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List of all events occurring in the persontype of

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
467

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, wife to local dairy farmer, William Byet, and the neighbor of Elizabeth Bennett. Although the Bytes lived in peace with their neighbor for the first year of their residence, things soon grew strained, and then violent between the families. Byet would sometime call Bennett an "olde trot and olde witche, and did banne and curse" her cattle. In return, Bennett would call Byett a "knave saying, winde it vp Byet, for it wil light vpon your selfe." Although Bennett mentioned the three of Byett's cow shortly after this incident, and more to do with poor animal husbandry; Byet beat the fallen cow until it died. Joan Byet also "did beate her swine seuerall times with greate Gybets." Moreover, she also" thrust a pitchforke through the side of one of [Elizabeth Bennet's] swine, the which Durrant a Butcher did buie, and for that when hee had dressed it, it prooued A messell," (a leprous animal, which presumably could not be eaten?). Of course, this version of the story is not the only one. According to Ursely Kempe, although Elizabeth Bennet's three familiars "plagued three of his Beastes whereof two of them dyed, and the third leyer fire or drooping, & not likly to liue: Byette caused his folkes to make a fire about her" presumably as an act of countermagic and cremation. Kempe suggested that "the Cowe feeling the heate of the fire, starte vp and ranne her way, and by that occasion was saued"; Byett himself seems to hint that the cow was certainly saved by jumping up, but also by "byting of stickes, bigger then any mans finger" from a local wood stack. Joan Byett was not so lucky. She appears to have died on Febraury 10, 1581, a crime attributed Kempe to Bennet's other familiar, Suckin who "did plague Byettes wife vnto death." The court blames the bewitchment on Bennet. Bennet acknowledges the felony, and is deemed guilty and charged to be hanged. (A2v-A3)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A2v-A3

Joan Byet Joan Byet Neighbor
606

A man from Hartford in the county of Huntingdonshire, described as neighbor of a Yeoman who is allegedly bewitched by Johane Harrison after he calls her an old hag. He helps the Yeoman concoct a plan where by he can lure Harrison to his home (not the Yeoman's) so the Yeoman can scratch her to unwitch himself.(19-20)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 19-20

Anonymous 70 Neighbor
644

A woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse. She allegedly had a falling out with Mother Waterhouse, after which Mother Waterhouse bid her familiar Sathan to drown three of Anonymous 67's geese.(15 (Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 15 (Bv)

Anonymous 67 Neighbor
645

A woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse who refused to give Mother Waterhouse butter. In revenge, Mother Waterhouse caused her to "lose the curdes" two or three days later.(15 (Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 15 (Bv)

Anonymous 68 Neighbor
646

A man from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse and the husband of Anonymous 86. He and his wife allegedly had a falling out with Mother Waterhouse, after which Mother Waterhouse bid her familiar Sathan to kill him with a "bluddye flux." (15 (Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 15 (Bv)

Anonymous 85 Neighbor
647

A woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse and the wife of Anonymous 85. She and husband allegedly had a falling out with Mother Waterhouse, after which Mother Waterhouse bid her familiar Sathan to kill Anonymous 85 with a "bluddye flux." (15 (Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 15 (Bv)

Anonymous 86 Neighbor
1103

A man from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a tailor and a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse. According to Mother Waterhouse's final confession, he offended her and she tried to set her familiar Sathan on him to "hurte and destroy him & his goodes." Sathan failed in his task and returns to tell Mother Waterhouse that "Wardol was so strong in fayth that he hadde no power to hurt hym." Sathan tries again numerous times to cause Wardol mischief, but it proves in vain.(38-40)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 38-40

Wardol Mr. Wardol Neighbor
1315

A man and a painter in St. Osyth in the county of Essex, who testifies against Alice Newman. Hooke suggests that Alice was the cause of husband's "great miserie and wretcher state," and possibly his death.(A6-A6v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A6-A6v

William Hooke William Hooke Neighbor
1958

A number of people from St. Andrew's in Dublin, who are witness on June 16, 1686, to the discovery of "torn Paper written in blood," that James Day confesses is a torn contract between him and the Devil. When the paper is put together again, "they could read the date of the Months and Year, and the words Promise and Law." The discovery of this evidence lends credibility to the story of James Day's encounter with the Devil, which is later revealed to be a fabrication to aid James Day in changing from the Protestant religion to the Roman Catholic.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 1

Anonymous 356 Neighbor
2039

A young woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be a neighbor of Dorothy Durent and a kinswoman of Amy Denny. Durent gave deposition alleging that the day after Durent found a toad in her son William's blanket and had it held into the fire, Anonymous 389 told her that her aunt, Amy Denny, "was in a most lamentable condition having her face all scorched with fire, and that she was sitting alone in her House, in her smock without any fire."(9-10)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 9-10

Anonymous 389 Neighbor
2048

A man from Cannon Lee in the county of Devon, who found with his coworker, another labourer (Anonymous 392), the young Joseph Buxford under a Hedge. Upon finding him, they "demanded what he was," but the boy was unable to answer them as "he was speechlesse." They find "his hands and legs strangely distorted, his haire of his head singyd, his cloathes all be smeared with pitch and rosin, and other sulfurous matter, which yeelded an odious stench." The two men "commiserating his miserable condition," take the boy to their master's house, Mr. Justice Cullum. There, they provide him with clothes, a bed, and food.(5)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 391 Neighbor
2049

A man from Cannon Lee in the county of Devon, who found with his coworker, another labourer (Anonymous 391), the young Joseph Buxford under a Hedge. Upon finding him, they "demanded what he was," but the boy was unable to answer them as "he was speechlesse." They find "his hands and legs strangely distorted, his haire of his head singyd, his cloathes all be smeared with pitch and rosin, and other sulfurous matter, which yeelded an odious stench." The two men "commiserating his miserable condition," take the boy to their master's house, Mr. Justice Cullum. There, they provide him with clothes, a bed, and food.(5)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 392 Neighbor
2076

A number of people from Evershot in the county of Dorset-shire, who are neighbours to "a poor Labouring Man" (Anonymous 395). This group of people includes two ministers. They collectively "marvelled" at how the man, being "a poor Labouring Man" managed to afford buying "some Sheep or Swine." He admits to them eventually that he "found a Shilling under his Door" every morning, and upon admitting this, he "was suddenly struck Lame and Bed-Rid," as witnessed by the neighbours.(46)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 46

Anonymous 396 (Plural) Neighbor
2094

A number of people from Brightling in the county of Sussex, who are given "meal" from an old Woman (Anonymous 398) suspected of witchcraft. They attempt to turn the meal into bread, but "they could not make it into Loaves," and it was instead "like Butter." Putting it into the oven, "it would not bake, but came out as it went in."(57)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 57

Anonymous 401 (Plural) Neighbor
2128

A number of ministers and "good people" from Colne, in the county of Essex, who come with Mr. Thomas Shepherd to pray at Colne's Priory. In Colne's Priory is built a chamber above a "Tomb-House," and every night "At Two of the Clock in the Morning there was always the sound of a great Bell tolling," After praying and giving "some respect to the place, serving to God," the Devil is cast out, and "from that time, never was any such noise heard in the Chamber."(158)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 158

Anonymous 408 Neighbor
2132

A number of people from Bewdley in the county of Worcestershire, who are the "praying Neighbours" of a "Sanguine strong Maid," (Anonymous 409) who is alleged seized by "Histerical Fits," caused by both a devil and "a suror uterinus." These people are encouraged by the prayers of Richard Baxter by the young maid, and resolved to "Fast and Pray by her, till she was recovered." During their prayers, the maid is "usually in violent Rage, and after thankt them." They continued this for many days, until she was cured.(194)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 194

Anonymous 410 (Plural) Neighbor
2133

A man from Kidderminster in the county of Worcestershire, who sits and prays with a "Sanguine strong maid" afflicted by a number of "strange Histerical Fits," caused by a devil and "a suror uterinus." After several days of fasting and praying on the part of many neighbours, Mr. Thomas Ware prays with the maid (Anonymous 409), "in the midst of the Day." During this prayer, the maid "fell on the Floor like a Block, and having lain so a while, cryed out, He is gone, He is gone; The Black Dog is gone." After this time, "she never had a Fit."(194)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 194

Thomas Ware Mr. Thomas Ware Neighbor
2134

A young man from Bewdley in the county of Worcestershire, who watches among other people "in Charity" over a "Sanguine strong Maid," (Anonymous 409), and prays with her during her "Histerical strange fits." This young man was "more with her than the rest," and often observed her during her Fits, where she would "toss her naked Body about, she being strong and comely." His "Lust was provoked," and on numerous fits, they sinned together. This did seem to ease the maid for a time, which "enticed him the more to do it," as "an Act of (Wicked) Compassion." In fact, it is believed this did nothing but "Enrage the Disease." When the maid is healed of her fits, the young man comes forth and "made known" what they had done. Richard Baxter believes that the maid was originally afflicted by "a suror uterinus," and then gained "a Real possession," as a "punishment of their Sins." The young man marries the maid, and "professed deep Repentance." However, Richard Baxter still advises that the young man not be received to Church Communion.(195)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 195

Anonymous 411 Neighbor
2160

A man, his wife, and "divers of the Neighbours," from Combe St. Nicholas, in the county of Somerset, who live near Blackhill Downs. They claim that "they had at many times seen this Fair-keeping in the Summer time," a fair held for fairies (Anonymous 174). None of them dared "adventure in amongst them," for it was rumoured that whoever did so, "had received great damage by it."(210)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 210

Anonymous 426 (Plural) Neighbor
2250

A man from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be married to Mistress Chappel and to be the next-door neighbour of John Samuel. According to the spirit Smack, John Samuel bewitched both Chappel and Mistress Chappel so that "woman not able to stirre her selfe, and then man was for a fitte or two in the same case that these children were in." Smack also claimed that John Samuel asked him to break Chappel's neck in a fall, so he "caused on the suddaine both his Pattins to be broken, and if he had fallen on the stones as he fell in the myre, he had beene maymed." Chappel, when asked, confessed that "confessed that he had once such a fall, as he met with old Samuell in the streetes, and both his Pattins were broken at one instant, and because he would not fall upn the causie (for it was but narrow) into the myre, wherin he was marveilously foyled, and if an other neighbor had not beene with him, he had beene in greater danger."(94-95)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 94-95

Chappel Neighbor
2251

A woman from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be married to Chappel and to be the next-door neighbour of John Samuel. According to the spirit Smack, John Samuel bewitched both Chappel and Mistress Chappel so that "woman not able to stirre her selfe, and then man was for a fitte or two in the same case that these children were in."(94-95)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 94-95

Chappel Mistress Chappel Neighbor
2279

A woman from London, who is a neighbour of the young girl, Mary Glover. Mary Glover visits her when her throat and neck swell after a visit from Elizabeth Jackson. At Anonymous 441's house, Mary Glover is struck blind and dumb, and so Anonymous 441 brings Mary Glover back to her father's house.(Fol. 4r - Fol. 4v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 4r - Fol. 4v

Anonymous 441 Neighbor
2309

A woman from London, who is a neighbor of the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson. Elizabeth Jackson is believed to have cursed the young girl Mary Glover, so that she experiences violent fits. On the first day that Elizabeth Jackson threatens Mary Glover, the young girl stops at Elizabeth Burges' house, as she felt ill. Elizabeth Burges immediately notices that something is wrong with Mary Glover, as her "contenance and colour had much altered." After Mary Glover leaves the house of Elizabeth Burges, Elizabeth Jackson who had apparently overheard the conversation, comes running over to Elizabeth Burges' house, and exclaims, "I have ratled up one of the Gossips that medled with my daughters apparrell, and I hope an evill death will come unto her." This is the first threat Elizabeth Jackson utters against Mary Glover in front of a witness. Similar threats are uttered in the house of Alderman Glover, the uncle of Mary Glover. At the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, Elizabeth Burges also comes forward as a witness to testify against the old woman. She confesses to having seen Elizabeth Jackson threaten Mary Glover, but also tells how she "had ben therefore threatned by her," so that one day while eating prunes, the old woman visits her and Elizabeth Burges is "not able to swallow one downe, but also fell on vomiting." This continues for some three weeks after being visited by Elizabeth Jackson, "upon all sustenance of meat receaved." At another visit of Elizabeth Jackson while Elizabeth Burges was vomiting, Elizabeth Jackson allegedly wishes "that she might cast up her heart, gutts and all," adding "Thou shortly, shalt have in thee an evill spirit too." The following night, Elizabeth Burges is visited by a vision in the shape of a fox; the night after that a vision in the shape of "an ougly black man, with a bounch of keyes in his hand, intysing her to go with him, and those keyes would bring her to gould enough"; and a final third night, Elizabeth Burges is visited by the vision in the "likenes of a mouse." However, by "faithfull praier," aided by her Master and Mistress, Elizabeth Burges was delivered from these visions. While recounting this tale at the trial, Elizabeth Jackson interrupts Elizabeth Burges, saying "thow wilt be sicke, and cast againe anon," causing Elizabeth Burges to lose her power of speech. She was led into a chamber after, where she fell ill as Elizabeth Jackson had predicted, "and after that, was led home weake, faynte and Casting, benummed in all her body, hardly able to stand, and never yet to this day recovered her perfect libertie againe."(Fol. 3v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 3v

Elizabeth Burges Elizabeth Burges Neighbor
2353

A number of men and women from Burton upon Trent in the county of Staffordshire, who come to the aid of a Tenant (Anonymous 2) when she finds that the green boughs in her hall have caught fire, although there were no candles or fires lit in the room for a fortnight. They stay the night after the fire is put out, to watch over the house.(3 - 4)

Appears in:
A., J.. The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton. London: 1671, 3 - 4

Anonymous 486 (Plural) Neighbor