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List of all events occurring in the persontype of

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
50

Hannah Crump is a girl from Warwick in the county of Warwickshire, identified as the daughter of John Crump, and who is "afflicted with strange fits. Crump is taken to Thomas Hospital in Southwark where she "was taken with one of her fits in such a manner that they would not [attempt to cure her,] but said she was fitter for Bedlam than to come into an Hospital among sick People." She was then taken to see a cunning-man or physician in "Winchester Park in Southwark," who after taking her patient history confirmed that she was bewitched and offered to cure her for five pounds, but suggested that he take on the bewitchment himself. Someone, he claimed, had to bare the curse, once it was made; if not him, than the witch herself, until one of her familiars could infect someone else with it. It occurs to Hannah Crump's sister that prayer and fasting may help Hannah Crump with her dispossession. Her family arranges for such a day to happen. During this day, Hannah Crump rises from her bed "in a very great race," tearing at her clothes, and crying out "in a lamentable manner." Although there are times Hanna Crump quiets down, she still resists, kicking her father, and continuing to burn herself and her family members, breaking windows, and demanding her tabacco pipe. She reveals during prayers that her illness befell her after she consumed an apple a woman (Anonymous 488) brought her in sickness. Her family turns their prayers towards stopping the witch's powers, and she resists violently, spitting at her father. Prayer continues until evening, when Hannah Crump is "quiet on the bed, as one that was willing to rest her self after a weary dayes work." Upon waking, Hannah Crump finds herself able to take a bible and read it for an hour or two. John Crump and his daughter, Hannah, rejoice as she is dispossessed, and her affliction never affected her again.(18 - 20)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 18 - 20

Hannah Crump Hannah Crump Demoniac
63

Jane Stretton is a young woman of about twenty years old from Ware in the county of Hertfordshire, who is allegedly afflicted and tortured by witchcraft thought to be caused by a cunning man (Anonymous 487) and his wife (Anonymous 322). During her fits, Stretton is "forced to live like a chameleon, on air" and also endures vomiting of "flax and hair and thread-ends and crooked pins; while blue, whit, and red flames came in the intervals out of her mouth, and her body was continually slashed and cut with a knife, and imps in the shape of frogs, and toads, and mice forever haunted her." The worst pain of her fits come from her back, as it often feels she is being stabbed. Upon making Jane Stretton's bed, a knife is found, but no one knowns how it came to be there. Although medicine is applied to her, it only seems to aggravate her condition. Jane Stretton is often described as quite innocent and trusting. Her fits begin when she accepts drink from Anonymous 322, and when she provides a pin to the same woman, but neither time did she link her fits to Anonymous 322. These fits last some nine months, during which she cannot eat or pass stool, only being able to consume syrups. Her condition causes many people from other villages to come and visit her and observe "the wonder" of her condition, that she may survive on so little sustenance. (Image 5 - Image 6)

Appears in:
Y., M.. The Hartford-shire Wonder. London: 1669, Image 5 - Image 6

Jane Stretton Jane Stretton Demoniac
72

Jame Barrow is a boy from the London Borough of Southwark described as the son of John Barrow who suffers from violent fits that start when it seems like the child is being burned. This fit lasts for a week, during which time Barrow also walks up and down a room, throws his hat from his head, lays his hands under his belly, screeches lamentably, and makes a croaking sound. He is also visited by a number of devils in the form of rats and cats, who demand his soul. During some of James Barrow's fits, he is also rendered lame, dumb, and blind. During one particular incident, James Barrow finds that he can control his fits by confining himself to a particular stool in the house. However, whenever anyone else sits on the stool, he falls over on his back. Because of the nature of James Barrow's fits, he also finds it impossible to eat until he sings. At times, he calls out the names of people, most particularly, Sam Man, John Sames, Mol Williams, and Mary Prett. Other incidents include James Barrow's inability to articulate to his father why he sits at a table with a pen, ink and a pin; a fit that causes James Barrow's feet to be extremely cold; and the inability for James Barrow to hear the Bible read in his presence without roaring or crying. Eventually, James Barrow's father, John Barrow, seeks help from outside. He first employs the help of physician and astrologer, John Hubbard, who believes Barrow has been bewitched. They use "fopperies and charms" including hanging papers around James Barrow's neck, and putting quills and quicksilver under the door. These prove unsuccessful at healing James Barrow. John Hubbard's second attempt to cure James Barrow of bewitchment is through cutting the boy's hair in a round circle, and trimming his fingers and toe nails. These are trimmings are wrapped in paper and deposited in an oak tree. This also proves useless at curing James Barrow's fits as well. However, after taking some medicine from doctors, astrologers, and apothecaries, James Barrow vomits, and seems well for a time, taking up an apprenticeship. However, after three months, James Barrow claims a rat entered his body, and he acts like a changeling, being unable to eat any food unless in his own household. Following this, John Barrow takes his son to a number of wise men, including: an Irish Roman Catholic (Anonymous 144), Lord Abony, a gentleman (Anonymous 146), a group of friars, and a doctor (Anonymous 487). No one seems able to cure James Barrow. However, shortly after this, John Barrow desires to engage in fasting and prayer for his son, resulting in three days of fasting and prayer, at the end of which he is restored and dispossessed. At first, James Barrow cannot even stand to hear the name of God and Christ, crying out "Legat, go to the Devil Legat," although his mouth did not move. As well, he shies away from the Bible. By the end of the first day, however, he seemed to rejoice at the sight of the Bible. A second day of exorcism consisted of prayers for the better part of the day, which James Barrow endures well until night, when "he fell into a very great Agony." The third day, James Barrow admits to "strong temptations of the Devil, namely to cut his throat, or drown himself, or knock out his brains against a post." Prayer is still performed for the boy, and he roars like a dog, and tears at his clothing. A departure of five spirits is noted from the boy, after which time he is restored.(5 - 8)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 5 - 8

James Barrow James Barrow Demoniac
101

A man from Dunwich and Cookly in the county of Suffolk, described as Bailiff twice in Dunwich in the county of Suffolk. Thomas Spatchet allegedly suffered a variety of fits, a condition attributed to Aubrey Grinset. Born in January of 1614, he was the son of Mr. James Spatchet, and the grandson of Mr. Robert Spatchet, who conversed frequently with the late Lord Chief Justice Sir Edward Coke. Thomas Spatchet is said to have been watched over by the Providence of God from a young age. As an infant, he was dropped on his head against stone by a careless servant, leaving deep seam on the left side. As a young man, he went to draw water and fell down the well instead. He suffered no broken bones, but lost flesh from one hand, suffered a hole in his wrist, lost some skin, and was sick and bedridden for days after. Therafter, Spatchet began to have fits. At first, he would find himself abruptly unable to speak; this soon interfered with fulfilling his religious duties and prayer. His fits later took three forms: Benumbing, in which he could hear but would be unable to move; a shake that would end with his legs and feet moving with agility and harmony; finally, skipping and jumping until his strength ran out. Within a year and a half, he lost all ability to hear or partake in worship, and had difficulty eating. By the winter of 1693, he would shake throughout the day, so that he would be unable to eat until evening and be forced to do so while walking. He suffered kneading fits in 1665, which ended when he seemed to catch a thumb in his mouth and bite it. The witch Aubrey Grinset was searched and found to have an impression on her toe. A year later, the fits resumed. In 1665, Aubrey Grinset confessed to being a witch and sending an imp to cause his fits. However, she denied causing his roaring fits, which he suffered from 1665 to 1666. When he was urged to scratch her, he refused, being too tender-hearted. He attempted to visit Grinset shortly before her death, at the urging of a Mr. R., but was repelled and made to curtsey back from her. His fits remained until the death of the witch, leaving him the last two years entirely unable to pray or otherwise participate in worship. Taking physic made his fits worse, but when he stopped for two years, the fits became violent. The fits allegedly end eight weeks before Grinsets death. Before she died, she said others had him in hand as well, and that her death would not free him. He found himself unable to travel before her death, but discovered himself able again after. He continued to suffer fits to his death, though far less frequently, and he continues to have trouble praying.(2-21, 23, 27, 31, Postscript)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 2-21, 23, 27, 31, Postscript

Thomas Spatchet Thomas Spatchet Demoniac
113

A thirteen year old boy from Burton upon Trent in the county of Staffordshire, who suffers from fits and is allegedly bewitched by Alice Gooderidge. According to John Darrell, Goodridge sent her familiar Minnie to torment him; he also claimed to have dispossessed the boy. Darrell later faced trial on charges of instructing Darling and others to counterfeit both their possessions and their dispossessions to bolster his own reputation. Darling gave a confession that was presented as evidence in court, but was allegedly barred from making the charges in person. Darrell's defense claimed Darling had been threatened with torture to make the confession in the first place, and that the prosecution had kept him from the court to prevent him from retracting that confession.(4)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 4

Thomas Darling Thomas Darling Demoniac
149

A young woman from Littte Gaddsen in the county of Hertfordshire and the daughter of a local smith. She is described as described as "very young, and seems bashful, and modest," a "civil fair-conditioned Maid," whose "Friends [are] inclined to the Anabaptists Sect, and most that came to pray by her were of their Teachers." Hall suffers a strange and disturbing illness which made her feet shake, her body convulse, and for her to shout out strange things. This illness first appears in Autumn 1663. She was taken to see a physician, a Dr. Woodhouse, a man described as " Doctor Woodhouse from Berkhamsted, in the county of Hertfordshire, "a Man famous in curing bewitched persons," who tested her urine and diagnosed her as bewitched / possessed. Hall was exorcised over "stinking Suffumigations," which made he (strain to) vomit. She was temporarily cured, but as of August 1664 (until presumably the time of publication (1665) her torments and voices and noises were soon heard inside of her again, like the "mewing of Cats, barking of Dogs, roaring of Bears, &c. at last a Voice spoke in her, Pus Cat, what a Cat?" It was concluded that this was an "evil spirit" which plagued Hall with these "tricks and torments, [and] convulsions." Hall pinpoints her possession as beginning sometime after she saw "two Flies come down the Chimny to her." She is allegedly possessed by two spirits sent by local witches Goodwife Young and Goodwife Harrod, spirits which attempted to possess her father but were unable to. Mary was soon tempted to self-destruction (by burning, drowning, and scalding herself), and was unable to ride her horse or read the bible. Her possession manifest as convulsions and a choking sensation, although she would also be made to dance and flail about. She is also treated by Sanders (an astrologer and chiromancer), and Mr. Redman (physician and conjurer). (32)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 32

Mary Hall Mary Hall Demoniac
197

An Anabaptist woman who lived on Old-Gravel lane in an unknown area of England, who was said to be possessed by the Devil and would speak in tongues, meow like a kitten and go suddenly blind. She becomes possessed after trying to convince her husband (Anonymous 482) to become baptized, and suffers from "strange and unusual Gestures, and involuntary Motions both of her Tongue and other Members." Ministers (Anonymous 483) visit her and converse with the spirit (Anonymous 240) possessing her, who admits to being sent from "a woman below." (Anonymous 238) These ministers believe the spirit is the Devil himself. The woman is unable to eat while possessed, as "the Vessels of her throat were stopped" whenever she attempted to eat. The spirit possessing her threatens in front of a number of Divines (Anonymous 484) to "throw her into the water, and so destroy her." It also tells the divines that it will make them sick for attempting to help the woman, and that "Prayers were not effectual, save only in [the] Pulpit." The woman remained possessed.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. News from Old-Gravel Lane. London: 1675, 2

Anonymous 19 Demoniac
211

A man from Beckenton in Somersetshire, known to be 18 years old. He is said to have regularly taunted an old woman (Anonymous 8) living in the Alms-House by calling her witch and telling her of her buns. Enraged, she appealed to a Justice of the Peace and Spicer was "so frightened, that he humbled himself to her, and promised never to call her so again." A few days later, he began to have strange fits; this condition lasted a fortnight. During these fits, he claimed to see "this Old Woman against the Wall in the same Room of the House where he was, and that sometimes she did knock her Fist at him; sometimes grin her Teeth, and sometimes laugh at him." Three or four men would be needed to hold him while in the throes of a fit. Whenever he asked for a small beer, he would vomit 30 or more crooked pins.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Great News from the West of England being a True Account of Two Young Persons Lately Bewitched in the Town of Beckenton in Somerset-shire. London: 1689, 1

William Spicer William Spicer Demoniac
214

A woman from Stradbrook in the county of Suffolk, known to be the servant of Symon Fox. She allegedly had a falling out with Doll Bartham when she refused to give Bartham some of Symon Fox's goods. Bartham first sent three toads to torment Jorden and keep her from sleeping, but the first was thrown out the window, and the next two burnt in the fire. She then sent her cat, Gyles, to Jorden. He made strange noises in the night, would pin her down and kiss her, and talked often both to her and to anyone who would hear him. Gyles told the onlookers that he came for Jorden's life. Jorden suffered fits after Gyles began to visit her. In these fits, a lump arose and moved about her body, she struggled so hard she broke a chair and needed six men to restrain her, and was thrown violently against a wall and under the bed. Witnesses saw her eyes sink into her head, her head bend backwards almost to her hips, and her teeth close fast. She cried out " Barthram, thou hast killed mee" before numerous witnesses.(92-98)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 92-98

Joan Jorden Joan Jorden Demoniac
217

A girl from Thames Street near Broken Wharf in London, known to be the daughter of Master Nayler, and sister to George and Joan Nayler. Anne Kirk allegedly tormented Anne Nayler to death with an evil spirit, which caused her to have frenzied fits. Before she died, the spirit would talk to Master Nayler, and told him that "one would come after who should discouer the causer, and the truth of all."(101)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 101

Anne Nayler Anne Nayler Demoniac
218

A girl from Thames Street near Broken Wharf in London, known to be the daughter of Master Nayler, and sister to George and Joan Nayler. The spirit tormenting her sister Anne told their father Master Nayler "one would come after who should discouer the causer, and the truth of all" before she died. The day after Anne's burial, at which Anne Kirk was denied some of the alms the Nayler family gave to the poor, Joan began to be tormented by an evil spirit as well. The spirit possessing Joan spoke was heard to say "Giue me thy liuer, thy lights, thy heart, thy soule, &c; then thou shalt be released, then I will depart fro[m] thee" and to bid Joan to hang herself. Her body would be contorted in tormenting fits, during which she accused Anne Kirk of bewitching her. Master Nayler had Kirk apprehended, and thereafter Joan was witnessed to fall into fits whenever in Kirk's presence. She also had a fit when Kirk was bailed from prison, and while the jury was deliberating at Kirk's trial.(101-103)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 101-103

Jone Nayler Joan Nayler Demoniac
233

A man Nottingham in the county of Nottinghamshire, who at the age of 19 or 20 allegedly had several fits after being bit by a familiar named Lucie. During this time, William Sommers was imprisoned, where the Devil appeared to him in the shape of a mouse and demanded that Sommers let him back in, promising to save him from death if he yielded. Sommers allegedly agreed to being repossessed and, though he was still tormented in truth, pretended that everything he had done under possession before had been faked. Yet, when the high Sheriff demanded in the name of God that Sommers tell the truth, Sommers was cast into a fit. To determine whether he was faking, pins were thrust into his hand and leg; when he roused from the fit, he said it was the other hand which had been pricked, and that he had fallen due to stomach problems. When they brought him back to question a second time, he tried to fling himself over the gallery and break his neck. The second questioning proved to everyone's satisfaction that he was indeed possessed. Sommers was brought to London and kept first by a barber of evil repute, then by the Bishop of London. Sommers continued to insist that he had only been pretending to be possessed, and furthermore, Mr. Darrell had hired him to do it. Mr. Darrell countered, insisting that Sommers' actions while possessed were not listed in Scripture as impossible, therefore they were indeed possible and proof of possession; this argument is regarded as a poor one. It is nonetheless agreed that there is no way Sommers could have counterfeited such things as his eyes, hands and face becoming unnaturally black, or turning his head all the way around. Numerous depositions are given, and taken as proof of Sommers' possessions. After his dispossession, Sommers named Millcent Horselie as a witch, and was able to give details of her examination despite not being present for it. John Darrell later faced trial on charges of instructing Sommers and others to counterfeit both their possessions and their dispossessions to bolster his own reputation. Sommers gave deposition against Darrell, and demonstrated a counterfeit swelling before the high Commission at Lambeth in support of his claim.(Images 3, 6, 7, 8, 15, 20-21)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Images 3, 6, 7, 8, 15, 20-21

William Sommers William Sommers Demoniac
240

A young woman from Bewdley in the county of Worcestershire, who wasformerly little taken notice of Religion, until about four years since [...] after hearing of a Sermon, seemed to be much wrought upon and dejected, who afterwards fell into some passion, and (as was conceived by her friends) Convulsion fits, which in time grown stronger upon her, and observed especially to take her in time of private prayer, or performance of pious duties. By 1642, Dovey, troubled by religious talk, preaching, and prayer, begins to have convulsions. Doveys possession might have been brought on by the belief of military man who, by some discourse, and other informations, strongly imagined, that shee is possessed. Her keeper "lifte[ed] his heart up to the Lord in prayer," and "without uttering the words," said that, if Dovey were indeed possessed, "the Lord would be pleased to make it manifest" (2). Dalton recounts how Dovey immediately acted like a woman possessed. The devil who occupied her body attempted to destroy it from the inside out, and God, in his infinite mercy, continued to preserve her. Throughout her trials, Dovey was "often en thrown against walls and into the fire, but all without any hurt" (ibid.). Dalton also recalls how, when she was "cast into a great fire, some would have taken her out but her keeper said, let her alone, and observe the providence of God and straight away she was snatched out without humane help, not having any hurt, or so much as the smell of fire on her clothes." Most brutally, Dovey appears to have tried to kill herself: she "snatched a paire of Cizzers from a womans girdle, and applied them to her throat, and another time a knife from another, in an admirable quick way, and strook her breast, yet both without so much as a scarre in either place." It is unclear if Dovey is ever cured. (1-4)

Appears in:
Dalton, James. A Strange and True Relation of a Young Woman Possest with the Devill, by name Joyce Dovey. London: 1647, 1-4

Joyce Dovey Joyce Dovey Demoniac
241

A girl of Cleworth in the county of Lancashire in the parish of Leigh, known to be the daughter of NIcholas Starchie and the sister of John Starchie, who at the age of nine allegedly began to suffer fits caused by Edmund Hartley. She was first taken with a dumpy and heavy countenance. Anne Starchy is alleged to have been given to scoffing and blasphemy during her fits, and to have caused a loud whupping noise by joining hands with other possessed persons. She described her possessor as being a foul ugly man with a white beard and a head-sized bulge on his chest. It is said that she developed supernatural strength and knowledge, able to foretell her fits.(Image 5, 9, 21)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 5, 9, 21

Anne Starchie Anne Starchie Demoniac
242

A boy from Cleworth in the County of Lancashire in the parish of Leigh, known to be the son of Nicholas Starchie and the brother of Anne Starchie, who at the age of ten allegedly began to suffer fits caused by Edmund Hartley. His fits started at school, where he could not keep himself from shouting, and progressing until they became more extreme. At various times, he would bleed abundantly, loudly blaspheme, cause a loud whupping noise, fall as if dead, gnash his teeth, or vomit. John Starchie described the possession as coming and going from him as a ill-favoured, hunchbacked man. He would also bite at people, snatch various things, and throw whatever came to hand. He developed supernatural strength, the ability to foretell his fits, and could tell what it was that someone was bringing him to drink ahead of time.(Image 5, 8, 9, 19, 21)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 5, 8, 9, 19, 21

John Starchie John Starchie Demoniac
244

A young girl of Cleworth in the County of Lancastershire in the parish of Leigh, known to be ten years of age and belong to the Starchie household, alleged to be afflicted with fits by Edmund Hartley. She is alleged to have been able to predict her fits and the details of them, and attributed this knowledge to a white dove. At one point, she and Elizabeth Hardman were unable to eat for three days and nights, nor speak to anyone but one another except " to ther lads. saue that their lads gaue them leaue (as the said) the one to eate a toast & drink, the other a sower milk posset." Hartley is said to have been angry that the ate, even with permission, and made them vomit it up. Holland was then made to spin with a distaff for an hour and a half, spinning faster and a finer thread than she ever had before. At a dinner, Holland and the Hardman sisters were thrown back, their bodies swelled, their faces disfigured, and strange motion was observed from within their bodies. Holland described her possessor as a great bear with an open mouth that turned into a white dove.(Image 6, 8, 10)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 6, 8, 10

Elinor Hollande Eleanor Holland Demoniac
246

A young woman of Cleworth in Lancashire in the parish of Leigh, known to be 30 years old and a member of the Starchie household, who is alleged to have been afflicted with fits by Edmund Hartley. When asked to bear witness against Hartley, she began to bark and howl. Later, she became sick after going into Hartley's chamber and looking in his chest. At another time, her belly swelled as if she were pregnant, but over the course of a day, before shrinking again. It is said that before her barking fit, Hartley had been seen kissing her, and was thought to have promised her marriage. She was not dispossessed with the rest, but instead suffered pains and vomited up foamy, bloody matter. She was thought to have been dispossessed, however, though it came out the next day that she was still tormented. The exorcism was performed again, this time successfully; the Devil was seen to leave her in a great breath, ugly like a toad. She confessed that the Devil had made her lie the day before.(Image 6, 8, 9)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 6, 8, 9

Jane Ashton Jane Ashton Demoniac
248

A woman from Cleworth in the county of Lancashire in the parish of Leigh, known to have been employed within the Starchie household, who allegedly suffered fits caused by Edmund Hartley. The first incident she suffered was to be flung toward the kitchen fire; throughout that day she was repeatedly flung about. During other fits, her belly would roil and feel like something was rising from it to her heart or her head and nose would feel as if full of nails. When her belly was swollen, she would be lifted up and bounced, and when the swelling subsided she would bark and howl while her body was numbed with cold. At one time, she accompanied Hartley to Salford, where he prayed over her and they met with two Justices of the Peace who tried to get Byrom to speak against him; she was struck speechless and was cast down backwards. She would be struck with visions of a large black dog or a black cat coming at her. Six times in a six-week period, she was left unable to eat or drink; when permitted to eat, she would eat greedily and cry for more, complaining that she was still hungry. At another time, she felt pulled to pieces and a stinking smoke and breath rose from her for a day and night. Shortly before Hartley's hanging, the Devil appeared to her in Hartley's likeness, promising silver and gold if she "took heed what she said."(Image 7)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 7

Margaret Byrom Margaret Byrom Demoniac
250

A fourteen year old girl from Wapping in London, who in 1693 starts suffering strange fits after an invisible hand hits her on the back while in a yard near her aunt's house, leaving her seeming as though she was dead. Sarah Bower is described as "of a Temper pretty Brisk and Lively, somewhat given to Pride." A surgeon (Anonymous 99) is sent for, and after blooding her, she seems somewhat recovered. However, Sarah Bower finds her side is numb after her fit, and she bends at the waist from the weight of her limbs that hang as though dead. Her fits continue in intervals over several weeks, and it is believed that these fits are caused by "Fright she might receive by the Stroke on the Back." The many doctors that visit Sarah Bower, including Richard Kirby, give her "Comfortable things to take." However, she is not cured, and the doctors proclaim that they had never seen fits of such a nature before. After six weeks of continued fits, Sarah Bower rises one morning to find that "she was taken Speechless." Her tongue was also contracted. With the permission of Sarah Bower's aunt, Kirby, an author and doctor put his hand into her mouth, and tried to move her tongue, only to find it fixed. Some time later, at a neighbour's house, a gentleman dressed all in black offered Sarah Bower riches in return from blood from her arm. However, this caused Sarah Bower to make all the "Noise that possible she could," causing her neighbours to come in, and the "black Gentleman or Devil [to] immediately Vanish[...]" When Sarah Bower tries to describe these events, most neighbours believe that "some Rogue had attempted to Rob the house." The following Thursday, Sarah Bower regains her power of speech, and relates the story about the Gentleman in black, citing that "he had sort of broad Feet like a Cow." She also tells of how an angel appeared to her, and advised her not to yield to Satan and predicted her death would arrive soon. The angel also sends a message through Sarah Bower, advising that if the "People of London, and England, did not speedily repent from their Sins, especially that of Pride in Apparrel, and turn from the Evil of their Ways, God Almighty would give them up as a Prey to their Enemies." She also predicted that she would lose the power of speech again, and "it would not be restored to her again till St. Thomas's-Day, at Christmas," when she would declare many more things. Further, Sarah Bower states that at two in the afternoon, she must go and meet the gentleman in black. Before this meeting, Sarah Bower looses her power of speech, and reads the 17th chapter of Matthew's Gospel in the Bible, while emitting a "buzzing Noise." At two o'clock, Sarah Bower leaves her room and went into the yard, "where she was soon thrown to the Ground in a strange manner," and her fits are more violent than every before. However, her neighbors could see "no Form or Shape [...] that could occasion her Fall." Sarah Bower's fits are believed to be caused by an Evil Spirit, that would "be troublesome, sometimes falling out a Laughing, other times making Faces at them," and spitting at those who pray for her. At other times during her fits, Sarah Bower barks like a dog, lowing like a bull, roaring like a lion, or makes "other most hedious Noise." It is believed that the Devil presents himself before her in "the hideous Shape of a Monstrous Fiery Dragon, other whiles a Lyon," and she is torn between the Angel "pulling one way, and the Devil another."(3)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 3

Sarah Bower Sarah Bower Demoniac
251

A girl from Great Gadson in the County of Buckinghamshire, known to have been sixteen or seventeen years old at the time of her possession. She is said to be "descended of honest Parents of good [repute], and by them carefully educated in the Principles of Christianity; nor was there a young maid of a more lovely innocent Beauty, sweet Carriage, or virtuous Disposition." Her father allegedly had a falling out with an unnamed woman with an "evil name" and not long after, she began to have strange fits. Two egg-sized bunches would rise in her throat and a strange voice, rough and guttural, would be heard within her speaking blasphemies; this voice would often converse with bystanders. Through these conversations, it was learned that there were two spirits possessing her, and that they had been sent into her by two women when the spirits found her father praying and were unable to enter him. Her father engaged five ministers to fast and pray to exorcise her (only four came, as predicted by the evil spirits), succeeding in removing one of the two. The spirit that remained inside her began tossing her about, taking the use of her legs, and contorting both her body and her face; it also caused her to ride home facing the rear of the horse. At other times, it would cause her to make a dog's barks, a bull's bellows or to roar. She is also said to have once attended a party, at which she lost the use of her legs to prevent her from drinking and tried to make her drown herself in the well in the yard. Her possession was still in effect at the time of the account's publication, about 13 years later.(2-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire. London: 1677, 2-4

Anonymous 28 Demoniac
252

A woman from Beckenton in Somersetshire, known to be 18 years old and to live with her brother and three younger sisters. Mary Hill allegedly demanded to borrow a ring from an old woman, Anonymous 8, and began threatening her for it. About a week before Mary's fits began, she met this same old woman in the street. Anonymous 8 took Mary by the hand and requested she escort her to Froom to look for work; Mary refused. The two met again four days later; Anonymous 8 begged an apple from Mary, and Mary again refused her. The following Sunday, Mary began to have prickings in her stomach, and on Monday something arose in her throat while she fell into a series of violent fits. Four or five people were needed to restrain her. While in the throes of a fit, Mary complained that she "saw this old Woman against the Wall, grinning at her, and being struck at, would step aside to avoid the blows." On Wednesday, she began to throw up crooked pins; this lasted a fortnight, and then threw up nails and pins. After an eight-day respite, she began throwing up "Nails again, and Handles of Spoons, both of Pewter and Brass; several pieces of Iron, Lead, and Tin, with several clusters of Crooked Pins; some tied with Yarn, and some with Thread, with abundance of Blood between." The townsfolk, concerned about Mary's condition, brought Anonymous 8 near her home. Though Mary allegedly did not know Anonymous 8 was approaching, she fell into a strong fit; Anonymous 8 was apprehended for witchcraft on this evidence. Mary's fits continued, however, as did her vomiting of nails and spoon-handles. Her vomiting is said to have been triggered by drinking small beer. Some accounts name the old woman as Elizabeth Carrier; Margery Combes and Anne More were also arrested in connection with Mary Hill's fits. Her vomiting was attested to in court by witnesses Susanna Belton, Ann Holland, Francis Jesse and Christopher Brewer. Belton and Holland brought numerous objects Mary was said to have vomited to court as evidence, while Jesse and Brewer gave deposition that they had searched Mary's mouth with their fingers before she vomited and were convinced she could not have faked it. John Humphreys observed that Mary vomited nails in the morning, sleep with her mouth open, groaned in her sleep while being impossible to wake, and to be much weakened by her vomiting. After the assizes, Humphreys reported that she vomited nails and glass; days later she swelled up and vomited bread and butter contaminated with white mercury.(1-2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Great News from the West of England being a True Account of Two Young Persons Lately Bewitched in the Town of Beckenton in Somerset-shire. London: 1689, 1-2

Mary Hill Mary Hill Demoniac
253

An eighteen year old maid from the city of Chester in the county of Cheshire who was allegedly possessed by a white spirit that enveloped her. She was possessed for fifteen to sixteen weeks. One day, she came home from the fields very sick and would only eat once every twenty-four hours. When she would eat, she would only eat bread and cheese. She had a fit and was in a trance from hour to hour. She was delivered by having vinegar spit up her nose until she called out for the blood of Christ and made to recite prayers with John Lane. The following day Mylner attends a sermon John Lane preached at Saint Mary's Cathedral in Chester (now St Mary's Centre, then Church of St Mary-on-the-Hill), where she attended. At the time of publication she "remayneth at this prese[n]t (praysed be god) in perfit good health and lyking." (Image 3-4)

Appears in:
Fisher, John. The Copy of a Letter Describing the Wonderful Woorke of God in Deliuering a Mayden within the City of Chester. London: 1565, Image 3-4

Anne Mylner Anne Mylner Demoniac
254

A twelve year old boy who faked possession in order to get attention and gifts. He would have violent fits and vomit a variety of objects.(46)

Appears in:
B., R.. The Boy of Bilson. London: 1622, 46

William Perry William Perry Demoniac
256

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, known to be an apprentice of Mr. Thomas Welling, who was allegedly bewitched by Sarah Morduck when asked to make a second key to fit her home's lock. He was convinced to take a drink from Morduck after much protesting, and is thereafter rendered unable to eat or drink, and and blind as well. His friends, concerned about him, brought Morduk to him, and convince him to scratch her. His vision returned, as did his ability to eat and drink, but when he finally had a bowel movement, the stool was full of pins. His friends then consulted a woman (Anonymous 370) known to have some skill who advised them to boil Hathaway's urine in a stone bottle, but the bottle burst into pieces when they did so, returning Hathaway to his former state even though none of the shards touched him. He remained in this state until some neighbors assisted him in scratching Morduck again, though he eventually relapsed once more.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 1

Richard Hathaway Richard Hathaway Demoniac
257

A seventeen year old woman from Turnbridge in the county of Kent, who in July of 1681 is suddenly plagued by two devils, one black and one gray, which seem bent bent on her destruction. The gray devil holds her hostage and tempts her to kill herself. Although she exorcises these demons, they appear again in August of the same year when Gurr becomes possessed by the little black devil. He crouches inside her, wishing sad wishes with the most ugly shrieking noises, and roaring out curses. The black devil instructs Gurr to curse and swear as I do and wish such wishes as I do and tells her that if she does, she should again be well. Gurr is also possessed by a witch who spake with the most hideous and strange noises, orders her to Be as I am, and you shall be as well as ever you were in your life. This witch continues to speak from inside of Gurr, continually repeating, do as I say, and do as I would have, and as I am, for I am a witch, a witch, I am a witch, do as I say and be as I am, and you shall be well. Gurrs claims to have twice been airborn with the black and grey devils, but prays and finds herself at ease. The witch soon attacks her again, however, warning her in such a loud, sudden, and fearful voice, to keep away from Doctor Skinner, that devil doctor, and makes Gurr strangely afrightened, causing much trembling and shaking. She continues to suffer, but so does the whole household. Gurr concluded that she had not been speedily cured and her Master and Mistress and all the family must have been forced to have left the house. Dr. Skinner casts out the devils and the witch from Margaret Gurr's body, and also cured her from scurvy and gout. After this, she is visited no more by the devils or the witch. Upon being cured, Gurr is also blessed with the miracle of being able to read the Bible, which she could not do before. (1)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 1

Margaret Gurr Margaret Gurr Demoniac
259

A woman from Denham in the county of Buckinghamshire, who was allegedly possessed by a devil in the shape of a headless bear; A woman who was allegedly possessed by the devil her idle talk escalates into unbridled raging violents fits.(Image 3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Most Dreadfull Discourse of a Woman Possessed with the Deuill who in the Likenesse of a Headlesse Beare Fetched her out of her Bedd. London: 1584, Image 3

Margret Hooper Margaret Hooper Demoniac
297

A boy from Lawrack (Landrake) in the County of Cornwall, known to be twelve years old and the servant of John Roberts, who was allegedly tempted into allowing the Devil to possess him after a Fair. The Devil appeared to him first as a woman who offered him money, which he refused, and then as a black dog with fiery eyes who came to him three nights running, again offering money, until he accepted and agreed to meet in a field in eight weeks time. The next morning, the money the Devil had given him had vanished, and he fell sick with a swollen stomach and a lack of appetite. This illness lasted a fortnight, then the swelling moved to his neck and throat. He also began to have fits, as if epileptic, and also convulsive fits. Soon, he began to have roaring and whistling fits whenever people conducted their religious duties around him, and fall into a dead sleep after. His mother, Dorothy Sawdie, eventually pressed him into confessing, after which the Devil appeared to him again, this time in the shape of a velvet-clad little man, who threatened him with his fist and told him he would fall down dead at the naming of God. The Devil would also appear to him at other times, sometimes showing him things, sometimes giving him visions of nearby towns and villages, and other times threatening him. John Roberts, after several weeks, appealed to various Ministers to help the boy, and they came to the house led by a Mr. Teag to pray over him for a day. They succeed in weakening the possession enough that, the next day, Thomas Sawdie is finally dispossessed after being made to recite the Lord's Prayer repeatedly.(Title Page, 1-3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Return of Prayer: or A Faithful Relation of Some Remarkable Passages of Providence concerning Thomas Sawdie. London: 1664, Title Page, 1-3

Thomas Sawdie Thomas Sawdie Demoniac
298

A young man from Herringswell in the county of Suffolk, who was allegedly possessed by an Irish spirit named Aubon, and dispossessed through prayers led by his brother Edward Nyndge. The possession manifested in various ways, foremost in a swelling in his chest and body, accompanied by staring eyes and contortions of his body; at other times he would make strange gestures and engaged in peculiar behaviors such that those with him thought him mad. Alexander was also rendered unable to eat for extended periods, would sometimes have fits of shaking, a lump would be seen moving under his skin, and at times strange flapping noises would be heard from his body. He was prone to fits in which he would curl up under the bedcovers, then bounce up from the bed and beat himself against the ground and bedstead, such that he needed to be restrained to not do himself injury. The spirit is also said to have conversed with Edward Nyndge, and to have grotesquely deformed Alexander Nyndge, caused him to laugh, shriek or cry abundantly, and gave him such strength that five men would be needed to restrain him during these conversations.(A3-A5, A7)

Appears in:
Nyndge, Edward. A True and Fearefull Vexation of one Alexander Nyndge being Most Horribly Tormented with the Deuill. London: 1615, A3-A5, A7

Alexander Nyndge Alexander Nyndge Demoniac
299

A widow from Suffolk who believed the Devil was in her. She also received a toad which would suck on her thigh.()

Appears in:
Unknown, . British Museum Add. MS. 27402 f. 109b. Unknown: 1645,

Margaret Mixter Margaret Mixter Demoniac
301

An eighteen year old man from Whalley in the county of Lancashire, who is a gardener and servant to Thomas Lister, and an avid dancer. Dudgale starts having fits by some accounts when a schoolfellow denies his ability to perform various tricks, and by other accounts after a night of dancing at a rushbearing in Whalley. Richard Dugdale's fits consist of his ability to become clairvoyant, vomiting stones, brass rings, and buttons, making strange noises, dancing on his knees, exhibiting great strength, extreme changes in weight, strange lumps on his chest and belly, speaking in voices other than his own, his blasphemy of God, his ability to repeat Sermons he has never heard, and strange contortions of his body. Richard Dugdale is also pricked with a pin by John Hindle during a fit, to which he gives no reaction. Richard Dugdale and his family seek help from Dr. Chew, Dr. Crabtree, and the minister Mr. Jolly. Richard Dugdale allegedly admits that he feels Dr. Chew's medicines cured him of his Fits, but that these Fits were the work of the Devil. It is believed that Richard Dugdale made a contract with the Devil to dance better than all others, and upon confessing this in drink, Richard Dugdale experiences his last fit on March 24, 1690, a date he himself predicted. When the Devil speaks through Richard Dugdale's body, he often refers to Richard Dugdale as "Dicky." After he is cured, Richard Dugdale marries, and continues to pursue his profession as a gardener.(Image 5)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, Image 5

Richard Dugdale Richard Dugdale Demoniac
303

A woman from Hockham in the county of Norfolk, who is allegedly bewitched by Elizabeth Frauncis.(145)

Appears in:
Ewen, L'Estrange C.. Witchcraft and Demonism. London: 1922, 145

Mary Cocke Mary Cocke Demoniac
305

A seventeen-year old girl, daughter of Alice Norrington, and the servant of William Sponer, from Westwell street in Kent, who was allegedly possessed by Satan "night and day" and who "rored and cried mightilie" under examination. The devil who possessed Mildred Norrington was allegedly kept by a woman only known as "Old Alice" with whom he had been with for twenty years. The Devil had been sent about a year ago in the shape of two birds to kill Mildred Norrington.Norrington, the "Pythonist of Westwell," retracted her possession while under examination.(71)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 71

Mildred Norrington Mildred Norrington Demoniac
306

A woman from Hockham in the county of Norwich who suffered suicidal tendencies diverse fits where she "sometimes seemed dead and senseles." Sometimes she "spoke strangely or barked like a dog" or had "strange visions and fearful sights of light and flashes of lightning in the evening," and of "two children, one white and the other red." She suffer tremendous physical and physiological complications: she foamed at the mouth, spat at the name of Jesus, and exhibited extraordinary strength. During these fits she "complained about Mother Frauncis" who was eventually imprisoned by Sir Bassingbourn Gawdy in the Norwich goal for causing Harvey's torments. It was there that Harvey scratched Frauncis to unwitch herself. Harvey was examined by Augustine Styward, sometime around December 20, 1600, and diagnosed as having "as physic calleth uteri suffoctio or strangulatio," or hysteria. Styward wrote to Goawdy, begging him to take mercy on Frauncis. Frauncis was released, but within three weeks she was dead. Beyond being diagnosed as a hysteric, Harvey was also accused of being a "counterfit."()

Appears in:
Unknown, . Brit. Mus., Add. MS. 28223, f.15. Unknown: 1600,

Joan Harvey Joan Harvey Demoniac
307

A man who was allegedly possessed. He would often lie as though dead and when they would prick him with needles, he would not bleed.()

Appears in:
Unknown, . Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 36,674, f.89. Unknown: ,

Edward Dynham Edward Dynham Demoniac
308

A man who was allegedly bewitched by William and Edith Walles. He would have sweating and shaking fits and would feel as though a mouse was running inside him.(230-233)

Appears in:
Guilding, J. M.. Reading Records: Diary of the Corporation, Volume 3. Unknown: 1896, 230-233

Edward Bonavent Edward Bonavent Demoniac
309

A woman from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who allegedly faked possession, being exploited by Richard Master, the local parson.(288)

Appears in:
Burnet, Gilbert. The History of the Reformation of the Church of England. Unknown: 1679, 288

Elizabeth Barton Elizabeth Barton Demoniac
311

An eighteen year old girl who allegedly had fits during which eight men could not hold her. Several pins were taken from her body. She had fits for three years before she died.(525-527)

Appears in:
Roberts, George. The Social History of the Southern Counties. London: 1856, 525-527

Mary TIllman Mary Tillman Demoniac
314

A ten or eleven year old girl, who allegedly suffered from fits for four years at the hands of Alice Huson. The accounts of suggest that she "did often Screech and Cry out vehemently, sometimes scratch and bite any she could lay hold on, and say, Ah, Alice, Old Witch, have I gotten thee? And sometimes lye down all drawn together, almost round; and lye still as in a Swoon, continuing thus the most part of a Week: And sometimes again all of a sudden, she became unusually Merry, and continued so for a considerable time together." The fits increased in nature and included convulsions. Faith was diagnosed as a hysteric, a melancholic, and possibly an epileptic. She could not be cured, Dr. Taylor postulated, because there was "fascination," or witchcraft causing her suffering.(50-55)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 50-55

Faith Corbet Faith Corbet Demoniac
315

A boy from Baildon in the county of West Yorkshire, who accuses Mary Armitage of bewitching him. He would have fits, vomit pins and a horse shoe stubb, and would cry out against Mrs. Capp.(208)

Appears in:
Sharpe, James. Instruments of Darkness. Philidelphia: UPenn Press: 1996, 208

Abraham Hartley Abraham Hartley Demoniac
316

A young boy from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who allegedly sufferes from fits all day long. He would make animal noises, his hands would be pressed together so hard no one could bring them apart, and his body would be in strange positions.(part ii., bk. ii, p. 95)

Appears in:
Clark, Samuel. The Marrow of Ecclesiatical History Divided into Two Parts . London: 1675, part ii., bk. ii, p. 95

Thomas Harrison Thomas Harrison Demoniac
317

A young girl who allegedly faked possession under pressure from her father. She had convulsions and vomited pins among other symptoms. She was relatively famous for a short period in the summer and autumn of 1605 when James VI and I interested himself in her alleged possession. Her case attracted the attention of many notable doctors of the time, including William Harvey.(135)

Appears in:
Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, . Report of the Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, Issue 11, Part 7. London: , 135

Anne Gunter Anne Gunter Demoniac
318

A woman who was said to be sick in body and mind. She allegedly bewitched by one Anne Clinche according to Mary Prowting. It was later decided that Waldron had faked possession.(477)

Appears in:
Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, . Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, Reign of Charles: 1633-1634. Vol 6. Unknown: 1635, 477

Anne Waldron Anne Waldron Demoniac
319

A young woman from London, who along with Rachel Pinder, fakes possession. She would vomit foreign bodies and fall into trances. The Devil would also speak through her.(Image 8)

Appears in:
Chrysostom, John. The Disclosing of a Late Counterfeyted Possession by the Deuyl in Two Maydens within the Citie of London. London: 1574, Image 8

Agnes Brigges Agnes Brigges Demoniac
320

A young woman, who along with Agnes Brigges, admitted to faking possession. She would vomit foreign bodies and fall into trances. The Devil also allegely spoke through her.(Image 9)

Appears in:
Chrysostom, John. The Disclosing of a Late Counterfeyted Possession by the Deuyl in Two Maydens within the Citie of London. London: 1574, Image 9

Rachel Pinder Rachel Pinder Demoniac
321

A girl from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the eleven year old daughter of Mary Muschamp (now Moore) and George Muschamp of the gentry, and the sister of Betty Muschamp and George Muschamp Jr. She allegedly began suffering fits at the hands of Dorothy Swinow during harvest in 1645, and was finally released from them two years later in 1647. Margaret would fall into trances and see visions of angels and other spirits. She would also suffer torments in which she would lose the use of her tongue and limbs and vomit; at various times she vomited fir branches, coal, pins, straw, wire, brick, lead and stones. She would also lose the ability to eat for weeks at a time, only able to have her lips wet with a bit of water or milk. She would also sometimes cry that a Rogue was striking her and be seen to shield herself from blows; she claimed that this Rogue fought her in various shapes such as dragon, bear, horse or cow, striking her with a club, staff, sword or dagger. Other things would fight for her. Margaret would not remember what she had done or said during her fits. If given a pen and paper, she would write then have fits and burn or chew the paper to illegibility. For a time, she insisted that she required two drops of blood from the Rogue (John Hutton) to live, and that her brother required the same. Margaret accused Dorothy Swinow and John Hutton of causing her affliction, and that of her brother and sister, claiming that her angels bid her speak out. Her statements and final prayer during her last fit was recorded.(1-4)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 1-4

Margaret Muschamp Margaret Muschamp Demoniac
322

A servant from birks-nooke, Yorkshire (presumably Birks Fell, Yorkshire) who is sent by her master, Mabel Fouler of Burtree House, to go buy eggs from Anne Forster. they could not agree on a price, however, and so Forster desired to look at Armstrong's head. Three days later as Armstrong is back at Burtree house and in the pasture shortly after day break, a man approaches her and asks her where she was the Friday previous. Armstrong relates that she was trying to get eggs from Ann Forster. He responds that the woman who looked at Armstrong's head "should be the first that made a horse of her spirrit, and who should be the next that would ride her ; and into what shape and liknesses she should be changed, if she would turne to there God." Then, Armstrong relates at the deposition that "And withall tould this informer how they would use all meanes they could to allure her: first, by there tricks, by rideing in the house in empty wood dishes that had never beene wett, and also in egg shells ; and how to obtaine whatever they desired by swinging in a rope; and with severall dishes of meate and drinke. But, if she eate not of their meate, they could not harme her. And, at last, tould her how it should be divulgd by eateing a piece of cheese, which should be laid by her when she laie downe in a field with her apron cast over her head, and so left her. As soon as the informant left her, she allegedly fell dead and remained so until six in the morning. She then allegedly starts suffering from these "fits" almost every day and sometimes a few times a day. She would sometimes fall into a fit from evening until dawn and on one such occasion, Anne Forster allegedly came to her and tried to put a bridle on her who was now "in the likeness of a horse." She alleges that after this incident, about a dozen people on horseback appear to her, asking her to sing for them as they danced around her, first in the shape of hares, then cats, then mice and several other shapes. They then returned home on their horses, led by their "protector." They then repeated the even for another six or seven nights. After dancing, they would go to the "Eideing house" where they all sat at a table. In the middle of a room, there was a rope hanging and everyone would touch it several times which made whatever they desired appear on the table, including meat and drink. When Armstrong tried to avoid joining them, they turned into their "own shape" and threatened her. They then never bothered her again. One day, while in the field, she found a piece of cheese and brought it home. After that, she divulged everything " hath disclosed all which she formerly kept secrett". (192-193)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 192-193

Anne Armstrong Anne Armstrong Demoniac
323

A "a younge mayden"from Upton, in the parish of West Ham, Essex, daughter of Katherine Malpas Senior. Katherine was allegedly taught by Thomas Saunders (described as a yeoman), his wife Elizabeth, and her own mother, to "counterfeite and fayne her selfe [to] be bewitched and possessed with an evill spirite, and to counterfeite and fayine certaine strange fitts and traunce." She allegedly woulde have a risinge upp in her stomacke to the bignes of a halfe penny loafe & would beat her heade against the wainscotte & would shrugge up her shoulders & woulde make her boanes to crackle wi* in her skyne & some tymes her mouth would be drawne on one side"(193)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Examinat[i]o . . . Attorn[atus] gen[er]alis quer[ens] v[e]r[su]s Tho[mas] Saunders et Kathere[n] Malpas senior def[endan]tes. The National Archives (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), Star Chamber (STAC) 8 32/13, fol. 1v.: 1622, 193

Katherine Malpas Katheren Malpas Demoniac
324

The (27) Ursuline nuns from Loudun, France allegedly suffered fits during which they performed erotic transgressions.(83)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 83

The Nuns of Loudun Demoniac
326

A fourteen year old girl from the parish of Little All Hallows in Thames street, London, daughter of Timothy and Gawthren Glover, sister to Anne Glover, and granddaughter of the puritan martyr, Robert Glover. Mary Glover is allegedly bewitched after Elizabeth Jackson, to whom she had been sent on an errand by her mother, wished "an evil death will come upon her." Mary Glover becomes increasingly ill over a three month period. She weeps with pain and prays for relief. She suffers from physical torments, and suffers them in a social context. She seems pained and reverent, but also enraged and wrathful. Glovers fits cause her blindness, and dumbness. She becomes pale. Her belly, breast, and throat heave and swell. She waxes eloquently and devoutly. She desperately sounds out almost, almost and once more, once more through her nose and was seen rubbing hard, or stroking down with her hand, her left side and flanke. In her sharpest conflict she raged against the bewitchment, looking fierce and demonic herself: her tongue was black and rotated in a wide gaping mouth, her expression was fierce, scornful, terribly threatening. She tosses her head back and forth, and looks at the men that stood or kneled before her, as if she would devour them. According to John Swan, the minister who recorded her trials, Glover is not vexed by Satan, but the means of a witch. During moments of painfully contracted paralysis, Glover is able, through a clenched jaw and a body paralyzed, to sound out at least twice, hang her, hang her in reference to Mother Jackson. Mary Glovers experience was medically diagnosed as hysteria but legally defined as a bewitchment caused by Elizabeth Jackson. Edward Jorden was one of the experts called in to testify on Glovers case as he would be called on, three years later, to testify on the validity of Anne Gunters possession. Jorden concluded that Glovers suffering was grounded in her own body, not in witchcraft. Stephen Bradwell disagreed. Bradwell posited that a natural disease, like hysteria, was more likely found in a woman in (or at the end of) her reproductive years Glover was simply too young. Sir John Crook, Londons chief legal officer, performed a series of behavioral tests (he tried to trick Glover by dressing another woman as Elizabeth Jackson to see if she would react) and pseudo-medical tests (burning both Glover and Jackson to prove Glovers insensibility). The torments might have been natural, but Jorden could not definitively prove the cure or cause of it and so the presiding judge dismissed Jordens diagnosis for what it was: vague and unsubstantiated. Jackson was sentenced to the pillory for a year. Sir John Crook ordered an exorcism be performed on Mary Glover, however, which was done with the supervision of six ministers: Mr. Evans, Mr. Skelton, Mr. Bridger, Mr. Barber, Mr. Swan, and Mr. Lewis Hughes. Over the course of two days, these ministers and a number of witnesses (Anonymous 437) fast and pray with Mary Glover, until she is dispossessed. During the prayers Mary Glover utters, she asks God to forgive Elizabeth Jackson. When Mary Glover is finally dispossessed, some witnesses including John Swan, believe they see something leave her body. Mary Glover also cries out, "The comforter is come!", words that her grandfather also apparently cried at his death upon the stake. Mary Glover, although much weakened, seems fully recovered after this, and goes to stay with the preacher, Mr. Lewis Hughes for a year after her dispossession, in order to prevent being taken by her affliction again. Mary Glover's case is famous throughout London, most notably for dividing the opinions of the city and the College of Physicians into those that believe she was afflicted by supernatural causes, and those that believe she was not.(191)

Appears in:
Sharpe, James. Instruments of Darkness. Philidelphia: 1996, 191

Mary Glover Mary Glover Demoniac
327

A fourteen-year-old girl, daughter of the Lady Mallory, of Studley Hall, from near Ripon, North Yorkshire who suffered from fits for twelve weeks during which she could not move her limbs. When witnesses asked her who or what caused her to have fits, she replied she did not know. After suggestions names, however, Mallory reacted particularly violently to the name William Wayde. Mary Wayde allegedly confessed to the events and Mallory instantly stopped having fits. Mallory started having fits again, however, when Wayde retracted her answer. (75-78)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 75-78

Elizabeth Mallory Elizabeth Mallory Demoniac
331

A seventeen-year old girl from Mansfield in the county of Nottinghamshire, who faked possession under the guidance of John Darrell. Darrell faced trial on the charge of instructing Katherine and others in counterfeiting both their possessions and their dispossessions to bolster his own reputation. In support of the charges, Katherine gave deposition stating that she had counterfeited her possession. She claimed that Darrell told her to speak in a strange voice, and when asked the name of the spirit possessing her, say "Middleclub."(Image 5)

Appears in:
Harsnett, Samuel. A Discouery of the Fraudulent Practises of John Darrel Bacheler of Artes in his Proceedings. London: 1599, Image 5

Katherine Wright Katherine Wright Demoniac
337

A woman from Bristol in the county of Bristol, who suffers painful fits after refusing to give money to a suspected witch. She suffered from fits for seventeen years.(189)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 189

Seavington Mrs. Seavington Demoniac
339

A woman from Denham in the county of Buckinghamshire, who is possessed because she allegedly loved the Devil.(19)

Appears in:
Harsnett, Samuel. A Declaration of Egregious Popish Impostures. London: 1603, 19

Sarah Williams Sarah Williams Demoniac
340

A girl from Denham in the county of Buckinghamshire, described as being sixteen-years of age. She is convinced that she had been possessed by the Devil and that he cried out through her. She is made to convert to Catholicism, renamed Frauncis during a christening, and undergoes an series of brutal exorcisms. She later retracts her confession, claiming that the priests told her that she and her sisters were all possessed, but "verily beleeueth, they thrust a rustie, naile into her mouth, and afterwards pretended, that it came out of her body."(21)

Appears in:
Harsnett, Samuel. A Declaration of Egregious Popish Impostures. London: 1603, 21

Friswood Williams Friswood Williams Demoniac
341

A woman from Denham in the county of Buckinghamshire, described as an eighteen-year old hysteric who had fits for a period of three years.(20-21)

Appears in:
Harsnett, Samuel. A Declaration of Egregious Popish Impostures. London: 1603, 20-21

Anne Smi Anne Smith Demoniac
342

A young man from Denham in the county of Buckinghamshire, described as being possessed according to the popish exorcists.(27)

Appears in:
Harsnett, Samuel. A Declaration of Egregious Popish Impostures. London: 1603, 27

William Trayford William Trayford Demoniac
343

A girl from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the daughter of Samuel Pacy and sister to Deborah Pacy, who was allegedly bewitched by Rose Cullender and Amy Denny at the age of eleven. Her father claimed in his deposition that Elizabeth was afflicted with a variety of fits, in which she would be unable to breathe, have a soreness in her entire body, be lame on one side, become deaf, dumb or blind, or cough pins and nails. During these fits, she is said to have seen apparitions of Cullender and Denny, to have been tormented by their imps, and to have been threatened by them with torments ten times worse if she told what she'd seen or heard. Denny allegedly made her able to speak the name of Satan or the Devil, but would not permit her to say Lord, Jesus or Christ. While in the care of her aunt Margaret Arnold, Arnold suspected her to be faking and removed all pins from her clothing, but she nevertheless continued vomiting pins; Elizabeth would claim that flies had brought them and put them in her mouth. Arnold also alleged in her deposition that Elizabeth would see things Arnold could not, catch them and throw them in the fire; once a thing Elizabeth said was a mouse made a flash like gunpowder. At the trial on the judge's order, Elizabeth was instructed to sit in a room with her eyes closed, and Amy Denny brought into the room; when their hands touched Elizabeth caught Denny's hand and attacked her with her fingernails.(15-17)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 15-17

Elizabeth Pacy Ellizabeth Pacy Demoniac
344

A man from Sandwich in the county of Kent, who is allegedly hit with a profound sadness during which he is visited by several visions and apparitions (Anonymous 22), which he believes are sent to him by God to do God's work. These continue for some five weeks, and appear to John Mowlin as a man in a coloured coat with "holes in [his] hands and feet," as well as through Voices. These same apparitions visit Thomas Lipeat, who suspects that they are not from God, but from the Devil.(1 - 3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Divell in Kent. London: 1647, 1 - 3

John Mowlin John Mowlin Demoniac
345

A young maid from Arpington in the county of Kent, who allegedly has two devils (Anonymous 18 and Anonymous 88) inside of her, causing her to have several fits. During fits, her face would be deformed so that she was unrecognizable. Her "Nerves, Joynts and Sinews, after so wonderful a manner, that they had almost drawn her out of human Shape," although generally, it was agreed she was a comely woman. Her face becomes so contorted that it is believed not her ever relatives would recognize her. She is further described as having a set jaw, and strained eyes, with "her Eye-balls an incredibly way into her Head." Doctor Boreman prays over her, which allegedly slightly improves her condition. Her condition attracts people (Anonymous 449) from far away who all say they have never seen anything like it. The spirits can be heard to groan inside of her belly, causing many spectators to run in fear and surprise. However, one witness, Mrs. Hopper and Doctor Boreman, hear one of the spirits within Anonymous 32 say "weaker and weaker, weaker and weaker" four times over before ceasing to speak. Both these two witness it when the spirits made the maid bark like a dog. At another occasion, when Doctor Boreman prayed over the maid during one of her fits, "a live and seeming substance forc'd its way out of her mouth in likeness of a large Serpent," (Anonymous 18) which then flew around Doctor Boreman's neck. It remains here until some witnesses take it off him, when it vanishes and is never seen again. However, despite being dispossessed by one spirit, Anonymous 32 is still under possession of a spirit (Anonymous 88) which causes her face to contort, and which makes noise whenever the maid moves, both answering questions and making "a hideous murmuring, as if it disliked its present habitation." It seems the maid is never completely dispossessed.(2-3)

Appears in:
Hopper, Mrs. Strange News from Arpington near Bexly in Kent being a True Narrative of a Young Maid who was Possest with Several Devils or Evil Spirits. London: 1679, 2-3

Anonymous 32 Demoniac
349

A twelve-year old girl who starts having violent fits and who is possessed by many evil spirits and devils; A young girl from Erskine, Renfrewshire who is allegedly bewitched by Catherine Campbell.(Image 6)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. A True Narrative of the Sufferings and Relief of a Young Girle; Strangely Molested, by Evil Spirits and their Instruments. Edinburgh: 1698, Image 6

Christian Shaw Christian Shaw Demoniac
352

A woman who is pressured by Thomas Saunders to visit Katherne Malpas during one of her fits. Godfrey begins to experience similar symptoms()

Appears in:
Anonymous. Examinat[i]o . . . Attorn[atus] gen[er]alis quer[ens] v[e]r[su]s Tho[mas] Saunders et Kathere[n] Malpas senior def[endan]tes. The National Archives (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), Star Chamber (STAC) 8 32/13, fol. 1v.: 1622,

Anne Godfrey Anne Godfrey Demoniac
366

A man betwitched by two women.()

Appears in:
Unknown, . British Museum Add. MS 32496 f. 42b. Unknown: 1604,

Marmaduke Jackson Marmaduke Jackson Demoniac
370

A man from Sandwich in the county of Kent, who has an encounter with an apparition (Anonymous 22) over several nights which tells him to go preach the gospel of all men. This is allegedly the same apparition that appeared to John Mowlin, as the apparition continually counsels Thomas Lipeat to speak with Mowlin. Over the course of several nights, the apparition appears to Thomas Lipeat as a ball of fire, the moon, a strange form, and a gentleman offering him money. However, through prayer, Thomas Lipeat is led to believe that these visions are in reality sent by the Devil and not by God. Eventually, Lipeat experiences a vision during which he is told by God that the Devil will offer him money, and he should refuse. When the apparition appears that night, and offers him money, Thomas Lipeat tells the apparition that all he needs is the grace of God, and the apparition leaves, never to return.(4 - 5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Divell in Kent. London: 1647, 4 - 5

Thomas Lipeat Thomas Lipeat Demoniac
397

A girl from Luyck in Brussels, known to be nine years of age. When Anonymous 12 came to the door to beg, this girl gave her bread and beer, and received a sorrel leaf in return, which she ate. Not long after, this girl began to suffer convulsive fits and "did fall down as dead." She was examined by physicians of both genders and many remedies were tried to no effect. A priest prayed over her, but this only caused her to contort violently and begin to vomit horse dung, pins, hair, feathers, knots of thread, nails, pieces of broken glass, eggshells and more. Her family noticed that when Anonymous 12 came near or looked toward their home, Anonymous 11 became all the more tormented and had her apprehended; Anonymous 12 confessed and was hanged for it. This did not end Anonymous 11's fits, however - Anonymous 12 claimed at her hanging that two other witches were also practicing their art on her. The girl's parents brought her to famous physician Henri de Heer, who witnessed her vomit a variety of strange things, be unable to eat for 15 days at a time, swell and suffer convulsions. de Heer claimed to pull the strange objects directly from her throat with his hand, disproving claims that she faked her bewitchment. He gives her a decoction of various herbs and makes an ointment, both of which he credits for her cure.(5-13)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-13

Anonymous 11 Demoniac
411

A girl from Yowel in Surrey, who was allegedly bewitched by Joan Buts; she became ill and died. Witnesses at Buts' trial swore that they had to remove pins from Farmer's arms and other parts of her bodies many times, also attributed to Buts' bewitchment of the child.(1, 2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. An Account of the Tryal and Examination of Joan Buts, for being a Common Witch and Inchantress. London: 1682, 1, 2

Mary Farmer Mary Farmer Demoniac
473

A man from Thorpe (now Thorpe-le-Soken) in the county of Essex and brother to Robert Sanneuet and husband of Felice Okey. Thomas Crosse becomes "verye sickly, and at tymes was without any remembrance," some time around 1579. He calls Sanneuet to his side and claims that "Margaret Ewstace had bewitched him, and brought him into that weak state hee then was at." Sannuet, in a rage, claimed, that if that was true, he "wished a spyt red hotte [be put] in her buttocks." His wife claims that Thomas Crosse fell to the ground one day, and thereafter "hee coulde neyther see, heare, nor speake, and his face all to bee scratched." He often lost his sence, but when regained his wits, "woulde alwayes crye out vpon the sayde Elizabeth euen vnto his dying day, and woulde say that sithence shee the sayd Elizabeth had threatned him he was consumed, and that shee had bewitched him."()

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582,

Thomas Crosse Thomas Crosse Demoniac
517

A woman from Little Clacton in the county of Essex and a servant to Richard Rosse. One day, around four o'clock, Baxter recounts having milked eight of the nine cows she was required to milk, the final cow she began to milk became spooked at "stroke downe her paile, and that shee saw all the rest to make a staring and a looking about." Baxster "felt a thing to pricke her vnder the right side, as if she had been striken with ones hande," and later "there came a thinge all white like a Cat, and stroke her at the hart." Baxster found that "shee could not stand, goe, nor speake," and, paralyzed, had to be carried home in a chair by Rosse and some of his staff. Out of the corner of her eye, she saw "the said thing to go into a bush by the style." This testimony, given at the March 1581 Chemlsford Assize, may have been given as evidence against Cecily and Henry Sellis and Ales Manfield, who were accused of and prosecuted for burning Richard Rosse's field or Mother Ewstance, who, according to Manfield has a white feline familiar; it is unclear. The story of Baxster's paralysis is confirmed, however, by Robert Smith, husband to witch-searcher, and grieving mother, Joan Smith. (D5-D5v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, D5-D5v

Ales Baxster Ales Baxster Demoniac
539

A girl of young woman from Great Clacton in the county of Essex, sister of John Death and daughter of Thomas Death. Sometime around March, 1581 Marie is "taken with an ache or numnes from her necke down her backe all ouer," and perhaps a supernatural weight and heaviness, because "two or three coulde scarce turne her in her bed as shee lay." Although her mother gives her remedies "sente from a Phisition," she is not cured. The next night, however, Marie sees the apparition of Cecley Sellis and Mary? Barker "standing before her in the same apparell that they did vsually weare" and telling her "bee not afraide, and that they vanished away." The next day she was "amended," apparently healed by the nocturnal visit of these women (or the apparition of them) as she lay in bed. (E, Ev)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, E, Ev

Mary Death Mary Death Demoniac
689

A girl from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the daughter of Samuel Pacy and sister to Elizabeth Pacy, who was allegedly bewitched by Rose Cullender and Amy Denny at the age of nine; she was too sick to attend their trial. Her father claimed in his deposition that her fits started with lameness, and progressed to extreme pain in her stomach and shrieking at the very moment Samuel Pacy refused to sell Amy Denny herring for the third time. After that time, Deborah was afflicted with a variety of fits, in which she would be unable to breathe, have a soreness in her entire body, be lame on one side, become deaf, dumb or blind, or cough pins and nails. During these fits, she is said to have seen apparitions of Cullender and Denny, to have been tormented by their imps, and to have been threatened by them with torments ten times worse if she told what she'd seen or heard. Denny allegedly made her able to speak the name of Satan or the Devil, but would not permit her to say Lord, Jesus or Christ. While in the care of her aunt Margaret Arnold, Arnold suspected her to be faking and removed all pins from her clothing, but she nevertheless continued vomiting pins; Deborah would claim that bees had forced the pins into her mouth. Arnold also alleged in her deposition that Deborah would see things Arnold could not, catch them and throw them in the fire.(15, 17)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 15, 17

Deborah Pacy Deborah Pacy Demoniac
693

A young woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the daughter of Edmund Durent, who was allegedly bewitched by Rose Cullender after her mother refused to sell Cullender herrings. According to Edmund Durent's deposition, Durent was afflicted with great pain in her stomach like the pricking of pins, fell into swooning fits, and upon recovery claimed that she had seen an apparition of Cullender which threatening to torment her. She was also said to have vomited pins, was rendered speechless in court, and was observed to fall into violent fits when brought before Cullender during the trial.(33-35)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 33-35

Ann Durent Ann Durent Demoniac
695

A young woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the daughter of Diana Bocking, who allegedly suffered fits at the hands of Rose Cullender and Amy Denny. She did not appear in court. Diana Bocking gave deposition instead, claiming that Jane had been afflicted with swooning fits, but recovered from them, only to have stomach pains some months later that progressed to further swooning and the daily vomiting of crooked pins. During her fits, she would spread her arms with her hands open, then make as if she had caught something; when her hands were forced open, they would be found to hold more crooked pins, or, once, a lath-nail. At other times, Jane would talk as if conversing to someone, but take no notice of anyone in the room with her. She would also complain that Cullender and Denny were standing at the head or foot of her bed, or elsewhere in the room. At one time, she suffered no fits but was stricken dumb for several days. When Jane regained her speech and asked for meat, her mother asked why she had been unable to speak, to which Jane answered "Amy Duny would not suffer her to speak." The lath-nail and pins were presented as evidence in court.(35-38)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 35-38

Jane Bocking Jane Bocking Demoniac
697

A young woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be eighteen years old and the daughter of Mary and Robert Chandler. According to Mary Chandler's deposition in court, Susan began to have fits after her mother was hired to search Rose Cullender for witches' marks. Rose Cullender allegedly appeared to Susan the morning after Cullender was searched, and took Susan by the hand, frightening her. Susan went immediately to her mother to report what she had seen, and became extremely sick to her stomach. The next day, she was afflicted with fits of extreme distraction, in which she cried out against Cullender, claiming Cullender came to her in her bed. In the intervals between fits, Susan alleged that she had seen an apparition of Cullender with a large dog. She also vomited crooked pins, and was at times struck blind or dumb. When brought into court, Susan allegedly fell into fits that prevented her from giving evidence; the only words she could get out were "burn her." After Cullender was pronounced guilty and sentenced to hang, Susan was the only person still afflicted, remaining thin and wan with a pain like the pricking of pins in her stomach.(38-42)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 38-42

Susan Chandler Susan Chandler Demoniac
719

A woman called Margaret, one of three women, or "a crew of women" called Margaret or Maggi. In Shaw's representation these women are represented as a conflation of harpies, familiars, and witches. This Margaret shrieks like a woman possessed, and, as such, seems to be represented as bewitching as she is bewitched. According to Shaw, these women are poised to "carry her out of the House that they might drown her in the Well, where there were eighteen more waiting for her."(14)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 14

Margaret Margaret Demoniac
732

A woman from East Basham in the county of Norfolk, who was allegedly bewitched. Her tongue is found tied "in her Head with a Hempenstring." As well, she is "run full of Pins." She sometimes suffered from around twenty fits a day and it was thought that the cause was a toad (Anonymous 236) believed the be Teechle's wife's familiar, which would creep into her lap on several occasions. When it was offered to burn the toad, the familiar disappeared.(7)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 7

Jane Walter Jane Walter Demoniac
734

A girl from Bungay in the county of Norfolk, known as John Ballard's daughter, who is allegedly bewitched for two years. During this time, she voids stones, crooked pins, glass, a buckle, buttons, and other things from her mouth, while having "many strange Fits in a day." All of these are presented as evidence before the Mayor of Norwich (Anonymous 101) by John Ballard.(7-8 )

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 7-8

Ballard Ballard (Daughter) Demoniac
735

A woman from Norwich in the county of Norfolk, who is allegedly bewitched for several years. She suffers from over twenty fits in one day, during which she voids "Pins, Nails, Quills, Tabacco pipes, and a bended Farthing, with several other things." These items were shown to the Mayor of Norwich (Anonymous 101) as proof of her possession.(8)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 8

Agnes Burgess Agnes Burgess Demoniac
736

A woman from Norwich in the county of Norfolk, the daughter of John Brown, who is allegedly bewitched for years. She "voided" many things from her body including pins. These were taken as evidence of her bewitchment before the Mayor of Norwich (Anonymous 101).(8)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 8

Grace Brown Grace Brown Demoniac
757

A twenty one year old woman, daughter of Edward Fairfax. Fairfax describes her as home schooled, 'slow of speach,' 'patient of reproof,' and free of melancholy(32)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 32

Helen Fairfax Helen Fairfax Demoniac
761

A woman from Salisbury in the county of Wilshire, described as a servant who visits Anne Bodenham numerous times acting a a go-between for Richard Goddard's family and Anne Bodenham. However, after Styles' purchase of arsenic (purportedly to be used as countermagic, but read as the poison to be used by Sara and Anne Goodard against their mother) is discovered, Styles is considered a criminal, an attempted murderer, who flees to London. Before she goes, she allegedly becomes Anne Bodenham's apprentice when she is seduced by the old witch into giving the Devil her soul "seald with her blood," in exchange for "wisdome and true grace" and "wealth and ease," found by using a looking glass. After having signed over her soul, Anne Styles is repentant "as she understood That she must loose the joyes of heaven." In one account, with Mistress Bodenham's understanding, Anne Styles flees to London, only to be taken at Stockbridge by the Devil and "cast to and froe," in front of a great number of witnesses. A Gentleman prays for Anne Stiles for four days, during which she is tormented by the Devil in the shape of a snake. She confesses to her contract with the Devil, and to the nature of Mistress Rodnam. When Mistress Rodnam comes to Stockbridge, Anne Stiles can finally sleep and when "she walkt againe, She praised God she felt no paine." Another account explains that all of this confession comes out when Mr. Chandler (son in law to Mris. Goddard) caught up with the Styles and who, in "a great trembling and shaking," was carried "between Sutton and Stockbridge," where she "did confesse and acknowledge all the transactions and passages between the Witch and her." The next night, at an Inn in Stockbridge, Styles had her first fit. These fits, fits which made her into a penitent victim of witchcraft, rather than an attempted murder, would continue for the three weeks Styles was in prison in Salisbury. She had "such strange fits that drew both pity and admiration from the beholders" they came "as frequent as violent," lasting thirty to sixty minutes, with only a fifteen minute respite, and while she was in them, she exhibited such strength that "six men, sometimes more could not keep her." While in her fits, she would be "miserably groaning and skrieking, being deprived of her speech and sight, and many times she grinded her teeth, and sweat in her fits continually, constantly in motion, seeking to tear her self." She could hear but not speak, and might sit "in a very senselesse idle manner" or be found "lying foaming, raving, groaning, skrieking, trembling in an unheard of manner." Styles represented herself as a ever penitent sinner who cried out "Oh very damnable, very wretched; this hand of mine writ my name in the Devils book, this finger of mine was pricked, here is yet the hole that was made, and with my blood I wrote my own Damnation, and have cut my self off from Heaven and Eternall life," who is more than willing to be saved. She participates in the normal tests demoniacs do, reacting to Bodenham, with out knowing she was there. Styles temporarily recovers from her fits, "but began to relapse into her former fits, and was tormented as formerly" the night before Bodenham's execution, as if to once more protest her innocence. After Bodenham's execution, Style's made a final assertion of her new godly self: "I am this day to go away home, I hope now to begin a holy life."(7-8, 15-16)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 7-8, 15-16

Anne Styles Anne Styles Demoniac
765

A twelve year old girl, the daughter of John Jeffray, who was allegedly bewitched in Yorkshire, in 1621.(32)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 32

Maud Jeffray Maud Jeffray Demoniac
847

An English gentlewoman, who suffered from what appeared to be possession by evil spirit as a result of the death of her husband. The disease is referred to as "the Mother." Her ladies in waiting all caught her disease. They were separated from her, and recovered. She was purged of her ill humours, and recovered too. (183)

Appears in:
Digby, Kenelm. Of The Sympathetick Powder. A Discourse in a Solemn Assembly at Montpellier. London: 1669 , 183

Anonymous 123 Demoniac
887

The infant daughter of Edward Fairfax who dies under mysterious circumstances; she begins bleeding all over her body. (106)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 106

Anne Fairfax Anne Fairfax Demoniac
1008

A girl from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the eldest daughter of Mary Moore and her first husband George Muschamp, the sister to Margaret Muschamp and George Muschamp Jr., and the half-sister to Sibilla Moore. After Margaret had been afflicted with her fits for about a year and her brother George Muschamp Jr. had also become afflicted with illness and pain, Margaret predicted that if there was no justice against Dorothy Swinow (the woman accused of being behind the afflictions), Betty too would became afflicted. This proved prophetic and Betty became the worst afflicted of the three. Margaret also claimed that if Swinow was brought to justice, all the afflictions would end, and if there were no justice, they would become sicker than ever before. Margaret White, in her confession, alleged that Swinow and Jane Martin were responsible for the afflictions of the Muschamp children. (14)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 14

Betty Muschamp Betty Muschamp Demoniac
1009

A boy from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the eldest son of Mary Moore and her first husband George Muschamp, the brother to Margaret Muschamp and Betty Muschamp, and the half-brother to Sibilla Moore. After his sister Margaret had been afflicted with her fits for about a year, George Muschamp Jr. allegedly also became afflicted with illness and pain while "both his stomack and the use of his legs taken from him." He subsisted on milk, water and sour milk, consuming away; he nevertheless retained his spirits and would talk and laugh with friends. The doctors predicted he had a month to live. According to Margaret, John Hutton and Dorothy Swinow were responsible for his wasting, and that two drops of blood from either of them would save his life. Mary Moore got blood from Hutton for George Jr., and Hutton used the opportunity to cast sole blame on Swinow. Margaret also claimed that if Swinow was brought to justice, her brother's illness would end and if there were no justice, he would become sicker than ever before. Margaret White, in her confession, alleged that Swinow and Jane Martin were responsible for the afflictions of the Muschamp children. (4-5)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 4-5

George Muschamp George Muschamp Jr. Demoniac
1065

A boy from Penzance in the county of Cornwall, known to be fifteen or sixteen years old, who allegedly suffers from strange and violent fits after seeing an unfamiliar woman (Anonymous 6) in a "blue Jerkin and Red Petticoat, with Yellow and Green patches" who told him he would not get better until he vomits "Nutshels Pins and nails." Soon after, Tonken is said to have vomited pins, nails, walnut shells and straw. The fits of vomiting strange objects continue, as do the apparitions of the woman, and sometimes that of a cat, whom Tonken identifies as the woman in another shape. The last time, three women appeared to him, and Anonymous 6 bid him farewell, saying she would trouble him no more; two days later he was well and able to go about on crutches. Two women were arrested on suspicion of witchcraft following his testimony, Jane Noal (alias Nickless) and Betty Seeze.(2-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Account of a Strange and Wonderful Relation of John Tonken, of Pensans in Cornwall. London: 1686, 2-6

John Tonken John Tonken Demoniac
1093

A girl, daughter of Dorothy Rodes, of Bolling in the county of York (now part of Bradford in West Yorkshire), who suffers from a series of debilitating fits which lasted over a half hour each and which she attributes to Mary Sykes bewitching her. Sykes first appears to Rodes one night while she sleeps in bed with her mother, Dorothy and another child. Crawling up through a hole in the floor, Sykes takes Rodes by the throat and chokes her. She keeps her from crying out by keeping her fingers lodged down Rode's throat. Rodes continues to suffer after this incident, however. Up to six times a day she is taken by "paines and benummednes," prevented from walking, suffers heart palpitations, and muteness, so that it seems her "whole body [was] neare unto death." After each of these fits she claimed that Mary Sykes had come to her (and presumably caused them). Rodes also blamed Susan Beamont and Kellett (wife) for plaguing her. The death of Mrs. Kellet two years previously did not seem to stop these accusations. Rather, Sara suggested that Kellet never rests, for she appeared to me the fowlest feind that ever I sawe, with a paire of eyes like sawcers, and stood up betwixt them, and gave me a box of the eare in the gapsteade, which made the fire to flash out of my eyes."(28-29)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 28-29

Sara Rodes Sara Rodes Demoniac
1109

A woman from Gunpowder Alley in the City of London, who is allegedly bewitched. She acts as a kind of consulted on treatments for the "forespoken." Her expertise is grounded on her personal experience and the contents of her "book." She suggests that only a "seminary priest," a catholic, could cure Elizabeth Jennings. ()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

Saxey Mrs. Saxey Demoniac
1202

A young girl of Cleworth in the County of Lancastershire in the parish of Leigh, known to be the sister of Margaret Hardmen and belong to the Starchie household, alleged to be afflicted with fits by Edmund Hartlay. Hardman is found under a bed making a hole in the wall, saying that she will be drawn through it to Heaven. She is alleged to have been able to predict her fits and the details of them, and attributed this knowledge to a white dove. At one point, she and Eleanor Holland were unable to eat for three days and nights, nor speak to anyone but one another except " to ther lads. saue that their lads gaue them leaue (as the said) the one to eate a toast & drink, the other a sower milk posset." Hartley is said to have been angry that the ate, even with permission, and made them vomit it up. At a dinner, Holland and the Hardman sisters were thrown back, their bodies swelled, their faces disfigured, and strange motion was observed from within their bodies. At one time, Harman describes her possessor as being like an urchin, who went through a tiny hole in the parlor and returned in a foul shape promising her gold if he gave her leave to possess her again; he threatened to throw her into the fire and break her neck when she resisted. At another time, he came to her in the shape of a bear with fire in its mouth, which terrified her into running away; she was caught and showed two bags, one of silver and one of gold, and promised nine times as much but she resisted. He came next in the shape of an ape, again promising gold, threatening to cast her out the window or into the fire, and departed with a shriek.(Image 5, 6, 8, 10)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 5, 6, 8, 10

Elizabeth Hardman Elizabeth Hardman Demoniac
1203

A man from Windsor in the county of Berkshire, known to be the son of the Mayor of Windsor Master Galis, brother to James Galis, and the author of "A brief treatise containing the most strange and horrible cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her confederates, executed at Abingdon, upon R. Galis." This pamphlet contains a full account of his alleged bewitchment at the hands of Elizabeth Stile (alias Rockingam), his meeting with Mother Dutton, his life at sea, and his return home.(2-3)

Appears in:
Galis, Richard. A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates. London: 1572, 2-3

Richard Galis Richard Galis Demoniac
1210

A man from Windsor in the county of Berkshire, known to be the brother of Richard Galis and the son of Mayor of Windsor Master Gallis, allegedly bewitched by Mother Dutton sometime in 1564. According to Richard Galis' account, James is still forespoken and "bereft of his wits" in 1579. (Image 4)

Appears in:
Galis, Richard. A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates. London: 1572, Image 4

James Galis James Galis Demoniac
1239

One of the four Merideth Children of Bristol in the county of Bristol (siblings made up of three daughters and a son, between the age of fourteen, and eight years), who are allegedly bewitched. This child takes on the role of prophet, predicting her imminent demise. None of her prophecies come to pass, and all the children recover after medical treatment.(167-169)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 167-169

Medideth Merideth (Daughter) Demoniac
1240

One of the four Merideth Children of Bristol in the county of Bristol (siblings made up of three daughters and a son, between the age of fourteen, and eight years), who are allegedly bewitched. This child vomits pins, but like her siblings, recovers after medical treatment.(167-169)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 167-169

Merideth Merideth (Daughter 2) Demoniac
1241

One of the four Merideth Children of Bristol in the county of Bristol (siblings made up of three daughters and a son, between the age of fourteen, and eight years), who are allegedly bewitched. All the children recover after medical treatment. (167-169)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 167-169

Merideth Merideth (Daughter 3) Demoniac
1242

One of the four Merideth Children of Bristol in the county of Bristol (siblings made up of three daughters and a son, between the age of fourteen, and eight years), who are allegedly bewitched. All the children recover after medical treatment. (167-169)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 167-169

Merideth Merideth (Son) Demoniac
1245

A man from Norfolk who is a shoe maker and a seller of Holland cheese. When his trade in dairy products threatens Mary Smith's, he finds himself the victim of supernatural torments, manifest as a "madnesse or phrensie," a body "benummed," and "pains and greifes from which hee is not yet freed." He twice attempts countermagic against Smith, once burning her familiar to burn her, and once trying to scratch her, but finding himself unable to. (57-59)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 57-59

Edmund Newton Edmund Newton Demoniac
1246

A woman from Norfolk who curses at Mary Smith after Smith wrongfully accuses her of stealing a chicken. Hancocke is plagued by a lingering illness which manifests like possession (she suffers extreme pains, loses her senses, is tossed about the bed, tears at her hair etc.). She recovers from her illness after he father makes a witch cake, but continues to be plagued by supernatural occurences, and haunted by a great cat, and the apparition (or the person) of Mary Smith. (50-55)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 50-55

Elizabeth Hancocke Elizabeth Hancocke Demoniac
1274

A woman from Exeter in the county of Devon, described as a servant-maid who is allegedly bewitched by Joan Baker. She suffered from a wasting illness for over nine months, in grievous pain, until she was consumed "away in her body and soe dyed." During this time, she "often cried out in her sickness that she was bewitched."(151)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 151

Anonymous 212 Demoniac
1310

A man who is allegedly bewitched by Johan Furnace. He has "fits in his head and distempers in his body" and seems to be unable to speak normally except in the presence of Johan Furnace.(152)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 152

Greene Greene Demoniac
1459

A man from Newmarket in the county of Suffolk who suffers from fits and bewitchment. He is visited by a local witch, Alice Read, sent to him at the behest of Sir Martin Stuteville, to test him or cure him. Paman attacks Read. He later retracts his possession.(198-199)

Appears in:
, Great Britain. Public Record Office. Calendar of State Papers: Domestic Series, of the Reign of Charles I, 1629-1631. London: 1830, 198-199

Thomas Paman Thomas Paman Demoniac
1475

A man from the Isle of Ely (now a region around the city of Ely in the county of Cambridgeshire) who is allegedly bewitched. Before his "strange fits" came on, her was allegedly visited by a thing "like a Mouse." He was sent to see a "white Witch, or Necromancer, Sorcerer, Magician," who gave him an "Amulet or Charm to hang about his neck, and so long as he wore that, he was freed; he durst not leave it off." The wizard who helped this man "asked if they were wicked People, else, he said, he could not, or would not help them." The they here is somewhat opaque. It appears that he seems like an unwitcher, but the pronoun confusion allows this to be read as him only taking wicked people as clients. (20)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 20

Anonymous 254 Demoniac
1506

A boy from Berkhamstead in the county of Hertfordshire who is allegedly possessed. His fits arrive at six o'clock each day, when he begins to pull of his head clothes, pull out his hair, and scratch the skin from his face. Dr. Woodhouse first sends him prescriptions for medicines to treat convulsions. When these medicines do not work, Woodhouse goes to visit the boy himself and prescribes him a "Venificifuge, a Chymical preparation," which appears to work as a curative. (38-39)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 38-39

Anonymous 262 Demoniac
1574

A boy, and apprentice worsted comber by trade, who lives outside the west gate of the city of Exeter in the county of Devonshire (now commemorated on the site St Mary's Steps Church in Exeter), who allegedly suffers from falling-fits and foaming at the mouth for over nine years. Nathan is the son of Zacheus Crab and Mrs. Crab, and the brother of Daughter Crab, family members who attempt to find a cure for his unexplained ailments. Nathan is introduced to Mr. Gibs, Mr. Elson, and Mr. Pridham, people who attempt to cure him. Their cures include a Bag to hang about the Youth's Neck, and Powder to take in White wine, as well as pills, induced vomiting, and urine collecting. These cures work, but only temporarily as the fits always return, leaving Nathan generally so deprived of Reason, that he is clad, and otherwise used as a meer Idiot.(47-52)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 47-52

Nathan Crab Nathan Crab Demoniac
1588

A twelve or thirteen year old boy from Husbands Bosworth in Leicestershire, described as John Smyth, son of Roger Smith, who would soon after be knighted. Smyth is described as having "had dyvars wonderful straunge fyts in the sight of all Is i all the greatest parsons here, as dyvars knights and ladies, and many othars of the bettar sort, most tereble to be tolld." He allegedly could not he held down or held still in his fits, but would "stryke himfellfe suche bls on his brest, being in his shirt, that you myght here the sound of yt the length of a long chamber, soumtvmes 50 bloes, soumtyms 100, yea soumtymes 2 or 300 bloes, that the least of them was able to stryke doune a strong man." He was often possessed by the spirits of the accused witches, possessions which manifest by acting like the animal spirit which filled him; "whom evary one of them tormented him: he woolld make soom syne according to the sperit; as, when the hors tormented him, he woold whinny; when the cat tormented him, he would cry like a cat, &c." Nine women would allegedly be executed based on these fits. Symth's claims were later investigated by King James himself, who believed the boy to be a fraud. Symth recanted and evidently perpetuated this fraud "to prevent a present Whipping, and avoyd going to School." He was not new to pranking his peers, "amongst other Prancks, he lived in an Orchard a Week, upon Apples onely." Although no women were executed the second time around because of Smyth's folly, six women were imprisoned; one woman died before the rest would be released. (6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

John Symth John Smyth Demoniac
1712

A man from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, the servant of Robert Turner, and a demoniac. The servant of Robert Turner suffers from terrible and ongoing fits, and demonstrates inhuman strength, a condition allegedly caused by familiar spirits sent by Rose Hallybread, Susan Cock, Margaret Landish, and Joyce Boanes after Robert Turner "refused to give to this Examinant a sack full of chips." According to Joybe Boanes, it was her Imp that "made the said servant to barke like a Dog; the Imp of the said Rose Hallybread inforced him to sing sundry tunes in his great extremity of paines; the Imp of the said Susin Cock, compelled him to crow like a Cock; and the Imp of Margaret Landish made him groan in such an extraordinary manner. (33)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 33

Anonymous 331 Demoniac
1714

A two year old child of Elizabeth Otley from Wivenhoe in the county of Essex who is allegedly killed (according to Alice Dixon), by Mary Johnson. Johnson allegedly took her familiar (an imp in the shape of a rat with no ears) from out of her pocket, shoved it through a hole in Otley's door, and told it to "go rock the Cradle, and do the businesse she sent it about, and return to her again." Johnson also took a hands on approach to this attack, arriving at Otely's door, presumably unseen by her, and giving this child an apple and a kiss the day after, the "child was taken with very violent fits, and in the fits (although the Child was but two yeers old) yet this Informant could very hardly with all her strength hold it down in the Cradle, and so continued untill it died."(21-22)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 21-22

Otley Otley (Child) Demoniac
1842

A young girl of Cleworth in the County of Lancastershire in the parish of Leigh, known to be fourteen years of age and the sister of Elizabeth Hardmen and belong to the Starchie household, alleged to be afflicted with fits by Edmund Hartlay. She is alleged to have been able to predict her fits and the details of them, and attributed this knowledge to a white dove. At a dinner, Holland and the Hardman sisters were thrown back, their bodies swelled, their faces disfigured, and strange motion was observed from within their bodies. She is heard to say " I must goe I must away: I cannot tarrie, whither shall I goe? I am hot, I am too hot. I will not dye" when a Mr. More was praying over her. She describes her possessor the same way as John Starchie, as like an ill-favoured man with a bulge on his back; at one time he offers gold and threatens to break her neck, cast her into a pit and drown her for refusing him.(Image 8, 10)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 8, 10

Margaret Hardman Margaret Hardman Demoniac
2032

A young man from Hadlaw in the county of Kent, who is the seventeen year old servant of Henry Chowning. The young man allegedly encounters a spirit in the form of a greyhound, who instructs him to go to Virginia before disappearing. Following this encounter, the boy returns home to master, "in a great fright," and "amazed." He falls ill, and his condition continues to deteriorate, so that observers "fear'd the Boy would make away with himself," because he was "under an evil Tongue or bewitcht." His master seeks the help of Dr. Skinner to treat him. Dr. Skinner sees that the boy is "melancholy," and likely possessed by the Devil in the shape of a greyhound, "for, it was as it were in amaze, and his eyes were always fixed in his head," and it was difficult to get him to speak. Once the boy did speak, he confessed to being tempted by strange things, such "as to go to Sea, and matters that he was not able to mention." As well, "he spoke through the Nose (as we call it) for it was not his own speech, but the Spirit or Devil within him." After assessing the pain he was under, Dr. Skinner "understood what the means must be that must relieve him." The boy is administered medicines, which "he was very willing to take." The boy's mother finds him "much ammended" within a week. The boy complains of a "pain in his belly," so that Dr. Skinner sent him more medicine, and he was cured within "18 days time." After this, the boy is dispossessed and cured of his illness, and "neither hath any thing attempted to trouble him since in the least." decides that the boy is "possest with a Devil in the shape of a Greay-hound," as Anonymous 384 confesses to being tempted by strange things, such "as to go to Sea," to great pain, and can speak in a voice "not his own speech." The young servant boy seems to be better when around Dr. Skinner, who then gives him medicine, leading to him being "made perfectly well in 18 days time."(8-9)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 8-9

Anonymous 384 Demoniac
2041

A fifteen year old boy from Bow in the county of Devon, who was "stubborne and untowardly." His father would like him to apprentice himself to Simon Culsver, a weaver in Crediton. Opposed to this, Joseph Buxford "secretly departed away to the Kings Army," but was forced to return home to his father when "the Cavaliers received at Langport-Moore," were defeated. His father "would have him returne to the Weaver again," but the boy refused. The old man, John Buxford, was "so incensed" that he "would bind him Apprentice to the Devill, which rash and in considerate threatenings, he often times used and repeated." On November 5, 1645, Joseph Buxford's father beats him into going on the road to Crediton, although Joseph Buxford still exclaims "he would rather go to the Devill." They encounter a carrier and four horses on the road to Crediton, who asks after their strange behaviour. Once John Buxford explains "the circumstances of his Sonnes refractory behaviour in running from his Master, and his unwillingnes to take any good course of life, or honest vocation for his future maintainance," the carrier offers to find a master for the boy, if the boy and the father agrees to it. The carrier offers to find employment for the boy that "would put him in the way so gaine a compleat estate to maintaine himself and helpe his friends." John Buxford agrees to these conditions, as long as the carrier "send backe the Boy in eight daies time at the furthest, if he should not take likeing of the promised service." Joseph Buxford agrees to these conditions as well, "being more inclined to any service then to live with his old Master the Weaver." Once his father leaves, however, the carrier transforms into "a flying Hourse in a black and ugly shape and colour." The flying horse takes Joseph Buxford onto his back, "with violence and motion swifter then imagination," and they fly through the air. Through this flight, Joseph Buxford begins a most "stupendious Miracle." Joseph Buxford and the horse see Earth so that it is "of a very small proportion, London and other magnificent Cities on greater than small cottages." They also pass the moon, and are plunged into "watrie dominions," where the boy "observed the most strange and unutterable wonders of the deepe diversified." These sights are beyond what astrologers and "the wisest Phoylosophers," are capable of understanding. The horse and Joseph Buxford eventually land in "a profound Cell or Cave, (the earth seeming to open it selfe.)" Here, the Joseph Buxford descends the horse, which turns into "a more terrible shape," and reveals itself to be the Devill. Joseph Buxford has landed in Hell. The Devil explains to him, "Bee not dismayed, thy employment here shall be onely to take a view of divers men, who thou hast formerly seene or knowne in the Malignant Army, whose base course of life have occasioned their suddaine and unexpected deaths, and now are sent to me to receive their due recompence for the same." Joseph Buxford witnesses the torment of a number of apparitions, who are familiar to him from his time in the "Malignant Army," as they wail, "Woe, Woe unto us that ever we undertooke the devence of such an unjust Cause." Joseph Buxford is further witness to the torment of Sir Peter Ball, "one of the Commissioners of Excester lately deceased," which "made the greatest impression" on him. Joseph Buxford also witnesses the torments of Greenvile, Goring, Lady Scot, and Lady Dolkeat. Their "waylings were too tedious here to relate but were in fine so full of dread and horrour to this wretched Boy, that he earnestly wished himselfe out of this place," and agreed to undergo any service that would not lead to something "so miserable and deplorable." At the end of eight days in Hell, the Devil releases Joseph Buxford to Cannon Lee in Devon, "where he was found by two honest Labourers," under a Hedge. The circumstances in which Joseph Buxford was found were strange, as he "was speechlesse, and his hands and legs strangely distorted, his haire of his head singyd, his cloathes all be smeared with pitch and rosin, and other sulfurous matter." Joseph Buxford is taken to Justice Cullum's household, where being provided with a bed and food, Joseph Buxford confesses "his name, birth-place, and his strange journey with the Devill." At first, this story is not believed, but upon reflection of the strange manner of the finding of Joseph Buxford, and the verification of his father in the manner which he left, it thought the story is true. Mr. Jonathan Gainwell, a minister, takes interest in the stor, and "gave the Boy very pious admonitions of obedience," which take such effect that Joseph Buxford is "truely penitent of his former lewd courses and there reconciled himselfe to his father, with whom he now liveth and is almost cured of that distortion of his members."(2)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 2

Joseph Buxford Joseph Buxford Demoniac
2042

A man from Crediton in the county of Devon, who is allegedly the Devil disguised as a carrier with four horses. The carrier is "one whom [John Buxford] had often observed to frequend the Roade." Happening upon John Buxford using "meere force" to compel his son on the road to Crediton on November 5, 1645, the carrier "very courtiously demanded of him why he used such severitie towards the boy." John Buxford explains his son's "unwillingnes to take any good course of life, or honest vocation for his future maintainance." The carrier placates the father, agree that "it was a pitty the Boy should miscarry by undertaking a forced service upon him." He offers to take the boy, if the boy is willing, to find him a master, "and such employment as would put him in the way so gaine a compleat estate to maintaine himself and helpe his friends." The father and son agree to these terms, as long as the boy should be sent "backe [...] in eight daies time at the furthest, if he should not take likeing of the promised service." As soon as John Buxford leaves, however, "the Hourses and Packes vanished," and the carrier "metamorphosed in a trice from a man to a flying Hourse in a black and ugly shape and colour." The carrier is revealed to be the Devil in disguise. At a later date, on November 13, 1645, the Devil resumes his disguise as a carrier, and comes "upon the way by stragling Troopers of the Malignant Party." When the troopers attempt to rob him of his horses, "the Carrier and his Horses suddainely vanished away in the flames of fire," killing three troopers, and leaving the rest "so terribly shaken and almost stifled with the noisome sent of Brimstone," that they were barely able to escape and share their story.(2-3)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 2-3

Anonymous 390 Demoniac
2059

A woman, wife of Richard Harrison (and presumably the daughter of a judge) who acts like a demoniac or a hysteric, and who is, at the origin of her torments, living in her family home in Little Oakley in the county of Essex. When Mrs. Harrison's hatched ducklings go missing, she "did suspect one Annis Herd a light woma~, and a common harlot to haue stolen her duckelins." An enraged Harrison went to accuse Heard in person; returning home "very angry against the said Annis." Within a few hours she "did crie out: Oh Lord Lorde, helpe me & keepe me, [...] that yonder wicked harlot Annis Herd doth bewitch me." Richard Harrison provided little comfort to his wife; interpreting her fear as a kind of disbelief inappropriate to a preacher's wife; saying "but trust in God and put your trust in him onely, and he will defend you from her, and from the Diuell himselfe also: and said moreouer, what will the people say, that I beeing a Preacher shoulde haue my wife so weake in faith." Despite his stern warning, Mrs. Harrison's illness continued for over two months; in desperation she cried out: "pray you as euer there was loue betweene vs, (as I hope there hath been for I haue v. pretie children by you I thanke God) seeke some remedie for me against yonder wicked beast (meaning the saide Annis Herd)," and promising to call on her father for assistance, promising that "if I haue no remedie, she will vtterly consume me." Harrison promised to ensure that Heard would hang if she had indeed bewitched his wife, and told Heard as much, when they saw one another as he gathered plums. However, the threat has no effect, and Harrison grew worse, "taken sore sick, & was at many times afraid both sleeping and waking," claiming all the while that Heard had bewitched her. She predicted her own, death, taking leave of her husband, and two days before she died, crying out, as she had "divers times in her sicknesse and before, repeating these wordes. Oh Annis Hersd, Annis Herd she hath consumed me." According to Bret's wife, these were her dying words. Both John Pollin and Bret's wife, as well as her own husband, born witness to this claim. _A True and Just Record_ records Mrs. Harrison's death as one crimes attributed to Heard; however, she was not indicted for Mrs. Harrison's death. (F2-F3v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, F2-F3v

Harrison Mrs. Harrison Demoniac
2115

A man from Colchester in the county of Essex, who allegedly "in a Bravado, and Defiance of the Devil," walked at night in a churchyard, where the Devil appeared to him, and "met him in the shape of a Black Dog with terrible Eyes." This encounter brought "Terrors," so that "he was never quiet in his Mind till he got into good Society." Upon this, Anonymous 407 decides to go to Colne, in the county of Essex, where he is taken in at Mr. Shepherd's house by Mr. Harlakenden. While staying in Colne, Anonymous 407 would pray, and during his prayers, "the Black Dog was seen by the Man as if he would have torn Mr. Harlakenden's Throat out," but Mr. Harlakenden seemed to never notice these apparitions, which also sometimes came to him "as a Fly or a Flea." This apparition haunted Anonymous 407 for the rest of years, making him "a most ferious Christian," so that even at his death, "lying long sick, had great Peace and Victory over the fear of Death, and was so joyful and desirous to be dissolved, that this Dog or Flea made no impression upon him."(153)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 153

Anonymous 407 Demoniac
2129

A woman from Bewdley in the county of Worcestershire, who is allegedly seized by "strange Histerical Fits." These fits began by the "Stoppage of the Mestrua." Anonymous 409 seeks help from Richard Baxter, who provides her with "Castory and Rad. Ostrutii, and Sem. Dauci on Forestus Commendation," all of which she took and "began to be better." However, after Richard Baxter and the Pastor Mr. Robert Morton must leave her and Bewdley, "she was left without help, and grew worse than ever." Eventually, her fits culminate in a "suror uterinus ex corruptione Seminis," and she "seemed possest by the Devil." Anonymous 409's fits are typically characterized by: her increase in strength far above her own, so that "many could not hold her" ; her requests for "Needles and Pins, and Cords," so that she might kill herself; her ability to foretell that a papist would come to cure her, and her laughter "at his Holy Water" ; her "Swear[ing], Curs[ing], and Rage against any that were Religious, and Hugg[ing] of those that were Vicious, and be merry with them." Her fits continued for many years, between 1642 and 1647. When Richard Baxter is able to return to Bewdley, he calls on her, and "Prayed by her." After this, her neighbours are encouraged and "resolved to joyn with some of Bewdley, to Fast and Pray by her, till she was recovered." During prayers, Anonymous 409 is "in a violent Rage, and after thankt them." During the prayers of Mr. Thomas Ware, "she fell on the Floor like a Block, and having lain so a while, cryed out, He is gone, He is gone; The Black Dog is gone." After this incident, Anonymous 409 "never had a Fit." One young man (Anonymous 411) in particular who cared for her during her fits succumbed to his lust in "an Act of Wicked Compassion," as "in her Fits, [she would] toss her naked Body about, she being strong and comely." After they sinned together, Anonymous 409 seemed eased, which "enticed him the more to do it." However, Richard Baxter believes this only served to "Enrage her Disease." After Anonymous 409 is cured, the young man (Anonymous 411) comes forth and admits to his sins. "He Marryed her, and professed deep Repentance." Richard Baxter believes that Anonymous 409 had at first "the furor uterinus," which were the cause of her fits, but "in punishment of their Sin," she also became the victim of "a Real possession."(193-194)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 193-194

Anonymous 409 Demoniac
2140

A man from Spreyton, in the county of Devon, who is visited by at least two specters in his service to Mr. Philip Furze. The first of these is "a resemblance of an Aged Gentleman, like his masters Father," who approaches him "with a Pole or Staff in his hand, resembling that he was wont to carry when living, to kill the moles withal." At first Francis Fey is "not a little surprized," to see the ghost, but his directed by the specter to fulfill "several Legacies which by his Testament he had bequeathed were unpaid," including paying two persons ten shillings, and the dead man's sister, a Gentlewoman, twenty shillings. Francis Fey points out that one of the former two persons is also deceased, which prompts the specter to tell him to pay "the next Relation." It is promised that if Francis Fey does these things, the ghost would "trouble him no further." Francis Fey fulfills these wishes, save that when he goes to Totnes to visit the Gentlewoman, (Anonymous 412), she refuses the twenty shillings, fearing it is "sent her from the Devil." Francis Fey spends the night at her house, and the specter appears to him again. Francis Fey challenges the ghost's promise not to trouble him any more, saying he had done all but could not provide the sister. The ghost tells him to into Totnes and buy her a ring worth twenty shillings, and that she should accept this. Francis Fey does as he was advised, and she received the ring. After this, the "Apparition of the old Gentleman, hath seemed to be at rest, having never given the young man any further trouble." The following day, traveling with a servant of the gentlewoman (Anonymous 413), Francis Fey is attacked by the ghost of the old Gentleman's second wife (Anonymous 169), and flung off of his horse "with such violence," that there was a "resounding great noise." The young man is continually tormented by this second ghost, who thrusts his head in small places, causing him injury and requiring "the strength of divers men" to release him. She also attempts to strangle him using the girding of his injuries, and various "Cravats and Handkerchiefs, that he hath worn about his Neck." When Francis Fey wears a perriwig, the ghost tears these up after tearing them off his head, and when Francis Fey attempts to protect the perriwig "he esteemed above the rest," by putting it in several boxes, and putting weights on these boxes, the ghost still breaks all the boxes, and "rended into many small parts and tatters." The ghost also tears his shoestrings from his shoes, and tears his gloves in his pocket, and the clothes on his back, unless they belonged to another. Finally, the daemon also entangles "the feet and legs of the young man [...] about his Neck, that he hath been loosed with great difficulty." This is repeated at times with "the frames of Chairs, and Stools." Near Easter, Francis Fey is "taken up by the skirt of his doublet, by this Female Daemon, and carried a heighth into the Air." His master, Mr. Philip Furze misses him, and goes to look for him. Francis Fey is found near half an hour later, and "he was heard singing, and whistling in a bog, or quagmire," and was in fact "in a king of Trance, or extatick fit," which he sometimes suffers from, although it is unclear if these fits are caused by the spirit. When Francis Fey is asked where he was, he tells his master that he had been carried so high into the air, that "his Masters house seemed to him to be but as a Hay-cock." This story is verified when a workman finds a shoe outside of Mr. Philip Furze's house, and a perriwig in a tree. After this incident, where the young man's body had bee "on the mud in the Quagmire," was "somewhat benummed, and seemingly deader than the other." Francis Fey is then taken to Crediton, "to be bleeded," which after accomplished, he was left alone. When "the Company" (Anonymous 417) which accompanied him to Crediton found him again, he was "in one of his Fits, with his fore-head much bruised, and swoln to a great bigness." When Francis Fey comes out of his fit, he explains that "a Bird had with great swiftness, and force flown in at the Window," and thrown a stone at his forehead. When searched, it was found that under where Francis Fey sat lay "a weight of Brass or Copper," which it seems the Daemon used to harm the boy. The Spirit continued to "molest the young man in a very severe and rugged manner," indefinitely.(178 - 179)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 178 - 179

Francis Fey Francis Fey Demoniac
2150

A woman from Winchester in the county of Hampshire, who was a schoolmistress there after her first husband died. When she married again, to John H. she continued "her practice." She refuses to lend a "piece of small changing money," causing a woman of "evil fame" to allegedly mutter. After this incident, the schoolmistress is visited by "a monstrous great Toad walking upon all four like a Cat." She retreats into her house, and "desired her husband to get some Instrument" in order to kill the toad. However, before John H. has a chance, the toad "rusht suddenly into another room, and was never seen afterwards." That same night, the schoolmistress experienced her first fit of many, which would last a total of 17 years. During her fit, she was afflicted "with violent prickings and pains, as if her inside had been stuck with pins, needles or thorns," which causes blood to come out with her urine. These fits occur sometimes as frequently as "twice or thrice in one day, sometimes whole days together." They were also preceded by the visitation of seven or nine familiars (Anonymous 171) in form of cats, who would enter the room she was in, and for a quarter of an hour, "crawl about, and stick against the walls," while making "a dreadful yelling, hideous noise." The cats would then suddenly disappear in "a mighty great light, like a flash of lightning." This light would linger all through the night, and she would be "in the highest extremity of Misery," crying out the name of the suspected witch (Anonymous 419). Although physicians (Anonymous 420) suggested she move houses, the fits still happened, and Anonymous 418's chickens would die by "suddenly turning round, twisting their Necks several times about, until they dropt down dead." The cats belonging to Anonymous 418 were often observed to react as "if they were Devil-drove" when the cat familiars (Anonymous 171) were in the same room. The son of Anonymous 418 (Anonymous 421) also suffered from a number of fits, and during one of these, the schoolmistress saw the suspected witch "scrambling against the wall of the room." She calls out to her husband, and he takes he sword to the witch, cutting her hand. The schoolmistress also finds herself unable to enter Church, if the suspected witch (Anonymous 419) was there, but instead would have to "continue in the Porch, or at the Window." Eventually the schoolmistress dies of "pain and grief" from these fits after 17 years and the loss of her son who goes missing during one of his own fits, while she was the age of 57, and reduced from "a strait well proportioned body to a very crooked deformity."(189 - 190)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 189 - 190

Anonymous 418 Demoniac
2154

A young man from Winchester in the county of Hampshire, who upon visiting his mother (Anonymous 418) in her second home when he is only seventeen, is "taken after a most dreadful manner, in raving, and frantick Fits." During these fits, "five or six men could not hold him," and he would "leap up with his head against the Cieling." He would also seek out "a Knife, Pen-knife, or Razor," and attempt to cut his own throat, "or do himself some other mischief." The young man further claims that during his fits, a suspected witch (Anonymous 419), possibly responsible for the fits his mother (Anonymous 418) experiences, appears to him, and commands him to do these things, "or else she would strangle him, or choke him with pins, or such like." This forced those around the young man to put away sharp objects, and to clear his hands and pockets. After these fits, as is characteristic of possession, he would "cast out of his mouth Pins, and Needles, in great abundance," and be in "extream weakness," forced to stay in bed. In one instance, during one of his fits, his mother allegedly sees the suspected witch (Anonymous 419), and his stepfather, John H. cuts her hand with his sword. The young man is afflicted by these fits "for about five years," after which time, "he ran away in one of them, and hath neither been seen, nor heard of since."(192-193)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 192-193

Anonymous 421 Demoniac
2226

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntington, known to be about ten years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, niece to Gilbert Pickering and sister to Joan, Elizabeth, Grace, Mary and Robert Throckmorton. Jane was the first of the Throckmorton children to become sick, be afflicted with fits and to accuse Mother Alice Samuel of being the cause. Her parents consulted Dr. Barrow on her initial illness; Dr. Barrow thought she had worms and sent medicine, but she did not improve. When consulted again a few days later, Dr. Barrow declared her to be clean of disease, and finally admitted that she might be bewitched. A consultation with Master Butler gave the same answer. Jane's four sisters all fell sick with the same illness within weeks of her affliction. It was said that they "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." When Gilbert Pickering brought Mother Samuel to the Throckmorton house, she fell into a severe fit and had to be carried to her bed, where her belly swelled massively and deflated again numerous times. She lay there scratching at the covers. Pickering covered her eyes and first touched her hand himself and then made Mother Samuel do so; Jane scratched Mother Samuel violently but would not scratch him. After Mother Samuel and Agnes Samuel were apprehended and imprisoned at Huntingdon, Jane and her sisters fell into fits in which their brother, Robert Throckmorton Jr., was the only person who could make himself understood to Jane, and Jane would relay the questions he asked to the other girls. By this means, the Jane and her sisters predicted Agnes Samuel's bail from gaol and arrival in the Throckmorton household. At this time, Jane also began to claim to talk to the spirit tormenting her. Once Agnes had lived with the Throckmortons for a few months, Jane and her sisters began to come out of their fits whenever Agnes said a "charm" stating that she was a witch, had killed Lady Cromwell and bewitched the girls. According to the spirit Smack, via Joan Throckmorton, Jane was tormented by the spirit Blew. Jane is also said to have been urged to suicide by Blew, and to have cast away knives while claiming he was urging her to kill herself, or to strain toward the fire and require restraint. She would have fits in which her mouth sealed shut repeatedly at meals, requiring Agnes to hold a knife at her lips to open it again, and other times would claim to see clothing and jewelry walking about of its own volition. Jane was among the girls who scratched Agnes severely. At his trial, John Samuel was made to say the same self-accusing charm as Agnes over Jane, which brought her out of her fits and was used as evidence that he had a part in the bewitchment of the Throckmorton girls. (3-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3-6

Jane Throckmorton Jane Throckmorton Demoniac
2228

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 12 or 13 years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, and sister to Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. She became afflicted by fits about a month after her younger sister, Jane, and all three "cryed out upon Mother Samuell: saying, take her away, looke where shee standeth here before us in a blacke thrumbd Cap, (which kind of Cap indeed shee did usually weare, but shee was not then present) it is shee (saide they) that hath bewitched us, and shee will kill us if you doe not take her away." It was said that once all five sisters were afflicted, they "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." She was thereafter afflicted by fits of "lamenesse, blindnesse, deafnesse, and want of feeling." While Agnes Samuel was living in the Throckmorton household, Mary had a fit in which she insisted it was the day she was to scratch Agnes and went after her eagerly and fiercely, then wept and claimed she didn't want to, but her spirit said she must. The next day, she claimed to speak to the spirit Smack, which had previously only conversed with Joan, and it told her she would have no more fits because she had scratched Agnes. Smack later told Joan that Mary had been assigned his cousin Smack (3).(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6

Mary Throckmorton Mary Throckmorton Demoniac
2229

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 12 or 13 years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, niece to Gilbert Pickering and sister to Joan, Jane, Mary, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. She became afflicted by fits about a month after her younger sister, Jane, at the same time as Mary, and all three "cryed out upon Mother Samuell: saying, take her away, looke where shee standeth here before us in a blacke thrumbd Cap, (which kind of Cap indeed shee did usually weare, but shee was not then present) it is shee (saide they) that hath bewitched us, and shee will kill us if you doe not take her away." It was said that once all five sisters were afflicted, they "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." When Elizabeth traveled to her uncle Gilbert Pickering's home in Tichmarch, Pickering noted that her fits ceased during the journey and resumed as soon as she entered the house. At dinner, she was prevented from eating, and she scratched, cried and sneezed during the evening prayers; the same happened when Pickering read from the Bible or she tried to pray herself. Pickering discovered that taking her out of the house ended her fits, but they resumed as soon as she reentered. Elizabeth remained with Pickering for months, as when she tried to return back to Warboys, her fits prevented her. Once Elizabeth had returned to Warboys and Mother Samuel was living in the Throckmorton household, Elizabeth had a fit in which she was unable to eat, drink or speak, and could not until her father, Robert Throckmorton, forbid Mother Samuel to eat until Elizabeth was able. While Agnes Samuel was living in the Throckmorton household, Elizabeth and her sisters had fits in which their mouths shut at meals, and would not reopen until Agnes Samuel ordered the spirits tormenting them to stop. Later, she had fit at dinner in which she declared she would scratch Agnes and did so viciously, then exhorted Agnes and faulted her for not confessing her bewitchments, for parting with her soul and for not praying in her heart, and demanded she make her confessions lest she go to hell. According to the spirit Smack, speaking through Joan, Elizabeth was tormented by his cousin Smack (2). After Joan had scratched Agnes's face bloody and burnt her blood-stained fingernail clippings, Joan assisted Elizabeth in scratching Agnes' right hand.(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6

Elizabeth Throckmorton Elizabeth Throckmorton Demoniac
2230

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 9 years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, and sister to Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. She became afflicted by fits a few weeks after her older sisters Jane, Elizabeth and Mary did. It was said that the sisters "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." She was thereafter afflicted by fits of "lamenesse, blindnesse, deafnesse, and want of feeling." When her sister Elizabeth first scratched Agnes Samuel, Agnes was comforting Grace, who was in the throes of a fit, in her arms; Grace was caught in Agnes' embrace for the duration while Agnes was viciously scratched. Grace tried to scratch Agnes herself some time later, but her nails were too short and her strength insufficient to cause Agnes any harm. According to the spirit Smack, speaking through Joan, Grace was tormented by the spirit White.(5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 5-6

Grace Throckmorton Grace Throckmorton Demoniac
2232

A girl from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 15 years of age, the eldest daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, niece to Gilbert Pickering and Henry Pickering, and sister to Jane, Elizabeth, Grace, Mary and Robert Throckmorton. She was the last of the sisters to be afflicted by fits, and hers are said to have been worst of them. The fits "forced her to neese, screetch & grone verie fearefullie, sometime it would heaue up her bellie, and bounce up her bodie with such violence, that had she not bin kept upon her bed, it could not but haue greatly brused her body." It was said that the sisters "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." After Joan had been afflicted for some time, she began to claim that spirits would give her predictions; she foretold that 12 people in total would become afflicted within the household. A year later, when her uncle Henry Pickering came to visit, she reported the details of his surveillance of and conversation with Mother Samuel, which no-one in the household had known he was doing. Thereafter, she was able to report on whatever Mother Samuel said and did, claiming that her spirit told her. She claimed to converse extensively with various spirits, first one named Blew, and then primarily with Smack. Joan accused Agnes Samuel of renewing Mother Samuel's bewitchment of the Throckmorton girls, saying that the spirits told her so. Joan also said the spirits told her that she would have her worst fits when strangers visited the Throckmorton home, in order to prove that Agnes was bewitching her, for they promised she would not come out of her fits until Agnes said a "charm" over her stating that she was a witch, had killed Lady Cromwell, and had bewitched the Throckmorton girls. Robert Throckmorton would thereafter order Agnes to say those words over his daughters whenever they had a visitor, and they would miraculously recover. Through Joan, Smack also began to predict her fits, report on Mother Throckmorton, who was imprisoned at that time, accused John Samuel of being a witch and listed off which spirits were assigned to torment which girls, with Smack being hers. Smack also told her she should scratch Agnes, and gave Joan the words to have Agnes say to bring her and her sisters out of their fits. When she scratched Agnes, Smack bid her attack one side of Agnes' face for herself, and the other for her aunt Pickering, who Agnes allegedly also bewitched. He also instructed her to clip her bloody fingernails after, throw them on the fire, and throw the wash water on as well after cleaning blood from her hands. While at Huntingdon to prove that Agnes Samuel was a witch to the assembled judges, Joan was seen repeatedly to have shaking and groaning fits whenever Agnes said God or Jesus Christ, and Agnes was made to say the self-accusing "charm" repeatedly over Joan before the judges. Joan is said to have never suffered another fit after these demonstrations.(6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6-7

Joan Throckmorton Joan Throckmorton Demoniac
2235

Seven women from Warboys in the county of Hampshire, known to be employed as servants by Robert and Mistress Throckmorton. They begin experiencing fits after Joan Throckmorton predicts that there will be a total of twelve people afflicted in the Throckmorton household, including the five Throckmorton girls. During their fits, "they all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." This lasted about two years, and when servants left the Throckmortons' employ, their fits ceased.(6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6-7

Anonymous 440 (plural) Demoniac
2264

A woman from Nottingham in the county of Nottinghamshire, known to be the sister of William Sommers. She is said to have had fits and to have been possessed, much as Sommers was, and to have started her fits when his ended. John Darrell faced charges for allegedly instructing Mary Cooper, William Sommers and others to counterfeit their possessions and dispossessions. Darrell alleged in his defense that Cooper's belly was heard to make a whooping noise like the purr of a cat and swelled as if in pregnancy. (13-17)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 13-17

Mary Cooper Mary Cooper Demoniac
2325

A woman from Westwell in the county of Kent, who "had so perfectly this imposture of speaking in the Belly," an act of pretending to have been possessed by the Devil, "that many Ministers were deceived by her." These ministers "came and talked so long with that Devil, and charged him in the name of God to go out of her." The woman claimed some "poor people for Witches," responsible for her alleged possession. However, two Justices of the Peace, Mr. Thomas Wotton, and Mr. George Darrel exposed her con. She is possibly Mildred Norrington.(78 - 79)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 78 - 79

Anonymous 469 Demoniac
2327

A woman from Braintree in the county of Essex, who feigned a possession, "to the astonishment of many, and gained money from the deceived beholders." Eventually, her story "grew stale," and when money stopped coming her way, the "Devil did easily leave her." She is never tried for this con.(79)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 79

Anonymous 470 Demoniac
2347

A young man from the town of Southwold in the county of Suffolk, who suffers from bewitchment for some time. The witch (Anonymous 480) responsible for his circumstance was allegedly executed for it.(7)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 7

Anonymous 479 Demoniac
2360

A woman who is allegedly possessed for three years. She would have extraordinary fits or sickness during which her flesh looked as though it had been torn up by hooks,;her belly swelled looking as though it would burst; her limbs contorted themselves; sometimes her body would be flung to the ground; and sometimes she could neither eat nor drink, surviving only on chalk and water.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange and Wonderful News from Goswell-street: or, a Victory over the Devil. London: 1678, 4

Anonymous 224 Demoniac
2364

A woman from Edmundbyres in the county of Durham, who allegedly possessed, and the wife of Stephen Hooper. Together, Stephen Hooper and Margaret Hooper have a young son. Margaret Hooper begins to act strange upon returning home from the village Hanstonueth, causing concern in her household, noticeably in her husband. She begins to talk to herself, and "continued as if she had beene one bewitched, or haunted by an evill Spirit."(Anonymous 248) Stephen Hooper becomes desperate to cure her, and tries to convince his wife to focus on God, and to pray with him. However, over time, Margaret Hooper becomes more troubled until one day, she experiences a fit, which causes such a fright for Stephen Hooper that he sends for her sister. Together, Stephen Hooper and Margaret Hooper's sister confine Margaret Hooper to her bed, where she foams at the mouth, and shakes so badly, that the chamber and the bed shook with her. Stephen Hooper begins to pray for his wife again, and within a half-hour, she is much recovered, although still complains that she followed by a beast without a head or tail that no one else can see. Stephen Hooper still implores his wife to pray with him, which she did, and seemed fine for a week. However, after this time, Margaret Hooper begins to rage again, and has little memory of her fits, "to the great griefe of her husband." One night, Margaret Hooper wakes from a violent fit, and calls out for Stephen Hooper, claiming to "see a strange thing like unto a snale."(Anonymous 247) Stephen Hooper tries to comfort his wife, but she remains fearful, asking him "doe not you see the Devill?" When Stephen Hooper counsels her to think of God, she tells him, "if you see nothing now, you shall see something by and by." Shortly after this, a great noise is heard in the street "as if it had beene the comming of foure or five carts." Looking up, Stephen Hooper sees a monster (Anonymous 245) coming towards their bed, "much like a beare, but it had no head nor taile," and was significantly taller. Stephen Hooper attempts to attack the beast with a stool, but it simply bounces off the monster as if it were a feather bed. The beast turns its attention to Margaret Hooper, stroking her on the feet three times. It then takes her out of the bed and rolled her around the chamber and under the bed. Finally, the apparition causes Margaret Hooper to put her head between her legs, and rolled her around like a hoop through the house, and down the stairs. Her husband does not dare go after at her, but instead weeps to see her carried away. The hall was filled with "an horrible stinke [...] and such fiery flames." Eventually, Margaret Hooper calls out to her husband, claiming the spirit is gone, and she comes up the stairs back to him. Together, with the rest of the household, Stephen and Margaret Hooper pray. During these prayers, the window is mysteriously opened, and suddenly, Margaret Hooper's leg's are thrust out the window, "so that they were clasped about the post in the middle of the Window betweene her leggs." As well, a great fire appears at her feet "the stink whereof was horrible." Her husband, and his brother decide to "charge the Devill in the name of the Father, the Sonne, and the holy Ghost to depart from her, and to trouble her no more," pulling her off the window. Margaret Hooper then cries out that she sees "a little child," (Anonymous 246) and upon looking out the window, a little child is seen, "with a very bright shinning countenance," that he outsides the candle. All present "fall flat to the ground," and pray. The child vanishes, and Margaret Hooper believes she is freed from her possession.(2 - 6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Most Fearful and Strange News from Durham being a True Relation of one Margaret Hooper of Edenbyres. London: 1641, 2 - 6

Margret Hooper Margaret Hooper Demoniac
2373

The daughter of Gentleman who lives in "the west" (presumably of England), who is bewitched by a maidservant (Anonymous 493) who worked for her family who would allegedly steal small objects and give them to her friends. After the gentleman's daughter reported the maidservant (who swore vengeance on her), she began to experience torments; her mouth would twist and her tongue would extend if she attempted to speak. She would vomit burning coals, hair, hay, and rags, she would be pinched, beaten, and bitten (the indents of toothmarks could be seen). In the end the gentleman's daughter's allegation supposedly caused the examination of some 20 witches.()

Appears in:
D, I. A Letter Concerning the Witches in the West. London: 1670,

Anonymous 494 Demoniac
2375

A woman from the district of Wapping in the City of London, wife of a carpenter, John Rogers and mother of two. Although she was formerly "a great professor of religion," Lydia becomes bedeviled in March of 1658 after she allegedly signs a blood contract with the devil in the shape of a minister who agrees to give her money for cloth that her husband will not provide. She suffers from "raving fits" that continually renew themselves. The tract concerns itself with making Roper an object lesson on church-hopping in an era of "heriticks, schismaticks, and seducers."(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Snare of the Devill Discovered. London: 1658, 6

Lydia Rogers Lydia Rogers Demoniac
2376

A twenty year old woman from Hammersmith, Middlesex, wife of John Fowles, described as a poor, ignorant wife of a labourer. Unhappy in her marriage, and with her in-laws, Fowles feigned melancholy in 1698 and began to speak in the voice of the devil. It is unclear is her husband and sister knew she was faking it, but "some" persuaded her to claimed she's been bewitched, and to speak as though there were two spirits in her. She became a sort of demoniac celebrity, and many came to sit in her room, watching over her and praying; there was concern that she would be dispossessed by Catholics. Her possession was tested; she was burnt by a hot iron, had smoke blown in her face, and was frighteded by a man who'd dressed like the devil. She admitted both that she'd been "persuaded, for filthy gain, to counterfeit herself possessed," and had come to believe she was really tormented. (20-24)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A full and true account of the life [...] of Susan Fowls. . London: 1698, 20-24

Susannah / Susan Fowles / Fowl Susannah Fowles Demoniac
2377

A twelve year old boy from Leyland, in Croston, Lancashire, the son of Mr Crook. Crook's son was read as a demoniac by much of his community (some of which appear to have a pro-Catholic agenda). Thomas Marsden, who was one of his attending physicians, described his eyes asglassy and much disturbed, and recounts that the boy spit, cursed, froze, his head lolled from side to side, he threw and distorted his body, and he swore beat the air with his arms; and afterwards let his head fall very Low upon his breast, at which time he seem'd to speak with another voice, mistaken by some present for the voice of the Devil. He was diagnosed by Mardsen in 1676 as suffering a natural distemper. At Marsden's recommendation, the boy was send to his "Wise and Worthy Friend Dr. Richmond of Leverpool, who healed the Lad and saved my Purse. He began with more general Evacuations, which proving less effectual, he fell to the purgation of his head, and by Gargarisms, Fumigations, Sternutaments and the like, he thinn'd, dislodged and fetched away all that viscous morbifick matter that had caused his sad distemper." Marsden encountered the lad years later when he was a healthy, happily married man and father.(Sig A2)

Appears in:
Taylor, Zachary. The devil turn'd casuist, or, The cheats of Rome laid open. London: 1696, Sig A2

Crook Crook's Son Demoniac