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List of all events occurring in the persontype of

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
482

A man who is infamously appointed England's first and last witchfinder general. (1-2)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 1-2

Matthew Hopkins Matthew Hopkins Examiner/Justice
556

Sir Francis Manners is Justice of the peace for the County of Lincoln, the Earle of Rutland, owner of Belvoir (Beaver) Castle and father of Henry Lord Rosse, Francis Lord Rosse, and Lady Katherine. He is from Belvoir in the county of Leicestershire. All three of his children are allegedly bewitched after his wife, Countess Manners, dismisses Joan and Margaret Flower from their employment at Belvoir Castle. Margaret Flower alleged in her examination that Sir Francis Manners and Countess Manners were also bewitched to make them unable to have more children. He participated in the examinations of Anne Baker and Phillip Flower. Countess Cecily Manners is his second wife, his first wife, Frances, died shortly after Lady Katherine's birth. Both of his sons died young, leaving Lady Katherine his sole heir.(C2-C2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C2v

Francis Manners Sir Francis Manners Examiner/Justice
562

A man from the county of Lincoln, known to be a Justice of the Peace for Lincoln, the brother of Sir Francis Manners and to hold the titles of Lord Rosse and the Earl of Rutland. Sir Francis Manners appealed to him for his assistance when his family was stricken and witchcraft was suspected. Sir George examined Phillip Flower and Anne Baker.(D2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D2v

George Manners Sir George Manners Examiner/Justice
580

A man from the county of Leicestershire, known to be a Doctor of Divinity and a Justice of the Peace for the county of Leicestershire. He examined Anne Baker, Joan Willimott and Ellen Greene, and witnessed their testimonies.(D4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D4

Samuel Fleming Samuel Fleming Examiner/Justice
585

A man from Ersby in the county of Lincolnshire, known to be a lord, who assisted in the examination of Phillip Flowers on February 25, 1618.(F4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F4v

Francis Willoughby Francis Lord Willoughby Examiner/Justice
639

Doctor Cole is a man from Stanford Rivers in the County of Essex, known to be a Reverend, a Doctor of Divinity and as of 1599 the Archdeacon of Essex. He and Master Henry Fortescue heard the confessions of Elizabeth Francis, Mother Agnes Waterhouse, Joan Waterhouse and Agnes Brown.,(9)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 9

Thomas Cole Dr. Thomas Cole Examiner/Justice
640

A man from Faulkborne in the County of Essex, known to be a Justice of the Peace and, as of 1564, Sherrif of Essex. Master Henry Fortescue and Reverend Dr. Thomas Cole heard the confessions of Elizabeth Francis, Mother Agnes Waterhouse, Joan Waterhouse and Agnes Brown.()

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566,

Henry Fortescue Henry Fortescue Examiner/Justice
648

A man from Chelmsford in the County of Essex, known to be a Queen's Attorney at the Essex Assizes. He heard the confessions of Mother Agnes Waterhouse, Joan Waterhouse and Agnes Brown on July 27, 1566. When Mother Waterhouse denied allowing her familiar Sathan to suck her blood, Master Gerard lifted her kerchief to reveal numerous red spots on her face and nose. This forced Mother Waterhouse to admit to feeding Sathan her blood.(22, 24, 36-37)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 22, 24, 36-37

Gerard Master Gerard Examiner/Justice
649

A man from Chelmsford in the County of Essex, known to be a Justice at the Essex Assizes. He heard the confessions of Mother Agnes Waterhouse, Joan Waterhouse and Agnes Brown on July 27, 1566.(22, 24)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 22, 24

Southcote Justice Southcote Examiner/Justice
665

A man from the County of Huntingdon, known to be a Justice of the Peace. He examined Elizabeth Weed, Francis Moore, Elizabeth Chandler and Ellen Shepherd on charges of witchcraft, and took information from Thomas Becke.(1)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 1

Nicholas Pedley Nicholas Pedley Examiner/Justice
667

A man from the County of Huntingdon, known to be a Justice of the Peace. He examined Elizabeth Weed, John Winnick, Peter Slater, Elizabeth Chandler and Ellen Shepherd on charges of witchcraft, and took information from William Searle and Mary Darnell.(1)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 1

Robert Bernard Robert Bernard Examiner/Justice
672

A Justice of the Peace who examines the women and records many of the trials of the witches of S.Osyth. Darcy become sheriff of Essex in 1585(3)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, 3

Brian Darcey Brian Darcey Examiner/Justice
676

A man from the County of Huntington, known to be a Justice of the Peace. Osborn examined Joan Wallis when she was accused of witchcraft.(12)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 12

Robert Osborn Robert Osborn Examiner/Justice
679

A man from the County of Huntingdon, known to be a Justice of the Peace, who took information from John Browne alleging that John Clarke Jr. had admitted to being a witch and cutting off his marks, and examined Clarke for witchcraft.(13)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 13

John Castell John Castell Examiner/Justice
692

A man from Bury St. Edwards in the County of Suffolk, known to be Lord Chief Baron of His Majesties Court of Exchequer. He was a dominant figure on the King's Bench for nearly twenty years. Most famously, Matthew Hale was the magistrate presiding over the trial of Amy Denny and Rose Cullender. He indicted Denny and Cullender on thirteen counts of witchcraft and condemned them to death by hanging, carried out on March 17, 1662. Hale is said to have been hesitant to acquit or pardon Denny and Cullender, lest he give support to a disbelief in witchcraft and thus in Christianity.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 4

Matthew Hale Matthew Hale Examiner/Justice
726

A man who is appointed by King James II (along with ten others) to look into the problem of witches and witchcraft in Renfrew and oversees, for one, the case of Christian Shaw.(23-24)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 23-24

Blantyre Lord Blantyre Examiner/Justice
737

A man from the County of Suffolk, known to be a Justice of the Peace, who ordered Rose Cullender searched for witch's marks at the request of Samuel Pacy. At his order, six women were appointed to the task, including Mary Chandler. The searchers allegedly found Cullender to have four teats, one on her lower belly about an inch long, and three smaller on her privy parts. The larger teat is said to have had a hole in its tip, to have shown signs of having been recently sucked, and to have secreted a milky substance when handled.(38-40)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 38-40

Edmund Bacon Edmund Bacon Examiner/Justice
748

A man from Maidstone in the county of Kent, described as a Justice of the Peace who presides over the examination, trial, and condemnation of Anne Ashby, Anne Martyn, Mary Browne, Mildred Wright, and Anne Wilson on Friday, July 30, 1652.(1)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 1

Peter Warburton Peter Warburton Examiner/Justice
788

A man, father to demoniac Faith Corbet, Henry Corbet witnessed his daughter's fits and desperate to find a cure, consulted three doctors, Dr. Taylor, Dr. Whitty, and Dr. Corbet, to find a cure. Corbet is the one who recorded Faith's case and pressed Huson for a confession which he too recorded.(53-54)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 53-54

Henry Corbet Henry Corbet Examiner/Justice
802

A man from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be a Justice of the Peace, who signs the warrant calling for Joan Peterson's apprehension and for her house to be searched for magical items.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 4

Waterton Mr. Waterton Examiner/Justice
811

A man from Salisbury? and a member of the local gentry in the county of Wiltshire and the Justice of Peace for Wiltshire, who first examines and imprisons Anne Styles "on suspicion of the poyson pretended to be provided for" Mistress Goddard (Styles had first bough the white arsenic at the best of Anne Bodenham to burn as preventative magic; the same arsenic was later believed to have been meant to use against Mistress Goddard). Edward Tucker later writes to Edmund Bower to beseech him to come to the Salisbury Assize to examine Anne Styles who, after a brief reprieve, was "troubled as formerly."(15)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 15

Edward Tucker Edward Tucker Examiner/Justice
850

A man who examines John Walsh on 20 August, 1566 on charges of witchcraft.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination of John Walsh before Master Thomas Williams. London: 1566, 1

Thomas Williams Thomas Williams Examiner/Justice
885

A Justice of the Peace who presides over the examination, trial, and condemnation of Margaret Thorpe.(87-88)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 87-88

Anonymous 130 Examiner/Justice
888

A Justice of the Peace who, as part of the York Assize Grand Jury, presides over the indictment of Margaret Waite (Sr), Margaret Waite (Jr.), Jennit Dibble, Margaret Thorpe, Elizabeth Fletcher, and Elizabeth Dickenson.(126)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 126

Anonymous 131 Examiner/Justice
891

A Justice of the Peace who, as part of the York Assize Grand Jury, presides over the indictment of Margaret Waite (Sr), Margaret Waite (Jr.), Jennit Dibble, Margaret Thorpe, Elizabeth Fletcher, and Elizabeth Dickenson.(126)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 126

Anonymous 132 Examiner/Justice
892

A Justice of the Peace who, as part of the York Assize Grand Jury, presides over the indictment of Margaret Waite (Sr), Margaret Waite (Jr.), Jennit Dibble, Margaret Thorpe, Elizabeth Fletcher, and Elizabeth Dickenson.(126)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 126

Anonymous 133 Examiner/Justice
893

A Justice of the Peace who, as part of the York Assize Grand Jury, presides over the indictment of Margaret Waite (Sr), Margaret Waite (Jr.), Jennit Dibble, Margaret Thorpe, Elizabeth Fletcher, and Elizabeth Dickenson.(126)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 126

Anonymous 134 Examiner/Justice
895

A Justice of the Peace who, as part of the York Assize Grand Jury, presides over the indictment of Margaret Waite (Sr), Margaret Waite (Jr.), Jennit Dibble, Margaret Thorpe, Elizabeth Fletcher, and Elizabeth Dickenson.(126)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 126

Anonymous 135 Examiner/Justice
896

A Justice of the Peace who, as part of the York Assize Grand Jury, presides over the indictment of Margaret Waite (Sr), Margaret Waite (Jr.), Jennit Dibble, Margaret Thorpe, Elizabeth Fletcher, and Elizabeth Dickenson.(126)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 126

George Ellis Sir George Ellis Examiner/Justice
898

The Judge who presided over the arraignment of Margaret Waite (Sr), Margaret Waite (Jr.), Jennit Dibble, Margaret Thorpe, Elizabeth Fletcher, and Elizabeth Dickenson, and who dismissed charges against them.(127)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 127

Anonymous 136 Examiner/Justice
900

A man from Bideford in the county of Devon, the local parish rector, who, along with the mayor, Thomas Gist and the Alderman, John Davie Alderman, questions Temperance Lloyd in 1682. Ogilby asked Lloyd a series of three questions designed to determine her damnation. He first asked: "how long since the Devil did tempt her to do evil?" Lloyd confessed that she had become a witch circa 1670; her first maelfic act that of murder had been against William Herbert, an act committed at the prompting of the devil who promised she "would do well." Ogilby also asked Lloyd if she "had prickt any Pins in the said Puppit or Baby-picture," she had grab from Thomas Eastchurch's shop, an act of thievery done while she was in the shape of a cat. Lloyd would not confess to any more then laying the puppet on Grace Thomas' bed. Finally, Ogilby asked Lloyd to "say the Lords Prayer and her Creed; which she imperfectly performing, the said Mr. Ogilby did give her many good Exhortations, and so departed from her." (17-20)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 17-20

Michael Ogibly Michael Ogibly Examiner/Justice
901

A man from Bideford in the county of Devon, described as the "Thomas Gist Mayor of the Burrough, Town and Mannor of Biddiford," who is one of the main examiners at Temperance Lloyd's trial. Gist personally heard the testimony of Dorcas Coleman (the Wife of John Coleman of Bideford, Mariner), Thomas Bremincom of Bideford, Gentleman, Grace Thomas of Bideford, Spinster, Elizabeth Eastchurch and Thomas Eastchurch of Biddiford, Gentleman, Anne Wakely, the Wife of William Wakely of Biddiford, Husbandman, William Herbert of Bideford, Black-smith, Grace Barnes and John Barnes of Bideford, Yeoman, William Edwards of Bideford, Black-smith, Joane Jones and Anthony Jones of Bideford, Husbandman, and examined, heard the testimony of, and the final confessions of Susanna Edwards, Temperance Lloyd, and Mary Trembles.(18)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 18

Thomas Gist Thomas Gist Examiner/Justice
906

A constable (Anonymous 137) who apprehended and carried Margaret Thorpe and Margaret Waite to Edward Fairfax's home.(77)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 77

Anonymous 137 Examiner/Justice
930

A witness to Elizabeth Jennings miraculous (and temporary) recovery, and examiner of Margaret Russell, the woman accused of bewitching her.()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

Thomas Fowler Thomas Fowler Examiner/Justice
943

A man from Stapenhill in the county of Staffordshire, described as a justice who scratches Alice Gooderidge in an attempt to cure Thomas Darling of his fits and illness.(9)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 9

Sir Humphrey Examiner/Justice
956

A man who determines that Anonymous 143 is not a witch. He then moves to Northumberland where he works as a witch-finder charging three pounds per case. (116)

Appears in:
Gardiner, Ralph . England's Grievance Discovered. Unknown: 1796, 116

Bartholomew Hobson Bartholomew Hobson Examiner/Justice
961

A man from the County of York, known to be a knight, a Baron of His Majesties' Court of Exchequer and a Justice of Assize for Oyer and Terminer. Sir James Altham heard the examination of Jennet Preston on July 27, 1612 along with Sir Edward Bromley.(Title Page)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Title Page

James Altham James Altham Examiner/Justice
962

A man from the County of York, known to be a knight, a Baron of His Majesties' Court of Exchequer and a Justice of Assize for Oyer and Terminer. Sir Edward Bromley heard the examination of Jennet Preston on July 27, 1612 along with Sir James Altham. Knighted in 1610, he rode the northern circuit as a Justice of the Assize from 1610-1618. He is known to have been influenced by Sir Edward Coke, as he was among those "whom Sir Edward Coke led in refusing to sit or to take the oath as commissioners."(Title Page)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Title Page

Edward Bromley Edward Bromley Examiner/Justice
973

A man from the County of Lancaster, known to be a Justice of the Peace for the County of Lancaster, who presided over the examinations and trials of Elizabeth Southerns, Alison Device, James Device, Elizabeth Device, Anne Whittle, Jennet Device, Jennet Preston and Anne Robinson.(B2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B2

Roger Nowell Roger Nowell Examiner/Justice
1091

A juror in the case agasint Mary Sykes.(28-29)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 28-29

Henry Tempest Henry Tempest Examiner/Justice
1114

A man who examines Margaret Russell on charges of having bewitched Elizabeth Jennings.()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

William Slingsby Sir William Slingsby Examiner/Justice
1120

A juror in the case against Margaret Morton.(38)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 38

John Savile John Savile Examiner/Justice
1121

A juror in the case against Margaret Morton.(38)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 38

Alex Johnson Alex Johnson Examiner/Justice
1122

A juror in the case against Margaret Morton.(38)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 38

John Stanhope John Stanhope Examiner/Justice
1123

A juror in the case against Margaret Morton.(38)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 38

John Hewley John Hewley Examiner/Justice
1140

A juror in the case against Anne Greene.(64)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 64

John Assheton John Ashton Examiner/Justice
1141

A juror in the trial against Anne Greene.(64)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 64

Eoger Coats Edgar Coats Examiner/Justice
1154

A Justice from Wakefield in the county of Yorkshire who heard the testimony of Richard Jackson, of Wakefield against Jennet and George Benton. The Bentons were indicted for allegedly practicing witchcraft on Richard Jackson and his family after Jackson reprimanded them for trespassing.(74-75)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 74-75

Jo. Warde Jo. Ward Examiner/Justice
1174

A man from the County of Leicestershire, known to be a knight and a Justice of the Peace, who examined Phillip Flower twice, first on February 4, 1618, and again on February 25, 1618.(F3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F3

William Pelham Sir William Pelham Examiner/Justice
1194

A person from Renfrew in the county of Renfrewshire, described as one of several Commisioners hired by the King (presumably James II) to look into the problem of witches and witchcraft in Renfrew. They put several women on trial and perform tests such as pricking and search for witch's marks.(3)

Appears in:
P., T.. A Relation of the Diabolical Practices of above Twenty Wizards and Witches of the Sheriffdom of Renfrew in the Kingdom of Scotland. London: 1697, 3

Anonymous 330 (Plural) Examiner/Justice
1256

A person from London in the county of Greater London, described as one of a jury at the Old Bailey who presides over Mary Poole's trial. They find her guilty of theft and sentence her to branding.(2)

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Mary Poole, Theft > grand larceny, 13th December 1699. . London: 1699, 2

Old Bailey Jury Examiner/Justice
1262

A man who presides over the hearing of Edmund Robinson who claims that he did not at first believe his son when he told him about witches in the area. (144)

Appears in:
Bruce (Editor), John. Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series: Charles I, 1634-5. Unknown: 1864, 144

George Long George Long Examiner/Justice
1263

The Recorder of London who is employed to test Mary Glover's alleged possession. Crook uses various methods to test Glover, including burning her hand with a piece of flaming paper, and pricking her nose with a long pin.(93, 96)

Appears in:
Sinclair, George. Satan's Invisible World Discovered. Edinburgh: 1685, 93, 96

John Crook Sir John Crook Examiner/Justice
1264

A man from Lancaster in the County of Lancashire, known to be a Justice of Peace for the County of Lancashire. Nicholas Bannister heard the examinations and confessions of James Device, Elizabeth Device and Jennet Device on April 27, 1612.(C2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2

Nicholas Bannister Nicholas Bannister Examiner/Justice
1302

A man from Leicester in the county of Leicestershire, described as a Justice of the Peace. Amcot twice examines Joan Willimott. On February 28, 1618 she confessed to Amcot that she was a cunning woman, that Joane Flower "told her that my Lord of Rutland had dealt badly with her and that they had put away her Daughter," that she had a vision of the Earl of Rutland, Sir Francis Manner, Lord Rosse's son being "striken with a white Spirit," but that she spirit suggested he would "do well," that the previous Friday night, her "Spirit came to her and told her that there was a bad woman at Deeping who had giuen her soule to the Diuell," a piece of information for which it demanded payment, "although it were but a peece of her Girdle," but she refused. On March 2, 1618, she confesses to Amcot how she got her spirit, (form William Berry of Langholme in Rutlandshire who blew it into her mouth), that it was a Fairy "the shape and forme of a Woman," that she did promise it her soul in exchange for services, but that she "neyther did she imploy her Spirit in any thing, but onely to bring word how those did which she had vndertaken to cure." By December 3, 1618, Francis Manners would appoint Alexander Amoct deputy recorder.(13)

Appears in:
Flower, Margaret. Witchcrafts, strange and wonderfull: discovering the damnable practices of seven witches. London: 1635, 13

Alexander Amcots Alexander Amcots Examiner/Justice
1327

One of three examiners in the case against Anne Piers. The examiners question several residents from the town of Padstow.(29)

Appears in:
Everett Greene, Mary Anne. Calendar of State Papers, Domestic: Edward VI, Mary Elizabeth I, James I: 1581-1590, Volume 2. London: 1865, 29

Sir. Rich Greynevile Sir. Rich Greynevile Examiner/Justice
1328

One of three examiners in the case against Anne Piers. The examiners question several residents from the town of Padstow.(29)

Appears in:
Everett Greene, Mary Anne. Calendar of State Papers, Domestic: Edward VI, Mary Elizabeth I, James I: 1581-1590, Volume 2. London: 1865, 29

Thomas Roscarrock Thomas Roscarrock Examiner/Justice
1329

One of three examiners in the case against Anne Piers. The examiners question several residents from the town of Padstow.(29)

Appears in:
Everett Greene, Mary Anne. Calendar of State Papers, Domestic: Edward VI, Mary Elizabeth I, James I: 1581-1590, Volume 2. London: 1865, 29

George Greynevile George Greynevile Examiner/Justice
1388

A man from Nuham in the County of Northumberland, known to be a Justice of the Peace. Mary Moore gave him information about both John Hutton and Dorothy Swinow in order to gain their apprehension. Justice Foster had Hutton apprehended and imprisoned at Newcastle Gaol, but not Swinow. He also heard Margaret White's confession, in which she accused Swinow and Jane Martin of killing the infant Sibilla Moore.(10, 12)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 10, 12

Foster Justice Foster Examiner/Justice
1398

One of a group of jurors who determined that Elizabeth Francis murdered Mrs. Poole and did so with forethought.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Essex Assize Jurors Examiner/Justice
1399

One of a group of jurors who determine that Margaret Hodgin planned the murder of Margaret Hull.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Essex Assize Jurors (2) Examiner/Justice
1402

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a Justice of the Peace. He heard Mary Moore's plea to remove Dorothy Swinow to Northumberland for prosecution, which he denied. The next day, Moore again appeared in the Judge's chamber to beg justice against Swinow on behalf of her family. While Moore was arguing her case, Margaret Muschamp fell into a fit, related "before them all DOROTHY SVVINOVVS malice from the beginning," and begged too for justice. The judge denied Moore and Muschamp, and declared Muschamp's fit to be feigned. (14-15)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 14-15

Anonymous 237 Examiner/Justice
1403

A man from Well-Close in London, described as a Constable who helps in the apprehension of the witch, Sarah Griffith, and the prevention of her escape by knocking her down when she attempted to jump a wall. The Constable takes Sarah Griffith to the Justice.(1)

Appears in:
Greenwel, Thomas. A Full and True Account of the Discovery, Apprehending and taking of a notorious witch,. London: 1704, 1

Constable Examiner/Justice
1406

A judge in the case against Alice Swallow. He find Swallow guilty of bewitching/murdering Alice Basticke.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Anonymous 347 Examiner/Justice
1421

A justice who does not find Margaret Ganne and Joan Norfolk guilty of murdering John Furmyn by witchcraft so that he languished and died.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1

Anonymous 241 Examiner/Justice
1441

One of a group of jurors in the case against Margaret Stanton. They find, contrary to the Justice of Peace, that Margaret Stanton used witchcraft to kill a gelding worth 3 and a cow worth 40s.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Essex Jurors (3) Examiner/Justice
1442

A justice of the peace in the case agasint Margaret Stanton who finds her not guilty of bewitching a white gelding worth 3 and a cow worth 40s causing them to languish and die. This conclusion is contrary to the jurors on the same case.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Anonymous 350 Examiner/Justice
1461

A man and member of the gentry from Dalham in the county of Suffolk. The friends of Thomas Paman write to Stuteville asking for legal, philosophical, or practical assistance is diagnosing or treating Paman's alleged possession. Stuteville sends Alice Read to see Paman, although it is unclear if he sends her as an unwitcher (to cure him) or as a witch (to be scratched by him). Paman attacks Read but later retracts his possession. Stuteville appears in the historical record for having paid for the tower arch of St Mary's church in Dalham and for his correspondence with Joseph Mede (1621-1631, Harley MSS 389 and 390). Curiously, Mede appears to have written to Stuteville about Mead wrote about Sir Edward Coke, father of Lady Purbeck, who was accused of using magic, (or paying for magic to be done by Dr. Lamb) against her husband.(198-199)

Appears in:
, Great Britain. Public Record Office. Calendar of State Papers: Domestic Series, of the Reign of Charles I, 1629-1631. London: 1830, 198-199

Martin Stuteville Sir Martin Stuteville Examiner/Justice
1496

One of a group of jurors who find Alice Aylett guilty of using witchcraft to murder Susan Parman and Simon (possibly Anonymous 259).(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1

Essex Assize Jurors (4) Examiner/Justice
1503

A man from the county of Essex who commits Anne Lamperill to prison at Colchester Castle because she was accused and suspected of being a witch.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Edward Eltonhead Edward Eltonhead Examiner/Justice
1532

A man presiding as the judge at "a sessions holden at St. Edmunds-bury in Suffolke," who condemns eighteen witches to die on the 27th of August, 1645. The names of the witches are: Mr. Lowes Parson, Thomas Evererd, Mary Evererd, Mary Bacon, Anne Alderman, Rebecca Morris, Mary Fuller, Mary Clowes, Margery Sparham, Katherine Tooley, Sarah Spinlow, Ian Limstead, Anne Wright, Mary Smith, Ian Rivert, Susan Manners, Mary Skipper, and Anne Leech. (Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Anonymous 348 Examiner/Justice
1533

An undetermined number of men presiding as the justices at "a sessions holden at St. Edmunds-bury in Suffolke," who condemns alongside a judge eighteen witches to die on the 27th of August, 1645. The names of the witches are: Mr. Lowes Parson, Thomas Evererd, Mary Evererd, Mary Bacon, Anne Alderman, Rebecca Morris, Mary Fuller, Mary Clowes, Margery Sparham, Katherine Tooley, Sarah Spinlow, Ian Limstead, Anne Wright, Mary Smith, Ian Rivert, Susan Manners, Mary Skipper, and Anne Leech. (Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Justices (3) Examiner/Justice
1573

A man who acts as a judge over several trials held in Essex in 1645.(Cover)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, Cover

Robert Robert, Earl of Warwick Examiner/Justice
1593

A man from Tunstall in the county of Kent, Tong is a member of the grand jury at the Maidstone Assizes in March 1676 which includes the case against Anne Neale.(3-16)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 3-16

James Tong James Tong Examiner/Justice
1594

A man from Foots Cray in the county of Kent (now the London Borough of Bexley), Maninge is a member of the grand jury at the Maidstone Assizes in March 1676 which includes the case against Anne Neale.(3-16)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 3-16

Samuel Maninge Samuel Maninge Examiner/Justice
1595

A man from Hayes in the county of Kent (now part of the London Borough Bromley), Scott is a member of the grand jury at the Maidstone Assizes in March 1676 which includes the case against Anne Neale.(3-16)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 3-16

Stephen Scott Stephen Scott Examiner/Justice
1596

A man from Dartford in the county of Kent, Faussett is a member of the grand jury at the Maidstone Assizes in March 1676 which includes the case against Anne Neale.(3-16)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 3-16

Henry Faussett Henry Faussett Examiner/Justice
1597

A man from Detling in the county of Kent, Clarke is a member of the grand jury at the Maidstone Assizes in March 1676 which includes the case against Anne Neale.(3-16)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 3-16

John Clarke John Clarke Examiner/Justice
1598

A man from Maidstone in the county of Kent, Netter is a member of the grand jury at the Maidstone Assizes in March 1676 which includes the case against Anne Neale.(3-16)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 3-16

Brett Netter Brett Netter Examiner/Justice
1599

A man from Maidstone in the county of Kent, Aldersey is a member of the grand jury at the Maidstone Assizes in March 1676 which includes the case against Anne Neale.(3-16)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 3-16

Farnham Aldersey Farnham Aldersey Examiner/Justice
1600

A man from Maidstone in the county of Kent, Reader is a member of the grand jury at the Maidstone Assizes in March 1676 which includes the case against Anne Neale.(3-16)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 3-16

James Reader James Reader Examiner/Justice
1601

A man from Cranbrook in the county of Kent, Peachy is a member of the grand jury at the Maidstone Assizes in March 1676 which includes the case against Anne Neale.(3-16)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 3-16

William Peachy William Peachy Examiner/Justice
1602

A man from Hawkurst (now the in the borough of Tundridge Wells) in the county of Kent, Woodgate is a member of the grand jury at the Maidstone Assizes in March 1676 which includes the case against Anne Neale.(3-16)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 3-16

Daniel Woodgate Daniel Woodgate Examiner/Justice
1603

A man from Norton (now Norton Ash) in the county of Kent, Hugessen is a member of the grand jury at the Maidstone Assizes in March 1676 which includes the case against Anne Neale.(3-16)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 3-16

William Hugessen William Hugessen Examiner/Justice
1604

A man from Kennington in the county of Kent (now a suburb of Ashford), Brett is a member of the grand jury at the Maidstone Assizes in March 1676 which includes the case against Anne Neale.(3-16)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 3-16

William Brett William Brett Examiner/Justice
1605

A man from Brookland in the county of Kent, Eve is a member of the grand jury at the Maidstone Assizes in March 1676 which includes the case against Anne Neale.(3-16)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 3-16

John Eve John Eve Examiner/Justice
1606

A man from Herne in the county of Kent, Mills is is a member of the grand jury at the Maidstone Assizes in March 1676 which includes the case against Anne Neale.(3-16)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 3-16

Christopher Mills Christopher Mills Examiner/Justice
1607

A man from Stone in the county of Kent, Tooke is a member of the grand jury at the Maidstone Assizes in March 1676 which includes the case against Anne Neale.(3-16)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 3-16

Nicholas Tooke Nicholas Tooke Examiner/Justice
1608

A man from Shorne in the county of Kent, Spencer is a member of the grand jury at the Maidstone Assizes in March 1676 which includes the case against Anne Neale.(3-16)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 3-16

Bonham Spencer Bonham Spencer Examiner/Justice
1609

A man from Chatham in the county of Kent, Yardley is a member of the grand jury at the Maidstone Assizes in March 1676 which includes the case against Anne Neale.(3-16)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 3-16

Robert Yardley Robert Yardley Examiner/Justice
1616

A man from the county of Kent who serves as a judge at the Maidstone Assizes on March 14, 1676. One of the case over which he presides is the case of Anne Neale.(3-16)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 3-16

Thomas Twisden Thomas Twisden Examiner/Justice
1618

A man from the county of St Albans in the county Kent who serves as judge at the Maidstone Assize on March 14, 1676 as well as the ones on July 29, 1679. Some of the cases over which he presided includes that of Anne Neale's, Thomas Whiteing's and Mary Foster's. Pemberton would eventually become Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench, even though he would hold the position for no more than two years. While Lord Chief Justice, he presided over the trial of Joan Buts, in which she was found not guilty of witchcraft. He was removed for his behaviour in the prosecution of Lord Russell in 1683. Pemberton had a notoriously turbulent career over the course of which he filled many esteemed positions, but was also arrested in 1689 for his attack on parliamentary privilege. Pemberton died in 1697.(87-91)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 87-91

Francis Pemberton Francis Pemberton Examiner/Justice
1630

A man from the county of Kent who presides over the assizes of Kent at Maidstone in July of 1679 which included the case against Mary Foster.(87-91)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 87-91

William Ellis William Ellis Examiner/Justice
1639

A man from Bedford in the county of Bedfordshire, who owned land at Cardington, Nothill, and Everton. Sir Humphrey Winch was one of two justices who, along with Randolph Crew, presided over the midland and northern assize circuits. He was responsible for imprisonment and execution of nine women as witches on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth. He was also responsible for the prosecution and imprisonment of another of six women at Husbands Bosworth, Leicester on October 15, 1616. based on the testimony of John Smith, whom the allegedly bewitched. Smyth recanted after King James I personally interrogated him, and called for the witches to be released from jail the following day. Five women walked free; one died. Winch's reputation was likely harmed by the incident.(6-9)

Appears in:
Osborne, Francis. A Miscellany of Sundry Essayes, Paradoxes, and Problematicall Discourses, Letters and Characters. London: 1659, 6-9

Humphrey Winch Sir Humphrey Winch Examiner/Justice
1640

A man from Nantwich in the county of Cheshire, described as Randolf Crewe who was made the King's Serjeants-at-Law, an elite legal position, in 1614. Serjeant Crewe was one of two traveling judges on the midland and northern assize circuits, where, along with Sir Humphrey Winch, he presided over the midland and northern assize circuits. He was responsible for imprisonment and execution of nine women as witches on July 18, 1616 at Husbands Bosworth. He was also responsible for the prosecution and imprisonment of another of six women at Husbands Bosworth, Leicester on October 15, 1616. based on the testimony of John Smith, whom the allegedly bewitched. Smyth recanted after King James I personally interrogated him, and called for the witches to be released from jail the following day. Five women walked free; one died. Crewe's reputation was likely harmed by the incident.(6-9)

Appears in:
Osborne, Francis. A Miscellany of Sundry Essayes, Paradoxes, and Problematicall Discourses, Letters and Characters. London: 1659, 6-9

Randolph Crew Sir Randolph Crewe Examiner/Justice
1663

A baronet from London and serving as judge at the Maidstone Assizes which included the case against Thomas Whiteing and Elizabeth Scott. Charlton was born in London around 1615. He went to Oxford and graduated with a B.A. in 1632. He was created 1st Baronet Charlton, of Ludford, co. Hereford, England on 12 May 1686. Before that, however, one of his many positions included holding the office of Justice of the Court of Common Pleas between 1680 and 20 April 1686.(141-157)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 141-157

Job Charlton Job Charlton Examiner/Justice
1669

A man from West Harling in the county of Norfolk and one time High Sheriff of Norfolk (1578), Sir Bassingbourn Gawdy is responsible for imprisoning Margaret Fraunces for the alleged bewitchment of Joan Harvey. Gawdy was prompted to release Fraunces after receiving a letter from Augustine Styward in which Styward pleaded for mercy for Fraunces and diagnosed Harvey as suffering from hysteria.(71)

Appears in:
Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, . Report on the manuscripts of the family of Gawdy, formerly of Norfolk. . London: 1885, 71

Bassingbourn Gawdy Sir Bassingbourn Gawdy Examiner/Justice
1680

A judge and politician who oversees the Maidstone Assizes of March 15, 1681. This includes the case of Anne Blundy. He sat in Parliament in 1660 and died in 1681.(135-137)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 135-137

Richard Weston Richard Weston Examiner/Justice
1681

A member of a prominent and wealthy family residing at Cotton Hall in Birdgnorth in Staffordshire (now part of Shropshire). There is a famous painting of Lee's family by Joseph Highmore. The painting includes his wife and ten children. (135-137)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 135-137

Eldred Lancelot Lee Eldred Lancelot Lee Examiner/Justice
1706

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is sent for by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, two alleged wicked women, along with his colleague, Anonymous 312, to arrest the eldest son of Mr. Goodwin, Andrew Goodwin, in the dead of night from his own home. Using an iron crow, he forces the bedchamber doors of Andrew Goodwin's room open in order to retrieve him. (20 - 21)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 20 - 21

Anonymous 310 Examiner/Justice
1707

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is sent for by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, two alleged wicked women, along with his colleague, Anonymous 311, to arrest the eldest son of Mr. Goodwin, Andrew Goodwin, in the dead of night from his own home. Using an iron crow, he forces the bedchamber doors of Andrew Goodwin's room open in order to retrieve him. (20 - 21)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 20 - 21

Anonymous 312 Examiner/Justice
1710

A number of men from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who preside over the trials of Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones at the request of the Goodwin children. As none of the Goodwin children come forth as witnesses to the alleged wicked deeds of Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, the case is dismissed "with only an admonition to old Mr. Goodwin, to forsake the company of these women so prejudicial to his reputation."(22 - 23)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 22 - 23

Justices (2) Examiner/Justice
1722

A man from the county of Suffolk, described as Sir Edward Coke who was Lord Chief Justice, and known to converse with Robert Spatchet of Dunwich in the county of Suffolk, the grandfather of alleged demoniac Thomas Spatchet, who suffered fits attributed to Aubrey Grinset. Coke was a prominent lawyer, legal writer and politician. By 1600, he had become an extremely wealthy land and owned over a hundred properties, including property in Suffolk. He was appointed chief justice of the court of common pleas in 1606, and chief justice of the king's bench in 1613. In his text The Third Part of the Institutes of the Laws of England, Coke defined a witch as someone who has conference with the Devil, and should not be suffered to live. He also rules against conjurers, sorcerers and enchanters, as being know to consort with demons or the Devil. All are to be punished by death. Burning is the punishment for heretics, and may also be used in the case of witchcraft and consulting with the Devil. Coke mentions a precedent in which a sorcerer was beheaded, and the head burnt along with his book of sorcery. He includes using, practicing or exercising an invocation of an evil or wicked spirit in his definition of felony. Also included is consorting with wicked spirits, using or otherwise disturbing the dead for the purpose of witchcraft, harming or killing a person through witchcraft, using witchcraft to find treasure or cheating others of their money, finding lost or stolen things, provoking unlawful love, or destroying the cattle or goods of another person, or otherwise through witchcraft hurting or destroying a person.(2)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 2

Edward Coke Sir Edward Coke Examiner/Justice
1774

A man from St. Paul's Cross in London who accepts the confessions of Rachel Pindar and Agnes Brigges as having "counterfeiringes" of being possessed by Satan, on August 15, 1574.(2-3)

Appears in:
Chrysostom, John. The Disclosing of a Late Counterfeyted Possession by the Deuyl in Two Maydens within the Citie of London. London: 1574, 2-3

Anonymous 333 Examiner/Justice
1795

A man from St. Paul's Cross in London who examined Agnes Brigges with James Style and John Kent Percer, and heard her confession to the pretense of being possessed by Satan, as he was commanded to by Sir John Rivers, a knight and mayor of London.(14)

Appears in:
Chrysostom, John. The Disclosing of a Late Counterfeyted Possession by the Deuyl in Two Maydens within the Citie of London. London: 1574, 14

Rober Dogeson Roger Dogeson Examiner/Justice
1796

A man from St. Paul's Cross in London who served as examiner with Roger Dogeson and John Kent Percer to the Agnes Brigges, and who also heard her confession to the pretense of being possessed by Satan. He was a minister and person of Saint Margaret's in Lothberry of John Taylor.(14)

Appears in:
Chrysostom, John. The Disclosing of a Late Counterfeyted Possession by the Deuyl in Two Maydens within the Citie of London. London: 1574, 14

James Style James Style Examiner/Justice
1797

A man from St. Paul's Cross in London who served as an examiner for Agnes Brigges with Roger Dogeson, and James Style. He also heard her confession of her pretense of being possessed by Satan.(14)

Appears in:
Chrysostom, John. The Disclosing of a Late Counterfeyted Possession by the Deuyl in Two Maydens within the Citie of London. London: 1574, 14

John Kent Percer John Kent Percer Examiner/Justice
1799

A man from an area in Canterbury who served as an examiner and confessor to Agnes Brigges, who admitted to having fabricated her possession. He is a minister and Archbishop of Canterbury.(16)

Appears in:
Chrysostom, John. The Disclosing of a Late Counterfeyted Possession by the Deuyl in Two Maydens within the Citie of London. London: 1574, 16

Matthew L Matthew L Examiner/Justice
1800

A man from an area of London who served as examiner and confessor to Agnes Brigges, who admitted to fabricating her possession by the devil. He is the recorder of London City.(16)

Appears in:
Chrysostom, John. The Disclosing of a Late Counterfeyted Possession by the Deuyl in Two Maydens within the Citie of London. London: 1574, 16

William Fletewood William Fleetwood Examiner/Justice
1801

A man from an area of London who serves as an examiner and confessor to Agnes Brigges who admitted to having lied about her possession by Satan. Sir Rosalind is also a wayward knight, and an alderman of the city of London.(16)

Appears in:
Chrysostom, John. The Disclosing of a Late Counterfeyted Possession by the Deuyl in Two Maydens within the Citie of London. London: 1574, 16

Rosolande Sir Rosalind Examiner/Justice
1861

A man from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who witnessed several of Richard Dugdale's alleged fits, especially those characterized by the vomiting of various objects and weight change from extremely light to very heavy. John Hindle also pricks the bottom of Richard Dugdale's foot with a needle during one of his fits, to which he "neither stirred nor complained at all." (57)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 57

John Hindle John Hindle Examiner/Justice
1899

A man of Windsor in the county of Berkshire, known to be a knight, to whom Richard Galis complained to in the matter of Mistress Audrey, Elizabeth Stile, Mother Dutton and Mother Nelson; Nevel agreed to examine the four and found them unable to engage in prayer. Nevel declared Galis overseer of their religious reform, responsible for ensuring they are publicly at the pulpit at Service. When Galis brings Stile to him again, this time uninvited with Stile in tow bound and foaming at the mouth, Nevel refuses to assist him. When Galis is at last able to provide sufficient evidence against Stile, Nevel is the one to commit her to Reading Gaol and order her examined.(Image 9, 11, 12)

Appears in:
Galis, Richard. A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates. London: 1572, Image 9, 11, 12

Henry Nevel Sir Henry Nevel Examiner/Justice
1906

A judge from Kent who presides over the Assizes at Maidstone in Kent including the case of James Watts. Watts was accused by several people of bewitching a 16 year old girl named Anne Huggins. She was found not guilty. (58-65)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 58-65

Timothy Littleton Timothy Littleton Examiner/Justice
1925

A man from Bridewell in London, who serves as the justice for the trial of Sarah Griffith as an alleged witch. Although she pleads innocent, evidence is lain forth as in the witness to Mr. John ---'s apprentice's sickness, and so Justice Bateman commits her to the Bridewell prison.(1)

Appears in:
Greenwel, Thomas. A Full and True Account of the Discovery, Apprehending and taking of a notorious witch,. London: 1704, 1

Bateman Justice Bateman Examiner/Justice
1934

A man from the London borough of Southwark, who is known to have been the Examiner for the trial of Mrs. Sarah Morduck and Richard Hathaway. Lane observed Hathaway scratch Morduck in court, consume the amount of bread and cheese an ordinary man could be expected to in three days, and not long after pass a large amount of urine and a small amount of excrement into his britches.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 2

Thomas Lane Sir Thomas Lane Examiner/Justice
1945

A man from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who serves as justice to James Day's confession to forging a story about encountering the Devil, so that James Day might join the Roman Catholic religion. "Upon this Declaration of the Boy, Sir Humphery Jervise issued his Warrants immediately that same day," arresting Patrick Dawson, his wife, James Tuit, and Joan Tuit. Sir Humphrey Jervise also seeks the arrest of an Old Woman (Anonymous 358) and two priests (Anonymous 360 and Anonymous 361), although they cannot be found. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Humphrey Jervise Sir Humphrey Jervise Examiner/Justice
1953

A man from Penzance in the county of Cornwall, known to be a Justice, who took testimony from several people regarding John Tonken's fits and the women who appeared to him; he ordered the arrest and imprisonment of Jane Noal and Betty Seeze on suspicion of witchcraft in connection to this case.(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Account of a Strange and Wonderful Relation of John Tonken, of Pensans in Cornwall. London: 1686, 6

John Geose John Geose Examiner/Justice
1965

A man from St. Andrew's in Dublin who is the local Protestant minister. He investigates James Day's sudden decision to join the Roman Catholic religion after visiting his uncle, Patrick Dawson, and reveals the fabrication of James Day's encounter with the Devil. Mr. Travers receives James Day's confession in writing.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Travers Mr. Travers Examiner/Justice
2050

A man from Cannon Lee in the county of Devon, whose two labourers find Joseph Buxford on his property. When Joseph Buxford is found, "his hands and legs strangely distorted, his haire of his head singyd, his cloathes all be smeared with pitch and rosin, and other sulfurous matter, which yeelded an odious stench." As he is unable to speak, and found in such a condition, the boy is brought to Justice Cullum's house, where he is given clothing, a bed, and "some nourishing broth." Upon receiving these things, Joseph Buxford is so restored, he immediately confesses "his name, birth-place, and his strange journey with the Devill," which at first seemed "rediculous" to the Justice. But, upon "a little better pondering in what manner he was found and brought to the house," the Justice decides the story might be true, and sends for the boy's father, John Buxford. The father verifies his son's story, by first acknowledging that the boy is his son, and the "manner of his departure, with other circumstances above rehearsed." Upon verifying the story, Justice Cullum and the minister Mr. Gainwell, write "a true information" to Major General Massie, in Tiverton, relating the entire story.(5)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 5

Justice Cullum Mr. Justice Cullum Examiner/Justice
2052

A man from Tiverton in Devon, who receives "a true information" in written form from Justice Cullum and Mr. Gainwell the Minister, relating the story of Joseph Buxford, who allegedly apprenticed himself to the Devil with his father's consent for eight days, during which time he viewed many torments in Hell. Following, Major General Edward Massie sends his own letter relating the information to Mr. Davenports Chesire, a gentleman in London, wherein he included "a Box of Reliques with a great Crucifix found in Tiverton Church in the wall which the Cavaliers had there built for the strengthning of the proch," as further evidence.(5-6)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 5-6

Edward Massie Edward Massie Examiner/Justice
2086

A man from Brightling in the county of Sussex, who offers one of his houses in the same parish to Joseph Cruttenden and his wife after their own house burns down. However, as soon as the Cruttenden's goods are brought in, the house burns as well, and although "endeavours are made by many to quench it," nothing helps until the goods are taken out, causing the fire to "cease with little or no help." Colonel Busbridge also examines and searches an old woman (Anonymous 398) suspected of witchcraft. It is believed she might be the cause of the fire, as she told a servant girl of Joseph Cruttenden that "sad Calamaties were coming upon her Master and Dame, their House should be Fired, and many other troubles befal them." The woman is also watched for some twenty four hours, "had to Maidstone about it, but got away," and moves to "Burwast, some time since." (55)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 55

Busbridge Colonel Busbridge Examiner/Justice
2091

A man from Brightling in the county of Sussex, who sends for an old woman (Anonymous 398) accused of witchcraft in the case of Joseph Cruttenden and his wife, whose goods are bewitched to fly and hit people of their own accord, and causing the houses they stay in the burn. When the old woman is apprehended, Captain Collins examined her with Mr. Busbridge, and she is also "searched and watched 24 Hours." The old woman "had to Maidstone about it, but got away," and lives in Burwast afterward.(56)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 56

Collins Captain Collins Examiner/Justice
2105

Two men from Beckington in the county of Somerset, who serve as Justices of the Peace in the apprehending of Margery Coombes and Ann More, who allegedly appeared to the girl Mary Hill during one of her fits, characterized by the vomiting of crooked nails.(75)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 75

Anonymous 404 Examiner/Justice
2106

A man from Beckington in the county of Somerset, who serves as Lord Chief Justice, and Judge in the trial regarding Mary Hill's alleged fits, characterized by the vomiting of crooked nails. He tries both Margery Coombes and Ann More, who are acquitted by the jury "for want of Evidence." When the witnesses Susanna Belton and Ann Holland describe how "they hookt out of the Navel of the said Mary Hill, as she lay in a dead fit, crooked Pins, small Nails, and small pieces of Brass," he hands these items over as evidence to the jury. Likewise, he hands more of the same as presented to him by the witnesses Mr. Francis Jesse and Mr. Christopher Brewer to the jurly. (75)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 75

Holt Lord Chief Justice Holt Examiner/Justice
2107

A number of people from Beckington in the county of Somerset, who serve as a jury for the trial surrounding the nature of Mary Hill's alleged fits, characterized by the vomiting of crooked nails. The jury acquits both Ann More and Margery Coombes who allegedly appear before May Hill in her fits, "for want of Evidence." The jury also examines a number of "crooked Pins, small Nails, and small pieces of Brass" presented as evidence of the nature of Mary Hill's fits by Susanna Belton, Ann Holland, Mr. Francis Jesse, and Mr. Christopher Brewer.(75)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 75

Anonymous 405 Examiner/Justice
2113

A gentleman from Castle Cary in the county of Somerset, who visits Mary Hill upon hearing accounts of her fits, where she allegedly vomits crooked nails. Esquire Player presents himself "incognito" and comes on a morning. However, beer is not given to Mary Hill, and "she lay in a very Deplorable condition," until past two in the afternoon, when "with much Difficulty," she vomited "a piece of Brass," which the gentleman decided to keep. Esquire Player cannot bring himself to believe she is a cheat, "because it was impossible for any Mortal to Counterfeit her miserable Condition." Further, he "searcht her Mouth himself," and held the "Bason into which she vomited," for a full eight hours until it happened. (76-77)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 76-77

Player Esquire Player Examiner/Justice
2163

A man from the County of Leicester, known to be a knight and a Justice of the Peace for the County of Leicester. He was one of the Justices of the Peace to examined Joan Willimott during her third examination, on March 17, 1618, and also examined Ellen Greene the same day.(E4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E4v

Henry Hastings Sir Henry Hastings Examiner/Justice
2164

A man from the County of Leicester, known to be a Justice of the Peace for the County of Leicester. He was one of the examining Justices of the Peace on February 4, 1618, when Phillip Flower was brought in to give evidence against her sister Margaret Flower.(F3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F3

Butler Mr. Butler Examiner/Justice
2169

A man from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, known to be the Mayor of Lancaster. William Sandes was present at the examinations and confessions of Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, and James Device. (B4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4

William Sandes William Sandes Examiner/Justice
2170

A man from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, known to be a Justice of the Peace for the County of Lancashire. James Anderton was present at the examinations and confessions of Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, and James Device. (B4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4

James Anderton James Anderton Examiner/Justice
2171

A man from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, known to be the Coroner for the County of Lancashire. Thomas Cowell was present at the examinations and confessions of Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, and James Device. (B4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4

Thomas Cowell Thomas Cowell Examiner/Justice
2179

A man from Lancaster in the County of Lancashire, known to be a Justice of the Peace for the County of Lancashire. Robert Holden heard the examinations of John Singleton, Willam Alker and Henry Hargreaves.(L4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, L4v

Robert Holden Robert Holden Examiner/Justice
2180

A man from Lancaster in the County of Lancashire, known to be a Justice of the Peace for Lancaster. He re-examined Grace Sowerbutts, Jennet Bierley, Ellen Bierley and Jane Southworth on August 19, 1612 at the direction of Justice of the Assizes Sir Edward Bromley.(M4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, M4v

William Leigh William Leigh Examiner/Justice
2181

A man from Lancaster in the County of Lancashire, known to be a Justice of the Peace for Lancaster. He re-examined Grace Sowerbutts, Jennet Bierley, Ellen Bierley and Jane Southworth on August 19, 1612 at the direction of Justice of the Assizes Sir Edward Bromley.(M4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, M4v

Edward Chisnal Edward Chisnal Examiner/Justice
2193

A man from Windle in the County of Lancashire, known to be a Justice of the Peace for the County of Lancashire. Sir Thomas Gerrard examined Peter Chaddock, Jane Wikinson, Margaret Lyon and Margaret Parre on July 12, 1612 in relation to the witchcraft charges against Isabel Robey.(T3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, T3

Thomas Gerrard Sir Thomas Gerrard Examiner/Justice
2218

A man from Fevorsham in the County of Kent, known to be the Mayor of Faversham and to have presided over the examinations, confessions and trials of Joan Williford, Joan Cariden, Jane Hott and Elizabeth Harris; he also attested to the executions of all but Harris. Harris was convicted, but had not yet been executed at the time of the account's publication. Joan Williford claimed during her examination that Joan Cariden, alias Argoll, had cursed him. (Title Page)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott. London: 1645, Title Page

Robert Greenstreet Robert Greenstreet Examiner/Justice
2242

A man from Buckden in the county of Huntingdon, known to be Bishop of Lincoln. Mother Alice Samuel was brought before him by Robert Throckmorton and Dr. Dorington to make her official confession. She confessed before him twice, first on December 26, 1592, and again on December 29, 1592.(59)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59

William William, Bishop of Lincoln Examiner/Justice
2243

A man from Buckden in the county of Huntingdon, known to be a Justice of the Peace for the county of Huntingdon. He, along with Justice of the Peace Richard Tryce and WIlliam, Bishop of Lincoln, heard Mother Alice Samuel's second confession, on December 29, 1592.(59)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59

Francis Crumwell Francis Crumwell Examiner/Justice
2244

A man from Buckden in the county of Huntingdon, known to be a Justice of the Peace for the county of Huntingdon. He, along with Justice of the Peace Francis Crumwell and WIlliam, Bishop of Lincoln, heard Mother Alice Samuel's second confession, on December 29, 1592.(59)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59

Richard Tryce Richard Tryce Examiner/Justice
2252

A man from Huntingdon in the county of Huntingdon, known to be a justice and a judge. He witnesses Joan Throckmorton have fits of struggling and groaning whenever Agnes Samuel says God or Jesus Christ. Robert Throckmorton also has Agnes demonstrate before Justice Fenner how Joan will come out of her fits whenever Agnes says "As I am a witch, & a worse witch then my mother, & did consent to the death of the La. Crumwell, so I charge the devil to let mistr. Ioan Throck. come out of her fit at this present." Joan is well for 15 minutes after this, and then falls into a shaking fit before the Judge until Agnes repeats the words. She has several such fits in his presence.(104-)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 104-

Fenner Justice Fenner Examiner/Justice
2277

A man from the vicinity of Thames Street in London, known to be a member of the gentry and likely a Justice of the Peace. He issues a warrant for Anne Kirk's apprehension at Master Nayler's request, on charges of bewitching Joan Nayler and causing her to become possessed. He witnesses Joan Nayler fall into a trance in Kirk's presence, and her hands clench so tightly they cannot be opened. He hears that a witch's hair cannot be cut, and orders Kirk's gaolers to try it; the scissors are battered and ruined by the attempt, and what little hair they can cut free of her head will not even burn when put in the fire.(101-103)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 101-103

Richard Martin Sir Richard Martin Examiner/Justice
2285

A number of men from London, who serve as the judges and justices of Elizabeth Jackson at her trial. These men include the Lord Chief Justice, Sir Edmund Anderson; the Recorder of London, Sir John Crook; Sir William Cornwallis, Sir Jerome Bowes, and "divers others." They preside over the 12 hour trial, which include an examination of Mary Glover in one of her fits, where they observe the "stiffenes of her body," the voice coming from her nostrils saying "Hang her" and her lack of reaction to being burned, and they also weigh the numerous points of evidence presented them, including the testimonies of diverse witnesses, the manner that Mary Glover fell ill, the curses of Elizabeth Jackson, and the nature of Mary Glover's fits. The judges seem to unanimously feel that Mary Glover was bewitched, and impart this viewpoint onto the jury.(Fol. 31v - Fol. 32r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 31v - Fol. 32r

Anonymous 452 (Plural) Examiner/Justice
2304

A man from London, who served as a justice at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old Mary Glover. Sir Jerome Bowes was an eminent man in London society, famous for being the ambassador of Queen Elizabeth I to Russia. As a justice, Sir Jerome Bowes helps others evaluate the evidence presented, proving that Mary Glover is neither a counterfeit, and is quite possibly bewitched. This is furthered by the inability of Elizabeth Jackson to repeat the Lord's Prayer, or the Apostle's Creed. He also is involved in examining the stiffness of Mary Glover's body during a fit brought on in court, by being in the same chamber as Elizabeth Jackson. (Fol. 31v - Fol. 32r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 31v - Fol. 32r

Jerome Bowes Sir Jerome Bowes Examiner/Justice
2305

A man from London, who serves as a justice at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old Mary Glover. Sir William Cornwallis is an "eminent man," and as a justice, helps to review evidence against Elizabeth Jackson, and evaluates the stiffness of Mary Glover's body during a fit brought on in court by being in the same room as Elizabeth Jackson. (Fol. 31v - Fol. 32r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 31v - Fol. 32r

William Cornwallis Sir William Cornwallis Examiner/Justice
2306

A number of men and women from London, who serve as the jury or "bench" at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the young fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover. When Mary Glover is first brought in front of the bench to testify against Elizabeth Jackson, on December 1, 1602, even though she cannot see Elizabeth Jackson who was in the prisoner's dock, she cries out, "Where is she?" Upon hearing this, the jury is initially convinced that Mary Glover counterfeits her affliction, and accuses her of such, and "bad her proceede in her evidence." Mary Glover eventually collapses in a "senseles fitt," however. Towards the end of the trial, the jury is counselled by the Lord Chief Justice Anderson, and Sir John Crook, the Recorder of London, that "the Land is full of Witches," who have "on their bodies divers strange marks," as Elizabeth Jackson is reported to have. Further, Judge Anderson declares that "you shall hardly finde any direct proofes in such a case," as the Devil is devious in his dealings. He reminds the Jury that Elizabeth Jackson is not afraid to threaten others, "She is full of Cursings, she threatens and prophesies, and still it takes effect." Judge Anderson also points out how illogical it is to believe that the cause of Mary Glover's fits is natural, considering the nature of her fits. The Recorder of London follows up by describing the trials he put both women through, and his conclusions that neither fear nor counterfeiting were responsible for Mary Glover's symptoms. He believes that it is "in dede through witchcraft." The Jury gather, and decide that Elizabeth Jackson is "guilty of witchcraft." She is sentenced to "a yeeres imprisonment," after being found guilty by the Jury (Anonymous 450) at the end of her trial. During this time, she is also expected to "stand on the pillory" four times, and confess to her crime.(Fol. 30r - Fol. 30v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 30r - Fol. 30v

Anonymous 450 (Plural) Examiner/Justice
2311

A man from London, who is one of the city's chief civil officers, and serves as the Recorder of London. Sir John Crook becomes involved in October 1602 with the case of Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl believed to be bewitched by the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson, when Mary Glover is accused of counterfeiting her symptoms by Bishop Bancroft in court. Lord Chief Justice Sir Edmund Anderson orders Sir John Crook to validate and test Mary Glover's symptoms. In order to do so, Sir John Crook arranges a series of trials for Mary Glover and Elizabeth Jackson. The two are brought together in front of numerous witnesses (Anonymous 439), with Elizabeth Jackson disguised. Sir John Crook initially believes that Mary Glover does not suffer from bewitchment, but rather from "fear." He brings the girl to a woman disguised as Elizabeth Jackson, but she does not react to seeing her. Satisfied, Sir John Crook then brings in the disguised Elizabeth Jackson, and Mary Glover immediately falls into a fit. In order to validate this fit, Sir John Crook heats up a pin and presses it against the girl's face, as well as burns paper against the inside of Mary Glover's hand until it blisters. However, Mary Glover shows no reaction at all to these tests. At this point, Sir John Crook turns to Elizabeth Jackson, and submits her to the same tests. However, the old woman cries out, and begs Sir John Crook not to burn her. The old woman further confesses that she does not believe Mary Glover is counterfeiting her symptoms. Sir John Crook is advised by the minister, Mr. Lewis Hughes, to have Elizabeth Jackson repeat the Lord's Prayers, and the Apostle's Creed. When Sir John Crook has Elizabeth Jackson do so, she is unable to say the line "Deliver us from evil," nor admit that Jesus is God. Sir John Crook believes that Mary Glover is bewitched, and that it is the fault of Elizabeth Jackson. He sends the old woman to Newgate Prison, saying "Lord have mercy upon thee woman." On December 1, 1602, Sir John Crook serves as one of the justices at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, alongside Sir Edmund Anderson, Sir Jerome Bowes, and Sir William Cornwallis. At this trial, he subjects Mary Glover to similar tests at the bidding of the jury (Anonymous 450), who initially believe Mary Glover is counterfeiting her symptoms when she falls into a fit at the trial in the presence of Elizabeth Jackson. While the young girl's body is "senseles," Sir John Crook presses a burning paper against the inside of her hand, with no reaction from the girl. Later, the Recorder of London presents himself with Judge Anderson to the jury, and advises them by describing the trials he put both women through, and his conclusions that neither fear nor counterfeiting were responsible for Mary Glover's symptoms. He believes that it is "in dede through witchcraft." The Jury gather and decide that Elizabeth Jackson is "guilty of witchcraft." Almost a month after Elizabeth Jackson was found guilty, Sir John Crook hears that Mary Glover still suffers from fits, and orders the minister, Mr. Lewis Hughes to perform an exorcism through fasting and prayer for the girl, as he "did blame me (Mr. Lewis Hughes) and all the Ministers of London [...] that we might all be of us be ashamed, to see a child of God in the clawes of Sathan." When Mary Glover is successfully dispossessed, Mr. Lewis reports back to Sir John Crook, who advises him to inform Bishop Bancroft of these events.(Fol. 28v - Fol. 30r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 28v - Fol. 30r

John Crook Sir John Crook Examiner/Justice
2312

A man from London, who serves as Lord Chief Justice for the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the young girl, Mary Glover. Judge Anderson initially orders the Recorder of London, Sir John Crook, to verify the authenticity of Mary Glover's fits when Bishop Bancroft initially accuses Mary Glover of counterfeiting her symptoms in October 1602. Sir John Crook comes to the conclusion that Mary Glover truly is possessed, and so Elizabeth Jackson is appointed a trial on December 1, 1602, where Sir Edmund Anderson serves as Lord Chief Justice. Sir Edmund Anderson was an eminent figure in London, whose "opinions were strongly against Elizabeth Jackson." Anderson had previously presided over many witchcraft trials, "including two involving victims who had been exorcised by the famous Puritan thamauturgist, John Darrell." As such, Judge Anderson "was something of an expert inquisitor." During the trial, he examines Mary Glover, including having Elizabeth Jackson touch the girl's body during a fit, causing her to cast herself towards Jackson. He also bids Elizabeth Jackson say the Lord's Prayer and the Apostle's Creed, during which she cannot say the line "Deliver us from evil." He also evaluates evidence with his fellow justices, including Sir John Crook, Sir William Cornwallis, and Sir Jerome Bowes. When the doctor, Dr. Jorden, testifies that he believes Mary Glover's illness is caused by natural disease, he challenges the doctor. Judge Anderson asks the doctor the name of the disease and if he were willing to cure the girl. Dr. Jorden names the disease "Passio Hysterica," but declines treating the girl or identifying a cure. Lord Anderson sternly replies that he believes Mary Glover's disease "is not naturall: for if you tell me neither a Naturall cause, of it, nor a naturall remedy, I will tell you, that it is not naturall." In a similar vein, before the jury leaves to come to a verdict on Elizabeth Jackson at the trial, Sir Anderson advises the jury that "The Land is full of Witches," and that he has "hanged five or sixe and twenty of them." He elaborates that witches have "on their bodies divers strange marks," as Elizabeth Jackson is reported to have. Further, Judge Anderson declares that "you shall hardly finde any direct proofes in such a case," as the Devil is devious in his dealings. He reminds the Jury that Elizabeth Jackson is not afraid to threaten others, "She is full of Cursings, she threatens and prophesies, and still it takes effect." Judge Anderson also points out how illogical it is to believe that the cause of Mary Glover's fits is natural, considering the nature of her fits. Following him, the Recorder of London also gives his opinion that Mary Glover is bewitched. The jury, under this advice, finds Elizabeth Jackson guilty of witchcraft, and she is sentenced to a year's imprisonment. (12)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 12

Edmund Anderson Sir Edmund Anderson Examiner/Justice
2313

A man from London, who is both a doctor, and Bishop of London. Richard Bancroft believes that Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of witchcraft against the young girl, Mary Glover, is innocent. To this end, he petitions the court to examine Mary Glover for counterfeit symptoms, which the Lord Chief Justice Anderson agrees to, appointing the Recorder of London to examine the girl. Bishop Bancroft is a powerful man, who also manages to pull many strings, including helping Elizabeth Jackson plan a petition to the College of Physicians in November, 1602; and arranging for Dr. Jorden and Dr. Argent to testify that Mary Glover suffers from natural causes at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson. Despite his input, Elizabeth Jackson is found guilty of witchcraft. However, some months later, Bishop Bancroft is approached by the minister Mr. Lewis Hughes, who wishes to tell the Bishop of his success in dispossessing Mary Glover. However, Mr. Lewis is never granted an audience with the Bishop, and called "Rascall and varlot," for his stories. He is imprisoned for four months, and named along with the five other preachers present during Mary Glover's dispossession "Devil finders, Devil puffers, and Devill prayers," by the Bishop Bancroft. (12)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 12

Richard Bancroft Bishop Richard Bancroft Examiner/Justice
2321

A man from London, who "did but study and contemplate upon this subject of Witchcraft and discovered a "Popish Idol" at Cheapside Cross, "which for many years," which few had known was there, until it was pulled down "at the command of the Parliament," and the where it falsely was made with pipes to shed tears, "bewitching the people." (42 - 43)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 42 - 43

Anonymous 466 Examiner/Justice
2323

A man from Cambridge in the county of Cambridgeshire, who visits a minister (Anonymous 467) residing at an inn as a Cambridge scholar. The two engage in a discussion, and fall into dispute about witches, "and their Power." The minister believes that witches conjure the devil in several shapes, and the Cambridge scholar offers to summon the Devil in various shapes. However, Anonymous 468 simply employs a local boy (Anonymous 477), to pretend to be a crow, a horse, a dog, and a duck. The minister believes that these noises come from real animals, even after the boy exposes himself. This "true relation" is an example of how even ministers can be deluded into believing falsehoods.(63 - 65)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 63 - 65

Anonymous 468 Examiner/Justice
2330

A man from London, who serves as a "wicked inquisitor" in Essex and Suffolk. He is allegedly responsible for "cutting off of fourteen innocent people at Chelm ford Assizes, and about an hundred at Berry Assizes," including a minister (Anonymous 473) from Framingham.(101 - 102)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 101 - 102

Anonymous 472 Examiner/Justice
2346

A man from Norwich in the county of Norfolk, who serves as mayor to the town. Three cases of demoniacs offer their vomited stones, pins, pieces of glass, buckles, buttons, quills, etc. to him as evidence of their possession. These including John Ballard's daughter from Bungay, Ann Burgess of St. Edmund's Parish, and Grace Brown from Norwich.(7 - 8)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 7 - 8

Anonymous 101 Examiner/Justice