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183 records returned.

List of all events occurring in the persontype of

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
22

Joan Prentice is a woman from Hinningham Sibble, in the county of Essex. She claims that she became a witch circa 1583 when the Devil appeared to her in the shape of a ferret with fiery eyes and demanded her soul saying: "Joan if thou will haue me doo any thing for thee, I am and wilbe alwaies ready at thy commaundement." She accepted and named the familiar Bidd. Prentice confessed to allowing Bidd to suck blood from her cheek, and sending him to spoil "William Adams' wife (of Hinningham Sibble) brew. In the course of her examination, Prentice also accused Elizabeth Whale and Elizabeth Mott or being "acquainted" with Bidd, but does not go so far as suggesting they had killed or harmed anyone with him; the women were brought to the Assize on the weight of this claim, but freed on insufficient proof. Prentice also confessed to sending Bidd to Glascock's house to "nippe one of his Children a little, named Sara, but hurt it not," after being refused alms at the Glascock home (disregarding the fact that it was a servant, not a relation which refused her). Bidd allegedly returned, claiming he had followed her, giving the two year old Sara Glascock a nip which would soon kill her. Prentice and Bidd soon fell out; she called him a villain and he disappeared never to return. Prentice was tried for the malefic murder of Sara Glascock. Prentice was hung in Chelmsford in July 5th, 1589.()

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589,

Joan Prentice Joan Prentice Accuser
45

Ellen Greene is a woman from Stathorne in the county of Leicestershire, who gave witness against Joan Willimott. Ellen Greene claimed that Willimott had persuaded her to forsake God six years before while she still lived in Watham, and had given her two spirits, one in the likeness of a kitlin, or kitten, and one in the likeness of a Moldiwarp, or mole; Willimott named the kitten Pusse, and the mole Hisse Hisse. The would suck from Greene on her neck under her ears, and she gave them her soul in exchange for their service. Greene claimed to have immediately sent Pusse to bewitch a baker to death, and sent Hisse Hisse to bewitch Anne Dawse to death; both died within a fortnight. The baker is said to have called her a witch, and Dawse to have called her a witch, whore and jade. Greene said that later, she sent both spirits to bewitch to death a husbandman named Willison and his son Robert; they died within ten days. Three years later, Greene moved to Stathorne, where she claimed to have bewitched John Patchett's wife and child to death at Willimott's direction; the child died the next day, and Patchett's wife lingered for over a month. Greene added that Willimott had a spirit in the shape of a white dog that would suck under her left flank. (Fv-F2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv-F2v

Ellen Greene Ellen Greene Accuser
96

A woman from Salisbury in the county of Wiltshire, who is either Richard Goddard's daughter in law, or his daughter, and step daughter to his wife, Mistress Goddard. Sara allegedly borrowed money from her mother (in law), Mrs. Goddard, which turned stained black in her pocket, a quasi-magical sign of Sara's ill intent. Mrs Goddard began to suspect that Sara, and her sister Anne, had intended to poison her, a suspicion supported by Mistress Roswell who, along with Goddard herself, sent Anne Styles to visit Anne Bodenham numerous times to get details about this supposed crime. The mode of murder was to be poison, which Bodenham said was hidden under Sarah's bed, then moved to "white Pot set upon the Dresser in the Kitchin" and added to Mistress Goodard's Sage Ale. Styles' suggested there was something odd floating in the Ale. Eventually Sarah and her sister Anne discovered that they were accused off plotting to poison their mother, and " being much moved at it, and to vindicate themselves, that no such aspersion might lie on them (in regard it was also reported, that they should buy one Ounce and halfe of poyson that cost 6 d. at an Apothecaries)" traveled around Salisbury, discovering that Styles had bought the poison herself. Styles was fired and they threatened to press charges against her for slander and attempted murder.(3-9)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 3-9

Sarah Goddard Sarah Goddard Accuser
126

A woman from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, known to be the grandmother of Grace Sowerbutts, mother of Henry Bierley, and mother-in-law to Ellen Bierley. She was indicted at the Lancaster Assizes, along with Ellen Bierley and Jane Southworth, for bewitching her granddaughter Grace so that her body wasted and was consumed. Jennet pleaded not guilty, and was eventually acquitted and released. Grace accused Jennet of numerous things. The accusations started with haunting and vexing her, drawing her by her hair, and laying her on top of a hay-mow. Grace also claimed that Jennet had shapeshifted into a black dog in front of her and picked her off a sty. Another time, Jennet came to Grace in dog shape and allegedly tried to persuade her to drown herself, but a spirit in a white sheet carried her away. Jennet-as-dog also buried Grace in hay and lay on top, robbing her of her speech, senses, and an entire day. Grace claimed to be unable to speak in Jennet's presence thereafter. Grace also accused Jennet and Ellen of stealing Thomas Walshman's child, driving a nail through its navel and sucking from the hole through a pen, then returning the child to its bed; the child languished and died thereafter. Once the child died, Jennet and Ellen allegedly took it from the churchyard, boiled it, ate it and rendered the fat from its bones to anoint themselves so they could change shape. Grace also said Jennet had brought her to attend a meeting of witches where four things like men carried them all across the water to eat strange meat, which Grace refused, and dance and "abuse their bodies." Thomas Walshman gave deposition confirming that he had a child who became sick and died, but he did not know the cause. Jennet accused Grace, in turn, of conspiring with the priest Master Thompson, who had been slandering her by calling her witch, and to whom Grace had been brought to by her mother. Grace retracted her accusations.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Jennet Bierley Jennet Bierley Accuser
128

A woman from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, known to be the widow of John Southworth. She was indicted at the Lancaster Assizes, along with Jennet Bierley and Ellen Bierley, for bewitching Grace Bierley so that her body wasted and was consumed. Jane pleaded not guilty, and was eventually acquitted and released. Grace's accusations started with haunting and vexing her, drawing her by her hair, and laying her on top of a hay-mow. Grace also said she saw Jane at a meeting of witches Jennet had brought Grace to, where four things like men carried them all across the water to eat strange meat, which Grace refused, and dance and "abuse their bodies." John Singleton and William Alker both gave deposition alleging that Jane was "thought an euill woman, and a Witch," and that Sir John Southworth (kin to Jane's husband) feared she would kill or bewitch him. Jane said, during her examination, that she had spoken to the priest Master Thompson a month or so before her imprisonment, and challenged him for slandering her as a witch; she accused him of being the origin of the claims against her, and of trying to drive her out of the Church. Grace eventually retracted her charges.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Jane Southworth Jane Southworth Accuser
129

A girl from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, known to be 14 years old and the granddaughter of Jennet Bierley and the niece of Henry Bierley and Ellen Bierley. She accused her grandmother, aunt and Jane Southworth of bewitching her so that her body wasted and was consumed. Grace eventually admitted to faking her afflictions and making false claims; she accused priest Master Thompson of having convinced her to make the claims. Grace accused all three women of haunting and vexing her, drawing her by her hair, and laying her on top of a hay-mow. Grace also claimed that Jennet had shapeshifted into a black dog in front of her and picked her off a sty. Another time, Jennet came to Grace in dog shape and allegedly tried to persuade her to drown herself, but a spirit in a white sheet carried her away. Jennet-as-dog also buried Grace in hay and lay on top, robbing her of her speech, senses, and an entire day; she claimed to be unable to speak in Jennet's presence thereafter. Grace also accused Jennet and Ellen of stealing Thomas Walshman's child, driving a nail through its navel and sucking from the hole through a pen, then returning the child to its bed; the child languished and died thereafter. Once the child died, Jennet and Ellen allegedly took it from the churchyard, boiled it, ate it and rendered the fat from its bones to anoint themselves so they could change shape. She also alleged that Jennet had brought her to attend a meeting of witches, at which Ellen and Jane were also present, where four things like men carried them all across the water to eat strange meat, which Grace refused, and dance; the black things pulled the women down to "abuse their bodies." Thomas Walshman gave deposition confirming that he had a child who became sick and died, but he did not know the cause. Jennet accused Grace, in turn, of conspiring with the priest Master Thompson when Grace's mother, brought her to him out of concern for Grace's fits. Grace retracted all her accusations before the court.(K3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K3

Grace Sowerbutts Grace Sowerbutts Accuser
260

Rebecca West, a young woman from Lawford in the county of Essex, and daughter to accused witch Anne West. West confessed to being at a meeting of witches, convened by Mother Benfield and Mother Goodwin, numerous other women, and a number of small familiar kittens and puppies. After agreeing to keep their council, and reciting a malefic compact, "the Divel in the shape of a little blacke dog leaped into her lap, & kissed her three times," kisses she claimed were cold. Later that night, the Devil (later legally treated as a familiar spirit), she claimed, appeared to her again, in "the shape of a hand some young man, saying that he came to marry her." He conducted an impromptu marriage ceremony in her bed chamber, where she promised to be an "obedient wife till death, faithfully to performe and observe all [his] commands, she took him to bed. Although she likewise swore to Mother Miller "shee would confesse nothing, if they pulled her to pieces with pincers," upon imagining herself surrounded by flames, "confessed all shee ever knew." Her big revelation, beyond testifying against numerous other women (including Anne Leech, Elizabeth Gooding, Hellen Clark, Anne West, and Elizabeth Clark), was that the "devel can take any shape, and speake plaine English." West had obviously struck a deal with Hopkins and/ or the state. She testified against her own mother, Anne West, on the charge that Anne had bewitched John Cutler Jr. to death. She testified against Elizabeth Gooding on charges of having bewitched John Edwards to death. Moreover, although indicted as a witch, and accused of entertaining, employing and feeding three evil spirits, one in the likeness 'of a grey catt' called Germany, the second like 'a white katt' called Newes and the third like 'a young man' called 'her husband,' with the intention of getting their help in withcraft and sorcery," she was not prosecuted for witchcraft, nor had she confessed to committing any crimes. (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex. London: 1645, 1

Rebecca West Rebecca West Accuser
346

A woman from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be an Irish cunningwoman, who was allegedly offered money by the confederates to murder Anne Levingston. Hook was also employed to procure witnesses who would swear to the advantage of the confederates; Hook is alleged to have sworn against Levingston herself.(3-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 3-5

Anne Hook Anne Hook Accuser
393

A girl from York in the county of Yorkshire. She and Anonymous 10 suffered fits of convulsion in which they would vomit wool, crooked pins and the hafts of knives, one of which was marble. They demonstrated their afflictions before the Judges as evidence that Anonymous 43 and Anonymous 44 had bewitched them. The Jury was satisfied with their evidence, but the Judges "thought it requisite to give some respite of time for a more deliberate determination" to decide whether the girls' affliction was diabolical in origin or a deceit.(3-4)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 3-4

Anonymous 9 Accuser
394

A girl from York in the county of Yorkshire. She and Anonymous 9 suffered fits of convulsion in which they would vomit wool, crooked pins and the hafts of knives, one of which was marble. They demonstrated their afflictions before the Judges as evidence that Anonymous 43 and Anonymous 44 had bewitched them. The Jury was satisfied with their evidence, but the Judges "thought it requisite to give some respite of time for a more deliberate determination" to decide whether the girls' affliction was diabolical in origin or a deceit.(3-4)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 3-4

Anonymous 10 Accuser
398

A man from Dagenham, in the County of Essex, husband of Alice Foster, and an accuser or amateur witch-finder. Foster, along with John Harrolde, identifies Joan Upney as a witch, forcing her to, or giving her time to flee. Upney does run, but she does not make it far, and she later confesses to sending her familiar to pinch Foster's wife soon after.(Sig. Aiiiv, B)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, Sig. Aiiiv, B

Richard Foster Richard Foster Accuser
474

A man from Little Clacton in the county of Essex. According to Rosse, who serves as one of the chief witness against the Sellis (their sons serve as the others), one day as Henry Sellis is plowing Rosse's his field, having only "gone twise or thrise aboute the lande, two of [Rosses] lykest horses fell downe in moste straunge wise, and dyed." Since these horsed were healthy and died so quickly, Rosse begins to think that Sellis had bewitched them. He has two reasons to think this, both involving Henry's wife Cecily. A negotiation over the price of malt between Rosse and Cecily Sellis had gone bad; Sellis wanted to pay about a third the cost Rosse was willing to part with his malt for. They fell out; and she left without malt and "vsing many harde speaches." The next verbal altercation happened between Rosse's wife and Cecily. Upon discovering Sellis' cows in her pasture, Mrs. Rosse dud "hunt the~ out therof." In a rage and great anger, Cecily gave Mrs. Rosse "lewd speeches." Shortly thereafter, "many of his beaste were in a most straung taking: the which he doth say, to be wrought by some witchcraft, or sorcery by ye said He~ry or Cisly his wife." Finally, and as almost an aside, Rosse mentions that before his barn burned, that John Sellis noted that the "youngest sonne of the saide Henrie and Cisley, should say heere is a goodly deale of corne, and a man vnknowen shoulde answere there was the diuell store."(C8-D)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C8-D

Rychard Rosse Richard Rosse Accuser
482

A man who is infamously appointed England's first and last witchfinder general. (1-2)

Appears in:
Hopkins, Matthew. The Discovery of Witches. London: 1647, 1-2

Matthew Hopkins Matthew Hopkins Accuser
540

A man from Great Clacton in the county of Essex and father to John Death and Marie Death and likely a sailor. Death's family begins to suffer from a series of problems following a verbal altercation between his wife and Cecily Sellis. Sellis had been fired as wet nurse to George Battell's child and Mrs. Death was hired, making Sellis "rayl" at Mrs. Death threatening that she would "loose more by the hauing of it, then thou shalt haue for the keeping of it," suggesting that getting this child would cost her one of her own. Their son, who had previously been healthy, "presently fell downe dead, and after by helpe being brought to life, the saide childe was in a pitious case, and so died presently." Right after, "seuerall Swine the which did skippe and leape about the yarde, in a most straunge sorte, and then died," and overnight a calf, which had been "very fatt," was found dead the next morning. Thomas' daughter would be the next to suffer. Death, newly returned from sea, was met by a messenger sent by his wife, with news that his daughter Marie, was ill. The messenger had Marie's urine with him to be studied by a physician in Ipswich, a man name Berte. The doctor would not tell him if "is daughter were not bewitched," so Death following an aquaitence, met up wit a cunningman, who studying the girl's urine suggested that Marie's situation was dire, sent him home with "thinges that were to bee ministred vnto his said daughter," and told him that within "two nyghtes after the parties that had hurte his daughter shoulde appeare vnto her, and remedie her." Within two nights Marie saw a vision of Cecley Sellis and Mary Barker and was indeed cured. (D8v-E2v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, D8v-E2v

Thomas Death Thomas Death Accuser
552

A man from Little Oakly in the county of Essex . Thomas Cartwright testifies at the indictment / examination of Annis Heard about a strange incident which transpired after he annoyed her. Heard had evidently used bough which had fallen off of Cartwright's tree after a heavy storm to make a ramp over a "wet or durtie place to goe ouer." Cartwright picked up the bough, to Heard's great annoyance, and "she said, that the churle (meaning this examinat) to a neighbour of hers had carried away the peece of the bough that she had laied to go ouer, saying, that shee woulde bee euen with him for it." Soon after two of Cartwright's cows wandered off in a snow storm. One fell in a ditch, twisting her neck so badly, she simply was not recovering, and Cartwright brained the animal to death. The other cow "caluing in a most strange sorte died. Cartwright said, without qualification, that "hee verily thinketh to be done by some witchery by the saide Annis Herd."(E6, E7-E7v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, E6, E7-E7v

Thomas Cartwrite Thomas Cartwright Accuser
553

A woman likely from Little Oakly in the county of Essex and wife of William Lanes, and a liberal users of countermgics. Bennet Lane testifies at the Annis Herd's indictement/ examination after a series of strange incidents happen in her home, following uncomfortable encounters with Annis Heard. Two or three weeks after having given Heard a pint of milk, Lane wanted to know from Heard's daughter, Annis Dowsing, when she might get her container back. Although the girl returned with the dish, Lane suspected foul play: "she could no lo~ger spin nor make a thread to hold," despite sharping her needle. She finally used a bit of countermagic, firing her needle and found it cured. This was not the last encounter which called for countermagic, however. Lane, having called in a loan from Heard, found her dairy processing came to a halt, no matter what she did, she could not seperate the milk and cream: "ye next day she would haue fleet hir milk bowle, but it wold not abide ye fleeting but would rop & role as it werethe white of an egge." She tried scoring the bowl with salt; she tried scaling it, but to no avail. The milk would burn and stink. She finally heated up a milk horseshoe, and submerged it in the milk and "shee coulde seath her milke, fleete her creame, and make her butter in good sort as she had before." Lane does not act as an accuser, per say, but as a witness to these events. Moreover, she provides an excellent example of the accessibility of countermagics. the white of an egge, also the milk being on the her it did not so soone seath but it would quaile, burne by and stincke, the which shee saide shee thought might be lo~g of y^ feeding of her beasts, or els that her vessels were not sweete, wherevpon she saith, she scalded her vessels, and scoured them with salt, thinking that might helpe, but it was neuer the better but as before: then she saith, shee was full of care, that shee shoulde loose both milke and creame, then shee saith it came into her minde to approoue another way, which was, shee tooke a horse shue and made it redde hote, and put it into the milke in the vessals, and so into her creame: and then she saith, shee coulde seath her milke, fleete her creame, and make her butter in good sort as she had before. (E7v-E8v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, E7v-E8v

Bennet Lane Bennet Lane Accuser
565

A woman from Bottesford in the county of Leicester, whose young daughter was allegedly bewitched to death by Anne Baker. According to Anne Baker's confession, Stannidge brought her daughter to Baker, and Baker laid her on her skirt, but did the child no harm. Stannidge claimed that in order to get Baker to let her daughter go, she had to burn some hair and nail parings from the child, which made Baker come in and set the child down. Baker said that she remembered coming into Stannidge's house in great pain, but knew nothing of the burnt hair and nails, and was so sick at the time that she doesn't recall why she went in the first place. (D4v-E)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D4v-E

Anne Anne Stannidge Anne Stannidge Accuser
588

A ten or twelve year old boy from Stisted in the county of Essex, grandson to Joan Cunny and the son of either Margaret or Avice Cunny. The person serves as chief witness against his grandmother. He testifies that while on her way to Braintree Market, Cunny stopped by Harry Finches' house, "to demaund some drink, his wife being busie and a brewing, tolde her she had no leysure to giue her any." Cunny allegedly cursed Mrs. Finch for her poor manners; Mrs. Finch stricken by head and side pain, died within a week (Cunny allegedly confessed to sending her familiar Jill to torment her). He also blamed another boy for stealing a bundle of wood, which he was meant to have collected; an act of theft allegedly punished by laming the boy (who testified against her). The boy finally claimed that, on his grandmother's instructions, took her familiar Jack, to Sir Edward Huddlestone's property, where the familiar summoned a wind which blew his oak tree down, on an otherwise calm day. (3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, 3-4

Cunny (Grandson/Son) Accuser
625

A man from Totnam in the county of Middlesex, now the London Borough of Haringey, known to be a Justice of the Peace, who is said to have long held the suspicion that Elizabeth Sawyer was a witch. Seeing the sudden inexplicable deaths of nursing infants and cattle, he stole thatching from Sawyer's roof to test whether she was a witch. He alleged that, wherever some of the thatching was burnt, Sawyer would shortly be seen. He also claimed that some of her neighbours had told him Sawyer had witch's marks on her body, and petitioned the Bench to have her searched by a jury of women.(A3-B1)

Appears in:
Goodcole, Henry. The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton. London: 1621, A3-B1

Arthur Robinson Arthur Robinson Accuser
626

A man from somewhere in between the London parishes of Shadwell and Wapping, himself a thief and a murder, who is later transported to the Barbados, and hanged for breaking and entering and killing his wife, who accuses his mother, Alice Flower, of bewitching him and several others for years on end. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange News from Shadwell being a True and Just Relation of the Death of Alice Fowler. London: 1684, 2

Walter Fowler Walter Fowler Accuser
627

A woman who presumably lived somewhere between the London parishes of Wapping and Shadwell who as a girl was nursed by Alice Flower (circa 1664). As the girl grew into a woman, she "was still fearful and apprehensive of her, until the time of her Death." The narrator suggest that Anonymous 79, who had "been affrighted by some of [Alice Fowler's] Tricks when she was Young," had a terrible life thereafter, living always in the "greatest Dread and Terror imaginable." She appears to have died by the time of publication. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange News from Shadwell being a True and Just Relation of the Death of Alice Fowler. London: 1684, 2

Anonymous 79 Accuser
668

A man from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, who alleged that Francis Moore had killed his wife with a curse 21 years before, in 1625. Slater reported that his wife had a falling out with Moore shortly before giving birth, and that she had died a week after the birth. When Slater heard that Moore was in custody on charges of witchcraft, he went to her and asked her directly if she had caused his wife's death; he claimed that she had admitted to cursing her.(6)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 6

Peter Slater Peter Slater Accuser
669

A man from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, known to be a Yeoman, who alleged that he heard Frances Moore confess to being a witch and causing much harm. Searle claimed that Moore had sent her familiar Pretty to kill his chickens after he refused to give her bread, and that she had killed one of his hogs in revenge after his servants set a dog on one of hers.(7)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 7

William Searle William Searle Accuser
671

A woman from Keyston in the County of Huntingdon, known to be the wife of blacksmith William Darnell and the mother of Katherine Darnell, who alleged that Elizabeth Chandler had bewitched Katherine to death after their children had a falling out. Darnell claims that Katherine told her Chandler had boxed her ear, which troubled her until her death three weeks later. Furthermore, Katherine was said to have shrieked often that Chandler had come to her and would kill her. Darnell also alleged that, a year later, she had pulled a pot of furmity off the fire only to have it continue boiling for an hour and run over the side no matter what she did, and that Lewis Carmell had told her that Chandler confessed to causing her familiar Beelzebub to spoil it. Chandler alleged that she had no part in Katherine's death or the furmity, and that, on the contrary, Darnell had bewitched Chandler by turning her into a duck for a time and causing a roaring spirit to come to her in the night.(8)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 8

Mary Darnell Mary Darnell Accuser
677

A man from Milton in the county of Bedford, known to be a gentleman landowner and the father of a seven year old son. Mother Sutton and Mary Sutton began a vendetta against him and his for some unknown slight, beginning with the destruction of his horses in their stables and of his swine in their pens. After his stricken servant, Anonymous 89, reported that Mary had tried to coerce him into having sex with her in exchange for the return of his health, Master Enger took matters into his own hands and began a campaign of harassment in return. He approached Mary as she was tending hogs. When he could not persuade her to come with him, he snatched her by force and took her to Anonymous 89's bedside, where Anonymous 89 scratched her; the servant improved but became worse than before when she left. Master Enger's son died, for which he blamed Mary and Mother Sutton; he was visited in his grief by a gentleman friend (Anonymous 90), who advised him to swim both women to see if they floated. The next day, Master Enger seized Mary again, beat her senseless, bound her to his horse and dragged her to the water. She was observed to float like a plank, searched for teats, and a confession of her spirits forced out of her son. Master Enger had her swum a second time, this time bound toe to thumb and with a rope around her middle held on either end by servants; she floated again, and spun about as if caught in a whirlpool. He forced a confession out of her and used it to apprehend Mother Sutton as well, ultimately succeeding in having both tried and executed for witchcraft.(A4-A4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, A4-A4v

Enger Master Enger Accuser
684

A man from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, the father of Martha Stevens, and described as "Michael, the shoemaker." Stevens claims to have heard from her own roommate that Annis Glascocke was a "naughtie woman, and a dealer in witchcrafte." This may be the reason he came to suspect, according to Ursley Kempe, that Glascocke had bewitched his daughter, Martha (via one of her spirits). Glascock was charged with bewitching Martha Stevens to death, found guilty, but remanded. She is still in prison as of August 2, 1582. (Cv)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, Cv

Michael Stevens Michael Stevens Accuser
690

A man from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be a merchant, who gave deposition in court accusing Amy Denny and Rose Cullender of bewitching his daughters, Elizabeth and Deborah Pacy. Samuel Pacy alleged that Deborah's fits started when he refused to sell Amy Denny herring; the fits first manifested with lameness, and progressed to extreme pain in her stomach and shrieking when he refused Amy Denny the third and final time. Deborah is said to have cried out that Denny was the cause of her fits, for which Pacy charged Denny with witchcraft in October 1663 and had her thrown in the stocks. Shortly thereafter, Pacy's daughter Elizabeth also became afflicted, and both girls now claimed to see Denny and Cullender's apparitions during their fits. Mary Chandler alleged in her deposition that Pacy had charged both Cullender and Denny with bewitching his daughters in February 1664, resulting in a warrant for their examination. The morning after Denny and Cullender received a guilty verdict, Pacy claimed that his daughters had been restored to health within half an hour of the convictions.(18-20)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 18-20

Samuel Pacy Samuel Pacy Accuser
694

A man from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the father of Ann Durent; he gave deposition alleging that Rose Cullender bewitched Ann when his wife refused to sell Cullender herring. According to Durent's deposition, Ann was afflicted with great pain in her stomach like the pricking of pins, fell into swooning fits, and upon recovery claimed that she had seen an apparition of Cullender which threatening to torment her. He also alleged she had vomited pins, which he produced as evidence in court.(33-34)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 33-34

Edmund Durent Edmund Durent Accuser
696

A woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the mother of Jane Bocking, who gave deposition in court alleging that her daughter had suffered fits at the hands of Rose Cullender and Amy Denny. According to her deposition, Jane was afflicted with swooning fits and the daily vomiting of crooked pins. During her fits, Jane would be found to hold crooked pins clenched in her hands, or, once, a lath-nail. At other times, Jane would talk as if conversing to someone, but take no notice of anyone in the room with her, or complain that Cullender and Denny were standing at the head or foot of her bed. After had recovered from being struck dumb for several days, Diana asked why she had been unable to speak, to which Jane answered "Amy Duny would not suffer her to speak." Diana produced the lath-nail and pins as evidence in court.(35-38)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 35-38

Diana Bocking Diana Bocking Accuser
702

A woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the mother of William and Elizabeth Durent, and a neighbor of Amy Denny. Dorothy gave deposition in court that Denny had bewitched both of her children and that Elizabeth had died as a result. She alleged that they had argued when Dorothy asked Denny to watch William and returned to find that Denny had suckled him against her express wishes, and that William had become sick with fits that same evening. William recovered after Dorothy consulted with Dr. Jacob, a known unwitcher, and burned a toad that fell out of William's blanket when Dorothy followed Dr. Jacob's directions. Elizabeth became sick soon after with similar fits, however. Dorothy claimed that she had returned from the apothecary one day to find Denny at her home on the excuse of giving Elizabeth some water and, when Dorothy ejected her from the house, prophesied that Elizabeth would not live long. Two days later, Elizabeth died. Dorothy also claimed that after Elizabeth's death, she suffered a lameness in her legs, and was seen to be on crutches at the trial. After the indictment, Dorothy was allegedly restored the use of her legs.(5-14)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 5-14

Dorothy Durent Dorothy Durent Accuser
710

A woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the wife of Cornelius Sandeswell, who gave deposition against Amy Denny in court. In her deposition, Ann Sandeswell claimed that she had bought geese from Denny, but Denny destroyed them when Sandeswell did not come get them fast enough for Denny's liking. Sandeswell also alleged that Denny was a tenant of her husband Cornelius shortly after the incident with the geese, and during her tenancy caused a new chimney to fall down; furthermore, Denny caused Sandeswell's brother to lose a quarter-barrel of fish she had requested into the sea.(55-57)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 55-57

Ann Sandeswell Ann Sandeswell Accuser
731

A woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the sister of Samuel Pacy and aunt to Elizabeth and Deborah Pacy, who gave deposition in court against Rose Cullender and Amy Denny. In her deposition, she alleged that she had taken care of her nieces for a time, and that on their arrival had removed all pins from their clothing, thinking their fits were the product of deceit. Despite her precautions, Arnold saw both girls vomit pins several times during violent fits, and that they cried out they had seen Cullender and Duny threaten to torment them ten times more if they complained. Arnold also alleged that the children would see things like mice, catch them in tongs and throw them into the fire; while Arnold could not see what they were catching, she did see one flash like gunpowder when it hit the fire. She reported that the girls claimed that bees and flies brought pins and nails, and forced them into their mouths. Deborah, the younger girl, once said to Arnold that Denny had been with her and tried to tempt her to suicide; another time both girls cried out asking Denny and Cullender why they sent imps to torment them instead of doing it themselves. At the end of her deposition, Arnold stated that she was now convinced that her nieces were truly possessed.(27-33)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 27-33

Margaret Arnold Margaret Arnold Accuser
762

A woman from Salisbury in the county of Wiltshire, who is either Richard Goddard's daughter in law, or his daughter, and step daughter to his wife, Mistress Goddard. Mrs Goddard began to suspect that Anne and her sister Sarah, had intended to poison her, a suspicion supported by Mistress Roswell who, along with Goddard herself, sent Anne Styles to visit Anne Bodenham numerous times to get details about this supposed crime. The mode of murder was to be poison, which Bodenham said was hidden under Sarah's bed, then moved to "white Pot set upon the Dresser in the Kitchin" and added to Mistress Goodard's Sage Ale. Styles' suggested there was something odd floating in the Ale. Eventually Anne and her sister Sarah discovered that they were accused off plotting to poison their mother, and " being much moved at it, and to vindicate themselves, that no such aspersion might lie on them (in regard it was also reported, that they should buy one Ounce and halfe of poyson that cost 6 d. at an Apothecaries)" traveled around Salisbury, discovering that Styles had bought the poison herself. Styles was fired and they threatened to press charges against her for slander and attempted murder.(3-9)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 3-9

Anne Goddard Anne Goddard Accuser
800

The seven year old daughter of Anonymous 113 who is allegedly found in her aunt and uncle's bedroom after she is taken there by her mother on a bed staff. She is the main witness against her mother.(49)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 49

Anonymous 115 Accuser
819

A woman from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be a "wandering person" whom in charity Joan Peterson had given a home to, who alleges in court that Joan Peterson cured Christopher Wilson of his sickness, and then made ill again when he does not pay her. Austin was ejected from Peterson's home for stealing goods from her house.(7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 7

Margaret Austin Margaret Austin Accuser
820

A man from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be a servant to Thomas Cromton, who allegedly stood in the session yard declaring Joan Peterson to be a witch, and offering money to strangers in exchange for testifying to the same. Colonel Okey and other Justices on the Bench summoned Southwick into the court when this came to their attention, so that the court's Recorder would take note of it.(8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 8

Thomas Southwick Thomas Southwick Accuser
826

A man from Lawford in the county of Essex, husband to Prudence Hart and father to John Hart. Thomas Hart suffers from two tragedies which are blamed on Rebecca West and Anne West. Prudence suffers a sudden miscarriage on a Sunday as she walks home; Prudence later finds herself lamed by a mysterious thing which touches her in bed. Hart's son John is also allegedly killed by Rebecca West as an act of vengeance against Hart himself. It appears that the Hart family saw themselves as bitter enemies of Rebecca West and Anne West.(15, 15-16, 17, 18, 19)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 15, 15-16, 17, 18, 19

Thomas Hart Thomas Hart Accuser
827

A physician who determines that John Hart was murdered by witchcraft.(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches. London: 1690, 3

Anonymous 119 Accuser
857

A man from Cottesbrook in the county of Northampton, known to be a knight, who allegedly apprehended suspected witches Joan Vaughan and Agnes Brown and delivered them to Northampton Gaole.(B4-B5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B4-B5

William Saunders Sir William Saunders Accuser
864

A man from Thrapston in the county of Northampton, know to be a knight, who apprehended Hellen Jenkenson on suspicion of bewitching a child to death and delivered her to the gaol at Northampton.(D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, D2

Thomas Brook Sir Thomas Brook Accuser
866

A man from Guilsborough in the county of Northampton, known to be a knight, who apprehended Mary Barber on suspicion of witchcraft and delivered her to gaol at Northampton.(D3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, D3

Thomas T[...]ham Sir Thomas T[...]ham Accuser
890

A woman from Bideford in the county of Devon, wife of Thomas Eastchurch and sister to Grace Thomas with whom she was staying on July 2nd when she both Grace Thomas complain "of a pricking pains in one of her knees," and saw "nine places on [Thomas'] Knee which had been prickt" as though they had been pricked by a thorn. She took it upon herself to find and examine Temperance Lloyd, asking her directly if she "had any Wax or Clay in the form of a Picture whereby she had pricked and tormented the said Grace Thomas?" It was Eastchurch to whom Lloyd first confessed that "had no Wax nor Clay, but confessed that she had only a piece of Leather which she had pricked nine times." Along with her husband Thomas Eastchurch, Honor Hooper, and Anne Wakely, Elizabeth Eastchurch, acted as part of a citizen's jury, who, "with the leave and approbation of the said Mr. Gist the Mayor," on July 2th, 1682, brought Temperance to the Parish-Church of Bideford for further examination by the local rector Michael Ogilby. (17-20)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 17-20

Elizabeth Eastchurch Elizabeth Eastchurch Accuser
903

A woman from Bideford in the county of Devon, wife of John Barnes, Yeoman, who as of May 18, 1682 suffered "very great pains of sticking and pricking in her Arms, Stomach, and Breast, as though she had been stabbed with Awls." Her pain was so severe, that her husband John "thought that she would have died immediately," yet she suffered still at the time of the trial. Grace Barns identified Mary Trembles as "one of them that did torment her" and likewise suspected "one Susanna Edwards of Biddiford aforesaid Widow, because that she the said Susanna would oftentimes repair unto this Informants Husband's house upon frivolous or no occasions at all."(26-28)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 26-28

Grace Barns Grace Barns Accuser
905

A spinster from Bideford in the county of Devon, who is allegedly bewitched to death by Temperance Lloyd after seeing Lloyd appear in the shape of a red pig. Burnman had testified against Lloyd May 15, 1679, on the charge of bewitching Anne Fellows. Lloyd was acquitted of this crime, and evidently decided to seek revenge against Burnman for her role in the trial. (22, 27)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 22, 27

Lydia Burman Lydia Burman Accuser
918

A twelve year old girl who is allegedly bewitched. She accuses four women of bewitching her.()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

Elizabeth Jennings Elizabeth Jennings Accuser
919

A woman whose daughter is allegedly bewitched. She quarrels with her neighbour and that is thought to have potentially caused her daughter's fits.()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

Jennings Lady Jennings Accuser
941

A woman from Clifton in the county of Bristol, described as the grandmother of Thomas Darling who visits her grandson and believes he has been bewitched by Alice Gooderidge.(5)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 5

Mistress Walkden Accuser
980

A man from Pendle in the County of Lancaster, whom Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, allegedly bewitched to death. According to Alison Device, Whittle had a falling-out with Hugh Moore when he accused her of bewitching his cattle, for which she "did curse and worry the said Moore, and said she would be Reuenged." Moore became sick not long after. He languished for half a year before dying.(E4-E4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E4-E4v

Hugh Moore Hugh Moore Accuser
981

A child from the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be nine years old and the granddaughter of Elizabeth Southerns, daughter of Elizabeth Device and John Device, sister of James Device and Alison Device and niece of Christopher Howgate. Jennet Device was the star witness in the witchcraft trials at Lancaster Assizes, and gave deposition against her entire family and several others, most notably Jennet Preston, whom Device picked out from the crowd at the trial. Her mother, Elizabeth Device, "outragiously cursing, cryed out against the child in such fearefull manner" at the trial for giving witness against her. Device provided a list of names of witches who attended a dinner at Elizabeth's home of Malking Tower, the names and shapes of familiars, and what she had overheard about who had bewitched to death whom. Device also recited two prayers she said Elizabeth had taught her, one to cure the bewitched and one to get drink. Twenty years later, in 1634, Jennet was herself accused of witchcraft. Two witches' marks were allegedly found, and she was convicted of bewitching Isabel Nutter to death; the charges were discredited, but she languished nevertheless in Lancaster Castle until August 1636.(F2-F3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, F2-F3

Jennet Device Jennet Device Accuser
989

A man from Salmesbury in the county of Lancashire, known to be a Jesuit and a seminary priest, who also goes by the alias Christopher Southworth. He was accused and found guilty of instructing Grace Sowerbuts to accuse Jane Southworth, her grandmother Jennet Bierly, and aunt Ellen Bierly of bewitching her and attending meeting of witches in which they ate strange meat and allowed four things like men to abuse their bodies and Grace's. He is also said to have coached Grace into accusing Jennet and Ellen of driving a nail into the navel of Thomas Walshman's child to suck from the hole, and, after the child died, stealing it from the churchyard to cannibalizing it and render the fat from its bones. He was convicted on the strength of Grace's retraction of her accusations and confession of Thompson's involvement. According to Grace, "one Master Thompson, which she taketh to be Master Christopher Southworth, to whom shee was sent to learne her prayers, did perswade, counsell, and aduise her, to deale as formerly hath beene said against her said Grand-mother, Aunt, and Southworths wife." Jane Southworth said "shee saw Master Thompson, alias Southworth, the Priest, a month or sixe weekes before she was committed to the Gaole; and had conference with him in a place called Barne-hey-lane, where and when shee challenged him for slandering her to bee a Witch." (K3-K3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K3-K3v

Thompson Master Thompson Accuser
993

A man from Windle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the husband of Mrs. Chaddock, who claimed to be bewitched by Isabel Robey. According to Chaddock, he had a falling out with Robey as she "was not pleased that hee should marrie his now wife: whereupon this Examinate called the said Isabel Witch, and said that hee did not care for her." He alleged that two days later, he was afflicted with a pain in his bones, but mended not long after. Four years after that, his wife argued with Isabelle, and he was afflicted with a pain in his neck for five days, was intensely thirsty, and felt hot throughout his body. He claimed that he only mended when James the Glover brought him a drink and prayed for him. The pain in his bones reoccured the year before the trial, and he was convinced Robey was behind it. (T3-T3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, T3-T3v

Peter Chaddock Peter Chaddock Accuser
995

A woman from Windle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the wife of Francis Wilkinson, who accused Isabel Robey of bewitching her. According to Wilkinson, Robey asked her milk and she refused to give any; Wilkinson became afraid of Robey and was sick shortly thereafter, accompanied by such pain that she could not stand. The next day, Wilkinson travelled to Warrington, and on the road felt a sudden pinch on her thigh, after which she was so sick she had to return home on horseback. She soon mended, however. According to Margaret Parre, Robey confessed to her that she had bewitched Wilkinson.(T4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, T4

Jane Wilkinson Jane Wilkinson Accuser
996

A Doctor who, in his book, accuses Dr. Dees of "having familiarity with Devils for many years in his life time."(8)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 8

Dr. Casaubon Accuser
998

An author who accuses Dr. Casaubon of being a witchmonger.(8)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 8

John Webster John Webster Accuser
999

An eleven year old boy and the son of Edmund Robinson, who witnesses many instances of witchcraft associated with the Pendle Hill witches. (347-348)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 347-348

Edmund Robinson Jr. Edmund Robinson Jr. Accuser
1013

A man from Sunderland in the County of Northumberland, known to be "one it was suspected that could do more then God allowed of." During one of her fits, Mary Muschamp wrote an abbreviation of his name, and the undeciphered abbreviation of one other person's name. Mary Moore sent to him shortly therafter, demanding that he confess who had afflicted Margaret and threatening to apprehend him if he would not. Moore's servant reported back his answer: "DOROTHY SVVINOVV wife then to Colonell SVVINOVV, was the party that had done all the mischiefe to her child, and was the cause of all her further crosses." John Hutton also blamed Swinow for the death of Margery Hambleton. When Hutton heard that Margaret wanted two drops of his blood to save her life, he tried to do it himself privately; instead "the child nickt him halfe a dozen times in the forehead, but no bloud appeared; then he put forth his right arme and that was not till her mother threatned his heart bloud should goe before she wanted it; then he layd his thumb on his arme, and two drops appeared, which she wip'd off with a paper." Margaret later claimed two more drops would save her brother, George Muschamp Jr.; her mother Mary Moore hunted Hutton down and took more of his blood. Margaret's fits were observed to not trouble her in Hutton's company, and she fell into a terrible one when he left. Moore had Hutton apprehended, and he died in prison. Margaret claimed that he was her greatest tormentor, and had he lived, he would have given them the names of two more witches. He is said to have been able to call up storms, and is credited with nearly blowing a ship off course as it entered Berwick Harbour.(7-11)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 7-11

John Hutton John Hutton Accuser
1037

Mother of the bewitched Fairfax children and wife of Edward Fairfax(50)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 50

Dorothy Fairfax Dorothy Fairfax Accuser
1038

A country gentleman, renown writer and translator, husband of Dorothy Fairfax and father to several bewitched children (esp Helen and Elizabeth), Fairfax is the author of Daemonologia, a tract he wrote to vindicate the legal prosecution of several witches.(31-33)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 31-33

Edward Fairfax Edward Fairfax Accuser
1040

A child from Manningtree in the county of Essex who identifies Margaret Landis as a witch and calls her "Pegg the Witch."(3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches. London: 1690, 3-4

Anonymous 120 Accuser
1056

A man from Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the husband of Mrs. Robinson and brother of John Robinson, who accused Anne Whittle and Anne Redferne of witchcraft, and was allegedly bewitched to death by Elizabeth Device. According to Robinson, his wife had hired Whittle to card wool six years before, and that the drink from which Whittle drew during the carding not only spoiled, but that any drink he brought into the house spoiled for eight or nine weeks after. He claimed that "the said Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, and Anne Redferne her said Daughter, are commonly reputed and reported to bee Witches," and that Robert Nutter the younger said that Whittle and Redferne had bewitched him, causing his sickness. Device confessed to bewitching Robinson to death; Jennet Device claimed to have heard her mother Elizabeth Device call for her familiar Ball to kill Robinson.(Ev-E2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Ev-E2v

James Robinson James Robinson Accuser
1085

A man, working as a jury, who circulates a petition on behalf of Mr. Dickenson for the arrest of Edmund Robinson Jr.(153)

Appears in:
Bruce (Editor), John. Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series: Charles I, 1634-5. Unknown: 1864, 153

Duxbury Mr. Duxbury Accuser
1086

A man who circulates a petition for the arrest of Edmund Robinson Jr. for having falsely accused his wife (Frances Dickenson) of practicing witchcraft.(153)

Appears in:
Bruce (Editor), John. Calendar of State Papers Domestic Series: Charles I, 1634-5. Unknown: 1864, 153

Dickenson Mr. Dickenson Accuser
1119

A woman, the wife of Wm. Booth from Warmfield in Yorkshire who accuses Margaret Morton of bewitching her son. She claims that her son became ill after Margaret Morton bewitched him. Morton offered him a piece of bread which made the child become ill almost immediately. Her son started to heal after Morton asked for forgiveness and she (Joan Booth) drew blood from him. (38)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 38

Joan Booth Joan Booth Accuser
1127

A servant to Hester Spivey from Hothersfielde in the county of Yorkshire (possible Huddersfield, Yorkshire) who is allegedly bewitched by Hester France. Spivey recounts that one evening, upon coming home, Johnson tells her that France had been at the house. While she (Johnson) was tending to the fire, France allegedly told her "itt was a good deede to scare her lipps with it" and then left, but then came again and curse her (Elizabeth Johnson), praying she would never bake again. Johnson starts then believing that she has been bewitched. When going to bed, she begins to suffer from fits. She laid down in bed, but could neither speak nor stand and continued to be unable to speak from six until eight or nine in the evening--except for speaking once to her brother to whom she asked that Hester France be sent for. When France came, Johnson spoke to her and "catched country people near Bradford." Elizabeth Johnson allegedly began to get better after being scratched. She was still ill, but became somewhat better. (51-52)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 51-52

Elizabeth Johnson Elizabeth Johnson Accuser
1129

A widow from Hosthersfield, Yorkshire (possibly Huddersfield) who accuses Hester France of bewitching her servant, Elizabeth Johnson. Spivey tells the jury that upon coming home one evening her servant, Elizabeth Johnson, explained how Hester France had come to the house and told her while she was tending to the fire that "itt was a good deede to scare her lipps with itt." Johnson thought nothing of it and France left, but then came back and allegedly cursed Johnson. Spivey then proceeds to explain how from six to eight one evening, Johnson could neither speak nor stand--except for one moment where she spoke to her brother, asking him to get Hester France. Spivey alleges that Johnson got better after being scratched by a needle.(51)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 51

Hester Spivey Hester Spivey Accuser
1131

A man from Hosthersfielde in the county of Yorkshire (presumably Huddersfield, Yorkshire) who testifies in the case against Hester France. He claims that Robert Cliff had been sick for about half a year, but was now very sick and weak. Johnson claims that Cliff had him send for Hester France.When France entered the Cliff's chamber, Johnson alleges Cliff scratched her and said " I thinke thou art the woman that hath done me this wrong" to which France replied that she "never did hurt in her life."(52)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 52

John Johnson John Johnson Accuser
1132

A man who, according to John Johnson, accused Hester France of bewitching him. According to Johnson, Cliff had been sick for about half a year but now (at the time of the trial) had become very weak and ill. One day, Cliff asked Johnson to send for Hester France. When France arrived in Cliff's chamber, he scratched her and accused her of having caused him to become ill to which France replied that she had never hurt. (52)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 52

Kobert Cliff Robert Cliff Accuser
1134

The constable of Redness in the coutny of Yorkshire who testifies against Elizabeth Lambe. Rennerd explains that his wife suspected Elizabeth Lambe of bewitching his child. Then, one day, Lambe allegedly showed up at the Rennerd's doorstep and when Rennerd's wife opened the door, Lambe fell to her knees and asked for forgiveness. The child got better shortly after.(58)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 58

Thomas Rennerd Thomas Rennerd Accuser
1135

A woman from Redness in the county of York and the wife of constable Thomas Rennerd who suspects Elizabeth Lambe of bewitching her child. Shortly after telling her husband about her suspicions, she meets Elizabeth Lambe at her doorstep where Lambe falls to her knees and asks forgiveness. The child recovers soon thereafter.(58)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 58

Rennerd's Wife Accuser
1136

A man from Redness in the county of Yorkshire who accuses Elizabeth Lambe of having drowned his foals. Baldwin was said to be sick "in bodye" testified that because Elizabeth Lambe had allegedly murdered his foals by witchcraft, he beat her with his cane and that were it not for his wife who got on her knees and begged him for forgiveness, he would have done much worse.(58)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 58

Nicholas Baldwin Nicholas Baldwin Accuser
1137

A man from Redness in the county of Yorkshire who accuses Elizabeth Lambe of having caused Richard Brown of Redness to become ill and die. While sick, Brown told Wreight that he was "cruelly handled at the heart with one Elizabeth Lambe." He added that she drew blood from his heart and wanted him to send for her to come to his house because he wanted to scratch her. He surmised that if he could scratch her and draw blood from her, his condition would improve. So, when Elizabeth Lambe is brought to him, Brown says to Lambe that she has wronged him and asks why he has done so. He concludes by saying that if she would do no more, he would forgive her. Lambe does not respond and so Wreight relates that Browne scratches her until she bled. He died within a week and complained all the while until he died that Elizabeth Lambe had caused his death.(58)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 58

John Wreight John Wright Accuser
1142

A man from Gargreave in the county of Yorkshire who testifies against Anne Greene before John Ashton and Edgar Coats. He claims that two weeks after Christmas, he became "disabled in body" and that one night he was troubled by spirits who advised him to worship the enemy, all of which were visible except Anne Greene. The spirits appeared to him at least four times (possibly on different dates). As a result, Tatterson approached Anne Greene, telling her that he wanted to sanctify and purify her heart as well as "worketh out the carnal part" thus leading to her salvation. (64)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 64

John Tatterson John Tatterson Accuser
1146

A woman, presumably from Gargreave in the county of Yorkshire, who claims that she saw both Mary Nunweeke and Anne Greene appear to her in the shape of dogs. According to Wade, her daughter Elizabeth fell from her bed one night and when she, Wade, came to attend to her daughter, she saw a great bitch sitting at the foot of her daughter's bed. the bitch had two feet and held in its mouth a dish. Afterwards, she said she saw three dogs, one of which was Anne Greene and another which was Mary Nunweeke.(64)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 64

Margaret Wade Margaret Wade Accuser
1150

A man from Rhodes in the county of Yorkshire who claims Katherine Earle struck him in the neck as well as his mare. Hatfield testifies that about August last Katherine Earle struck him in the neck and his mare with a "docken stalke." The mare immediately became sick and died and he became troubled by pain in his neck. (69)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 69

Henry Hatefeild John Hatfield Accuser
1155

A man who testifies against Jennet and George Benton. He claims that after throwing stones at them for trespassing, he and his wife and child began suffering from a myriad of fits. The Bentons and Jackson had been arguing about the Benton's alleged trespassing. An angry Jackson procured an action against the Bentons, prohibiting them from passing. The Bentons then threaten him and his family. Richard Jackson starts to suffer from pains in the shoulders, heart and back. he also began to hear strange noises like bells ringing accompanied by singing and dancing. (74)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 74

Richard Jackson Richard Jackson Accuser
1161

A woman from Studley Hall, from near Ripon, North Yorkshire, who testifies in the case against Mary and William Wade for bewitching the fourteen year old Elizabeth Mallory, daughter of the Lady Mallory, of Studley Hall. She relates how Elizabeth Mallory suffered from various fits for twelve months and how Mallory repeatedly accused Mary Wade of having bewitched her, also threatening Wade that she (Mallory) would be ill and force Wade to be tried before a justice and punished if she did not confess to wronging her. (75-78)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 75-78

Ann Duffeild Ann Duffield Accuser
1162

A woman from the area Studley Hall, from near Ripon, North Yorkshire, who testifies in the case against Mary and William Wade for bewitching the fourteen-year old Elizabeth Mallory, daughter of the Lady Mallory, of Studley Hall. She relates how, at the age of fourteen, Elizabeth Mallory laid languishing for approximately twelve weeks. She lost the use of her limbs and was unable to rise from bed. In that time, she suffered from several fits. Mary Wilson claims that during a fit Mallory yelled out "she comes! she comes!" and when asked to whom she was referring, Mallory replied saying it was Mary and specified that it was Mary Wade when asked. Wilson continues on to explain how Elizabeth Mallory claimed to have no recollection of her fits. (75- 79)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 75- 79

Mary Wilson Mary Wilson Accuser
1197

A woman who testifies against Elizabeth Stile, and who, along with four other women search Elizabeth Stile for witch's marks. When the women find a mark, they prick it with a pin, leaving it in the mark for others to see.(145)

Appears in:
Glanvill, Joseph. Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts. London: 1681, 145

Elizabeth Torwood Elizabeth Torwood Accuser
1235

A man and tailor from Manningtree in the county of Essex whose wife (Mrs. Rivet) in late December, 1645, became "sicke, and lame, with such violent fits, that this Informant verily conceived her sicknesse was something more then meerly naturall." He husband sought the counsel of a cunning woman, one the wife of one Hovye at Hadleigh in Suffolke, who told him his wife was bewitched by two neighboring witches. Rivet deduced that Elizabeth Clarke was one the witches, based on the proximity of her home and the common knowledge that "Elizabeths mother and some other of her kinsfolke did suffer death for Witchcraft and murther."(5)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 5

John Rivet John RIvet Accuser
1253

A man from London in the county of Greater London, who accuses Mary Poole of having stolen seven pounds and ten shillings from him. He testifies against her in court telling the story of how she had "juggled all his Money away."(1)

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Mary Poole, Theft > grand larceny, 13th December 1699. . London: 1699, 1

Robert Walburton Robert Walburton Accuser
1254

A man from Chester in the county of Cheshire, who identifies Mary Poole as a witch and claims the she allegedly bewitched him and his horse when they crossed paths in Sutors-Hill about seven years earlier. (2)

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Mary Poole, Theft > grand larceny, 13th December 1699. . London: 1699, 2

Anonymous 203 Accuser
1255

A man from Chester in the county of Cheshire, who claims that Mary Poole Stole from him. Suspecting that she would steal the money on his counter, he took it in his hand. When she saw him do so, she asked him to cross her with a piece of silver. In doing so, the piece disappears, but he had not the power to cry out after her.(2)

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Mary Poole, Theft > grand larceny, 13th December 1699. . London: 1699, 2

Anonymous 204 Accuser
1257

A person from Chester in the county of Cheshire, described as one of many people who claimed to have been a victim of Mary Poole's thievery. (2)

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Mary Poole, Theft > grand larceny, 13th December 1699. . London: 1699, 2

Anonymous 205 Accuser
1277

A tobacco pipe maker who accuses Diana Crosse of burning down his home, rendering him unable to smoke his pipe properly, and bewitching one of his employees so that he becomes ill. (150-151)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 150-151

Ezekiel Trible Ezekiel Trible Accuser
1279

A witness who states that Diana Crosse came to her house begging. She declines to relieve Crosse and calls her an old witch. Shortly after, one of her children falls sick, and in cleaning her house she finds a toad in her chamber and small worms.(151)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 151

Dicker Mrs. Dicker Accuser
1281

A woman from Exeter in the county of Devon, who testifies against Diana Crosse. She claims that her children (Anonymous 216 & 217) fell sick because she refused Diana Crosse some milk. She also claims her husband (Anonymous 218) fell ill about two years previous, an illness for which she consulted Dr. Browne, who could not diagnose nor cure him. (151)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 151

Anonymous 215 Accuser
1288

A man from Exeter who testifies against Diana Crosse. He claims that after he refused to bring the mayor a petition on her behalf, his wife (Anonymous 221) fell ill, suffering from limb pain; his son (Anonymous 222) fell down and broke his arm; and worst of all, his brew "would not run at the 'penn'."(151)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 151

Anonymous 220 Accuser
1315

A man and a painter in St. Osyth in the county of Essex, who testifies against Alice Newman. Hooke suggests that Alice was the cause of husband's "great miserie and wretcher state," and possibly his death.(A6-A6v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A6-A6v

William Hooke William Hooke Accuser
1323

A man from London who is paid forty pounds to testify against Margaret Wellam. Wellam is accused upon suspicion "to be a witch and to give sucke or feede evill spirrits." (265)

Appears in:
Le Hardy, William. County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16. Middlesex: 1937, 265

Andrew Cansfield Andrew Cansfield Accuser
1347

One of three women (including Katherine Barbor and Mary Aldridge) who bring forward charges in the case against Emma Branch.()

Appears in:
Le Hardy, William. County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16. Middlesex: 1937,

Alice Smythe Alice Smythe Accuser
1348

One of three women (including Katherine Barbor and Alice Smythe) who bring forward charges in the case against Emma Branch.()

Appears in:
Le Hardy, William. County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16. Middlesex: 1937,

Mary Aldridge Mary Aldridge Accuser
1349

One of three women (including Mary Aldridge and Alice Smythe) who bring forward charges in the case against Emma Branch.()

Appears in:
Le Hardy, William. County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16. Middlesex: 1937,

Katherine Barbor Katherine Barbor Accuser
1364

One of a group of messengers who claim to have been cursed by Anonymous 229 as they were passing by her house in a boat.(150)

Appears in:
Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, . Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, Reign of Charles 1: 1637. H. M. Stationery Office: 1868, 150

Anonymous 231 Accuser
1365

A waterman who is allegedly "stricken with such a lamentable crick in his back that he was constrained to get help" soon after the group of messengers (Anonymous 231) are allegedly cursed by Anonymous 229.(150)

Appears in:
Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, . Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, Reign of Charles 1: 1637. H. M. Stationery Office: 1868, 150

Anonymous 232 Accuser
1416

A man from Coven-Garden in London and the county of Greater London, described as a plain Country Yeoman that discovers seven witches residing at Queen-Street in Coven-Garden who are falsely giving confession for monetary prices and after swearing confessors under several articles. John Stockden refuses to swear to these articles, although he "was willing to have a wench," and he thus discovers them to be witches.(5)

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Seven Women Confessors or a Discovery of the Seven White Divels which Lived at Queen-Street in Coven-Garden. London: 1641, 5

John Stockden John Stockden Accuser
1428

A man from Pinner in the county of Middlesex, described as the servant of Master Edling who believes he is bewitched by Mother Atkins after running into two of her familiars: the hare and a monstrous black cat. The bewitchment caused him to be carried in the air to unknown location where he is kept imprisoned and burned, as well as rendered mute. Upon release some four days later, he is cured of his lack of speech by the parson of the town, and scratches Mother Atkins, which seems to have remedied him, "for since that he hath mended reasonablie, and nowe goeth to Churche."()

Appears in:
B., G.. A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England) . London: 1592,

Richard Burt Richard Burt Accuser
1472

A maid (Anonymous 253) from Bedford in the county of Bedfordshire who, upon refusing to share her pease porridge with Goodwife Rose, found it had gone mealy. This maid turned accuser against Rose and went so far as to offer to be swum next to her, to prove an honest woman would sink while a witch floated. This is indeed what happened, but as much to the Maid's detriment as to Rose's. While Rose floated sinisterly on the water, the Maid almost drowned, and could hardly be recovered. (41)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 41

Anonymous 253 Accuser
1504

A Bailiff of the hundred of Tendring in the county of Essex who allegedly falls into fits after going to John Harris' house. Upon getting to the house, he allegedly asked Harris' servant (Anonymous 261) to see Harris or his wife, but the servant told Harris was absent while his wife was either out as well or still sleeping. It is at this moment that Munt fell raving, calling the servant a witch and an old whore. Harris' wife then appeared to see what was happening and tried to drive Munt away, but he then threatened Harris' wife with a dagger, swearing he would kill her.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=5)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=5

Edward Munt Edward Munt Accuser
1565

A woman from Mistley, Suffolk, who offends Anne Leech by suspecting her to be "a naughty woman." This causes Anne Leech to send her imps to kill Mr. Bragge, her husband's horses. (7-8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 7-8

Bragge Mrs. Bragge Accuser
1632

A woman from Ramsgate in the county of Kent who, along with eight other people, accuses Mary Foster of bewitching Michael Jordan so that his body became "greatly wasted and consumed."(87-91)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 87-91

Isabel Jordan Isabel Jordan Accuser
1633

A person from Ramsgate in the county of Kent who, along with eight other people, accuses Mary Foster of bewitching Michael Jordan so that his body became "greatly wasted and consumed."(87-91)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 87-91

Parnel Bourn Parnel Bourn Accuser
1634

A woman from Ramsgate in the county of Kent who, along with eight other people, accuses Mary Foster of bewitching Michael Jordan so that his body became "greatly wasted and consumed."(87-91)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 87-91

Elizabeth Sheerman Elizabeth Sheerman Accuser
1635

A woman from Ramsgate in the county of Kent who, along with eight other people, accuses Mary Foster of bewitching Michael Jordan so that his body became wasted and consumed. (87-91)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 87-91

Jane Moverley Jane Moverley Accuser
1636

A woman from Ramsgate in the county of Kent who, along with eight other people, accuses Mary Foster of bewitching Michael Jordan so that his body became "greatly wasted and consumed."(87-91)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 87-91

Anne Joad Anne Joad Accuser
1637

A woman from Ramsgate in the county of Kent who, along with eight other people, accuses Mary Foster of bewitching Michael Jordan so that his body became "greatly wasted and consumed."(87-91)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 87-91

Elizabeth West Elizabeth West Accuser
1638

A man from Ramsgate in the county of Kent who, along with eight other people, accuses Mary Foster of bewitching Michael Jordan so that his body became "greatly wasted and consumed."(87-91)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 87-91

Henry Rigden Henry Rigden Accuser
1641

A woman from Ramsgate in the county of Kent who, along with eight other people, accuses Mary Foster of bewitching Michael Jordan so that his body became "greatly wasted and consumed."(87-91)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 87-91

Martha Glover Martha Glover Accuser
1642

A woman from Ramsgate in the county of Kent who, along with eight other people, accuses Mary Foster of bewitching Michael Jordan so that his body became "greatly wasted and consumed."(87-91)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 87-91

Frances Williams Frances Williams Accuser
1644

A man from Hoo in the county of Kent who, along with 18 other people, accuses Thomas Whiteing of having bewitched Sarah Curtis so that her body was "greatly wasted, pined, and consumed."(150-157)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 150-157

Robert Rogers Robert Rogers Accuser
1645

A man from Hoo in the county of Kent who, along with 18 other people, accuses Thomas Whiteing of having bewitched Sarah Curtis so that her body was "greatly wasted, pined, and consumed."(150-157)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 150-157

Joseph Miller Joseph Miller Accuser
1647

A man from Hoo in the county of Kent who, along with 18 other people, accuses Thomas Whiteing of having bewitched Sarah Curtis so that her body was "greatly wasted, pined, and consumed."(150-157)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 150-157

William Burman William Burman Accuser
1648

A man from Hoo in the county of Kent who, along with 18 other people, accuses Thomas Whiteing of having bewitched Sarah Curtis so that her body was "greatly wasted, pined, and consumed."(150-157)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 150-157

John Ellis John Ellis Accuser
1649

A man from Hoo in the county of Kent who, along with 18 other people, accuses Thomas Whiteing of having bewitched Sarah Curtis so that her body was "greatly wasted, pined, and consumed."(150-157)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 150-157

Simon Beadell Simon Beadell Accuser
1650

A woman from Hoo in the county of Kent who, along with 18 other people, accuses Thomas Whiteing of having bewitched Sarah Curtis so that her body was "greatly wasted, pined, and consumed."(150-157)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 150-157

Bridget Gilbert Bridget Gilbert Accuser
1651

A man from Hoo in the county of Kent who, along with 18 other people, accuses Thomas Whiteing of having bewitched Sarah Curtis so that her body was "greatly wasted, pined, and consumed."(150-157)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 150-157

Thomas Haley Thomas Haley Accuser
1652

A woman from Hoo in the county of Kent who, along with 18 other people, accuses Thomas Whiteing of having bewitched Sarah Curtis so that her body was "greatly wasted, pined, and consumed."(150-157)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 150-157

Joan Stephens Joan Stephens Accuser
1653

A man from Hoo in the county of Kent who, along with 18 other people, accuses Thomas Whiteing of having bewitched Sarah Curtis so that her body was "greatly wasted, pined, and consumed."(150-157)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 150-157

Robert Witherley Robert Witherley Accuser
1654

A man from Hoo in the county of Kent who, along with 18 other people, accuses Thomas Whiteing of having bewitched Sarah Curtis so that her body was "greatly wasted, pined, and consumed."(150-157)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 150-157

Robert Beadle Robert Beadle Accuser
1658

A woman from Hoo in the county of Kent who, along with 18 other people, accuses Thomas Whiteing of having bewitched Sarah Curtis so that her body was "greatly wasted, pined, and consumed."(150-157)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 150-157

Anne Seares Anne Seares Accuser
1659

A woman from Hoo in the county of Kent who, along with 18 other people, accuses Thomas Whiteing of having bewitched Sarah Curtis so that her body was "greatly wasted, pined, and consumed."(150-157)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 150-157

Faber Armitage Faber Armitage Accuser
1660

A man from Hoo in the county of Kent who, along with 18 other people, accuses Thomas Whiteing of having bewitched Sarah Curtis so that her body was "greatly wasted, pined, and consumed."(150-157)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 150-157

William Tucke William Tucke Accuser
1661

A woman from Hoo in the county of Kent who, along with 18 other people, accuses Thomas Whiteing of having bewitched Sarah Curtis so that her body was "greatly wasted, pined, and consumed."(150-157)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 150-157

Barbara Cena Barbara Cena Accuser
1662

A man from Hoo in the county of Kent who, along with 18 other people, accuses Thomas Whiteing of having bewitched Sarah Curtis so that her body was "greatly wasted, pined, and consumed."(150-157)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 150-157

William Verron William Verron Accuser
1666

A woman from Crankbrook in the county of Kent, who along with Samuel Bradshaw and Anne Butler, accuses Elizabeth Scott of murdering John Colman by use of witchcraft. (141-147)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 141-147

Mary Colman Mary Colman Accuser
1667

A man from Cranbrook in the county of Kent who, along with Mary Colman and Anne Butler, accuses Elizabeth Scott for murdering John Colman by the use of witchcraft. (141-147)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 141-147

Samuel Bradshaw Samuel Bradshaw Accuser
1668

A woman from Cranbrook in the county of Kent who, along with Samuel Bradshaw and Mary Colman, accuses Elizabeth Scott of murdering John Colman by use of witchcraft. (141-147)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 141-147

Anne Butler Anne Butler Accuser
1675

A woman from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who married Mr. Wessell Goodwin in his youth. A Gentlewoman, she is a woman of "most excellent frame of spirit," and a very religious woman. She has four children with her husband: three sons and one daughter. She falls sick in her husband's old age, "contracted by melancholy, of which in a few moneths she died." Before her death, she begs her husband to give up his music, which he refuses. She also pleads with her children to help Mr. Goodwin avoid Mrs. Jones, "whom shee saw to be a subtil undermining woman."(1-3)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 1-3

Eleanor Armstrong Eleanor Armstrong Accuser
1683

A woman from Strood in the county of Kent and the mother of Mary Griffin (as well as wife of John Griffin). Anne Griffin is one of four people of accuse Anne Blundy of murdering Mary Griffin. (135-137)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 135-137

Anne Griffin Anne Griffin Accuser
1685

A woman from Strood in Kent and one of four people who accuse Anne Blundy of murdering Mary Griffin. (135-137)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 135-137

Judith King Judith King Accuser
1686

A woman from Strood in Kent and one of four people who accuse Anne Blundy of murdering Mary Griffin.(135-137)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 135-137

Mary F--Ham Mary F--Ham Accuser
1687

A person from Strood in Kent and one of four people who accuse Anne Blundy of murdering Mary Griffin. (135-137)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 135-137

Anonymous 313 Accuser
1695

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the minister of Mr. Goodwin. Mr. Cooper "labours much with him," in an attempt to show him the scandal he has wrecked upon his family through his associations with Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones. When these attempts fail, Mr. Cooper suspends Mr. Goodwin from the Sacrament, to which Mr. Goodwin shows no desire to be restored. (4, 12)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 4, 12

Cooper Mr. Cooper Accuser
1715

A woman from Wivenhoe in the county of Essex whose child is allegedly killed by Mary Johnson and who finds herself "taken with extreme pains in her body." According to Alice Dixon, herself an accused witch, Johnson, allegedly took her familiar (an imp in the shape of a rat with no ears) from out of her pocket, shoved it through a hole in Otley's door, and told it to "go rock the Cradle, and do the businesse she sent it about, and return to her again." Johnson also took a hands on approach to this attack, arriving at Otely's door, presumably unseen by her, and giving this child an apple and a kiss the day after, the "child was taken with very violent fits, and in the fits (although the Child was but two yeers old) yet this Informant could very hardly with all her strength hold it down in the Cradle, and so continued untill it died." Soon after Otley began to experience extreme pain, loss of appetite, and insomnia; Johnson visited her numerous times during this period, pleading her innocence. However, Otley would not rest until she had made Johnson bleed an act of countermagic which seems to have been adminiters by punching Johnson in the mouth Otley's health returned. (21-22)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 21-22

Elizabeth Otley Elizabeth Otley Accuser
1716

A woman from Wivenhoe in the county of Essex and the wife of George Durrant. Durrant encountered Johnson one day while traveling Wivenhoe to Fingerhoe. Johnson approached Durrant and her daughter, told her it "was a pretty child; and stroaked it upon the face, and gave it a peece of bread and butter." Having eaten the snack, the child strangely "shricked and cried out." Mr. Dawber, a local surgeon, could "find no naturall cause of its lamenesse," and her daughter "continued for the space of eight dayes shricking and tearing it self, and then died." Annaball is herself is "taken with extreme pains in her body," torments which come every day of every few days and last seven or eight months. She describes the pain as "if she had been to be delivered of a child, but was not with child." She is also temporarily, but severely lamed; she recovers just in time to testify against Johnson, an act encouraged by her husband, when her too begins to suffer sweating and paninting "in great extremity," having cried out "It comes, it comes, Now goodwife Johnsons Impe is come, Now she hath my life. Durrant believes that Mary Johnson was the "cause of her childs death: And that she is now the cause of her husbands extremity." (24-25)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 24-25

Annaball Durrant Annaball Durrant Accuser
1718

A man from Wivenhoe in the county of Essex and the husband of Annaball Durrant. Durrant is allegedly bewitched by Mary Johnson, as is his two year old daughter and his wife. Durrant's daughter becomes ill after she accepts a compliment (she was called a "pretty child") and a "peece of bread and butter" from Johnson. The illness is extreme and lasts about eight days before the child dies. Annaball is herself bewitched, suffering from labour-like pains for around eight months, and a strange bout of lameness and stiffness. Durrant's bewitchment begins after she shrieks and cries out that Mary Johnson would be at his death; he claims "It comes, it comes, Now goodwife Johnsons Impe is come, Now she hath my life." He appears in this extremity while his wife testifies against Johnson, an act he encouraged, and an act which allegedly cost him his health. (24-25)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, 24-25

George Durrant George Durrant Accuser
1724

One of an unknown number of Gentlemen of the county of Suffolk who questioned Aubrey Grinset, an accused witch who allegedly bewitched John Collet of Cokely and Henry Winson of Walpool to death, and caused the fits of Mr. Thomas Spatchet of Dunwich. A group of gentlemen first heard her confess that she had a familiar spirit, had been the death of some, and that she bewitched Thomas Spatchet. She later confessed again to two gentlemen (who may have been in the first group or different gentlemen entirely); this time she admitted to harming Spatchet but denied causing the deaths of Collet and Winson.(19-20)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 19-20

Anonymous 314 Accuser
1725

One of an unknown number of Credible Persons of Dunwich in the county of Suffolk, who offered to give testimony against Aubrey Grinset of Dunwich in the county of Suffolk. She stood accused of bewitching John Collet of Cokely in the county of Suffolk and Henry Winson of Walpool in the county of Suffolk to death, and caused the fits of Mr. Thomas Spatchet of Dunwich in the county of Suffolk.(19)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 19

Anonymous 317 Accuser
1727

A man from Thorpe-le-Soken in the county of Essex, a husband and the father of Joan Cornwall, Henry Cornwall acts as witness against Margaret Moone and, along with his wife and daughter, was her victim. Corwall had allegedly done some work for Margaret Moone, afterwards, she decided to buy a hook off of him, an item paid for with a half a peck of apples. Cornwall brought the apples home, ate one, and was sick "with an extreme shaking and pain in all parts of his body" for twelve weeks. Although his wife threw the apples away, sensing that they might be a contaminate from a known witch, she too became ill, as does their daughter. Although Henry appears to make a full recovery, his wife, who suffered as he did, only partially recovers, and his daughter, "languishing for a moneth, and died."(26)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 26

Henry Cornwall Henry Cornwall Accuser
1728

A woman from Thorpe-le-Soken in the county of Essex, wife of Henry and mother of Joan, Mrs. Cornwall and her family fall victim to a malefic contamination which enters her home and her body by way of a peck of apples her Henry traded Margaret Moone for a hook. Although Mrs. Cornwall recognized Moone as a "woman of a very bad fame and suspected for a Witch, and had formerly been questioned at an Assize for the same," and threw the apples away, she soon fell sick to a mysterious disease which consumed her and her husband for twelve weeks and which kills their daughter. Mrs. Cornwall never fully recovers. Moone is found guilty and executed for the death of her daughter. (26)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 26

Cornwall Mrs. Cornwall Accuser
1734

A woman from Harwich in the county of Essex, sister of Marian Hockett, Sarah Barton alledges that her sister gave her three familiars named Little-man, Pretty-man, and Dainty. Barton, herself accused of witchcraft, and held in the Harwich gaol, claims that her sister, Marion, has sliced off her witch's marks and healed herself pilasters, to conceal the open wounds. (32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 32

Sara Barton Sara Barton Accuser
1769

A father from Manningtree in the county of Essex, described as a beef or dairy farmer who turns state informant against Anne Leech. Edwards accuses Anne Leech of bewitching two of his cattle to death after they die suddenly and no natural cause can be found. One of Edward's children, one who is nursed by Goodwife Wyles, "was taken sick, and had very strange fire, extending the limbs, and rowling the eyes, and within two dayes after dyed. Edward's blames Anne Leech and the Elizabeth Gooding, for this child's death.(11-13)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 11-13

Richard Edwards Richard Edwards Accuser
1770

A woman from Lawford in the county of Essex, described as the wife of Thomas Hart and Mother to John Hart. Prudence Hart suffers from two tragedies which are blamed on Rebecca West and Anne West. Prudence suffers a sudden miscarriage on a Sunday as she walks home; Prudence later finds herself lamed by a mysterious thing which touches her in bed. Her son son John is also allegedly killed by Rebecca West as an act of vengeance against her husband Thomas Hart. It appears that the Hart family saw themselves as bitter enemies of Rebecca West and Anne West.(15, 15-16, 17, 18, 19)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 15, 15-16, 17, 18, 19

Prudence Hart Purdence Hart Accuser
1804

A woman from Manningtree in the county of Essex, described as a Manningtree rogue, who watches Elizabeth Clarke as a witch, and testifies that Clarke "smacked with her mouth, and beckned with her hand, and instantly there appeared a white thing about the bignesse of a Cat." Milles then confirms that Clarke was implicated in the murder of Robert Okes, a Clothiers child, and William Cole of Manningtree aforesaid in handling, who dyed not long since of a pining and languishing disease. She also searched Margaret Moone as a witch. She finds "three long teats or bigges in her secret parts, which seemed to have been lately sucked." She concludes that "they were not like Pyles, for this Informant knows well what they are, having been troubled with them her self." She likewise searches her daughters and finds like marks on them. She claims to have born witness to Margaret Moone's attempt to conjure her familiars (from out of a hole in the wall) with beer and bread. (8-9, 28, 28-29)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 8-9, 28, 28-29

Francis Milles Francis Milles Accuser
1824

A man from Nottingham in the County of Nottinghamshire, known to be the Alderman of Nottingham, who is offended by William Sommer's accusation that his kinswoman is a witch. The Alderman counter-accuses Sommers, and has him thrown into prison.(Image 6)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 6

Alderman of Nottingham Accuser
1825

A man from St. Nicholas' in Rochester in the county of Kent who, along with Anne Huggins, Margaret Day, Elizabeth Hartridge, Anne Benson, and Anne Staines, accuses James Watts of bewitching Anne Huggins so that her body became wasted and consumed. (58-65)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 58-65

John Batty John Batty Accuser
1826

A man from St. Nicholas' in Rochester in the county of Kent who, along with Anne Huggins, Margaret Day, Elizabeth Hartridge, Anne Benson, and Anne Staines, accuses James Watts of bewitching Anne Huggins so that her body became wasted and consumed. (58-65)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 58-65

John Batty John Batty Accuser
1827

A woman from St. Nicholas' in Rochester in the county of Kent who, along with Anne Huggins, John Batty, Margaret Day, Anne Benson, and Anne Staines, accuses James Watts of bewitching Anne Huggins so that her body became wasted and consumed. (58-65)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 58-65

Elizabeth Hartridge Elizabeth Hartridge Accuser
1829

A woman from St. Nicholas' in Rochester in the county of Kent who along with Anne Huggins, John Batty, Margaret Day, Elizabeth Hartridge, and Anne Staines, accuses James Watts of bewitching Anne Huggins so that her body became wasted and consumed.(58-65)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 58-65

Anne Benson Anne Benson Accuser
1830

A woman from St. Nicholas' in Rochester in the county of Kent who, along with Anne Huggins, John Batty, Margaret Day, Elizabeth Hartridge, and Anne Benson, accuses James Watts of bewitching Anne Huggins so that her body became "wasted and consumed."(58-65)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 58-65

Anne Staines Anne Staines Accuser
1836

A man from and former Constable of Ramsey in the county of Essex, described as the husband to Mrs. Stock and father to at least two children, and witness for the state in the Essex Assize at Chelsmford, July 1645. Stock would testify three time at the Assize, first testifying that Elizabeth Harvey confessed to them she had been made a witch by Marion Hocket; a transmutation which was painful to her. He also spoke about how his wife and children would allegedly become victims in a vendetta between their family and the Hatting family. He allegedly "impressed William Hating, husband to the aforesaid Sarah Hating for a scolder, whereupon the said William threatened this Informant very much." His wife was soon bothered by a mysterious snake, and then becomes ill "with extraordinary fits, pains and burnings all over her body, and within one week dyed." She blamed Sara Hatting for her death. The condition which took her life would also take the lives of two of his children. Stock finally testified that he had heard from her sister, Sara Barton, that Marion Hocket had cut off her witch's marks to avoid detection. (31)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31

Francis Stock Francis Stock Accuser
1881

An unknown number of persons of Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be associated with Abraham Vandenbemde and Thomas Cromton, who hired Anne Hook to give affidavits against Anne Levingston and seek out others who would do the same; Levingston's inheritance of Lady Powel's estate had "undone 36 Persons of the said Ladyes Kindred," an inheritance they sought to overturn.(3-4, 5, 6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 3-4, 5, 6

Anonymous 339 Accuser
1882

A man of of Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be associated with Abraham Vandenbemde and Anonymous 339 in a confederation, who hired Anne Hook to give affidavits against Anne Levingston and seek out others who would do the same; Levingston's inheritance of Lady Powel's estate had "undone 36 Persons of the said Ladyes Kindred," an inheritance they sought to overturn. Cromton is also known to be the employer of Thomas Southwick.(3-4, 5, 6, 8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 3-4, 5, 6, 8

Thomas Cromton Thomas Cromton Accuser
1883

A man of of Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be associated with Thomas Cromton and Anonymous 339 in a confederation, who hired Anne Hook to give affidavits against Anne Levingston and seek out others who would do the same; Levingston's inheritance of Lady Powel's estate had "undone 36 Persons of the said Ladyes Kindred," an inheritance they sought to overturn.(3-4, 5, 6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 3-4, 5, 6

Abraham Vandenbemde Abraham Vandenbemde Accuser
1884

A woman of Wapping in the county of Greater London, who was approached by Abraham Vandenbemde and his confederates and offered money to swear that Anne Levingston had used witchcraft to murder Lady Powel; Simpson soon realized that she had been asked in order to strip an innocent gentlewoman of her inherited livelihood and, despising such practices, refused to comply.(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 3

Joan Simpson Joan Simpson Accuser
1897

A man from Manningtree in the county of Essex, described as "very honest" and unwilling to "speake an untruth," and maybe a glover. This man, whose testimony is presented at court second hand by Sir Thomas Bowes, Knight, claims to have encountered four of Anne West's familiar spirits one morning at four AM, outside her home. He launches off on a prolonged and intensive attempt to kill them; braining one, strangling one, attempting to drown one, only to discover it had disappeared. This man accuses West of sending these spirit to torment him, a crime she denies, by allegedly suggesting that they were scouts, sent out on another mission. This anecdotal evidence is the last narrative in _A True and Exact Relation of the Severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, Arraigned and Executed in the County of Essex_, suggesting its importance in the whole narrative. (39-40)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 39-40

Anonymous 346 Accuser
1905

A woman from St. Nicholas' in Rochester in the county of Kent who, along with Anne Huggins, John Batty, Elizabeth Hartridge, Anne Benson, and Anne Staines, accuses James Watts of bewitching Anne Huggins so that her body became wasted and consumed. (58-65)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 58-65

Margaret Day Margaret Day Accuser
1909

A young boy from Stisted in the county of Essex, grandson to Joan Cunny and the son of either Margaret or Avice Cunny. The person allegedly serves as one of the chief witness against his grandmother, although his testimony is not recorded. (A4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A4

Cunny Cunny (Grandson/Son 2) Accuser
1962

A man from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who is a smith and the master of James Day. James Day tells his master about his alleged encounter with the Devil, and Roger Day advises him that he must meet again with the Devil the following week if he promised. When James Day returns from a visit to his Uncle Patrick Dawson's house, and claims he will no longer serve Roger Day, but rather his uncle, James Tuit, and that he would not trouble himself with the Protestant minister Mr. Travers any longer, Roger Day goes to Mr. Travers, and "prevail'd upon him to discover what had happen'd to him." This leads to James Day revealing that his encounter with the Devil was fabricated, and James Day swears to serve Roger Day faithfully thereafter.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 1

Roger Day Roger Day Accuser
2055

A man from Little Oakly in the county of Essex, husband to Anne West, and a farmer or specifically a pig farmer. West and his wife Anne testify about a number of odd occurrences which happen, which point to Annis Heard as the generative element. Andrew West falls afoul with Annis Heard after he appears to rescind a deal his wife made with her. Anne has offered to give Heard a pig at below market value because she could not afford to keep it. In the mean time, Andrew, claiming he suspected that Heard no longer wanted it because she never came to pick it up, sold two of his free pigs to another neighbor. Shortly thereafter, one of his best pigs grew frighteningly ill. It "fel vpon a crying as they stood all together before the dore in the yard, and the rest of the pigs we~t away from yt: at the length the pig that cried folowed stackering as though it were lame in the hinder partes." He called his labours from all around and a number of them gave him suggestions which amounted countermagics; "some of them said, burne it, other said, cut of the eares & burn them, and so they did, & then the pig amended by & by." (E8v-Fv)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, E8v-Fv

Andrew West Andrew West Accuser
2056

A man from Little Oakley in the county of Essex and Husband of Godlife Osborne. Edmond returned home from Manningtree with some good malt, which he wished his wife to brew into a quality beer. She set out to do so the next day, but after attempting to call in a loan from Annis Heard, was foiled. The beer was not salvageable and given to the swine. (Fv-F2)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, Fv-F2

Edmond Osborne Edmond Osborne Accuser
2057

A woman from Little Oakley in the county of Essex and wife of Edmond Osbones. Around Christmas 1581, Godlife began to brew a batch of beer from malt her husband brought home with him from Manningtree. The first steps went well, however, after she sent her son to call in a loan from Annis Heard (who refused, claiming she would have no money until money from wool came in), her brewing took a turn for the worse. The batch began to bubble up, and regardless of what she did, she could not make it stop frothing. Although a bit of countermagic seemed to do the trick (as it had for Anne West and Bennet Lane, who both put hot iron in misbehaving liquids) "she did heat an yron redde hot, and put ye same into it, & it rose vp no more." However, when she "did seath the wort, and when it was sodden it stancke in suche sorte, as that they were compelled to put ye same in the swill tubbe." This story appears to have been presented at Annis Heard's indictement / examination, by Godlife's husband Edmond. It is not clear that it is presented in her own voice. (Fv-F2)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, Fv-F2

Godlife Osborne Godlife Osborne Accuser
2058

A man and self-described preacher from Beaumont in the county of Essex, then living in Little Oakley on his wife, Mrs. Harrison's property. Harrison is residing in London when his wife becomes convinced she has been bewitched by Annis Heard. As she grew increasingly frantic, the "said Richard, said to his wife, I pray you be content and thinke not so, but trust in God and put your trust in him onely, and he will defend you from her, and from the Diuell himselfe also: and said moreouer, what will the people say, that I beeing a Preacher shoulde haue my wife so weake in faith." But his wife did not get better. Harrison swore that he would see Heard hanged if she had in fact bewitched his wife. However, the next encounter between Harrison and Heard wad rather one sided, and entirely verbal, despite all this bravado. They saw one another in an orchard, and to Heard's request for some plums, he answered "I am glad you are here you vield strumpet, saying, I do think you haue bewitched my wife, and as truly as God doth liue, if I can perceiue y^ she be troubled any more as she hath been, I will not leaue a whole bone about thee, & besides I will seeke to haue thee hanged." He continues threatening her, claiming his father in law would also see her hang, and rehearsing all the crimes he attributed to her. Despite verbally berating her, he seemed surprised when Annis "did sodenly depart from him without having any plummes," taking her departure as a sign of guilt. Two days before his wife died, and with John Pollin and Bret's wife as witnesses, she claimed "I must depart from you, for now I am utterly consumed with yonder wicked Creature, meaning Annis Herd [...] repeating these wordes. Oh Annis Herd, Annis Herd she hath consumed me." (F2-F3v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, F2-F3v

Richard Harrison Richard Harrison Accuser
2081

A woman from Brightling in the county of Sussex, who is the servant of Joseph Cruttenden. The girl is allegedly approached by an old woman (Anonymous 398), who tells her that "sad Calamaties were coming upon her Master and Dame, their House should be Fired, and many other troubles befal them." The girl is further warned that if she tells anyone of this prediction, "the Devil would tear her to pieces." Some time after Anonymous 398's predictions come to pass, the girl "told her Dame the former story of the Womans Discourse," leading to the apprehending, examination and searching of the old woman, although the girl refuses to identify the woman apprehended as the same woman who approached her, saying "she is like the Woman, but I think will not swear it is the same." (54)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 54

Anonymous 397 Accuser
2084

A man from Tichmarch in the county of Northampton, known to be a knight, the brother or brother in law of Robert and Mistress Throckmorton, and the uncle of Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Mary, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. On hearing about the afflictions of his nieces, he came to Warboys to visit and see it for himself. He went with the group who went to persuade Mother Alice Samuel to persuade her to visit the Throckmorton children; she refused due to the accusations that she had bewitched them and feared that the children would scratch her. Pickering and company forced her to come, along with her daughter Agnes Samuel and Cicely Burder; he overheard her tell Agnes not to confess to anything. He witnessed the children fall into fits when Mother Samuel entered the house, and assisted Jane in scratching her. When Pickering returned home to Tichmarch Grove, he brought the children with him. He observed that Elizabeth was unafflicted during the ride there, but fell into a fit as soon as she entered his home; these fits often affected coordination when she tried to eat. Pickering experimented with taking the children into the churchyard adjoining his home while they were in their fits. He noted that they would come out of the fit as soon as they entered the churchyard, but resume again on returning to the house. About 20 years later, Sir Gilbert Pickering apprehended Arthur Bill, Bill (Mother) and Bill (Father) on charges of witchcraft and delivered them to Northampton Gaol.(C3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C3

Gilbert Pickering Sir Gilbert Pickering Accuser
2101

A man from Edmonton in the county of Middlesex, now part of the London Borough of Enfield, known to be married to Agnes Radcliffe. He accused their neighbor Elizabeth Sawyer of bewitching Agnes to death after Sawyer's sow ate some of Agnes' soap, and Agnes struck the animal. Mr. Radcliffe claims that, on her deathbed, Agnes told him "Elizabeth Sawyer her neighbour, whose Sowe with a washing-Beetle she had stricken, and so for that cause her malice being great, was the occasion of her death."(B2)

Appears in:
Goodcole, Henry. The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton. London: 1621, B2

Radcliffe Mr. Radcliffe Accuser
2161

A woman from Kent, wife of Henry Ridgen, whose 9 week old daughter daughter is allegedly bewitched and murdered by Mary Foster. Along with eight others, Ridgen endorses Foster's indictment.(87-91)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 87-91

Sara Ridgen Sara Ridgen Accuser
2162

A man from Kent whose 9 week old daughter is allegedly bewitched and murdered by Mary Foster. Along with eight others, Ridgen endorses Foster's indictment.(87-91)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 87-91

Henry Ridgen Henry Ridgen Accuser
2182

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, known to be the daughter of Christopher Nutter, sister to Robert Nutter and John Nutter, and granddaughter of Elizabeth Nutter and old Robert Nutter. Crooke gave deposition alleging that Anne Redferne was responsible for the deaths of Robert and Christopher.(O-Ov)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, O-Ov

Margaret Crooke Margaret Crooke Accuser
2226

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntington, known to be about ten years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, niece to Gilbert Pickering and sister to Joan, Elizabeth, Grace, Mary and Robert Throckmorton. Jane was the first of the Throckmorton children to become sick, be afflicted with fits and to accuse Mother Alice Samuel of being the cause. Her parents consulted Dr. Barrow on her initial illness; Dr. Barrow thought she had worms and sent medicine, but she did not improve. When consulted again a few days later, Dr. Barrow declared her to be clean of disease, and finally admitted that she might be bewitched. A consultation with Master Butler gave the same answer. Jane's four sisters all fell sick with the same illness within weeks of her affliction. It was said that they "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." When Gilbert Pickering brought Mother Samuel to the Throckmorton house, she fell into a severe fit and had to be carried to her bed, where her belly swelled massively and deflated again numerous times. She lay there scratching at the covers. Pickering covered her eyes and first touched her hand himself and then made Mother Samuel do so; Jane scratched Mother Samuel violently but would not scratch him. After Mother Samuel and Agnes Samuel were apprehended and imprisoned at Huntingdon, Jane and her sisters fell into fits in which their brother, Robert Throckmorton Jr., was the only person who could make himself understood to Jane, and Jane would relay the questions he asked to the other girls. By this means, the Jane and her sisters predicted Agnes Samuel's bail from gaol and arrival in the Throckmorton household. At this time, Jane also began to claim to talk to the spirit tormenting her. Once Agnes had lived with the Throckmortons for a few months, Jane and her sisters began to come out of their fits whenever Agnes said a "charm" stating that she was a witch, had killed Lady Cromwell and bewitched the girls. According to the spirit Smack, via Joan Throckmorton, Jane was tormented by the spirit Blew. Jane is also said to have been urged to suicide by Blew, and to have cast away knives while claiming he was urging her to kill herself, or to strain toward the fire and require restraint. She would have fits in which her mouth sealed shut repeatedly at meals, requiring Agnes to hold a knife at her lips to open it again, and other times would claim to see clothing and jewelry walking about of its own volition. Jane was among the girls who scratched Agnes severely. At his trial, John Samuel was made to say the same self-accusing charm as Agnes over Jane, which brought her out of her fits and was used as evidence that he had a part in the bewitchment of the Throckmorton girls. (3-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3-6

Jane Throckmorton Jane Throckmorton Accuser
2228

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 12 or 13 years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, and sister to Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. She became afflicted by fits about a month after her younger sister, Jane, and all three "cryed out upon Mother Samuell: saying, take her away, looke where shee standeth here before us in a blacke thrumbd Cap, (which kind of Cap indeed shee did usually weare, but shee was not then present) it is shee (saide they) that hath bewitched us, and shee will kill us if you doe not take her away." It was said that once all five sisters were afflicted, they "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." She was thereafter afflicted by fits of "lamenesse, blindnesse, deafnesse, and want of feeling." While Agnes Samuel was living in the Throckmorton household, Mary had a fit in which she insisted it was the day she was to scratch Agnes and went after her eagerly and fiercely, then wept and claimed she didn't want to, but her spirit said she must. The next day, she claimed to speak to the spirit Smack, which had previously only conversed with Joan, and it told her she would have no more fits because she had scratched Agnes. Smack later told Joan that Mary had been assigned his cousin Smack (3).(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6

Mary Throckmorton Mary Throckmorton Accuser
2229

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 12 or 13 years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, niece to Gilbert Pickering and sister to Joan, Jane, Mary, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. She became afflicted by fits about a month after her younger sister, Jane, at the same time as Mary, and all three "cryed out upon Mother Samuell: saying, take her away, looke where shee standeth here before us in a blacke thrumbd Cap, (which kind of Cap indeed shee did usually weare, but shee was not then present) it is shee (saide they) that hath bewitched us, and shee will kill us if you doe not take her away." It was said that once all five sisters were afflicted, they "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." When Elizabeth traveled to her uncle Gilbert Pickering's home in Tichmarch, Pickering noted that her fits ceased during the journey and resumed as soon as she entered the house. At dinner, she was prevented from eating, and she scratched, cried and sneezed during the evening prayers; the same happened when Pickering read from the Bible or she tried to pray herself. Pickering discovered that taking her out of the house ended her fits, but they resumed as soon as she reentered. Elizabeth remained with Pickering for months, as when she tried to return back to Warboys, her fits prevented her. Once Elizabeth had returned to Warboys and Mother Samuel was living in the Throckmorton household, Elizabeth had a fit in which she was unable to eat, drink or speak, and could not until her father, Robert Throckmorton, forbid Mother Samuel to eat until Elizabeth was able. While Agnes Samuel was living in the Throckmorton household, Elizabeth and her sisters had fits in which their mouths shut at meals, and would not reopen until Agnes Samuel ordered the spirits tormenting them to stop. Later, she had fit at dinner in which she declared she would scratch Agnes and did so viciously, then exhorted Agnes and faulted her for not confessing her bewitchments, for parting with her soul and for not praying in her heart, and demanded she make her confessions lest she go to hell. According to the spirit Smack, speaking through Joan, Elizabeth was tormented by his cousin Smack (2). After Joan had scratched Agnes's face bloody and burnt her blood-stained fingernail clippings, Joan assisted Elizabeth in scratching Agnes' right hand.(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6

Elizabeth Throckmorton Elizabeth Throckmorton Accuser
2230

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 9 years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, and sister to Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. She became afflicted by fits a few weeks after her older sisters Jane, Elizabeth and Mary did. It was said that the sisters "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." She was thereafter afflicted by fits of "lamenesse, blindnesse, deafnesse, and want of feeling." When her sister Elizabeth first scratched Agnes Samuel, Agnes was comforting Grace, who was in the throes of a fit, in her arms; Grace was caught in Agnes' embrace for the duration while Agnes was viciously scratched. Grace tried to scratch Agnes herself some time later, but her nails were too short and her strength insufficient to cause Agnes any harm. According to the spirit Smack, speaking through Joan, Grace was tormented by the spirit White.(5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 5-6

Grace Throckmorton Grace Throckmorton Accuser
2232

A girl from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 15 years of age, the eldest daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, niece to Gilbert Pickering and Henry Pickering, and sister to Jane, Elizabeth, Grace, Mary and Robert Throckmorton. She was the last of the sisters to be afflicted by fits, and hers are said to have been worst of them. The fits "forced her to neese, screetch & grone verie fearefullie, sometime it would heaue up her bellie, and bounce up her bodie with such violence, that had she not bin kept upon her bed, it could not but haue greatly brused her body." It was said that the sisters "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." After Joan had been afflicted for some time, she began to claim that spirits would give her predictions; she foretold that 12 people in total would become afflicted within the household. A year later, when her uncle Henry Pickering came to visit, she reported the details of his surveillance of and conversation with Mother Samuel, which no-one in the household had known he was doing. Thereafter, she was able to report on whatever Mother Samuel said and did, claiming that her spirit told her. She claimed to converse extensively with various spirits, first one named Blew, and then primarily with Smack. Joan accused Agnes Samuel of renewing Mother Samuel's bewitchment of the Throckmorton girls, saying that the spirits told her so. Joan also said the spirits told her that she would have her worst fits when strangers visited the Throckmorton home, in order to prove that Agnes was bewitching her, for they promised she would not come out of her fits until Agnes said a "charm" over her stating that she was a witch, had killed Lady Cromwell, and had bewitched the Throckmorton girls. Robert Throckmorton would thereafter order Agnes to say those words over his daughters whenever they had a visitor, and they would miraculously recover. Through Joan, Smack also began to predict her fits, report on Mother Throckmorton, who was imprisoned at that time, accused John Samuel of being a witch and listed off which spirits were assigned to torment which girls, with Smack being hers. Smack also told her she should scratch Agnes, and gave Joan the words to have Agnes say to bring her and her sisters out of their fits. When she scratched Agnes, Smack bid her attack one side of Agnes' face for herself, and the other for her aunt Pickering, who Agnes allegedly also bewitched. He also instructed her to clip her bloody fingernails after, throw them on the fire, and throw the wash water on as well after cleaning blood from her hands. While at Huntingdon to prove that Agnes Samuel was a witch to the assembled judges, Joan was seen repeatedly to have shaking and groaning fits whenever Agnes said God or Jesus Christ, and Agnes was made to say the self-accusing "charm" repeatedly over Joan before the judges. Joan is said to have never suffered another fit after these demonstrations.(6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6-7

Joan Throckmorton Joan Throckmorton Accuser
2233

A man from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be wealthy and maintain a large household, and be the husband of Mistress Throckmorton, the father of Jane, Elizabeth, Grace, Mary, Joan and Robert Throckmorton, and the neighbour of Mother Alice Samuel, John Samuel and Agnes Samuel. He and his family were "but newly come to the towne to inhabite" when his daughter Jane "fell uppon the sodaine into a strange kinde of sickenes and distemperature of body." Mother Samuel was among the neighbours to visit the Throckmorton home during Jane's illness; on seeing her, Jane cried out "looke where the old witch sitteth...did you euer see (said the Child) one more like a witch than she is?" Numerous consultations with Dr. Barrow showed no illness or disease to be affecting Jane. At a loss, Dr. Barrow told Throckmorton that "he verily thought that there was some kind of sorcerie & witchcraft wrought towards his childe." Within weeks, all five of his daughters were afflicted with fits and claiming to see apparitions of Mother Samuel tormenting them. Mother Samuel, in turn, said that Throckmorton's children misused her with their accusations, that they were "playing the wantons" and that if they were her children they would have been punished for it. He witnessed his daughter Joan report Henry Pickering's encounter with Mother Samuel down to their actions and exact words, and confirmed the accuracy of this report with Henry later that day. He dispersed his children to various relatives for a time, suspecting that the separation would reduce their fits; this proves to be the case. When the children were back together under his roof, he noticed that their fits were fewer when Mother Samuel was in the house, and approached her husband John Samuel, offering him money for Mother Samuel's hire. Mother Samuel refused, however, due to the accusations the children had leveled against her, but consented when Robert Throckmorton offered her refuge after John beat her severely with a cudgel for refusing. Robert began to believe his children were indeed bewitched, and ordered Mother Samuel to predict their fits, which he saw to come true. He also witnessed her chin bleeding, which Mother Samuel later told Henry Pickering was because her spirits had been sucking at it. When the children told him Agnes Samuel needed to be questioned but would hide if he tried to speak to her, Robert went to John Samuel's home to test this out. She was found to be hiding, as predicted, and would not admit she was there until he threatened to pry open the trap door she had piled with heavy sacks. At another time, he witnessed Elizabeth unable to eat until he threatened that Mother Samuel would not eat until Elizabeth could again. Not long after, he witnessed Mother Samuel suffer several days of tormenting fits of her own, including strange swellings of her belly. When his daughter Elizabeth claimed her fits would not ease until John Samuel spoke a self-accusing "charm" over her, like his daughter Agnes had been made to, Robert Throckmorton tried unsuccessfully to make John do so. He stood by his daughter Joan at the Assizes in Huntindon while she had fits before the judges and was brought out of them by Agnes' "charm." During the trial, Robert gave a deposition that was instrumental in sentencing Mother Samuel, Agnes Samuel and John Samuel to death.(3-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3-6

Robert Throckmorton Robert Throckmorton Accuser
2240

A woman from Ramsey in the county of Huntingdon, known to be the wife of Sir Henry Cromwell and the mother-in-law of Mistress Cromwell. Lady Cromwell comes to the Throckmorton home to comfort Robert and Mistress Throckmorton and visit the children. While there, she confronts Mother Alice Samuel, accusing her of witchcraft and taking a lock of hair and a hairlace from her. Lady Cromwell gives these objects to Mistress Throckmorton to burn. When she returns to Ramsey that night, she has a nightmare in which Mother Samuel sends a cat to her to pluck off all of her skin and flesh from her arms and body. She becomes sick thereafter, suffering fits similar to those of the Throckmorton children, and dies of it 15 months later.(30-32)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 30-32

Cromwell Lady Cromwell Accuser
2241

A man from Cambridge in the county of Cambridgeshire, known to be a scholar, brother to Gilbert Pickering and uncle to Mary, Elizabeth, Joan, Jane, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. He visited the Throckmorton home and, without the knowledge of the Throckmorton family, spent a day watching Mother Alice Samuel as she went about her errands. He watched her exchange a wooden tankard for some barme with a neighbour, and overheard the womens' conversation. Pickering then stopped her in the street and questioned her; Mother Samuel was loud and impatient with him. She was also critical of Robert Throckmorton, saying that he misused her with the accusations, that the children's fits were nothing but wantonness and that they should have been punished for their behaviour. He also questioned her about her belief in God; his interpretation of her answers implied she worshiped a different God. He told her to repent and confess, or else he would have her burnt at the stake and the children would come to blow on the coals; she replied "I had rather (sayd she) see you dowsed over head and eares in this pond." Mother Samuel later confessed to Pickering that her chin bled because her spirits sucked blood from it. Pickering also witnessed Mary Throckmorton's scratching of Agnes Samuel, and Elizabeth Throckmorton's encounter with John Samuel in which she was unsuccessful in persuading him to say a self-accusing "charm" to end her fit. His deposition was used to sentence Mother Samuel, Agnes Samuel and John Samuel to death.(32-33)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 32-33

Henry Pickering Henry Pickering Accuser
2253

A man from Brampton in the county of Huntingdon. Robert Poulter, vicar of Brampton, a deposition before the Huntingdon Assizes on behalf John Langley, who was too sick to come to court himself. Langley claimed to Mother Alice Samuel bewitched various of his livestock to death, and caused him to become sick, after she overheard him order that she was to have no meat. He is said to have died during the Assizes.(110)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 110

John Langley John Langley Accuser
2254

A man from Brampton in the county of Huntingdon, known to be the vicar and curate of Brampton. He gave a deposition before the Huntingdon Assizes on behalf of his parishoner, John Langley, who was too sick to come to court himself; Langley claimed to Mother Alice Samuel bewitched various of his livestock to death, and caused him to become sick.(110)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 110

Robert Poulter Robert Poulter Accuser
2257

A man from the vicinity of Huntingdon Gaol in the county of Huntingdon, known to be a Jailor/Gaoler. He gave deposition at Mother Alice Samuel's trial, alleging that she bewitched one of his men (Anonymous 445) so that he began to have fits much like the Throckmorton children, and died of it five or six days later. He also claimed that his son, Anonymous 446, became sick with fits as well. The child did not improve until the Jailor brought him to Mother Samuel's bedside and had him scratch her. After Mother Samuel, Agnes Samuel and John Samuel were executed, he stripped them for burial and found a lump of flesh on Mother Samuel's body "adioyning to so secrete a place, which was not decent to be seene."(59, 61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59, 61

Jailor of Huntingdon Accuser
2267

A woman from Arpington in the county of Kent, who is part of the group of spectators (Anonymous 449) who witness Anonymous 32's fits as Doctor Boreman sat next to her praying. It is conveyed that Mrs. Hopper especially heard Anonymous 32, in one of her fits say in a dreadful tone "weaker and weaker, weaker and weaker" repeatedly. Others in the group of spectators became fearful of the maid in her fits and so dispersed, but Mrs. Hopper decidedly remained until the Doctor (Doctor Boreman) finished his prayer. Later, when Mrs. Hopper and Doctor Boreman were the only two left in the room with the young maid, they could allegedly hear one of the spirits (Anonymous 88) inside the maid and she barked twice. She is described as a brave, gentlewoman who was resolved to be a witness and see all events surrounding Anonymous 32 through to the end.(3-4)

Appears in:
Hopper, Mrs. Strange News from Arpington near Bexly in Kent being a True Narrative of a Young Maid who was Possest with Several Devils or Evil Spirits. London: 1679, 3-4

Hopper Mrs. Hopper Accuser
2273

A girl from the vicinity of Castle Alley near Broken Wharf in London, known to be the daughter of Anonymous 457 and to have a sister. Her mother had a falling out with Anne Kirk, which resulted in her sister being bewitched to death. Not long after the child died, Anonymous 458 met Kirk in the street, and was "stricken downe in a very strange maner; her mouth beeing drawne aside like a purse, her teeth gnashing togeather, her mouth foming, and her eyes staring the rest of her body being strangely disfigured." When Kirk left, she recovered, but often had similar fits thereafter. She gave deposition against Kirk, but claimed that she could not show how she was tormented until she had a fit.(99-100)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 99-100

Anonymous 458 Accuser
2281

A man from London, who is allegedly cursed by Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman believed to be responsible for bewitching the young girl, Mary Glover. Anonymous 455 words for Lady Bond, and at one time asked Elizabeth Jackson to wash his clothes. When Elizabeth Jackson came "to his lodging for money," she found that he was out of town, and cried, "Is he gone? I pray god he may breake his necke, or his legge, before he com again." Accordingly, during his journey, Anonymous 455 broke his leg. This account is given at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, as proof that her cursing "had ben observed to have a mischevous consequent."(Fol. 35r - Fol. 35v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 35r - Fol. 35v

Anonymous 455 Accuser
2313

A man from London, who is both a doctor, and Bishop of London. Richard Bancroft believes that Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of witchcraft against the young girl, Mary Glover, is innocent. To this end, he petitions the court to examine Mary Glover for counterfeit symptoms, which the Lord Chief Justice Anderson agrees to, appointing the Recorder of London to examine the girl. Bishop Bancroft is a powerful man, who also manages to pull many strings, including helping Elizabeth Jackson plan a petition to the College of Physicians in November, 1602; and arranging for Dr. Jorden and Dr. Argent to testify that Mary Glover suffers from natural causes at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson. Despite his input, Elizabeth Jackson is found guilty of witchcraft. However, some months later, Bishop Bancroft is approached by the minister Mr. Lewis Hughes, who wishes to tell the Bishop of his success in dispossessing Mary Glover. However, Mr. Lewis is never granted an audience with the Bishop, and called "Rascall and varlot," for his stories. He is imprisoned for four months, and named along with the five other preachers present during Mary Glover's dispossession "Devil finders, Devil puffers, and Devill prayers," by the Bishop Bancroft. (12)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 12

Richard Bancroft Bishop Richard Bancroft Accuser