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List of all events occurring in the persontype of

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
9

Joan Pechey is a woman who lived in St. Osyth, in the county of Essex for at least eleven years and who claims to be somewhere above sixty years old before and the mother of Phillip Barrenger. She is allegedly described by Widow Barnes, via her daughter Margerie Sammons, as "skilfull and cunning in witcherie," and a woman who could both do "as much as the said mother Barnes," or "any other in this towne of S. Osees." She allegedly bewitched Johnson, the Collector and distributer of alms after her gave her "bread was to hard baked for her," she being an old woman, presumably should have received a softer loaf and the harder bread should have been given to "a gyrle or another, and not to her." She denies any involvement in witchcraft and denies Mother Barnes had any either. She also denies the accusations of incest between herself and her twenty three year old son, Phillip Barrenger, who confessed that "manye times and of late hee hath layne in naked bed with his owne mother, being willed and commaunded so to doe of her." Although Margarey Sammon allegedly sent her familiars (formerly her mother's two familiars) Tom and Robbyn skipping and leaping off to Pechey's home, and Ales Hunt claimed that she had heard Pechey scolding her spirits, saying"yea are you so sawsie? are yee so bolde? you were not best to bee so bolde with mee: For if you will not bee ruled, you shall haue Symonds sause, yea saide the saide Ioan, I perceiue if I doe giue you an inch, you you will take an ells," Pechey likewise denied these charges. She claimed she indeed had pets, a kitten and a dog, but no "Puppettes, Spyrites or Maumettes." Although she was "committed to prison for suspicion of felony and upon inquisition," she was released by proclamation. (C5-C6)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C5-C6

Joan Pechey Joan Pechey Cunning-folk
28

Geillis Duncane is a maidservant from the town Trenent, in the council area of East Lothiam, in the country of Scotland, whose healing practices are suspected of being witchcraft.(7)

Appears in:
Carmichael, James. News from Scotland, Declaring the Damnable Life and Death of Doctor Fian a Notable Sorcerer. London: 1592, 7

Geillis Duncane Geillis Duncane Cunning-folk
48

Doctor John Lambe is a man from Worcester in the county of Worcestershire, known to be an astrologer, cunning-man, teacher of gentleman's children, magician and juggler, and to style himself a physician. He employed Anne Bodenham as a maid. He stood charges at the Worcester Assizes for "two seuerall Inditements; one for vnchristian and damnable practises against the person of an Honourble Peere of this Realme; and the other for damnable inuocation and worship of euill Spirits." The first charge referred to an attempt to disable or weaken the Thomas, sixth Lord Windsor. He was found guilty on both charges, but judgement was suspended in the case of the first. Dr. Lambe allegedly drew Mr. Wayneman into his practice of conjuration and promised to show him an angel, but summoned a spirit instead. He is said to posses the skill to "intoxicate, poyson, and bewitch any man so as they should be disabled from begetting of children," and to have four spirits trapped in a crystal glass. He called the chief sprit Benias. He also predicted the drowning of Lady Fairfax's brothers. While at a gentleman's house entertaining guests with juggling tricks, Anthony Birch saw shapes in his crystal ball. Through the use of his spirits, he could "vndertake any difficult thing, and did very often discouer and bring to light goods and chattels although they had for a long time beene lost," tell whether someone was a witch or not, what disease afflicted a person whether he had seen them or not, and show women their future husbands in his crystal ball. He could also tell what private marks a person had on their body and personal details they had kept secret. 40 people involve in his arraignment allegedly died within two weeks after. Dr. Lambe was indicted a second time on charges of luring Joan Seager, an 11-year-old girl, to his home and raping her. He was found guilty and sentenced to death for this violation, but was pardoned by the crown. Some evidence surfaced suggesting that Seager's father owed Dr. Lambe money, and that the rape charge was laid shortly after he tried to collect on the debt. A year later, Dr. Lambe attended a play at the Fortune Theatre in London and was mobbed when he left. The mob pursued him and beat him to death with stones and cudgels.(2-3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 2-3

John Lambe John Lambe Cunning-folk
69

William Berry is a man from Langham in the county of Rutland who was allegedly Joan Willimott's master for three years. According to Joan, William Berry gave her a spirit named Pretty; he asked her to open her mouth and told her "hee would blow into her a Fairy which should doe her good." A spirit then came out of her mouth in the shape of a woman and he willed Joan to give her soul to the spirit as it requested.(E4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E4

William Berry William Berry Cunning-folk
86

A cunningwoman from Pannier Alley, a street in the city of London, who appears to a maid, tells her fortune, and sells her a love powder(4-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. News from Pannier-alley, or, A True Relation of some Pranks the Devil hath Play'd with a Plaster-pot There. London: 1687, 4-5

Anonymous 7 Cunning-folk
116

A woman from Stapenhill in the county of Staffordshire, described as a cunning woman who is unable to cure the young boy, Thomas Darling, of his fits.(18)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 18

Widow Worthington Widow Worthington Cunning-folk
346

A woman from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be an Irish cunningwoman, who was allegedly offered money by the confederates to murder Anne Levingston. Hook was also employed to procure witnesses who would swear to the advantage of the confederates; Hook is alleged to have sworn against Levingston herself.(3-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 3-5

Anne Hook Anne Hook Cunning-folk
412

A man from Yowell in the county of Surrey, known to be a doctor and a cunning-person, whom the parents of Mary Farmer allegedly consulted on the matter of her bewitchment. He is said to have confirmed that Mary was "under an ill tongue" and advised Mr. and Mrs. Farmer to save Mary's urine, close it in a bottle and bury it in the earth, then burn Mary's clothes, and that this would draw out the witch who had afflicted her.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. An Account of the Tryal and Examination of Joan Buts, for being a Common Witch and Inchantress. London: 1682, 1

Bourn Dr. Bourn Cunning-folk
466

A woman who is identified by a local boat-cawker / cunning-man named Herring as the witch who "haunted" Annis Glascocke.(Cv, C2-C2v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, Cv, C2-C2v

Arnold's Wife Cunning-folk
615

A cunning woman and witch, from Rochester in the county of Kent, she is known as 'the great witch of Rochester,' but described by Reginald Scot as a "cousening queane." Bungy is renown for her ability to foretell and prophesy.(80, 116, 125, 126, 324, 341-342)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 80, 116, 125, 126, 324, 341-342

Bungy Mother Bungy Cunning-folk
703

A man from Yarmouth in the County of Suffolk, known to be an unwitcher or cunning-person, whom Dorothy Durent alleged that she had consulted in her deposition. She claimed that she went to him after her infant son William developed fits due to his reputation for helping bewitched children. According to Durent's deposition, he had advised her to "hang up the Childs Blanket in the Chimney corner all day, and at night when she put the Child to Bed, to put it into the said blanket, and if she found any thing in it, she should not be afraid, but to throw it into the Fire." When she did so, a great toad fell out of William's blanket, which made a horrible noise and flashed like gunpowder when held in the fire before disappearing.(8-10)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 8-10

Jacob Dr. Jacob Cunning-folk
832

A group of "wizards" from Knaresborough forest in North Yorkshire who allegedly practice and teach countermagic. (34-35)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 34-35

Anonymous 326 (Plural) Cunning-folk
924

A woman who lived in London. In an attempt to save Elizabeth Jennings, Margaret Russell appears to attempt to access a network of female physicians and cunning women, but would come to be accused of, examined for, and imprisoned for bewitching Jennings. She is accused blaming Jennings' possession on a conflict between the Jennings' and Higgins' houses. ()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

Margaret Russell Margaret Russell (Countess) Cunning-folk
951

A man from Stapenhill in the county of Staffordshire, described as a cunning man who comes to Robert Toones home to help cure Toones nephew, Thomas Darling. The cunning man sends for the Witch of Stapen Hill, and attempts to coerce a confession by putting her in painful and constricting shoes. (24-25)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 24-25

Cunning Man Cunning-folk
1013

A man from Sunderland in the County of Northumberland, known to be "one it was suspected that could do more then God allowed of." During one of her fits, Mary Muschamp wrote an abbreviation of his name, and the undeciphered abbreviation of one other person's name. Mary Moore sent to him shortly therafter, demanding that he confess who had afflicted Margaret and threatening to apprehend him if he would not. Moore's servant reported back his answer: "DOROTHY SVVINOVV wife then to Colonell SVVINOVV, was the party that had done all the mischiefe to her child, and was the cause of all her further crosses." John Hutton also blamed Swinow for the death of Margery Hambleton. When Hutton heard that Margaret wanted two drops of his blood to save her life, he tried to do it himself privately; instead "the child nickt him halfe a dozen times in the forehead, but no bloud appeared; then he put forth his right arme and that was not till her mother threatned his heart bloud should goe before she wanted it; then he layd his thumb on his arme, and two drops appeared, which she wip'd off with a paper." Margaret later claimed two more drops would save her brother, George Muschamp Jr.; her mother Mary Moore hunted Hutton down and took more of his blood. Margaret's fits were observed to not trouble her in Hutton's company, and she fell into a terrible one when he left. Moore had Hutton apprehended, and he died in prison. Margaret claimed that he was her greatest tormentor, and had he lived, he would have given them the names of two more witches. He is said to have been able to call up storms, and is credited with nearly blowing a ship off course as it entered Berwick Harbour.(7-11)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 7-11

John Hutton John Hutton Cunning-folk
1041

A man from Winchester Park in the London Borough of Southwark, described as a physician or astrologer who provides John Crump a means of curing his bewitched daughter, Hannah Crump. Anonymous 147 suggests that in order to unwitch Hannah, he would have to take the curse on himself. The curse, he suggests, needs to be carried by someone; if not Hannah, than him, if not him the witch who cursed her would have to carry the curse until her familiars could plague someone else with it. (18)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 18

Anonymous 147 Cunning-folk
1237

A cunning woman who John RIvet consults regarding his wife's (Mrs. RIvet) violent fits. Anonymous 198 informs John Rivet that his wife has been bewitched by two of his neighbours.(5)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 198 Cunning-folk
1352

A woman, likely an unwitcher, cunning woman, or female physician, described as dwelling "12 miles from Waltham," and having some skill in treating the bewitched, Anonymous 227 prescribed some treatment for Israel Amyce, administered before he went to bed, and enabled him to feel better in the next morning (and perhaps begin on the road to recovery).()

Appears in:
Roberts, R. A.. Calendar of the Cecil Papers in Hatfield House, Volume 10: 1600. Unknown: 1904,

Anonymous 227 Cunning-folk
1448

A man from the county of Essex, described as a cunning-man who is a "notable cousening Knave [..] skilful in the Black Art," a "deceiving Witch," and a "conjurer," who with the help of a "confederate" (Anonymous 248) runs a confidence scam against a local butcher who is seeking help finding a lost cow/ cattle. The cunning-man is exposed when his partner, dressed menacingly like the devil, or a devil, is attacked by the butcher's dog and is forced to revel himself to have the man call off his dog.(62-63)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 62-63

Anonymous 247 Cunning-folk
1449

A man from the county of Essex, described as a cunning-man who works with Anonymous 247 to run a confidence scam against a local butcher who is seeking help finding a lost cow/ cattle. His job was to cover himself in a "Bulls Hide, and a pair of horns on his head," and pose as the Devil to terrify the butcher who was meant to be seeing the Devil. The butcher figured out the con and returned with his Boy and a mastiff, who attacked the disguised man and forced him to revel himself in exchange for having the butcher call off his dog.(62)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 62

Anonymous 248 Cunning-folk
1451

A woman Hadleigh in the county of Suffolk, described as the "wife of one Hovye," who acts as a cunning-woman and consultant when Mrs Rivet grows ill in late December (1645) becoming "sicke, and lame, with such violent fits, that this Informant verily conceived her sicknesse was something more then meerly naturall." Mrs. Hovye tells John Rivet that his wife was "cursed by two women who were neere neighbours to this Informant, the one dwelling a little above his house, and the other beneath his house, this Informants house standing on the side of an Hill." Rivet deduced that Elizabeth Clarke was one the witches, based on the proximity of her home and the common knowledge that "Elizabeths mother and some other of her kinsfolke did suffer death for Witchcraft and murther."()

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645,

Hoyve Mrs. Hoyve Cunning-folk
1468

A man from Amersham in the county of Buckinghamshire, described as "Conjurer," or an "honest and able Physician," Redman appears to be an untrained, but practicing physician / cunningman, who was "once sent to Prison" for either practicing medicine without a license, or witchcraft. Mary Hall's possessing spirits suggest Redman could help heal her. Redman instructs her parents to "take the length of the Child with a Stick, and measure so much ground in the Churchyard, and there dig, and bury the Stick of the Childs length, and the Child suddenly recovered." Although Redman appears to heal, in part with the aid of astrology, his pratice seems based on sympathetic magic. He once advised a client to urinate in a hole in the crossroads to cure himself of Ague and another to boil an egg in urine and bury it in an ant hill to cure his distemper. Although his practice crosses magic, medicine, and folklore, it is not actually witchcraft. (39-40)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 39-40

Redman Dr. Redman Cunning-folk
1476

A man from the Isle of Ely (now a region around the city of Ely in the county of Cambridgeshire) who is described as a "white Witch, or Necromancer, Sorcerer, Magician." He gave a man tormented with fits (Anonymous 254) an "Amulet or Charm to hang about his neck, and so long as he wore that, he was freed; he durst not leave it off." This wizard also asked Anonymous 254 "if they were wicked People, else, he said, he could not, or would not help them." The they here is somewhat opaque. It appears that he seems like an unwitcher, but the pronoun confusion allows this to be read as him only taking wicked people as clients.(20)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 20

Anonymous 255 Cunning-folk
1479

A woman from Golding Lane in the parish of St. Giles who allegedly "occupieth the syve and sheeres [divination tools], and she only speaketh with the fayrayes [faries]." This information comes from William Whycherly during his 1597 examination by Sir Thomas Smith.(334)

Appears in:
Foxe, Thomas Cranmer, John Gough Nichols, John. Narratives of the Days of the Reformation. Unknown: 1859, 334

Croxton Mrs. Croxton Cunning-folk
1488

A man and labourer from Aldersgate Street, in the City of London, who is said to "occupieth the syve and sheeres [divination tools]." This information comes from William Whycherly during his 1597 examination by Sir Thomas Smith. (334)

Appears in:
Foxe, Thomas Cranmer, John Gough Nichols, John. Narratives of the Days of the Reformation. Unknown: 1859, 334

Thomas Shakilton Thomas Shakilton Cunning-folk
1490

A woman, and the wife of Christopher Morgan, from Beche-lane, besides the Barbicane, (now Beach Street, near the Barbican complex in the City of London), who is said to "occupieth the syve and sheeres [divination tools]." This information comes from William Whycherly during his 1597 examination by Sir Thomas Smith.(334)

Appears in:
Foxe, Thomas Cranmer, John Gough Nichols, John. Narratives of the Days of the Reformation. Unknown: 1859, 334

Morgan Mrs. Morgan Cunning-folk
1931

A woman from the London borough of Southwark, known to be a cunning-woman, whom Richard Hathaway and his friends (Anonymous 368) consulted when he was cured of his blindness and inability to eat or drink, but left passing pins in his stool. She advised them to boil Hathaway's urine in a stone bottle, but the bottle burst into pieces when they did so, returning Hathaway to his former state even though none of the shards touched him. (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 1

Anonymous 370 Cunning-folk
1948

A man from Spitalfields in the borough of Greater London, known to be a doctor, to whom Mr. Chamblet came for advice on un-witching his wife Mrs. Chamblet after the death of their daughter Elizabeth; Dr. Ha[w]ks advises that Mr. Chamblet boil a quart of Mrs. Chamblet's urine with parings from her nails and some of her hair.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Proceedings at the Sessions of Oyer and Terminer. London: 1682, 4

Ha[...]ks Dr. Ha[w]ks Cunning-folk
1974

A man of Stoke Climsland in the county of Cornwall, known to be a cunning person, to whom alleged demoniac Thomas Sawdie's uncle (Anonymous 376) came for a cure for Sawdie's fits. Condy declaired Sawdie to be "overlookt" and first prescribed a plaster, a powder and a little bag to hang around the boy's neck. When this failed to cure him, Condy next prescribed only a powder and the promise of a cure; the third time, he simply charged Sawdie's family with watching him carefully and not to let the boy out of their sight.(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Return of Prayer: or A Faithful Relation of Some Remarkable Passages of Providence concerning Thomas Sawdie. London: 1664, 3

Condy Condy Cunning-folk
2067

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex and likely a cunning woman, wise woman, or medical practitioner. When Annis Letherdall comes to believe that her year and a half old daughter, Elizabeth, who is then "in most piteous case to beholde," has been bewitched by Ursley Kempe, she takes the child to see Mother Racliffe because "shee had some experience of her skill." Ratcliffe appears to be a neighbor of Ursley Kempe; to get to Ratcliffe's home, Letherdall has to pass by Kempe's home, prompting Elizabeth to cry and point. Although Ratcliffe "doubted shee shoulde doe it any good, yet shee ministred" to Letherdall's daughter. She was indeed unable to do much good, the infant died and Kempe was charged for the crime. (A2V-A3)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A2V-A3

Ratcliffe Mother Ratcliffe Cunning-folk
2274

A woman from the vicinity of Castle Alley near Broken Wharf in London, known to be a wisewoman or cunningwoman. When Anne Kirk bewitches a child in retaliation for not being invited to its christening, the parents consult with Mother Gillam. She recognizes that the child has been forespoken, and advises its parents to "cut of a piece of the witches coate with a payre of sheeres, & burne it togeather with the childs vnder cloth."(100)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 100

Gillam Mother Gillam Cunning-folk
2276

A man from the vicinity of Castle Alley near Broken Wharf in London, known to be a cunning-man. The innkeeper Anonymous 459 consulted with him when his child became strangely tormented. Anonymous 461 revealed, after making Anonymous 459 swear not to tell who told him, that Anne Kirk was responsible for the child's affliction. He showed Anonymous 459 Anne Kirk's image in a glass.(100-101)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 100-101

Anonymous 461 Cunning-folk
2356

A man from Ware in the county of Hertfordshire, who is known as a "Cunning man, Wizard, or Fortune-teller." He is visited by his neighbour, Thomas Stretton, who has lost his Bible and wishes to consult the cunning man to find it. However, the two engage in an argument when Stretton accuses Anonymous 487 of being "a Witch or a Devil, seeing he could neither write nor read." These words anger Anonymous 487, and his wife, Anonymous 322. In turn, it is believed they cause Jane Stretton, Thomas Stretton's daughter, to be bewitched, and suffer from a number of violent fits. When it is discovered that Anonymous 487 and Thomas Stretton fought, he is brought forward to Jane Stretton with his wife, while the young girl is in the midst of a violent fit.(1 - 3)

Appears in:
Y., M.. The Hartford-shire Wonder. London: 1669, 1 - 3

Anonymous 487 Cunning-folk