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List of all events occurring in the persontype of

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
11

Ales Newman is a woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex who is accused of bewitching at least four people: Thorlow's wife (on the knee), John Stratton's wife (on the back -- to her death), Letherdalls' child, Johnson (the tax / alms collector) and his wife (unto the death), Bulter (who languished still in pain), the "late Lorde Darcey, (whereof hee dyed)", and her "ownher husband, William Newman. (Ales) Newman confessed nothing herself and was accused of being obstinate. She is condemned but remanded. She is found guilty and remanded to prison. As of August 2, 1582, she is still imprisoned, along with Cecily Sellis, Ellen Southern, and Agnes / Annis Glascock at the Colchester Goal. (Image 53)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, Image 53

Alice Newman Alice Newman Co-conspirator
15

Ales Manfield is a sixty-three year old woman from Thorpe in the county of Essex who for approximately twelve years allegedly shared two male and two female familiars in the shape of black cats with Margaret Grevell: Robin, Jack, William, Puppet (alias Mamet) for twelve years which she keeps in a wool lined box on her shelf. Manfield serves as witness against Mother Ewstace, claiming that she had a white, a gray, and a black feline familiar which she used to kill a child. She also stands as witness against Mother Grevell, claiming that Grevell had plagued Mother Ewstance's husband to death. However, more often than not, she claims to have worked with Grevell. Manfield allegedly sends Robin to lame Robert Cheston's bull (circa 1575) and Grevell sends Jack to lame Cheston himself (circa 1580) beginning on his toe, but causing his death. After Joan Cheston refused to give Manfield her curds, she claims to have sent Puppet (alias Mamet) "foure of her Beastes," and after John Sayer ruined her yard with his cart, she has Puppet ensure that the same cart became stuck and would not move (as Sayer tells the story, the cart became stuck when the man thatching his barn refused to thatch Manfield's oven until he got permission to do so). Around Michaelmas, all four familiars allegedly took a trip together to assist Cecily Sellis in the burning of Ross' barn and cattle. Her familiar, William, allegedly gave notice to Manfield for the whole group, claiming that since she would soon be apprehended, they would go to work for Urseley Kempe, Margery Sammon, Ales Hunt, or Mother Torner (aka Joan Turner). Lynd's wife would not give her milk, that her cow would not feed her twenty day old calf (which died). She is indicted as a witch, but not charged as one. Rather, she is charged for arson. She is found guilty of co-conspiring with Cecily Sellis to burn Richard Ross's barn and "field of grain worth 100 marks."(D5-D8)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, D5-D8

Alice Manfield Alice Manfield Co-conspirator
16

Margaret Grevell is a fifty five year old woman from Thorpe in the county of Essex who, according to Alice Manfield, shares four feline familiars with her for seven years: Robin, Jack, William, Puppet (alias Mamet). Again according to Manfield, Grevell "caused her impes to destroy seuerall brewinges of beere," belonging to Reade and Carter (Carter likewise testified against Grevell on this charge) a number of "batches of bread." Nicholas Stickland accuses her of preventing his wife's butter from churning and causing the untimely demise of a calf. Although Grevell is accused (again by Mansfield) of the murder of Elizabeth Ewstace's husband, she is indicted for the malefic murder of Robert Cheston. She is searched as a witch, but the witch-searchers "say that they cannot judge her to haue any sucked spots vpon her body." She is found not guilty of causing Cheston's death, and acquitted. (D5-D8)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, D5-D8

Margaret Grevell Margaret Grevell Co-conspirator
79

Temperance Lloyd is a woman from Bideford, in the county of Devon who is accused using image magic to cause suffering and death. Lloyd was tried as a witch three times. On March 14, 1670, she was "Accused, Indicted, and Arraigned, [and acquitted of] practising of Witchcraft upon the Body of one William Herbert, late of Biddiford aforesaid, Husbandman," at Exeter Castle. On May, 15th 1679, before the "Mayor and Justices of the Town of Biddiford" she was accused of and acquitted of "practising Witchcraft upon the Body of one Anne Fellow the Daughter of Edward Fellow of Biddiford Gent." Having been "searched by four Women of the Town of Biddiford aforesaid," the physical proof (in the form of witch marks), was not "so clear and conspicuous" and she was released 1679. However in 1682, Lloyd would be prosecuted against, predominately for the bewitching of Grace Thomas through image magic and for consorting with a devil. Lloyd would again be examined by a group of citizens (her accusers) and Mr. Michael Ogilby, the local rector. It is at this point that Lloyd begins to admit to all the crimes of which she has been accused. She admits to using image magic against Grace Thomas; although she was accused of pricking a doll with a thorn to do so, Lloyd only admitted to using a piece of leather. She also admitted killing William Herbert, Anne Fellow, and Linda Burman, and blinding Jane Dallyn in one eye. Ogliby made Llyod recite "the Lords Prayer and her Creed" as a test, which she did, but "imperfectly." Lloyd admitted to having a familiar in the shape of a black man, wearing "blackish Clothes, and was about the length of her Arm. That he had broad Eyes, and a Mouth like a Toad." Anne Wakely searched Lloyd, and found in her "secret Parts two Teats hanging nigh together like unto a piece of Flesh that a Child had suckt. And that each of the said Teats was about an Inch in length." She asked Lloyd "whether she had been suckt at that place by the black Man? (meaning the Devil)." Lloyd acknowledged that "she had been suckd there often times by the black Man; and the last time that she was suckd by the said black Man was the Friday before she was searchd" (ibid.). She later admitted that the black man did "suck her Teats which she now hath in her Secret Parts ... [and] did suck her again as she was lying down; and that his sucking was with a great pain unto her" (15). Temperance Lloyd was tried and convicted, along with Marry Trembles and Susana Edwards, at the Bideford assizes on August 14th, 1682, one of the last witch trials. She was executed on August 25th, 1682.(2, 10-13, 13-15, 16-19, 19-21, 20-22, 25,)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 2, 10-13, 13-15, 16-19, 19-21, 20-22, 25,

Temperance Lloyd Temperance Lloyd Co-conspirator
98

A man from Salisbury in the county of Wiltshire and Richard Goddard's son in law. Thomas Mason consults Anne Bodenham (via Anne Styles) three times for his own needs. He fist consults Bodenham to find three pieces of lost gold, a request he had posed twice before to Bodenham via a young male servant, and a request which cost him seven shillings and didn't help him find the gold. He then asks if "Master Rawley did intend him any mischief, for winning his money from him at play," a request which costs him two shillings but comes with a paper charm which will prevent people from meddling with him, if he wears it around his neck. He also inquires about how to move forward with a law suit he has against Richard Goddard, a request which costs him three shillings. Bodenham advises him to "demand fifteen hundred pound, and one hundred and fifty pound per annum of Master Goddard, and if he denyed it, he should prosecute the Law against him." Mason teams with Mistress Roswell to perpetuate the fuel inquiries about Anne and Sarah Goddard's intent to poison Mistress Goddard; they also pay for her escape from Salisbury, Roswell buying her clothing giving nine shillings and Mason giving her twelve pence. It seems likely that Mason fueled the paranoia about the poisoning to cause strife in the family.(4-5)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 4-5

Thomas Mason Thomas Mason Co-conspirator
262

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, an accused witch, and maybe a relative of Mary Cook, an accused witch who died in the goal at Chelmsford, 1645. Susan Cook allegedly had a familiar named Bess, and conspired with Rose Hallybread, Margaret Landish, and Joyce Boanes, to torment Robert Turner's servant, because" hee had refused to give unto her this Examinant, the said Susan Cocks, Margaret Landish and Joyce Boanes a few chips." With the help of thier familiars, they made him fall "sick, and oftentimes barked like a Dog: And this Examinant saith, that shee believeth that the said four Imps were the cause of his barking and sicknesse." In _The full Trualls, Examinations and Condemnations of Four Notorious Witches, At the Assizes held at Worchester on Tuesday the 4th of March_ she is accused of murdering Mary Peak a crime for which she is burned at the stake. (5)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 5

Susan Cock Susan Cock Co-conspirator
284

A woman from Chipping Campden in the county of Gloucestershire, described as a widow who along with her sons (Anonymous 92 and Anonymous 93), allegedly rob and murder William Harrison. Perry is brought to trial on these accusations, found guilty, and executed by hanging. Before her execution, Widow Perry predicts that William Harrison will return in seven years time, a prophecy which comes to pass.(5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Power of Witchcraft being a Most Strange but True Relation of the Most Miraculous and Wonderful Deliverance of One Mr. William Harrison. London: 1662, 5-6

Widow Perry Widow Perry Co-conspirator
351

A woman who confessed to encouraging her daughter to feign a possession. She describes the possession in vivid and guesome terms()

Appears in:
Anonymous. Examinat[i]o . . . Attorn[atus] gen[er]alis quer[ens] v[e]r[su]s Tho[mas] Saunders et Kathere[n] Malpas senior def[endan]tes. The National Archives (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), Star Chamber (STAC) 8 32/13, fol. 1v.: 1622,

Elizabeth Saunders Elizabeth Saunders Co-conspirator
355

A man who confessed to encouraging his grand-daughter to feign a possession. He also encouraged Anne Godfrey's possession symptoms, and engineered witchcraft charges against Elizabeth Hedlyn.()

Appears in:
Anonymous. Examinat[i]o . . . Attorn[atus] gen[er]alis quer[ens] v[e]r[su]s Tho[mas] Saunders et Kathere[n] Malpas senior def[endan]tes. The National Archives (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), Star Chamber (STAC) 8 32/13, fol. 1v.: 1622,

Thomas Saunders Thomas Saunders Co-conspirator
356

A woman who confessed to encouraging her daughter in law to feign a possession()

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. A True Narrative of the Sufferings and Relief of a Young Girle; Strangely Molested, by Evil Spirits and their Instruments. Edinburgh: 1698,

Katherine Malpas Katheren Malpas Senior Co-conspirator
442

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex and the mother of Ales Hunt and Margary Sammon, Mother Barnes is alternately described as "a notorious Witch" and as "no witch" by Joan Pechey. She allegedly gave her daughter, Margery Sammon two familiar spirits, in the shape of toads, instructing her to feed and care for them, or to give them to Mother Pechey if she would not. Mother Barnes is accused of conspiring with her daughter Ales Hunt to bewitch Rebbecca Durrant, after her father Henry refused to give them some pork. Rebbecca Durrant died November 24th. Although her Hunt was indicted for the malefic murder of Rebbecca Durrant (and found not guilty) Mother Barnes never made it to court. She died on February 12, 1582. (C4-C4v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C4-C4v

Mother Barnes Co-conspirator
475

A man from Little Clacton in the county of Essex, husband of Cecily and father Henry Sellis Jr., John Sellis, and at least one daughter. There appears to be some conflict between Henry Sellis and Richard Rosse, one of his hired laborers, which leads to a wide spread conflict between the families, and eventually to his wife, Cecily Sellis being accused of witchcraft. Two of Rosse's horses died as Sellis plowed his field for him, making Rosse suspect that Henry or his wife, had bewitched them. Richard Rosse and Cecily had fought in the past over the price of malt, and Mrs. Rosse and Cecily had fought over Mrs. Rosse's treatment of her cattle, but after "many of [Rosse's] beaste were in a most straung taking" and after their son, admired the volume of corn in his barn before it burnt, Rosse came to the conclusion that these events were "wrought by some witchcraft, or sorcery by ye said He~ry or Cisly his wife." Rosse ensure that Henry and his wife were tried (and found guilty) for this arson. Rosse was not the only one who implicated Henry Sellis in witchcraft. His son John, who is allegedly injured by one of Cecily's familiars, claims his father not only knew about the existence of these imps, but did little, beyond yelling at his wife, to save his children. Moreover, he allegedly mocked John, but referring to the little black household demon as "John," because his name was [also] so." For his own part, Henry denies the charges brought against him, nor can he, he claims, really remember the incidents Rosse refers to. (C8-D)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C8-D

Henry Sellis Henry Sellis Sr. Co-conspirator
492

A woman who teaches Joan Cunny the art of witchcraft and how to pray to the Devil by kneeling and making a circle on the ground.()

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589,

Mother Humfrey Mother Humfrey Co-conspirator
493

A man from Windsor in the county of Berkshire, described as a servant to Matthewe Glouer of Eaton, who hired Elizabeth Stile (alias Rockingham), Mother Dutton, Mother Deuell, and Mother Margaret to enact revenge on a man named Foster, after they had a falling out. Whytting provided them with an image of Foster, which they thrust hawthorn needles into.(Image 7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579, Image 7

George Whittyng George Whittyng Co-conspirator
591

A woman from Barking in the county of Essex who allegedly gives Joan Upney a familiar that resembles mole and "tolde her if she ought any body any ill will, if she did bid it, it would goe clap them." This could be Mother Arnold, whose story is recorded in _The Examination and Confession of a Notorious Witch named Mother Arnold, alias Whitecote, alias Glastonbury, at the Assise of Burntwood [Brentwood] in July 1574._(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, 4

Arnold Mother Arnold (alias White-coate) Co-conspirator
606

A man from Hartford in the county of Huntingdonshire, described as neighbor of a Yeoman who is allegedly bewitched by Johane Harrison after he calls her an old hag. He helps the Yeoman concoct a plan where by he can lure Harrison to his home (not the Yeoman's) so the Yeoman can scratch her to unwitch himself.(19-20)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 19-20

Anonymous 70 Co-conspirator
685

A boy from Gloucester in the county of Gloucestershire, described as the son of Widow Perry who, along with his mother and brother (Anonymous 93), allegedly robs and murders William Harrison. Anonymous 92 is brought to trial on these accusations, found guilty, and executed by hanging. (5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Power of Witchcraft being a Most Strange but True Relation of the Most Miraculous and Wonderful Deliverance of One Mr. William Harrison. London: 1662, 5-6

Anonymous 92 Co-conspirator
686

A boy from Gloucester in the county of Gloucestershire, described as the son of Widow Perry and servant of William Harrison who, along with his mother and brother (Anonymous 93), allegedly robs and murders William Harrison. Anonymous 93 is brought to trial on these accusations, found guilty, and executed by hanging from chains; his body is left on display after death for others to see. (5-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Power of Witchcraft being a Most Strange but True Relation of the Most Miraculous and Wonderful Deliverance of One Mr. William Harrison. London: 1662, 5-7

Anonymous 93 Co-conspirator
794

A man who receives money which the Devil gave to Alice Huson.(58-59)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 58-59

Lancelot Harrison Lancelot Harrison Co-conspirator
795

A man who receives money which the Devil gave to Alice Huson.(58-59)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 58-59

Thomas Ratle Thomas Ratle Co-conspirator
796

A man who sells Alice Huson wheat, barley, and peas, and was paid in money Huson recieved from the devil.(59)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 59

Will Parkely Wil Parkely Co-conspirator
1050

A man who allegedly hired Margaret Waite and Margaret Thorpe to bewitch Helen and Elizabeth Fairfax, and Maud Jeffray.(92)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 92

Henry Graver Henry Graver Co-conspirator
1102

An Apothecary in London who, via Margaret Russell, is implicated in the bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings.()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

Higgins Mr. Higgins Co-conspirator
1227

A woman from Ipswich in the county of Suffolk, described as a maid of a reputed witch (Anonymous 194). Anonymous 195 is sent by her Mistress to collect herbs, but is delayed by a "meeting with her sweetheart" and beginning to grow nervous, that she "should bee halfe hanged for staying so long," was told by her lover that she could get the same herbs "in their owne garden." She collected the herbs, and despite her long delay, her mistress was pleased because she brought the herbs back. She spied her employer cut up and "strew the herbs about a room," and the next day witnessed the master of the house cry that he had "found twelve or fourteene great Hogs, being all his owne, dead in the yard, and so for his Sheepe and all his other Cattell." (4-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex. London: 1645, 4-5

Anonymous 195 Co-conspirator
1250

A man from Norfolk, described as a glove maker who is married to Mary Smith. Smith appears to be inculcated in his wife's witchcraft and be able to do some of his own, having cursed Thomas Younge.(45-46, 50-51, 58-59)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 45-46, 50-51, 58-59

Henry Smith Henry Smith Co-conspirator
1489

A man, plasterer, and the husband of Mrs. Morgan from Beche-lane, besides the Barbicane (now Beach Street, near the Barbican complex in the City of London) who is said to "occupieth the syve and sheeres [divination tools]." This information comes from William Whycherly during his 1597 examination by Sir Thomas Smith. (334)

Appears in:
Foxe, Thomas Cranmer, John Gough Nichols, John. Narratives of the Days of the Reformation. Unknown: 1859, 334

Christopher Morgan Christopher Morgan Co-conspirator
1490

A woman, and the wife of Christopher Morgan, from Beche-lane, besides the Barbicane, (now Beach Street, near the Barbican complex in the City of London), who is said to "occupieth the syve and sheeres [divination tools]." This information comes from William Whycherly during his 1597 examination by Sir Thomas Smith.(334)

Appears in:
Foxe, Thomas Cranmer, John Gough Nichols, John. Narratives of the Days of the Reformation. Unknown: 1859, 334

Morgan Mrs. Morgan Co-conspirator
1502

A man from the county of Essex who is imprisoned at Colchester Castle on July 29th, 1639 for allegedly trusting witches and talking with them which is considered to be a "dishonour of God."(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Robert Garnett Robert Garnett Co-conspirator
1567

A woman from Stoke in Ipswich, Suffolk who allegedly exchanges imps with Anne Leech, her sister-in-law.(7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 7

Anne Pearce Anne Pearce Co-conspirator
1672

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who was married at age 26 to a most goodly woman, Mrs. Eleanor Armstrong, with whom he had at least four children: three sons and a daughter. Mr. Wessell Goodwin is much given to music of all sorts, often choosing music above his family, even on his wife's deathbed. This is allegedly thought to be the faults of Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. James. Upon his wife's death (when he is already aged), he is seduced and bewitched by Mrs. James, still a married woman, causing him to engage in publicly lewd acts, and to act strangely himself including dancing, and violence. Mr. Goodwin is convinced to grant Mrs. Jones his estate and to estrange his children. Through his relationship with Mrs. Jones, which becomes incestuous in the eyes of God upon the marriage of his youngest son to one of Mrs. Jones' daughters, his family and himself are ruined. (1 - 26)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 1 - 26

Wessell Goodwin Mr. Goodwin Co-conspirator
1704

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the youngest son of Mr. Goodwin. At seventeen years of age, Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones arrange for him to marry Mrs. Jones' daughter by first making him "maillable." The marriage between these two cause Mrs. Jones and Mr. Goodwin's relationship to appear incestuous in the eyes of God.(18 - 19)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 18 - 19

James Goodwin James Goodwin Co-conspirator
1705

A woman from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the daughter of the alleged wicked woman, Mrs. Jones. At fifteen years of age, she is married to Mr. Goodwin's youngest son, James Goodwin. This causes her mother's relationship with Mr. Goodwin to become incestuous in the eyes of God. (18 - 19)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 18 - 19

Jones Jones (Daughter) Co-conspirator
1708

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the "sure friend" of the alleged wicked women, Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones. He helps them secure the estates and goods of their husbands and the Goodwin family. He is believed to be the leader behind their designs, as "this monster could not be brought forth by women."(21 - 22)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 21 - 22

Colborne Mr. Colborne Co-conspirator
1840

A man from Ramsey in the county of Essex, described as the husband of Sara Hatting, father to John Hatting, and a local tailor. William Hatting gets into a verbal altercation where he "threatened [Francis Stock] very much," after Stock calls his wife Sara "a scolder." Presumably Stock tells his wife this because three members of Stock's family soon after sicken and die. Sara is accused of taking malefic revenge on them. This would not be the last time the Hattings were at war with the Stock's however. About nine months after the above deaths, Hatting's son John would be beaten by Stock's servant after those two men had a disagreement. The servant would die, and Hatting's wife would again be blamed. (31-32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31-32

William Hatting William Hatting Co-conspirator
1841

A boy or young man from Ramsey in the county of Essex, described as one of the sons of accused witch Sara Hatting and her husband William Hatting. John Hatting allegedly uses "ill language" at Francis Stock's servant, Anonymous 336. The man servant, in returns, administers a beating to John Hatting, but finds himself sick the next day, and "in a pining and languishing condition," often accused John's mother, Sara, or being the cause of his plight and bringing on his imminent death. (31, 32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31, 32

John Hatting John Hatting Co-conspirator
1926

A man from St. Andrew's parish in Dublin, who was one of two Roman Catholic priests (with Anonymous 360) allegedly involved in the plot to convert James Day from Protestant to Catholic. He helps fabricate a story about James Day's signing of his soul to the Devil, and swears "by the Mass Book to relate and stand by it," so that others might never "discover the secret." The justice Sir Humphrey Jervise issues warrants for their arrest, but the priests are never discovered. It is believed that even if the priests are identified, they will "legitimate a false Oath."(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 361 Co-conspirator
1927

A man from St. Andrew's parish in Dublin, who was one of two Roman Catholic priests (with Anonymous 361) allegedly involved in the plot to convert James Day from Protestant to Catholic. He helps fabricate a story about James Day's signing of his soul to the Devil, and swears "by the Mass Book to relate and stand by it," so that others might never "discover the secret." The justice Sir Humphrey Jervise issues warrants for their arrest, but the priests are never discovered. It is believed that even if the priests are identified, they will "legitimate a false Oath."(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 360 Co-conspirator
1929

A man from St. Andrew's Parish in Dublin, who allegedly served as witness to the the plot to convert James Day from Protestant to Catholic. The con is accomplished by fabricating a story about James Day's signing of his soul to the Devil, and this man swears "by the Mass Book to relate and stand by" the story, so that others might never "discover the secret."(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 359 Co-conspirator
1944

A woman from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who is allegedly involved in the plot to help her nephew, James Day, change from the Protestant religion to the Roman Catholic religion. Joan Tuit takes her nephew to "the Popish Chappel at St. Audoen's Arch," and swears to keep the fabricated story of James Day's encounter with the Devil a secret. When James Day confesses, Sir Humphrey Jervise sends a warrant for her arrest, and she is accordingly apprehended. Joan Tuit herself confesses that she intended on helping with the fabricated story, by taking her nephew to a well, where is was to claim being miraculously cured.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Joan Tuit Joan Tuit Co-conspirator
1946

A woman from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who allegedly dressed "with a Friar's Mantle like a Fryars Habit," and tells James Day at his Uncle Dawson's house that she had died and gone to Heaven, only to rise from the dead again. She tries to persuade James Day to change his religion, for "Mass was Celebrated in as good English as was used, either in Church or Meeting." When the minister Mr. Travers investigates, it is revealed that the old woman "lived in the end of the Town," and that she was simply "a begger Woman that came in by accident"; she is part of a fraud to get James Day to change religions. When a warrant is issued for her arrest by the justice Sir Humphrey Jervise, the old woman is unable to be located. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 358 Co-conspirator
1954

A young girl from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who is sent by James Day's aunt to find Father Branwell, to help James Day change from the Protestant religion to the Roman Catholic religion.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 357 Co-conspirator
1955

A woman from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who was the aunt of James Day, of the Roman Catholic church and therefore a papist. James Day visits his uncle, Patrick Dawson, and his Aunt Dawson sends a little girl (Anonymous 357) to fetch Father Barnwell. She "frequently Advis'd and Press'd this Boy their Nephew, to come over to their Religion," and she was in on the fabricated story where James Day encounters the Devil. She is arrested with her husband by order of Sir Humphrey Jervise when the fabricated story is revealed.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Dawson Dawson (Aunt) Co-conspirator
1956

A man from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who is the uncle of James Day, and of the Roman Catholic religion, and therefore a papist. James Tuit spend much time pressuring his nephew James Day "to leave his Master Roger Dav's service and live with him, promising him that he should never be without pence in his Pocket." James Tuit comes up with the story of James Day's encounter with the Devi, and instructs his nephew "to leave a torn Paper written in blood," for other people to find. James Tuit is arrested by order of the justice Sir Humphrey Jervise, along with his wife, Joan Tuit.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

James Tuit James Tuit Co-conspirator
1957

A man from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who is the uncle of James Day, as well as a Roman Catholic and therefore a papist. Patrick Dawson sends a coach for his nephew, so that James Day might visit him. This is all part of an elaborate plot Patrick Dawson help devise, surrounding a fabricated encounter between James Day and the Devil, intended to help James Day change from the Protestant religion to the Roman Catholic religion. Once the fabrication is revealed, Patrick Dawson is arrested under the orders of Sir Humphrey Jervise, along with his wife. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Patrick Dawson Patrick Dawson Co-conspirator
1960

A man from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who approaches James Day on June 15, 1686 while James Day is collecting water from a well. The unrecognized man, described as being "in colour'd Cloths," allegedly tells James Day that a "Gentleman," likely the Devil, is waiting for James Day in the fields, and bids him bring a knife, a piece of paper, and a pen to the field with him. (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 1

Anonymous 354 Co-conspirator
1968

A young man from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who allegedly encountered the Devil in a field, and discussed the signing over his soul. James Day allegedly begins to write a lease in blood, but the Devil bids him tear it up, and rewrites a lease using words James Day does not recognize. James Day refuses to sign the lease, and the Devil allegedly takes him to an unknown Tavern, without barkeeps, and where drinks magically filled themselves. Upon returning home, James Day recounts his story to his master, the smith Roger Day. He visits his uncle, Patrick Dawson, and upon returning to his master, claims that he will become Roman Catholic and that he is leaving his master to work for his uncle James Day. When Mr. Travers, the local Protestant minister, investigates, it is found that James Day fabricated the entire story with the help of his uncles, in order to help him change religions to Roman Catholic, and to leave the service of his master. After repenting these actions, James Day "promises amendment of life and diligence in his Masters service for the future."(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 1

James Day James Day Co-conspirator
2134

A young man from Bewdley in the county of Worcestershire, who watches among other people "in Charity" over a "Sanguine strong Maid," (Anonymous 409), and prays with her during her "Histerical strange fits." This young man was "more with her than the rest," and often observed her during her Fits, where she would "toss her naked Body about, she being strong and comely." His "Lust was provoked," and on numerous fits, they sinned together. This did seem to ease the maid for a time, which "enticed him the more to do it," as "an Act of (Wicked) Compassion." In fact, it is believed this did nothing but "Enrage the Disease." When the maid is healed of her fits, the young man comes forth and "made known" what they had done. Richard Baxter believes that the maid was originally afflicted by "a suror uterinus," and then gained "a Real possession," as a "punishment of their Sins." The young man marries the maid, and "professed deep Repentance." However, Richard Baxter still advises that the young man not be received to Church Communion.(195)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 195

Anonymous 411 Co-conspirator
2156

A man from Sherborne in the county of Dorset, who is "much devoted to a glass of Liquour, as is usual with men of his function," and found himself as a man that was "very unfit for any other Contemplations." One day, while talking with a falconer (Anonymous 422), he told the falconer that "Falconers used to look upwards, and blaspheme, when the Huntsman looked downwards, and therefore minded him to regard his own state." That night, the huntsman slept, only to be awakened by the falconer who had seen a goblin (Anonymous 172). The huntsman only says, "Good Devil, do not mistake, for that is the Falconer." This is so disconcerting to the falconer and the chaplain (Anonymous 424) whose house they stayed at, that the huntsman was "discharged" as an "unwelcome Guest."(196 - 198)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 196 - 198

Anonymous 423 Co-conspirator
2283

A woman from London, who allegedly accompanies Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman accused of bewitching the young girl Mary Glover, to visit fortune tellers. Elizabeth Jackson confesses that Elizabeth Cook "did at that time geve xl to have her fortune tould her." The act of visiting fortune tellers is considered associated with witchcraft.(Fol. 35v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 35v

Elizabeth Cook Elizabeth Cook Co-conspirator
2284

A woman likely from the parish of Little All Hallows in Thames street, London, and the daughter of Elizabeth Jackson, a charwoman accused of bewitching the young girl, Mary Glover. Elizabeth Jackson's daughter is known to have accompanied her mother at once to fortune tellers. This behaviour places her mother further under suspicion of witchcraft when this evidence is presented at Elizabeth Jackson's trial.(Fol. 35v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 35v

Jackson Jackson (Daughter) Co-conspirator
2324

A boy from London, who works at an inn as a tapsters boy. He is quite talented at imitating "the crowing of a Cock, the neighing of a Horse, the barking of a Dogge, the quacking of Ducks, and the noyse of many several Beasts." He is employed by a Cambridge scholar (Anonymous 468) in order to convince a minister (Anonymous 467) that the scholar is capable of conjuring the Devil in several shapes. The boy is so convincing, the minister believes real animals are conjured. However, the boy exposes himself from "under the Bed" in laughter. Even after this, the minister would not be persuaded that animals were not present in the room. This story is used as an example of how even ministers can believe false information.(63 - 65)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 63 - 65

Anonymous 478 Co-conspirator
2328

A man from London, who serves in King James' court. This man was so talented at imposture, that "he could call the King by name, and cause the King to look round about him." When this was revealed, the King took "merriment" in asking Anonymous 471 "to make sport upon some of his Courtiers," including one Sir John. Anonymous 471 would call out Sir John's name, without revealing himself, in order to get Sir John "to stamp with madness," and find himself unable to ever begin discourse with the King due to constant interruption.(81 - 82)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 81 - 82

Anonymous 471 Co-conspirator