoms. Mary Glover was a young girl suffering from mysterious fits, allegedly caused by the curses of the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson. Dr. Bradwell believed that Mary Glover suffered from supernatural causes, and was brought to petition by Elizabeth Jackson on November 13, 1602, in front of many fellows of the College of Physicians. These allegations were brought up against Dr. Mounford, and Dr. Herring as well. Dr. Bradwell explained the symptoms of Mary Glover to the fellows, and "stressed that whenever Jackson came into her presence, she said, 'hang her, hang her' through her nostrils." Many of the fellows believed that Jackson was innocent. After Jackson was nonetheless condemned for witchcraft at her trial, Dr. Bradwell wrote his text "Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case," largely in response to the text a physician with an opposing view (that Mary Glover's sickness was natural) wrote: Dr. Edward Jorden's "A Briefe Discourse of a Disease Called the Suffocation of the Mother." Dr. Bradwell's account of Mary Glover's sickness is the longest and most complete, but also one of the most biased. He follows his account of the proceedings around Mary Glover and Elizabeth Jackson's trial with a rebuking of Dr. Jorden, attacking his fellow physician on many grounds, including Dr. Jorden's "fearfull scholarship" and lack of ability to account for all of Mary Glover's symptoms. Dr. Bradwell himself attempts to diagnose the girl, concluding that contagion, and natural disease could not be responsible for Mary Glover's sickness, including the suffocation of the mother, and rather that the Devil was tormenting the young girl. (xvi)

Appears in:
McDonald, Michael. Witchcraft and Hysteria in Elizabethan London: Edward Jorden and the Mary Glover Case. London: 1990, xvi

Stephen Bradwell Dr. Stephen Bradwell Physician
2301

A man from London, who serves as a government witness at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover. Dr. Argent was a Censor and eight times President of the College of Physicians in the 1620s and 1630s, and therefore a notable figure in the trial. He came to support Jackson, denying that Mary Glover suffered from the supernatural. Dr. Argent "sought earnestly, to make the case a meere naturall disease." The support of such an eminent doctor to Elizabeth Jackson was important and demonstrated the division of opinions among medical doctors as the cause of Mary Glover's disease. He was opposed in court by Dr. Francis Herring, and Dr. Spencer.(Fol. 37r - Fol. 37v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 37r - Fol. 37v

John Argent Dr. John Argent Physician
2302

A man from London, who testified on behalf on Mary Glover at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, the old woman believed to have bewitched the young girl. Summoned by the court along with fellow physician, Dr. Herring, Dr. Spencer is called upon to examine Mary Glover's case, and determine the cause of her affliction. Dr. Spencer firmly believes that Mary Glover is afflicted "of som cause supernaturall," as her symptoms are "strange effects, then either the mother, or any other naturall disease hath ever ben observed to bring forth." He further argues that it is unlikely that "so young a mayde" should suffer from the suffocation of the mother, and that the "disproportioned moving in her belly, which was not so uniformely a rising or bearing upward, but in a rounder and narrower compasse, playing up and downe, as with a kind of easie swiftenes, that certainly it did not truly resemble the mother." He cites also the variety of fits that Mary Glover experiences, only the company of the Elizabeth Jackson, as evidence of the supernatural. Dr. Spencer is possibly Dr. Ethelbert Spencer, who would have been "hardly an unalloyed asset to Mary Glover's team." Dr. Ethelbert Spencer had failed his examinations for fellowship at the College of Physicians twice, the second time after receiving his MD.(Fol. 36r - Fol. 37r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 36r - Fol. 37r

Spencer Dr. Spencer Physician
2303

A man from London, who is summoned by the court to Elizabeth Jackson's trial, a woman accused of bewitching the young Mary Glover. Dr. Herring, "a highly successful" doctor from the College of Physicians, and a "medical author," had been petitioned before the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, by the old woman herself. Dr. Herring, Dr. Bradwell, and Dr. Mounford were all listed as her accusers, and Dr. Herring was examined by a dozen fellows from the College (Anonymous 462). Dr. Herring "explained that he had accompanied the girl during her first test by the Recorder, at her parents' request." He had been convinced during this trial by stages (which included being exposed to Elizabeth Jackson in disguise, as well as being burned by hot pins and paper to prove that Mary Glover experienced real fits in the presence of Elizabeth Jackson), that Mary Glover was truly bewitched, and that Jackson was the culprit. Nonetheless, many at the College opposed his views and supported Elizabeth Jackson, including Dr. Edward Jorden and Dr. John Argent. At the trial, Dr. Herring testifies with Dr. Spencer, and he concludes that Mary Glover is afflicted "of som cause supernaturall; having stranger effects, then either the mother, or any other naturall disease hath ever ben observed to bring forth." Dr. Herring cites the strange motions of Mary Glover's hands to her mouth, the strict timing of the opening and shutting of Mary Glover's mouth, the voice from her nostrils, and Mary Glover's falling into fits int he presence of Elizabeth Jackson as evidence of the supernatural. Dr. Herring also believes the casting of Mary Glover's body towards Elizabeth Jackson during the reciting of the Lord's Prayer to be further evidence of the involvement of the supernatural. (Fol. 36r - Fol. 37r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 36r - Fol. 37r

Francis Herring Dr. Francis Herring Physician
2307

A man from London, who serves as the second physician of Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl mysteriously afflicted with fits after being cursed by the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson. Dr. Mounford takes over Dr. Shereman in the caretaking of Mary Glover early in her fits, after Dr. Shereman proved unable to cure or identify Mary Glover's illness, instead stating "that som cause beyond naturall was in it." The parents of Mary Glover then seek Dr. Mounford, who treated the girl for "the space of almost three monthes." Dr. Thomas Mounford was a very distinguished doctor, "seven times President of the College of Physicians, and an expert on melancholy, which was another natural disease widely believed like hysteria to produce apparently supernatural symptoms." However, Dr. Mounford is also unable to identify the cause of Mary Glover's illness, or to cure it. He concludes that the disease is not hysteria, but another natural illness, which he cannot identify. This differing opinion from Dr. Shereman began a "division of medical opinion," that lasted throughout the rest of Mary Glover's case. However, interestingly enough, on November 13, 1602, Dr. Mounford is among the doctors that Elizabeth Jackson petitions the College to confront. However, Dr. Mounford is away during that time, and unable to account for his alleged accusations against the old woman.(Fol. 5v - Fol. 6r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 5v - Fol. 6r

Thomas Mounford Dr. Thomas Mounford Physician
2344

A number of men from Wapping in London, who attend to the demoniac Sarah Bower during the first six weeks she experiences violent fits. At first, they assume that she suffers from "the Fright she might received by the Stroke on the Back," and so she is given many "Comfortable things to take." However, her condition does not improve, and the doctors declare that "they never were with any Patient that had such Fits before."(3)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 3

Anonymous 481 Physician
2359

A man from Southwark in the city of London, who is employed by John Barrow to attend to his bewitched son, James Barrow. Although the doctor is at first amazed to hear the story of the young boy, but only reads Latin to the boy in an attempt to cure him. After a week, the doctor refuses to see the boy, and John Barrow leaves his service, concluding that it was the Devil's work to delay a dispossession of James Barrow.(11 - 12)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 11 - 12

Anonymous 487 Physician
2361

A number of men from an unknown area of London, who attend to Anonymous 224, a woman with "unusual symptoms" residing at Goswell Street. They agree that it is unlikely that Anonymous 224 suffers from Melancholy, Hysterical Passions, "or Fits of the Mother." They prescribe her medication, however, "both Cathartick and Emetick," but her condition never improves, even when they double their dosage. These physicians are then led to conclude that she was bewitched.(2 - 3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange and Wonderful News from Goswell-street: or, a Victory over the Devil. London: 1678, 2 - 3

Anonymous 319 Physician