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17 records returned.

List of all events occurring in the persontype of

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
1272

A woman from Exeter in the county of Devon, described as Dr. Browne's former servant who warns Grace Matthew. If Grace Matthew should see her, she should give her nothing but say that her husband is bewitched and that a plot is laid for the suspected one.(150)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 150

Anonymous 211 Suspect
1363

One of a group of people who, along with Anonymous 229, are accused of causing "mutinous facts" in the county of Cambridgeshire. (150)

Appears in:
Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, . Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, Reign of Charles 1: 1637. H. M. Stationery Office: 1868, 150

Anonymous 230 Suspect
1372

A spinster from Witham in the county of Essex who is accused of bewitching Joan Bowltell, Thomas Emmerye, and others as well as fraudulently taken money from them. She is found not guilty on the count of witchcraft, but guilty on other counts.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=331225)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=331225

Joan Haddon Joan Haddon Suspect
1422

A woman from Hatfield in the county of Essex, wife of "Jeromie" and a noted witch, who is indicted in 1566 for allegedly bewitching a cow, six sheep, and four pigs belonging to William Higham. She pleads not guilty and is ultimately found to be not guilty.( http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Lora Wynchester Lora Wynchester Suspect
1425

A spinster from Kelvedon in the county of Essex, a suspected witch, who is indicted at the Assizes in Chelmsford in 1566 for bewitching a one-year-old infant named Agnes Cryspe so that she became "lame, enfeebled and maimed." Cocke pleads not guilty and is found not guilty. She is also tried at the Assizes in Brentwood for clapping her hands on Richard Sherman's knees, making him lame saying "that she defied one Blackbornes wyfe whome the saide Richard Sherman said & reported to be gladde of hir deliveraunce." Cocke's daughter is also a suspected witch according to Noble's wife because she (Noble's wife) could not get butter and to have bewitched Belfild's wife cows so that one would not give milk and other would give milk of all colors.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=332210)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=332210

Joan Cocke Joan Cocke (Kelvedon) Suspect
1572

A woman who is falsely accused of witchcraft in the Book of the Essex Witches, she is cleared as a minister's wife, and "a gentlewoman of a very godly and religious life, and a very good conuersation."(8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 8

Wayt Mrs. Wayt Suspect
1578

A man from Exeter in the county of Devonshire, and suspected wizard, who attempts to cure Nathan Crab of his unexplained falling-fits and foaming at the mouth. Mr. Gibs collects Nathans urine, which is brought to him by Zacheus Crab and Daughter Crab, and administers a Bag to hang about the Youth's Neck, and Powder to take in White wine. These cures, however, are only temporary, a fact which causes Zacheus Crab to become suspicious of Mr. Gibs as a healer. (47-52)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 47-52

Gibs Mr. Gibs Suspect
1926

A man from St. Andrew's parish in Dublin, who was one of two Roman Catholic priests (with Anonymous 360) allegedly involved in the plot to convert James Day from Protestant to Catholic. He helps fabricate a story about James Day's signing of his soul to the Devil, and swears "by the Mass Book to relate and stand by it," so that others might never "discover the secret." The justice Sir Humphrey Jervise issues warrants for their arrest, but the priests are never discovered. It is believed that even if the priests are identified, they will "legitimate a false Oath."(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 361 Suspect
1927

A man from St. Andrew's parish in Dublin, who was one of two Roman Catholic priests (with Anonymous 361) allegedly involved in the plot to convert James Day from Protestant to Catholic. He helps fabricate a story about James Day's signing of his soul to the Devil, and swears "by the Mass Book to relate and stand by it," so that others might never "discover the secret." The justice Sir Humphrey Jervise issues warrants for their arrest, but the priests are never discovered. It is believed that even if the priests are identified, they will "legitimate a false Oath."(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 360 Suspect
1944

A woman from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who is allegedly involved in the plot to help her nephew, James Day, change from the Protestant religion to the Roman Catholic religion. Joan Tuit takes her nephew to "the Popish Chappel at St. Audoen's Arch," and swears to keep the fabricated story of James Day's encounter with the Devil a secret. When James Day confesses, Sir Humphrey Jervise sends a warrant for her arrest, and she is accordingly apprehended. Joan Tuit herself confesses that she intended on helping with the fabricated story, by taking her nephew to a well, where is was to claim being miraculously cured.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Joan Tuit Joan Tuit Suspect
1946

A woman from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who allegedly dressed "with a Friar's Mantle like a Fryars Habit," and tells James Day at his Uncle Dawson's house that she had died and gone to Heaven, only to rise from the dead again. She tries to persuade James Day to change his religion, for "Mass was Celebrated in as good English as was used, either in Church or Meeting." When the minister Mr. Travers investigates, it is revealed that the old woman "lived in the end of the Town," and that she was simply "a begger Woman that came in by accident"; she is part of a fraud to get James Day to change religions. When a warrant is issued for her arrest by the justice Sir Humphrey Jervise, the old woman is unable to be located. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Anonymous 358 Suspect
1955

A woman from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who was the aunt of James Day, of the Roman Catholic church and therefore a papist. James Day visits his uncle, Patrick Dawson, and his Aunt Dawson sends a little girl (Anonymous 357) to fetch Father Barnwell. She "frequently Advis'd and Press'd this Boy their Nephew, to come over to their Religion," and she was in on the fabricated story where James Day encounters the Devil. She is arrested with her husband by order of Sir Humphrey Jervise when the fabricated story is revealed.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Dawson Dawson (Aunt) Suspect
1956

A man from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who is the uncle of James Day, and of the Roman Catholic religion, and therefore a papist. James Tuit spend much time pressuring his nephew James Day "to leave his Master Roger Dav's service and live with him, promising him that he should never be without pence in his Pocket." James Tuit comes up with the story of James Day's encounter with the Devi, and instructs his nephew "to leave a torn Paper written in blood," for other people to find. James Tuit is arrested by order of the justice Sir Humphrey Jervise, along with his wife, Joan Tuit.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

James Tuit James Tuit Suspect
1957

A man from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who is the uncle of James Day, as well as a Roman Catholic and therefore a papist. Patrick Dawson sends a coach for his nephew, so that James Day might visit him. This is all part of an elaborate plot Patrick Dawson help devise, surrounding a fabricated encounter between James Day and the Devil, intended to help James Day change from the Protestant religion to the Roman Catholic religion. Once the fabrication is revealed, Patrick Dawson is arrested under the orders of Sir Humphrey Jervise, along with his wife. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 2

Patrick Dawson Patrick Dawson Suspect
1968

A young man from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who allegedly encountered the Devil in a field, and discussed the signing over his soul. James Day allegedly begins to write a lease in blood, but the Devil bids him tear it up, and rewrites a lease using words James Day does not recognize. James Day refuses to sign the lease, and the Devil allegedly takes him to an unknown Tavern, without barkeeps, and where drinks magically filled themselves. Upon returning home, James Day recounts his story to his master, the smith Roger Day. He visits his uncle, Patrick Dawson, and upon returning to his master, claims that he will become Roman Catholic and that he is leaving his master to work for his uncle James Day. When Mr. Travers, the local Protestant minister, investigates, it is found that James Day fabricated the entire story with the help of his uncles, in order to help him change religions to Roman Catholic, and to leave the service of his master. After repenting these actions, James Day "promises amendment of life and diligence in his Masters service for the future."(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 1

James Day James Day Suspect
2103

A woman from Beckington in the county of Somerset, who allegedly appears before Mary Hill during of on her fits, which are characterized by her vomiting up crooked nails. She is described as "an old woman," and appears with another woman, Ann More, to Mary Hill. A warrant is sent out from two Justices of the Peace, and Margery Coombes is "apprehended and brought to the sessions," and committed to the county goal. When she is tried at the "Tannton Assizes, by my Lord Chief Justice Holt," she is acquitted by the Jury (Anonymous 405), "for want of Evidence."(75)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 75

Margery Coombes Margery Coombes Suspect
2104

A woman from Beckington in the county of Somerset, who allegedly appears before Mary Hill during of on her fits, which are characterized by her vomiting up crooked nails. She is described as "an old woman," and appears with another woman, Margery Coombes, to Mary Hill. A warrant is sent out from two Justices of the Peace, and Ann More is "apprehended and brought to the sessions," and committed to the county goal. When she is tried at the "Tannton Assizes, by my Lord Chief Justice Holt," she is acquitted by the Jury (Anonymous 405), "for want of Evidence."(75)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 75

Ann More Ann More Suspect