Go back
11 records returned.

List of all events occurring in the persontype of

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
63

Jane Stretton is a young woman of about twenty years old from Ware in the county of Hertfordshire, who is allegedly afflicted and tortured by witchcraft thought to be caused by a cunning man (Anonymous 487) and his wife (Anonymous 322). During her fits, Stretton is "forced to live like a chameleon, on air" and also endures vomiting of "flax and hair and thread-ends and crooked pins; while blue, whit, and red flames came in the intervals out of her mouth, and her body was continually slashed and cut with a knife, and imps in the shape of frogs, and toads, and mice forever haunted her." The worst pain of her fits come from her back, as it often feels she is being stabbed. Upon making Jane Stretton's bed, a knife is found, but no one knowns how it came to be there. Although medicine is applied to her, it only seems to aggravate her condition. Jane Stretton is often described as quite innocent and trusting. Her fits begin when she accepts drink from Anonymous 322, and when she provides a pin to the same woman, but neither time did she link her fits to Anonymous 322. These fits last some nine months, during which she cannot eat or pass stool, only being able to consume syrups. Her condition causes many people from other villages to come and visit her and observe "the wonder" of her condition, that she may survive on so little sustenance. (Image 5 - Image 6)

Appears in:
Y., M.. The Hartford-shire Wonder. London: 1669, Image 5 - Image 6

Jane Stretton Jane Stretton Faster
219

A man from London in the county of Greater London, who wanders the streets naked for ten or twelve years and fasts for thirty-five consecutive days.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Miraculous Fasting of the Naked Man. Unknown: 1700, 1

Joseph Wright Joseph Wright Faster
253

An eighteen year old maid from the city of Chester in the county of Cheshire who was allegedly possessed by a white spirit that enveloped her. She was possessed for fifteen to sixteen weeks. One day, she came home from the fields very sick and would only eat once every twenty-four hours. When she would eat, she would only eat bread and cheese. She had a fit and was in a trance from hour to hour. She was delivered by having vinegar spit up her nose until she called out for the blood of Christ and made to recite prayers with John Lane. The following day Mylner attends a sermon John Lane preached at Saint Mary's Cathedral in Chester (now St Mary's Centre, then Church of St Mary-on-the-Hill), where she attended. At the time of publication she "remayneth at this prese[n]t (praysed be god) in perfit good health and lyking." (Image 3-4)

Appears in:
Fisher, John. The Copy of a Letter Describing the Wonderful Woorke of God in Deliuering a Mayden within the City of Chester. London: 1565, Image 3-4

Anne Mylner Anne Mylner Faster
321

A girl from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the eleven year old daughter of Mary Muschamp (now Moore) and George Muschamp of the gentry, and the sister of Betty Muschamp and George Muschamp Jr. She allegedly began suffering fits at the hands of Dorothy Swinow during harvest in 1645, and was finally released from them two years later in 1647. Margaret would fall into trances and see visions of angels and other spirits. She would also suffer torments in which she would lose the use of her tongue and limbs and vomit; at various times she vomited fir branches, coal, pins, straw, wire, brick, lead and stones. She would also lose the ability to eat for weeks at a time, only able to have her lips wet with a bit of water or milk. She would also sometimes cry that a Rogue was striking her and be seen to shield herself from blows; she claimed that this Rogue fought her in various shapes such as dragon, bear, horse or cow, striking her with a club, staff, sword or dagger. Other things would fight for her. Margaret would not remember what she had done or said during her fits. If given a pen and paper, she would write then have fits and burn or chew the paper to illegibility. For a time, she insisted that she required two drops of blood from the Rogue (John Hutton) to live, and that her brother required the same. Margaret accused Dorothy Swinow and John Hutton of causing her affliction, and that of her brother and sister, claiming that her angels bid her speak out. Her statements and final prayer during her last fit was recorded.(1-4)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 1-4

Margaret Muschamp Margaret Muschamp Faster
397

A girl from Luyck in Brussels, known to be nine years of age. When Anonymous 12 came to the door to beg, this girl gave her bread and beer, and received a sorrel leaf in return, which she ate. Not long after, this girl began to suffer convulsive fits and "did fall down as dead." She was examined by physicians of both genders and many remedies were tried to no effect. A priest prayed over her, but this only caused her to contort violently and begin to vomit horse dung, pins, hair, feathers, knots of thread, nails, pieces of broken glass, eggshells and more. Her family noticed that when Anonymous 12 came near or looked toward their home, Anonymous 11 became all the more tormented and had her apprehended; Anonymous 12 confessed and was hanged for it. This did not end Anonymous 11's fits, however - Anonymous 12 claimed at her hanging that two other witches were also practicing their art on her. The girl's parents brought her to famous physician Henri de Heer, who witnessed her vomit a variety of strange things, be unable to eat for 15 days at a time, swell and suffer convulsions. de Heer claimed to pull the strange objects directly from her throat with his hand, disproving claims that she faked her bewitchment. He gives her a decoction of various herbs and makes an ointment, both of which he credits for her cure.(5-13)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-13

Anonymous 11 Faster
1009

A boy from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the eldest son of Mary Moore and her first husband George Muschamp, the brother to Margaret Muschamp and Betty Muschamp, and the half-brother to Sibilla Moore. After his sister Margaret had been afflicted with her fits for about a year, George Muschamp Jr. allegedly also became afflicted with illness and pain while "both his stomack and the use of his legs taken from him." He subsisted on milk, water and sour milk, consuming away; he nevertheless retained his spirits and would talk and laugh with friends. The doctors predicted he had a month to live. According to Margaret, John Hutton and Dorothy Swinow were responsible for his wasting, and that two drops of blood from either of them would save his life. Mary Moore got blood from Hutton for George Jr., and Hutton used the opportunity to cast sole blame on Swinow. Margaret also claimed that if Swinow was brought to justice, her brother's illness would end and if there were no justice, he would become sicker than ever before. Margaret White, in her confession, alleged that Swinow and Jane Martin were responsible for the afflictions of the Muschamp children. (4-5)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 4-5

George Muschamp George Muschamp Jr. Faster
2204

A man from Great Gadson in the County of Buckinghamshire, known to be one of four ministers who prayed and fasted over alleged demoniac Anonymous 28 at the request of her father, Anonymous 429. A fifth was supposed to have joined them, but was prevented by an unexpected accident, as predicted by the evil spirits possessing the girl. The ministers' efforts succeeded in driving out one of the two spirits, and in forcing the girl to read from the Bible despite the best efforts of the remaining spirit.(5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire. London: 1677, 5-6

Anonymous 436 Faster
2205

A man from Great Gadson in the County of Buckinghamshire, known to be one of four ministers who prayed and fasted over alleged demoniac Anonymous 28 at the request of her father, Anonymous 429. A fifth was supposed to have joined them, but was prevented by an unexpected accident, as predicted by the evil spirits possessing the girl. The ministers' efforts succeeded in driving out one of the two spirits, and in forcing the girl to read from the Bible despite the best efforts of the remaining spirit.(5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire. London: 1677, 5-6

Anonymous 435 Faster
2206

A man from Great Gadson in the County of Buckinghamshire, known to be one of four ministers who prayed and fasted over alleged demoniac Anonymous 28 at the request of her father, Anonymous 429. A fifth was supposed to have joined them, but was prevented by an unexpected accident, as predicted by the evil spirits possessing the girl. The ministers' efforts succeeded in driving out one of the two spirits, and in forcing the girl to read from the Bible despite the best efforts of the remaining spirit.(5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire. London: 1677, 5-6

Anonymous 434 Faster
2207

A man from Great Gadson in the County of Buckinghamshire, known to be one of four ministers who prayed and fasted over alleged demoniac Anonymous 28 at the request of her father, Anonymous 429. A fifth was supposed to have joined them, but was prevented by an unexpected accident, as predicted by the evil spirits possessing the girl. The ministers' efforts succeeded in driving out one of the two spirits, and in forcing the girl to read from the Bible despite the best efforts of the remaining spirit.(5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire. London: 1677, 5-6

Anonymous 433 Faster
2314

A company of twenty four men and women from London, who are witness to the dispossession of Mary Glover as performed by five preachers: Mr. Evans, Mr. Lewis Hughes, Mr. Bridger, Mr. Barber and Mr. Skelton. These witnesses rejoice upon the release of Mary Glover, and are led in prayers and fasting for the girl by the preachers. At times, these witnesses are "fearfull" of Mary Glover when she is in her fits, and express much thanks when she is released. These witnesses visit Mary Glover some time after her dispossession as well, in order to assure themselves that her affliction has not returned. However, these witnesses are "slandered" by the Bishop Bancroft when he hears of their work in the dispossession of Mary Glover, named "a rout, rable, and swarme of giddy, idle, lunatick, illuminate, holy spectators, of both sexes." (41-42)

Appears in:
Swan, John . A True and Breife Report, of Mary Glover's Vexation and Her Deliverance. London: 1603, 41-42

Anonymous 437 (Plural) Faster