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List of all events occurring in the persontype of

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
1094

A woman who allegedly appears several times to Sara Rodes two years after her death. Rodes tells her mother (Dorothy Rodes) that Kellet's wife "stood up betwixt them, and gave [her] a box of the eare in the gapsteade, which made the fire to flash out of my eyes." (29)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 29

Kellet Mrs. Kellet Divine
1483

A woman who is allegedly a "skryers of the glasse [a person who uses material objects such as mirrors, glass, or crystals for divination purposes]." This information comes from William Whycherly during his 1597 examination by Sir Thomas Smith. (334)

Appears in:
Foxe, Thomas Cranmer, John Gough Nichols, John. Narratives of the Days of the Reformation. Unknown: 1859, 334

Anonymous 257 Divine
1489

A man, plasterer, and the husband of Mrs. Morgan from Beche-lane, besides the Barbicane (now Beach Street, near the Barbican complex in the City of London) who is said to "occupieth the syve and sheeres [divination tools]." This information comes from William Whycherly during his 1597 examination by Sir Thomas Smith. (334)

Appears in:
Foxe, Thomas Cranmer, John Gough Nichols, John. Narratives of the Days of the Reformation. Unknown: 1859, 334

Christopher Morgan Christopher Morgan Divine
2208

A young boy from Walsham-le-Willows in the county of Suffolk, who on December 24th at eleven years of age "laye in a traunce the spaceof tenne dayes." During this time, he took no sustenance, nor said a word. Upon coming back to himself, "he declareth most straunge and rare thinges, which are to come," and continued to do so for three weeks. Generally, his prophecies relate to praising God, and are told in a "voyce seemeth to bee of such power that all the bedde shaketh." Master Ashley, Esquire, visits the child with a company of men. During this visit, William Withers singles out the servant, Smith, and scolds him for wearing "great and monstrous ruffes," which make the servant vain and "in such abhominable pride," as to subject him to "euerlasting tormentes in hell fire." This was Smith's second warning, and upon hearing it, "as one prickt in conscience, he sorrowed & wept for his offence." He took the cloth band from around his neck, and cut it into pieces using a knife, and vowed never to wear anything like it again. A minister, Mr. Gatton, and two knights, Sir William Spring and Sir Robert [...]armine, visit William Withers during this time as well, who all believe the child's word is true, and that he is an instrument of God.(Cover)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The wonderful worke of God shewed vpon a chylde. London: 1581, Cover

William Withers William Withers Divine
2300

A man from London, who is known as a "noted divine." James Meadowes testifies at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman accused of bewitching the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover. A doctor of divinity, Meadowes presents himself with the physicians, Dr. Edward Jorden and Dr. John Argent, although none were officially summoned to testify. As a government witness, James Meadowes attempts to "purge Elizabeth Jackson, of being any cause of Mary Glovers harme."(Fol. 37r - Fol. 37v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 37r - Fol. 37v

James Meadowes James Meadowes Divine