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List of all events occurring in the persontype of

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
1

Agnes Waterhouse is a woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex. She is known to be a widow, the mother of Joan Waterhouse, and sister of Elizabeth Francis. She was executed for witchcraft on July 29, 1566. Elisabeth Francis allegedly passed her familiar Sathan on to Mother Waterhouse; her first request of the familiar was to have him kill one of her hogs to see whether the cat could indeed do it. Sathan did, demanding a chicken and a drop of her blood in return. Sathan ate the chicken down to the bones and feathers, leaving no trace behind. The marks from where she pricked herself for drops of blood she gave him for his deeds are said show up red on her skin. Mother Waterhouse claimed to have sent Sathan to enact revenge on her neighbours for numerous slights, including drowning a cow, killing three geese, cause a brewing to fail, causing curds to be lost after she was denied butter, and kill a neighbour and his wife. She also had Sathan kill her husband. After each act, she would recite the Pater Noster in Latin. She turned Sathan into a toad by praying, kept him in a pot whenever she left home, and fed him in this form with milk. Sathan allegedly warned her about her apprehension in advance and predicted she would be hanged or burned. Joan Waterhouse claimed her mother tried to teach her witchcraft. Mother Waterhouse claimed not to have fed Sathan with blood in court, but confessed when numerous red spots were found on her face and nose, claiming instead that she had not fed him in over a fortnight. In the confession taken immediately before her execution, she claimed to have been a witch for 15 years, to desire to repent, and to have God's forgiveness for her evil ways. She alleged that she had once sent Sathan to destroy a tailor and his goods, but Sathan could not because the man was too strong in his faith. She also said that she had attended church services regularly and prayed often, but in Latin as Sathan would not tolerate prayers in English. According to the Essex Assize Records, Mother Waterhouse was accused of bewitching William Fynee to death, to which she confessed as well.(13)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 13

Agnes Waterhouse Agnes Waterhouse Relative of Victim
2

Elizabeth Francis is a woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be the granddaughter of Eve of Hatfield Peverel and the wife of Christopher Francis. Eve is said to have taught her granddaughter to be a witch at the age of twelve, bidding her to renounce God and "to geue of her bloudde to Sathan," a familiar in the shape of a white spotted cat. Eve taught her to feed Sathan with bread and milk and to keep it in a basket. Her first request was to "be ryche and to haue goodes" which the cat fulfilled by bringing her eighteen sheep but they "dyd all weare awaye." She wanted to marry Andrew Byles, which Sathan promised to help her do on the condition that she allow Byles to "abuse" her first; Byles refused to marry her after. In revenge, she had Sathan "waste his goodes" and later has Sathan kill him with a touch. Sathan demanded a drop of blood for every service, leaving red spots on her body. Francis found herself to be pregnant after Byle's death, which she ended by drinking a decoction of a herb Sathan recommended. When she was ready to try again for a husband, she successfully persuaded Christopher Francis by getting pregnant with his child; their daughter was born three months after the wedding. They fought often, leading Francis to have Sathan kill the child, now a year and a half old. The girl's death did not smooth their relationship, and Francis has Sathan lame her husband by appearing in his shoe in the shape of a toad and allowing Christopher to kill him. When she tired of Sathan, she allegedly passed him on to Mother Agnes Waterhouse, a woman who may have been her sister making her also the aunt of Joan Waterhouse. Francis is also said to have had a familiar in the shape of a dog bewitch Alice Poole for denying her yeast. She appears as tied to the legal pursuit of witchcraft in 1566, 1572, 1578, and 1579; she is mprisoned and pilloried. However, her alleged crimes eventually catch up with her. She is hanged for the bewitchment of Alice Poole. The Essex Assize records show her charged first with bewitching the infant John Auger, second with bewitching Mary Cocke, and the final time for bewitching Alice Poole to death.(9-11)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 9-11

Elizabeth Frauncis Elizabeth Francis Relative of Victim
126

A woman from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, known to be the grandmother of Grace Sowerbutts, mother of Henry Bierley, and mother-in-law to Ellen Bierley. She was indicted at the Lancaster Assizes, along with Ellen Bierley and Jane Southworth, for bewitching her granddaughter Grace so that her body wasted and was consumed. Jennet pleaded not guilty, and was eventually acquitted and released. Grace accused Jennet of numerous things. The accusations started with haunting and vexing her, drawing her by her hair, and laying her on top of a hay-mow. Grace also claimed that Jennet had shapeshifted into a black dog in front of her and picked her off a sty. Another time, Jennet came to Grace in dog shape and allegedly tried to persuade her to drown herself, but a spirit in a white sheet carried her away. Jennet-as-dog also buried Grace in hay and lay on top, robbing her of her speech, senses, and an entire day. Grace claimed to be unable to speak in Jennet's presence thereafter. Grace also accused Jennet and Ellen of stealing Thomas Walshman's child, driving a nail through its navel and sucking from the hole through a pen, then returning the child to its bed; the child languished and died thereafter. Once the child died, Jennet and Ellen allegedly took it from the churchyard, boiled it, ate it and rendered the fat from its bones to anoint themselves so they could change shape. Grace also said Jennet had brought her to attend a meeting of witches where four things like men carried them all across the water to eat strange meat, which Grace refused, and dance and "abuse their bodies." Thomas Walshman gave deposition confirming that he had a child who became sick and died, but he did not know the cause. Jennet accused Grace, in turn, of conspiring with the priest Master Thompson, who had been slandering her by calling her witch, and to whom Grace had been brought to by her mother. Grace retracted her accusations.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Jennet Bierley Jennet Bierley Relative of Victim
127

A woman from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, known to be the wife of Henry Bierley, aunt of Grace Sowerbutts, and daughter--in-law to Jennet Bierley. She was indicted at the Lancaster Assizes, along with Jennet Bierley and Jane Southworth, for bewitching her niece Grace so that her body wasted and was consumed. Ellen pleaded not guilty, and was eventually acquitted and released. Grace's accusations started with haunting and vexing her, drawing her by her hair, and laying her on top of a hay-mow. Later in the trial, Grace accused Ellen and Jennet of stealing Thomas Walshman's child, driving a nail through its navel and sucking from the hole through a pen, then returning the child to its bed; the child languished and died thereafter. Once the child died, they allegedly took it from the churchyard, boiled it, ate it and rendered the fat from its bones to anoint themselves so they could change shape. Grace also said she saw Ellen at a meeting of witches Jennet had brought Grace to, where four things like men carried them all across the water to eat strange meat, which Grace refused, and dance and "abuse their bodies." Thomas Walshman gave deposition confirming that he had a child who became sick and died, but he did not know the cause. Ellen accused Grace of conspiring with the priest Master Thompson in levelling the charges of witchcraft, but she could not say why, as she attended the church regularly. Grace retracted her accusations.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Ellen Bierley Ellen Bierley Relative of Victim
131

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be the wife of Richard Nutter, and the mother of Myles Nutter. She was charged with bewitching Henry Mytton to death and pronounced guilty. She was elderly, wealthy and of good reputation, and maintained her innocence to the end. Alice is said to be "a rich woman; had a great estate, and children of good hope: in the common opinion of the world, of good temper, free from enuy or malice." According to James Device, Alice conspired with Elizabeth Southerns and Elizabeth Device in Mytton's death after Mytton refused to give Southerns a penny, that Alice had been seen attending a meeting at Southerns' home, and that she had been at a feast of witches held at Malking Tower.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Alice Nutter Alice Nutter Relative of Victim
216

A boy from Thames Street near Broken Wharf in London, known to be the son of Master Nayler, and brother to Anne and Joan Nayler. Anne Kirk allegedly tormented George Nayler to death.(101)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 101

George Nayler George Nayler Relative of Victim
217

A girl from Thames Street near Broken Wharf in London, known to be the daughter of Master Nayler, and sister to George and Joan Nayler. Anne Kirk allegedly tormented Anne Nayler to death with an evil spirit, which caused her to have frenzied fits. Before she died, the spirit would talk to Master Nayler, and told him that "one would come after who should discouer the causer, and the truth of all."(101)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 101

Anne Nayler Anne Nayler Relative of Victim
218

A girl from Thames Street near Broken Wharf in London, known to be the daughter of Master Nayler, and sister to George and Joan Nayler. The spirit tormenting her sister Anne told their father Master Nayler "one would come after who should discouer the causer, and the truth of all" before she died. The day after Anne's burial, at which Anne Kirk was denied some of the alms the Nayler family gave to the poor, Joan began to be tormented by an evil spirit as well. The spirit possessing Joan spoke was heard to say "Giue me thy liuer, thy lights, thy heart, thy soule, &c; then thou shalt be released, then I will depart fro[m] thee" and to bid Joan to hang herself. Her body would be contorted in tormenting fits, during which she accused Anne Kirk of bewitching her. Master Nayler had Kirk apprehended, and thereafter Joan was witnessed to fall into fits whenever in Kirk's presence. She also had a fit when Kirk was bailed from prison, and while the jury was deliberating at Kirk's trial.(101-103)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 101-103

Jone Nayler Joan Nayler Relative of Victim
223

A man from Edmundbyres in the county of Durham, who is the husband of Margaret Hooper, a demoniac. Together, Stephen Hooper and Margaret Hooper have a young son. Stephen Hooper becomes concerned for his wife when she begins to act strange upon returning home from the village Hanstonueth. She begins to talk to herself, and "continued as if she had beene one bewitched, or haunted by an evill Spirit." Stephen Hooper becomes desperate to cure her, and tries to convince his wife to focus on God, and to pray with him. He himself undertakes praying for his wife, asking God to "send her a more quiet spirit, and to strengthen her." However, over time, Margaret Hooper becomes more troubled until one day, she experiences a fit, which causes such a fright for Stephen Hooper that he sends for her sister. Together, Stephen Hooper and Margaret Hooper's sister confine Margaret Hooper to her bed, where they notice she foams at the mouth, and shakes so badly, that the chamber and the bed shook with her. Stephen Hooper begins to pray for his wife again, and within a half-hour, she is much recovered, although still complains that she followed by a beast without a head or tail that no one else can see. Stephen Hooper still implores his wife to pray with him, which she did, and seemed fine for a week. However, after this time, Margaret Hooper begins to rage again, and has little memory of her fits, "to the great griefe of her husband." One night, Margaret Hooper wakes from a violent fit, and calls out for Stephen Hooper, claiming to "see a strange thing like unto a snale." Stephen Hooper tries to comfort his wife, but she remains fearful, asking him "doe not you see the Devill?" When Stephen Hooper counsels her to think of God, she tells him, "if you see nothing now, you shall see something by and by." Shortly after this, a great noise is heard in the street "as if it had beene the comming of foure or five carts." Looking up, Stephen Hooper sees a monster (Anonymous 245) coming towards their bed, "much like a beare, but it had no head nor taile," and was significantly taller. Stephen Hooper attempts to attack the beast with a stool, but it simply bounces off the monster as if it were a feather bed. The beast turns its attention to Margaret Hooper, stroking her on the feet three times. It then takes her out of the bed and rolled her around the chamber and under the bed. Finally, the apparition causes Margaret Hooper to put her head between her legs, and rolled her around like a hoop through the house, and down the stairs. Her husband does not dare go after at her, but instead weeps to see her carried away. The hall was filled with "an horrible stinke [...] and such fiery flames." Eventually, Margaret Hooper calls out to her husband, claiming the spirit is gone, and she comes up the stairs back to him. Together, with the rest of the household, Stephen and Margaret Hooper pray. During these prayers, the window is mysteriously opened, and suddenly, Margaret Hooper's leg's are thrust out the window, "so that they were clasped about the post in the middle of the Window betweene her leggs." As well, a great fire appears at her feet "the stink whereof was horrible." Her husband, and his brother decide to "charge the Devill in the name of the Father, the Sonne, and the holy Ghost to depart from her, and to trouble her no more," pulling her off the window. Margaret Hooper then cries out that she sees "a little child," (Anonymous 246) and upon looking out the window, a little child is seen, "with a very bright shinning countenance," that he outsides the candle. All present "fall flat to the ground," and pray. The child vanishes, and Margaret Hooper believes she is freed from her possession.(2 - 6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Most Fearful and Strange News from Durham being a True Relation of one Margaret Hooper of Edenbyres. London: 1641, 2 - 6

Stephen Hooper Stephen Hooper Relative of Victim
243

A man of Cleworth in the county of Lancashire and the parish of Leigh, known to be a gentleman and the father of the Starchie children, including Anne Starchie and John Starchie; the children allegedly suffered fits. Nicholas Starchie sought help as the children's fits became worse, eventually hiring Edmund Hartley, a conjurer with a reputation for charms and herbs. Starchie offered Hartley an annual pension for his help.(Image 5)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 5

Nicholas Starchie Nicholas Starchie Relative of Victim
364

A man from the parish of Little All Hallows in Thames street, London, husband of Grawthern, and the father of demoniac, Mary Glover. Timothy Glover is also the father of Anne Glover, a sister of Mary Glover; as well as the brother of the alderman and Sheriff Glover. When his daughter is taken ill, Tim Glover and his wife fear for their daughter's life as she is sickly, and so have the bells tolled, "the customary announcement of death or approaching death." When Mary Glover is assessed by Dr. Shereman, who believes the girl is afflicted by supernatural causes, Tim Glover and his wife, Gawthren Glover, seek out the help of another doctor, Dr. Mounford. All the while, he attempts to keep news of his daughter's sickness secret, even as her resistance to her fits give her parents hope that she will be cured. Eventually, Tim Glover and his wife seek out a group of ministers to perform a dispossession. During the dispossession of Mary Glover, Mr. Glover is visibly shaken, crying for his daughter "with abundance of teares in the disquietnes of this minde, and anguish of his hart." As soon as Mary Glover is dispossessed, Tim Glover "cryed out and saide (as well as his weepinge would giue him leaue) this was the crye of her grandfather goeing to be burned," comparing the words of his daughter to Dr. Taylor, her grandfather, an Anglican who was burned in the days of Queen Mary. Upon the dispossession of their daughter, the Glovers' reputation is restored. (Fol. 3r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 3r

Tim Glover Tim Glover Relative of Victim
365

A woman from the parish of Little All Hallows in Thames street, London, and the mother of demoniac, Mary Glover. Gawthren Glover is married to Tim Glover, and they share another daughter, Anne Glover. It is Gawthren Glover who sends her daughter initially on an errand to Elizabeth Jackson's house, the old woman accused of bewitching Mary Glover. While her daughter is at the house, Elizabeth Jackson curses and threatens the girl. A similar situation arises later, when Elizabeth Jackson stops by the Glover household, claiming to be seeking Gawthren Glover, and cursing the young Mary Glover again upon finding her. Upon hearing rumours of these threats and curses against her daughter, Gawthren Glover confronts Elizabeth Jackson herself in person. Elizabeth Jackson denies everything, "yet could not forbeare but speake these wordes to her face; You have not crosses ynow, but I hope you shall have as many crosses, as ever fell upon woman and Children." Mary Glover continues to suffer from mysterious fits, however, and her affliction becomes so severe that both Gawthren Glover and her husband, Tim Glover, have the bells tolled in anticipation of their daughter's death. Mary Glover is treated at this time by Dr. Shereman, who proves unable to cure the girl, and suggests she is afflicted by supernatural causes. However, the parents of Mary Glover decide to pursue the help of a second doctor, Dr. Mounford. During this, Gawthren and Tim Glover seek to keep their daughter's illness a secret. One day, Gawthren takes her daughter for a walk through the city, when they accidentally run into Elizabeth Jackson. Mary Glover is immediately taken ill, and Gawthren Glover must return home with her daughter. During these early fits, Mary Glover sometimes has her mouth open exceedingly wide, "during the which, there did flie out of her mouth a great venemous and stinking blast." When she breathes upon her mother's face, Gawthren Glover's face is swollen and blistered for many days, as well as Gawthren Glover's arm. Mary Glover attempts to fight off these fits, giving some hope to her parents that she will be cured. However, Mary Glover's symptoms persist. Eventually, Elizabeth Jackson is taken to court, where Mary Glover is accused by Bishop Bancroft of counterfeiting her symptoms. In order to prove this, Sir John Crook, the Recorder of London, is appointed to test Mary Glover. Gawthren Glover accompanies her daughter to these tests, which include being exposed to Elizabeth Jackson in disguise, and burning the inside of Mary Glover's hand. At the end of the tests, Sir John Crook is convinced that Mary Glover is bewitched, and imprisons Elizabeth Jackson. Gawthren Glover departs home with her daughter. Some months later, after Elizabeth Jackson has been convicted of witchcraft, Gawthren Glover is witness to her daughter's dispossession, performed by six preachers in front of numerous witnesses. After this dispossession, Gawthren Glover accompanies her daughter to live for the period of a year, along with Anne Glover, at the house of the preacher, Mr. Lewis Hughes, in order to help prevent a recurrence of Mary Glover's possession.(Fol. 3r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 3r

Gawthren Glover Gawthren Glover Relative of Victim
384

A man from Green-head in Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be minor gentry the father of Robert Nutter, John Nutter and Margaret Crooke, father-in-law of Marie Nutter, and the son of Elizabeth and old Robert Nutter. Anne Redferne was charged with and convinced of bewitching him to death; he died around 1594. Elizabeth Southerns alleged that she saw Anne Whittle and Anne Redferne making clay images of Christopher, Robert and Marie Nutter at Thomas Redferne's home. Margaret Crooke claimed that Christopher died the year after his son Robert, and that he said numerous times in his illness that he was bewitched. (E-Ev)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E-Ev

Christopher Nutter Christopher Nutter Relative of Victim
388

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, described as the father of demoniac, Hannah Crump. He takes his daughter to Thomas Hospital in London, as she suffers from strange, violent fits. However, the hospital refuses to take in Hannah Crump, leading John Crump to seek help from a man (Anonymous 147) who is said to know astrology. Anonymous 147 declares that Hannah Crump has been bewitched and that he cannot provide a perfect cure, and is thus dismissed by John Crump. He participates in a day of fasting and prayer to help his daughter become dispossessed. During this day, his daughter spits at him and rages while they pray over her. However, her dispossession is successful, and "God clothed our friend Iohn Crump [...] with garments of joy."(18)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 18

John Crump John Crump Relative of Victim
398

A man from Dagenham, in the County of Essex, husband of Alice Foster, and an accuser or amateur witch-finder. Foster, along with John Harrolde, identifies Joan Upney as a witch, forcing her to, or giving her time to flee. Upney does run, but she does not make it far, and she later confesses to sending her familiar to pinch Foster's wife soon after.(Sig. Aiiiv, B)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, Sig. Aiiiv, B

Richard Foster Richard Foster Relative of Victim
409

A woman from Yowell in the county of Surrey, known to be the mother of Mary Farmer and a witness in the trial against Joan Buts, who gave deposition alleging that Buts had bewitched her daughter to death. Mrs. Farmer and her husband, Mr. Farmer, consulted with Dr. Bourn; he said their child was under an "ill tongue" and advised them to catch some of Mary's urine, close it in a bottle and bury it, then burn the girl's clothes, and that doing so would draw out the witch. When the Farmers did so, Joan Buts allegedly came into their home and sat on a stool looking ghastly, and when asked said that she had not been well in several weeks, and could not help coming to the house. She was then seen to throw down her hat and roll on the ground making a horrible noise, then get up and start cursing.(1-2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. An Account of the Tryal and Examination of Joan Buts, for being a Common Witch and Inchantress. London: 1682, 1-2

Farmer Mrs. Farmer Relative of Victim
410

A man from Yowell in the county of Surrey, known to be the father of Mary Farmer and a witness in the trial against Joan Buts, who gave deposition alleging that Buts had bewitched his daughter to death. Mr. Farmer and his wife, Mrs. Farmer, consulted with Dr. Bourn; he said their child was under an "ill tongue" and advised them to catch some of Mary's urine, close it in a bottle and bury it, then burn the girl's clothes, and that doing so would draw out the witch. When the Farmers did so, Joan Buts allegedly came into their home and sat on a stool looking ghastly, and when asked said that she had not been well in several weeks, and could not help coming to the house. She was then seen to throw down her hat and roll on the ground making a horrible noise, then get up and start cursing.(1-2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. An Account of the Tryal and Examination of Joan Buts, for being a Common Witch and Inchantress. London: 1682, 1-2

Farmer Mr. Farmer Relative of Victim
419

A woman from Luyck in Brussels, known to be the wife of Anonymous 321 and the mother of Anonymous 11. She witnessed Anonymous 11's fits, in which the girl convulsed and vomited strange objects after Anonymous 12 came to the family home to beg and gave the girl a sorrel leaf. Anonymous 316 and Anonymous 321, along with their friends and neigbours, noticed that Anonymous 11's torments intensified whenever Anonymous 12 came near or looked at the home, and had the woman apprehended for witchcraft. Their daughter's condition did not improve after Anonymous 12's execution, however, so they took her to famous physician Henri de Heer.(5-6)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-6

Anonymous 316 Relative of Victim
420

A man from Luyck in Brussels, known to be the husband of Anonymous 316 and the father of Anonymous 11. He witnessed Anonymous 11's fits, in which the girl convulsed and vomited strange objects after Anonymous 12 came to the family home to beg and gave the girl a sorrel leaf. Anonymous 316 and Anonymous 321, along with their friends and neigbours, noticed that Anonymous 11's torments intensified whenever Anonymous 12 came near or looked at the home, and had the woman apprehended for witchcraft. Their daughter's condition did not improve after Anonymous 12's execution, however, so they took her to famous physician Henri de Heer.(5-6)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-6

Anonymous 321 Relative of Victim
429

A man from Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be a father. According to James Device, Bullock went to Elizabeth Southerns' home and accused her granddaughter Alison Device of bewitching his child. Alison allegedly "fell downe on her knees, & asked the said Bullocke forgiuenes, and confessed to him, that she had bewitched the said child, as this Examinate heard his said sister confesse vnto him this Examinate."(C2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2

Henry Bullocke Henry Bullocke Relative of Victim
450

A woman from Chelmsford in the county of Essex, known to be the wife of William Corner and the mother of one child, who refused to give Mother Staunton various items she had demanded; Staunton then demanded to know how many children Mrs. Corner had. The Corner child was then allegedly taken with sweat and chills, and started shrieking and staring, and wringing and writhing, until those who saw it were uncertain it would live.(12)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 12

Corner Mrs. Corner Relative of Victim
451

A man from Chelmsford in the county of Essex, known to be the husband of Mrs. Corner and the father of one, whose home Mother Staunton often stopped to beg alms; when Mrs. Corner refused to give Mother Staunton various items she had demanded, Staunton then demanded to know how many children Mrs. Corner had. The Corner child was then allegedly taken with sweat and chills, and started shrieking and staring, and wringing and writhing, until those who saw it were uncertain it would live.(12)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 12

William Corner William Corner Relative of Victim
453

A man from Chelmsford in the county of Essex, whose wife allegedly refused to give Mother Staunton milk; Mother Staunton is said to have made a circle on the ground with her knife in front of their door, marking it with the points of the compass in full view of the Cornells and their maid, and when they asked what she was doing, she answered that she was making an outhouse and left. The next day, Mrs. Cornell was taken sick after leaving the house through that door, her body swelling from time to time as if with child until she feared she would burst.(12-13)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 12-13

Robert Cornell Robert Cornell Relative of Victim
510

A woman from Maldon in the county of Essex, known to be the mother of Ellen Smith and wife to John Chaundeler, Alice Chaundleler executed for murder by witchcraft in 1574. After her death, Smith and John Chaundler had a falling out over money Alice had given her daughter that resulted in John Chaundler's death.(7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 7

Alice Chaundler Alice Chaundeler Relative of Victim
514

A woman from Little Clacton in the County of Essex and the wife of Robert Smith. Joan Smith is examined regarding the mysterious death of her infant. Smith, baby in her arms, had encountered Cecily Sellis one day as she was heading to church and Sellis had suggested that "shee hath neuer the more children for that, but a little babe to play wtall for a time. And she saith within short time after her said childe sickned and died." The proximity of these two events in enough to suggest a connection, however, Smith appears to resist making one; rather stating that her "co~science wil not serue her, to charge the said Cysley or her husband to be the causers of any suche matter, but prayeth God to forgiue them if they haue dealt in any such sort. &c." Her Christian conscious does not prevent Smith, however, from acting as a witch-searcher during the trial, participating in the search of Sellis and Ursely Kempe (at least). (D2v-D3)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, D2v-D3

Ioan Smith Joan Smith Relative of Victim
537

A man from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, a father to Rebecca Durrant, and local butcher. Durant appears once as having purchased a sow which had belonged Elizabeth Bennet after William Byet's wife Byets wife "did beate her swine seuerall times with greate Gybets, and did at an other time thrust a pitchforke through the side of one of this examinats swine, the which Durrant a Butcher did buie, and for that when hee had dressed it, it prooued A messell," so he returned the butchered beast, without recompense. Durrant who testifies against Ales Hunt, accusing her and her mother, Widow Barnes, of bewitching his daughter Rebbecca to death. Although Durrant testifies, the information he gives about this felony comes courtesy of Ursley Kempe while she was already imprisoned at Colchester Castle on suspicion of being a witch, and issued "some demaunds which hee vsed vnto her." According the Kempe, the malefic murder was an act of retribution for refusing to give the women some pork he had butchered. (D4v-D5)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, D4v-D5

Henry Durrant Henry Durrant Relative of Victim
540

A man from Great Clacton in the county of Essex and father to John Death and Marie Death and likely a sailor. Death's family begins to suffer from a series of problems following a verbal altercation between his wife and Cecily Sellis. Sellis had been fired as wet nurse to George Battell's child and Mrs. Death was hired, making Sellis "rayl" at Mrs. Death threatening that she would "loose more by the hauing of it, then thou shalt haue for the keeping of it," suggesting that getting this child would cost her one of her own. Their son, who had previously been healthy, "presently fell downe dead, and after by helpe being brought to life, the saide childe was in a pitious case, and so died presently." Right after, "seuerall Swine the which did skippe and leape about the yarde, in a most straunge sorte, and then died," and overnight a calf, which had been "very fatt," was found dead the next morning. Thomas' daughter would be the next to suffer. Death, newly returned from sea, was met by a messenger sent by his wife, with news that his daughter Marie, was ill. The messenger had Marie's urine with him to be studied by a physician in Ipswich, a man name Berte. The doctor would not tell him if "is daughter were not bewitched," so Death following an aquaitence, met up wit a cunningman, who studying the girl's urine suggested that Marie's situation was dire, sent him home with "thinges that were to bee ministred vnto his said daughter," and told him that within "two nyghtes after the parties that had hurte his daughter shoulde appeare vnto her, and remedie her." Within two nights Marie saw a vision of Cecley Sellis and Mary Barker and was indeed cured. (D8v-E2v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, D8v-E2v

Thomas Death Thomas Death Relative of Victim
542

A man likely from Thorpe in the county of Essex, a butcher, and the husband of Mrs. Strickland. Strickland testifies against Margaret Grevell. He suggests that his family experienced at least two bits of property damaged brought about by Grevell. Strickland refused to give Grevell's son a rack of newly butchered lamb on demand, and rather suggested the son come back after noon (it is unclear on whether or not he does. However, soon after, his wife is unable to churn butter. Strickland attempted a number of counter magic and pasteurizing techniques. He heated the milk over a great fire; he poured half out, and attempted to heat it again, but could neither make it seeth, nor later churn. The whole batch was ruined and pour out for the pigs. Soon after his main breeding cow "cast her calf" Strickland, fearing it would die painfully, euthanized the calf. (E3-E3v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, E3-E3v

Nicholas Stricklande Nicholas Stricklande Relative of Victim
544

A man from St. Osyth in the county of Essex and brother to Ursley Kempe. Lawrence Kempe testifies that "his late wife was taken in her backe, and in the priuie partes of her bodye, in a very extreame and most straunge sorte, and so continued about three quarters of a year. This origin of this bewitchment occurred circa 1580 when Ursley and Mrs. Kempe has a physical altercation when Ursley "tooke vp her clothes and did heat her vpon the hippes, and otherwise in wordes did misuse her greatly." Mrs. Kempe allegedly told her husband "seuerall times that Ursley kempe his sister, had forspoke her, and that shee was the onely cause of that her sicknesse." Mrs. Kempe's body grew cold before she died, and she lay in a kind of half life, "like a dead creature," until Ursley came one day, unannounced and again "lifted vp the clothes and tooke her by the arme, the which shee had not so soone doone, but presently after she gasped, and neuer after drew her breath and so dyed."(C4v-C5)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C4v-C5

Lawrence Kempe Lawrence Kempe Relative of Victim
554

A man from St. Osyth in the county of Essex and a husband to a sick woman. Edward Upcher visits Ursley Kempe to get see "what sicknes or diseases his wife had." Kempe confirmed to Upcher that his wife was "forspoke[n] or bewitched," by a local woman who had one small ear, a mole under her arm, and a woodstack in her yard. This narrative is listed amongst a number of other testimony against Joan Robinson, and therefore might be refereing to Robinson as the witch who had bewitched Mrs. Upcher.(F5v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, F5v

Edward Upcher Edward Upcher Relative of Victim
556

Sir Francis Manners is Justice of the peace for the County of Lincoln, the Earle of Rutland, owner of Belvoir (Beaver) Castle and father of Henry Lord Rosse, Francis Lord Rosse, and Lady Katherine. He is from Belvoir in the county of Leicestershire. All three of his children are allegedly bewitched after his wife, Countess Manners, dismisses Joan and Margaret Flower from their employment at Belvoir Castle. Margaret Flower alleged in her examination that Sir Francis Manners and Countess Manners were also bewitched to make them unable to have more children. He participated in the examinations of Anne Baker and Phillip Flower. Countess Cecily Manners is his second wife, his first wife, Frances, died shortly after Lady Katherine's birth. Both of his sons died young, leaving Lady Katherine his sole heir.(C2-C2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C2v

Francis Manners Sir Francis Manners Relative of Victim
557

Countess Cecily Manners, the second wife of Sir Francis Manners and the wealthy widow of Sir Edward Hungerford, she was from Belvoir in the county of Leicestershire. Identified as Lady Rosse, the Countess of Rutland, she was the mother of Henry Lord Rosse and Francis Lord Rosse, and stepmother to Lady Katherine. All three of her children allegedly become bewitched after Lady Rosse dismisses the Joan and Margaret Flower from their employment at Belvoir (Beaver) Castle. Margaret Flower alleged in her examination that Sir Francis Manners and Lady Rosse were also bewitched to make them unable to have more children. Countess Manners (C2-C2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C2v

Cecily Manners Countess Cecily Manners Relative of Victim
559

A young woman from from Belvoir in the county of Leicestershire, known to be the the daughter of Sir Francis Manners and Frances, (d. 1605), daughter of Henry Knyvet of Charlton, Wiltshire, and widow of Sir William Bevill, and the subsequent stepdaughter of Countess Cecily Manners. She was through this marriage the half-sister of Henry Lord Rosse and Francis Lord Rosse. This child of Sir Francis' first marriage, she would have been about 15 years old at the time of Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower's apprehension. She allegedly became afflicted with "extreame maladies and vnusuall fits" after Joan and Margaret Flower were dismissed from their employment at Belvoir (Beaver) Castle. Margaret Flower claimed that she stole a handkerchief from Lady Katherine at her mother, Joan Flower's, command. Joan is said to have put the handkerchief in hot water, rubbed it on her familiar Rutterkin, and bid Rutterkin to go to Lady Katherine, but the familiar only mewed, having no power to harm her. She would later marry George Villiers, becoming the Duchess of Buckingham, and bore three children to him (3 of whom survived infancy). Katherine was purportedly one of Jone of Charles I's favorites, he called her "poor fond Kate," and held a position of honor in Queen Henrietta Maria's chamber, and upon Villiers' death, she would become enormously wealthy. She would next marry Randal MacDonnell, a man with a lesser estate and a few years her junior, but who stood as the heir to the first earl of Antrim. She was described later in life as a woman of "great extraction and fortune, [...] very great wit and spirit."(Dv-D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Dv-D2

Katherine Manners Lady Katherine Manners Relative of Victim
565

A woman from Bottesford in the county of Leicester, whose young daughter was allegedly bewitched to death by Anne Baker. According to Anne Baker's confession, Stannidge brought her daughter to Baker, and Baker laid her on her skirt, but did the child no harm. Stannidge claimed that in order to get Baker to let her daughter go, she had to burn some hair and nail parings from the child, which made Baker come in and set the child down. Baker said that she remembered coming into Stannidge's house in great pain, but knew nothing of the burnt hair and nails, and was so sick at the time that she doesn't recall why she went in the first place. (D4v-E)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D4v-E

Anne Anne Stannidge Anne Stannidge Relative of Victim
573

A man from Bottesford in the county of Leicestershire, known to be the husband of Elizabeth Hough; Elizabeth was allegedly bewitched to death by Anne Baker after giving her "second bread," or inferior quality bread, for alms.(E)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E

William Hough Wiliam Hough Relative of Victim
574

A woman from Bottesford in the County of Leicester, known to be a mother, who asked Anne Baker to diagnose her child's illness. Baker told her that the child was forspoken; the child died some time later.(E-Ev)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E-Ev

Joane Gylles Joane Gylles Relative of Victim
582

A man from Stathorne in the county of Leicestershire, known to be a yeoman and widower. Both his wife, Mrs. Patchett, and their child died. Joan Willimott alleged that his child would have lived had he sought help for it in time, and his wife "had an euill thing within her, which should make an end of her, and that she knew by her Girdle." Ellen Green alleged that she had sent spirits to bewitch the child and Mrs. Patchett to death at Willimott's direction.(E4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E4v

John Patchett John Patchett Relative of Victim
583

A woman from Stathorne in the county of Leicestershire, known to be the wife of John Patchett. Both she and her child died, allegedly bewitched to death. Joan Willimott claimed that the child would have lived had John Patchett sought help for it in time, and Mrs. Patchett "had an euill thing within her, which should make an end of her, and that she knew by her Girdle." Ellen Green claimed that she had sent spirits to bewitch the child and Mrs. Patchett to death at Willimott's direction. According to Green, Mrs. Patchett languished "by the space of a moneth and more, for then shee dyed; the childe dyed the next day after she touched it."(E4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E4v

Pathchett Mrs. Patchett Relative of Victim
610

A man from Ware in the county of Hertfordshire, who loses his bible and swears revenge on the thief. He goes to see his neighbour (Anonymous 487), a reputted cunningman, to find out who stole the bible. However, Thomas Stretton accuses the cunning man of being a Witch or a Devil, causing deep anger in the cunning man and his wife, who in turn cause Thomas Stretton's daughter, Jane Stretton, to become afflicted with violent fits. Thomas Stretton eventually moves his daughter to a quieter house, as her condition causes many people from far and wide to visit. She is never dispossessed.(2)

Appears in:
Y., M.. The Hartford-shire Wonder. London: 1669, 2

Thomas Stretton Thomas Stretton Relative of Victim
647

A woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse and the wife of Anonymous 85. She and husband allegedly had a falling out with Mother Waterhouse, after which Mother Waterhouse bid her familiar Sathan to kill Anonymous 85 with a "bluddye flux." (15 (Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 15 (Bv)

Anonymous 86 Relative of Victim
653

A man from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, whom Elizabeth Weed allegedly attempted to kill by setting her familiar Lilly on him. Lilly went to him, but returned saying that he did not have the power to do so. Three days later, Weed succeeded in having Lilly kill Bedell's child instead.(2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 2

Henry Bedell Henry Bedell Relative of Victim
668

A man from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, who alleged that Francis Moore had killed his wife with a curse 21 years before, in 1625. Slater reported that his wife had a falling out with Moore shortly before giving birth, and that she had died a week after the birth. When Slater heard that Moore was in custody on charges of witchcraft, he went to her and asked her directly if she had caused his wife's death; he claimed that she had admitted to cursing her.(6)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 6

Peter Slater Peter Slater Relative of Victim
670

A girl from Keyston in the County of Huntingdon, known to be nine years old and the daughter of Mary Darnell and William Darnell, who was allegedly bewitched to death by Elizabeth Chandler. Katherine's mother claimed that Chandler had boxed Katherine's ear after their children had a falling out, and that the Katherine became sick soon thereafter. Katherine lay ill for three weeks before dying, complaining of pain in her ear and shrieking that Chandler had appeared to her and would kill her. Chandler denied striking Katherine, or having set a spirit on her.(8)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 8

Katherine Darnell Katherine Darnell Relative of Victim
677

A man from Milton in the county of Bedford, known to be a gentleman landowner and the father of a seven year old son. Mother Sutton and Mary Sutton began a vendetta against him and his for some unknown slight, beginning with the destruction of his horses in their stables and of his swine in their pens. After his stricken servant, Anonymous 89, reported that Mary had tried to coerce him into having sex with her in exchange for the return of his health, Master Enger took matters into his own hands and began a campaign of harassment in return. He approached Mary as she was tending hogs. When he could not persuade her to come with him, he snatched her by force and took her to Anonymous 89's bedside, where Anonymous 89 scratched her; the servant improved but became worse than before when she left. Master Enger's son died, for which he blamed Mary and Mother Sutton; he was visited in his grief by a gentleman friend (Anonymous 90), who advised him to swim both women to see if they floated. The next day, Master Enger seized Mary again, beat her senseless, bound her to his horse and dragged her to the water. She was observed to float like a plank, searched for teats, and a confession of her spirits forced out of her son. Master Enger had her swum a second time, this time bound toe to thumb and with a rope around her middle held on either end by servants; she floated again, and spun about as if caught in a whirlpool. He forced a confession out of her and used it to apprehend Mother Sutton as well, ultimately succeeding in having both tried and executed for witchcraft.(A4-A4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, A4-A4v

Enger Master Enger Relative of Victim
684

A man from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, the father of Martha Stevens, and described as "Michael, the shoemaker." Stevens claims to have heard from her own roommate that Annis Glascocke was a "naughtie woman, and a dealer in witchcrafte." This may be the reason he came to suspect, according to Ursley Kempe, that Glascocke had bewitched his daughter, Martha (via one of her spirits). Glascock was charged with bewitching Martha Stevens to death, found guilty, but remanded. She is still in prison as of August 2, 1582. (Cv)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, Cv

Michael Stevens Michael Stevens Relative of Victim
690

A man from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be a merchant, who gave deposition in court accusing Amy Denny and Rose Cullender of bewitching his daughters, Elizabeth and Deborah Pacy. Samuel Pacy alleged that Deborah's fits started when he refused to sell Amy Denny herring; the fits first manifested with lameness, and progressed to extreme pain in her stomach and shrieking when he refused Amy Denny the third and final time. Deborah is said to have cried out that Denny was the cause of her fits, for which Pacy charged Denny with witchcraft in October 1663 and had her thrown in the stocks. Shortly thereafter, Pacy's daughter Elizabeth also became afflicted, and both girls now claimed to see Denny and Cullender's apparitions during their fits. Mary Chandler alleged in her deposition that Pacy had charged both Cullender and Denny with bewitching his daughters in February 1664, resulting in a warrant for their examination. The morning after Denny and Cullender received a guilty verdict, Pacy claimed that his daughters had been restored to health within half an hour of the convictions.(18-20)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 18-20

Samuel Pacy Samuel Pacy Relative of Victim
694

A man from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the father of Ann Durent; he gave deposition alleging that Rose Cullender bewitched Ann when his wife refused to sell Cullender herring. According to Durent's deposition, Ann was afflicted with great pain in her stomach like the pricking of pins, fell into swooning fits, and upon recovery claimed that she had seen an apparition of Cullender which threatening to torment her. He also alleged she had vomited pins, which he produced as evidence in court.(33-34)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 33-34

Edmund Durent Edmund Durent Relative of Victim
696

A woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the mother of Jane Bocking, who gave deposition in court alleging that her daughter had suffered fits at the hands of Rose Cullender and Amy Denny. According to her deposition, Jane was afflicted with swooning fits and the daily vomiting of crooked pins. During her fits, Jane would be found to hold crooked pins clenched in her hands, or, once, a lath-nail. At other times, Jane would talk as if conversing to someone, but take no notice of anyone in the room with her, or complain that Cullender and Denny were standing at the head or foot of her bed. After had recovered from being struck dumb for several days, Diana asked why she had been unable to speak, to which Jane answered "Amy Duny would not suffer her to speak." Diana produced the lath-nail and pins as evidence in court.(35-38)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 35-38

Diana Bocking Diana Bocking Relative of Victim
698

A woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the mother of Susan Chandler and the wife of Robert Chandler, who was called on to search Rose Cullender for witch's marks along with five other women. Mary gave deposition in court that they had stripped Cullender naked during the search, finding a thing like a teat on the lower part of her belly, about an inch in length. Three more were found on Cullender's privy parts, but smaller. The largest one had a little hole in the end and looked as though it had recently been sucked; on handling, it was induced to issue a "white milkie Matter." Mary further alleged that the day after the search, Cullender appeared to Susan Chandler and took her by the hand. Later that day, Susan began to be afflicted with fits in which she vomited pins or was struck blind or dumb; Mary reported that Susan claimed to have seen an apparition of Cullender accompanied by a large dog during these fits.(38-42)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 38-42

Mary Chandler Mary Chandler Relative of Victim
699

A man from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the father of Susan Chandler and husband of Mary Chandler. Robert Chandler gave deposition against Rose Cullender, corroborating Mary's account of having been one of the witch-searchers who examined Cullender, and her account of their daughter Susan's affliction with fits at Cullender's hands after the examination.(42)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 42

Robert Chandler Robert Chandler Relative of Victim
701

A boy from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the infant son of Dorothy Durent, whom Dorothy alleged in her deposition was bewitched by Amy Denny. Dorothy claimed that William was afflicted by fits of swooning after Denny looked after the child for her; Dorothy said that she had requested Denny not give William suck, but discovered on her return that Denny had done so anyway. She had been angry and Denny angry in return, saying "she had as good to have done otherwise than to have found fault with her." William fell sick that night. Dorothy reported that she consulted a Doctor Jacob in Yarmouth, who had a reputation for helping bewitched children, and that he had advised her to "hang up the Childs Blanket in the Chimney corner all day, and at night when she put the Child to Bed, to put it into the said blanket, and if she found any thing in it, she should not be afraid, but to throw it into the Fire." When she did so, a great toad fell out of William's blanket, which made a horrible noise and flashed like gunpowder when held in the fire before disappearing. The next day, Durent visited Denny and found her burnt. William recovered, and was well at the time of the assizes.(5-11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 5-11

William Durent William Durent Relative of Victim
702

A woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the mother of William and Elizabeth Durent, and a neighbor of Amy Denny. Dorothy gave deposition in court that Denny had bewitched both of her children and that Elizabeth had died as a result. She alleged that they had argued when Dorothy asked Denny to watch William and returned to find that Denny had suckled him against her express wishes, and that William had become sick with fits that same evening. William recovered after Dorothy consulted with Dr. Jacob, a known unwitcher, and burned a toad that fell out of William's blanket when Dorothy followed Dr. Jacob's directions. Elizabeth became sick soon after with similar fits, however. Dorothy claimed that she had returned from the apothecary one day to find Denny at her home on the excuse of giving Elizabeth some water and, when Dorothy ejected her from the house, prophesied that Elizabeth would not live long. Two days later, Elizabeth died. Dorothy also claimed that after Elizabeth's death, she suffered a lameness in her legs, and was seen to be on crutches at the trial. After the indictment, Dorothy was allegedly restored the use of her legs.(5-14)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 5-14

Dorothy Durent Dorothy Durent Relative of Victim
729

A woman from Wapping in the county of Greater London who is with Sarah Bower during her fits. She is Sarah Bower's aunt. (3)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 3

Bower (Aunt) Relative of Victim
731

A woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the sister of Samuel Pacy and aunt to Elizabeth and Deborah Pacy, who gave deposition in court against Rose Cullender and Amy Denny. In her deposition, she alleged that she had taken care of her nieces for a time, and that on their arrival had removed all pins from their clothing, thinking their fits were the product of deceit. Despite her precautions, Arnold saw both girls vomit pins several times during violent fits, and that they cried out they had seen Cullender and Duny threaten to torment them ten times more if they complained. Arnold also alleged that the children would see things like mice, catch them in tongs and throw them into the fire; while Arnold could not see what they were catching, she did see one flash like gunpowder when it hit the fire. She reported that the girls claimed that bees and flies brought pins and nails, and forced them into their mouths. Deborah, the younger girl, once said to Arnold that Denny had been with her and tried to tempt her to suicide; another time both girls cried out asking Denny and Cullender why they sent imps to torment them instead of doing it themselves. At the end of her deposition, Arnold stated that she was now convinced that her nieces were truly possessed.(27-33)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 27-33

Margaret Arnold Margaret Arnold Relative of Victim
824

A woman from Southwark in the county of Greater London, known to be the mother of Joan Seager. Elizabeth Seager brought her daughter to Mabel Swinnington for help after Joan was raped by Dr. Lambe. At the time, Elizabeth's husband was imprisoned awaiting execution on unknown charges.(16-18)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 16-18

Elizabeth Seager Elizabeth Seager Relative of Victim
845

A woman from Guilsborough in the county of Northampton, known to be the sister of Master Avery, who is allegedly bewitched by Agnes Brown and Joan Vaughan after striking Vaughan for unseemly behavior and sending her away. Not long after, Belcher is said to have been taken with a sudden intolerable pain in her body and to have suffered disfigurement. She was heard to cry out "Heere comes Ioane Uaughan, away with Ioane Uaughan," and to have cried out against Brown as well. When Brown and Vaughan were apprehended and gaoled in Northampton, Belcher was brought to them and allowed to scratch them, which ended her pain for a time. On the road back home from the gaol, she and Avery suffered the loss of their horses after encountering a strangely gesturing man and woman.(B2-B3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B2-B3

Belcher Mistress Belcher Relative of Victim
958

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, described as the father of James Barrow, a boy who suffers from violent and tormenting fits. John Barrow is the author of the text, "The Lord's arm stretched out in an answer of prayer, or, A true relation of the wonderful deliverance of James Barrow," in which he chronicles his son's episodes, and attempts to determine their cause. James Barrow's father, John Barrow, seeks help from outside. He first employs the help of physician and astrologer John Hubbard, who believes Barrow has been bewitches. They use "fopperies and charms" including hanging papers around James Barrow's neck, and putting quills and quicksilver under the door. These prove unsuccessful at healing James Barrow. John Hubbard's second attempt to cure James Barrow of bewitchment is through cutting the boy's hair in a round circle, and trimming his fingers and toe nails. These are trimmings are wrapped in paper and deposited in an oak tree. This also proves useless at curing James Barrow's fits as well. However, after taking some medicine from doctors, astrologers, and apothecaries, James Barrow vomits, and seems well for a time, taking up an apprenticeship. However, after three months, James Barrow claims a rat entered his body, and he acts like a changeling, being unable to eat any food unless in his own household. Following this, John Barrow takes his son to a number of wise men, including: an Irish Roman Catholic (Anonymous 144), Lord Abony, a gentleman (Anonymous 146), a group of friars, and a doctor (Anonymous 487). No one seems able to cure James Barrow. However, shortly after this, John Barrow desires to engage in fasting and prayer for his son, resulting in three days of fasting and prayer, at the end of which he is restored and dispossessed. (6-7)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 6-7

John Barrow John Barrow Relative of Victim
963

A man from Weethead within the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be a miller and a father, whose daughter was allegedly bewitched to death by Elizabeth Southerns. According to Southerns' confession, her daughter, Elizabeth Device, had helped out Richard Baldwin's family with running the mill, and Device asked Southerns to go to his home to ask him to give her something in payment. Southerns, accompanied by her granddaughter Alison Device (Southerns was blind due to advanced age), was thrown out by Baldwin, who said "get out of my ground Whores and Witches, I will burne the one of you, and hang the other." Southerns instructed her familiar Tibb to "Reuenge thee eyther of him, or his" on the way home. Device gave deposition alleging that Southerns had a falling out with Baldwin, and once asked her to lead Southerns to Baldwin's home late at night; the next day, Device heard that Baldwin's daughter was sick. The child languished for a year before finally dying; Device was convinced that Southerns bewitched her to death.(B2v-B3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B2v-B3v

Richard Baldwyns Richard Baldwin Relative of Victim
969

A man from the Bull-Hole in Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be minor gentry and the son of Christopher Nutter, brother to Robert Nutter and Margaret Crooke, grandson of Elizabeth Nutter and Robert Nutter the older, and father to a son. He is also the neighbour of Anne Whittle, alias Chattox. According to Alison Device, John Nutter once asked her grandmother Elizabeth Southerns to cure a sick cow, which Southerns agreed to do. Device also told of an encounter Nutter had with Anne Whittle's daughter Elizabeth. Whittle's daughter went to Nutter to beg a dish of milk and brought the milk to Whittle. While Whittle was churning it, Nutter's son came up to her and, disliking what she was doing, knocked over the can with the milk. The next day, Nutter's cow was found to be sick; it languished three or four days before dying.(C-Cv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C-Cv

John Nutter John Nutter Relative of Victim
990

A man from Halifax in the County of York, known to be a clothier (tailor) and the son of John Law. He accompanied his father to the Lancaster Assizes to give deposition against Alison Device, who was charged with bewitching John Law. Abraham claimed that he went to his father in Coine after receiving a letter from him, and found John speechless and lamed on his left side with the exception of his eye. Abraham said that once John recovered his speech, he complained of being pricked, and that it had started when Alison Device offered to buy pins from him but had no money to pay; John gave her the pins anyway. John also complained to him that Device lay upon him and troubled him along with an old woman he did not know.(R3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, R3

Abraham Law Abraham Law Relative of Victim
991

A woman from Paddiham in the county of Lancashire, known to be a mother, who was allegedly bewitched to death along with her daughter by Margaret Pearson. Anne Whittle gave the deposition accusing Pearson of causing the Childers' deaths.(S4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, S4v

Childer Mrs. Childer Relative of Victim
992

A girl from Paddiham in the county of Lancashire, who was allegedly bewitched to death along with her mother Mrs. Childer by Margaret Pearson. Anne Whittle gave the deposition accusing Pearson of causing the Childers' deaths.(S4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, S4v

Childer Childer (Daughter) Relative of Victim
994

A woman from Windle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the wife of Peter Chaddock. According to Peter Chaddock, he had a falling out with Robey as she "was not pleased that hee should marrie his now wife: whereupon this Examinate called the said Isabel Witch, and said that hee did not care for her." Four years later, Mrs. Chaddock argued with Robey at Chaddock's home, which Peter claimed caused Robey to bewitch him with with a pain in his neck, intense thirst and a feeling of heat throughout his body for five days. Margaret Lyon claimed to have had a conversation with Mrs. Chaddock in which Chaddock said, regarding Robey, "I thinke that my Husband will neuer mend vntill hee haue asked her forgiuenesse, choose him whether hee will bee angrie or pleased, for this is my opinion: to which he answered, when he did need to aske her forgiuenesse, he would, but hee thought hee did not need, for any thing hee knew."(T3-T3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, T3-T3v

Chaddock Mrs. Chaddock Relative of Victim
1005

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the author of "Wonderfull Newes from the North," the mother of Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr., Betty Muschamp and Sibilia Moore, the widow of George Muschamp and the wife of Edward Moore. Mary Moore's children Margaret, George and Betty were all allegedly bewitched by Dorothy Swinow and John Hutton; Swinow was also accused of causing Moore's daughter Sibilia to die in infancy. Moore consulted doctors on behalf of her children, and brought two drops of John Hutton's blood to Margaret when the child became convinced she required it to recover. Moore campaigned to have both Hutton and Swinow tried for the bewitchment of her children.(Preface)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, Preface

Mary Moore Mary Moore Relative of Victim
1009

A boy from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the eldest son of Mary Moore and her first husband George Muschamp, the brother to Margaret Muschamp and Betty Muschamp, and the half-brother to Sibilla Moore. After his sister Margaret had been afflicted with her fits for about a year, George Muschamp Jr. allegedly also became afflicted with illness and pain while "both his stomack and the use of his legs taken from him." He subsisted on milk, water and sour milk, consuming away; he nevertheless retained his spirits and would talk and laugh with friends. The doctors predicted he had a month to live. According to Margaret, John Hutton and Dorothy Swinow were responsible for his wasting, and that two drops of blood from either of them would save his life. Mary Moore got blood from Hutton for George Jr., and Hutton used the opportunity to cast sole blame on Swinow. Margaret also claimed that if Swinow was brought to justice, her brother's illness would end and if there were no justice, he would become sicker than ever before. Margaret White, in her confession, alleged that Swinow and Jane Martin were responsible for the afflictions of the Muschamp children. (4-5)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 4-5

George Muschamp George Muschamp Jr. Relative of Victim
1011

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the wife of Lord Robert Hambleton, the sister of Mary Moore and the aunt of Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr., Betty Muschamp and Sibilla Moore. According to Mary Moore, Margery Hambleton "dyed in a restlesse sicknesse;" John Hutton claimed that Dorothy Swinow was responsible. Margaret Muschamp also blamed Swinow for Hambleton's death. Robert Hambleton is said to have died from a broken heart not long after, the estate falling to their son thereafter.(8)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 8

Margery Hambleton Margery Hambleton Relative of Victim
1012

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a Lord and knight, the husband and widower of Lady Margery Hambleton, and the brother-in-law of Mary Moore. Robert Hambleton is said to have died from a broken heart not long after Margery's death, the estate falling to their son thereafter.(15)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 15

Robert Hambleton Sir Robert Hambleton Relative of Victim
1014

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the first husband of Mary Moore, and the father of Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. He died an unknown time before his children allegedly became bewitched; his widow Mary married Edward Moore and later authored an account of their bewitchment.(1)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 1

George Muschamp George Muschamp Relative of Victim
1015

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the second husband of Mary Moore, the father of six sons and one daughter from his previous marriage, the father of Sibilla Moore, and the stepfather of Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. He, along with his sons and eldest daughter, witnessed Margaret's fits and alleged conversations with angels, and her claim that two drops of John Hutton's blood had helped her and would do the same for her brother George. Margaret also claimed that Dorothy Swinow had hardened the hearts of the judges and of Edward Moore against Mary Moore. Margaret White alleged that Swinow and Swinow's sister Jane Martin had come to Edward Moore's home to bewitch Margaret to death, cause George Jr. and Betty's torments, and bewitch Sibilla Moore to death as an infant when they could not kill Mary Moore or cause Sibilla to die in the womb. Swinow was finally apprehended and gaoled awaiting trial on charges of bewitching his daughter Sibilla to death.(9)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9

Edward Moore Edward Moore Relative of Victim
1043

A man from Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the father of Anne Nutter. Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, confessed to using her familiar Fancie to bewitch his cow to death for preferring Elizabeth Southerns to her. Alison Device claimed that Whittle also bewitched his daughter Anne do death for laughing at her.(E2v-E3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2v-E3

Anthony Nutter Anthony Nutter Relative of Victim
1044

A young girl from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the ten year old daughter of Dorothy Durent and sister of William Durent; she was allegedly bewitched to death by Amy Denny. Dorothy Durent gave deposition in court that, after Denny gave suck to baby William against Dorothy's wishes and caused William to have fits when Dorothy became angry, Elizabeth also began to suffer fits. According to Dorothy, Elizabeth complained of Denny during her fits. Dorothy also claimed that she had returned from the apothecary one day to find Denny at her home; Denny said she was there to give Elizabeth some water, and, when Dorothy ejected her from the house, prophesied that Elizabeth would not live long. Two days later, Elizabeth died.(11-13)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 11-13

Elizabeth Durent Elizabeth Durent Relative of Victim
1047

A child from Belvoir in the county of Leicester, the son of Sir Francis Manners and Countess Manners, brother to Henry Manners and half brother to Katherine Manners. Francis would be poised to inherit the title of Lord Rosse and the Earl of Rutland following the death of his brother Henry; he is half-brother to Lady Katherine. Child of Sir Francis' second marriage, he would have been no more than 7 or 8 years old at the time of Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower's apprehension. He allegedly became bewitched, suffering a strange sickness, after Phillip and Margaret Flowers were dismissed from service by his mother, Lady Rosse. His glove was stolen from a dung-heap by Margaret Flower, who gave it to her mother Joan Flower; Joan is said to have used the glove to bewitch him by boiling it in water, rubbing it on her familiar Rutterkin and burying it in the yard. He eventually recovered from his affliction. Francis would not be the only member of his family would would allegedly suffer from the malefic ministrations brought down by the Flowers women. Both his parents would likewise become extraordinarily ill with "sicknesse and extraordinary conuulsions," his sister, Katherine was at "many times in great danger of life, through extreame maladies and vnusuall fits," and his elder brother, Henry, sickened and died. (Dv-D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Dv-D2

Francis Manners Francis Lord Rosse Relative of Victim
1049

A man from Salmesbury in the county of Lancashire, known to be the husband of Ellen Bierley and uncle of Grace Sowerbutts. Grace accused Ellen of bewitching her along with three other women; she claimed that once they dragged her on top of a hay-mow in Henry Bierly's barn.(K4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K4v

Henry Bierley Henry Bierley Relative of Victim
1051

A child from Belvoir in the county of Leicester, known to be the son of Sir Francis Manners. He would become himself, for a short while, Lord Rosse and the Earl of Rutland. He is brother to Francis Manners Jr. and half-brother to Lady Katherine Manner. Child of Sir Francis' second marriage, he would have been no more than 7 years old at the time of his death. Henry was allegedly bewitched by Margaret, Phillip and Joan Flowers, so that "he sickened verty strangely and after a while dyed."Lord Henry's glove was stolen by Margaret Flower for her mother Joan Flower; Joan rubbed the glove on the back of her familiar Rutterkin, boiled it it water, stuck it with pins, and buried it in her yard. Lord Henry died not long after. According to Anne Baker's confession, Mrs. Peake and Mrs. Dennis told her that Lord Henry had died because as the glove rotted and wasted, so did Lord Henry's liver. Henry would not be the only member of the family tormented by witchcraft; his parents would be "subiect to sicknesse and extraordinary conuulsions," and made barren, and his brother would likewise be "inhumanely tortured by a strange sicknesse," and his sister was "many times in great danger of life, through extreame maladies and vnusuall fits." However, Henry appears to be the only one who died as a direct cause of presumed bewitchment. (F3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F3

Henry Rosse Henry Lord Rosse Relative of Victim
1061

A man from Higham in the county of Lancashire, known to a gentleman, the husband of Mrs. Moore and father of John Moore. Anne Whittle confessed to having amended some drink belonging to Moore which had been forespoken; she claimed that Mrs. Moore had sent for her to do it. Alison Device alleged that Whittle was suspected of having bewitched the drink herself, and that Whittle had also caused Moore's son to become sick for half a year and finally die. Device claimed to have seen Whittle sitting in her garden with a clay image of Moore's child.(E2v-E3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2v-E3

John Moore John Moore Relative of Victim
1062

A child from Higham in the county of Lancashire, known to be the son of John Moore and Mrs. Moore. Alison Device alleged that Whittle caused John Moore Jr. to become sick for half a year and finally die. Device claimed to have seen Whittle sitting in her garden with a clay image of him.(E4-E4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E4-E4v

John Moore John Moore Jr. Relative of Victim
1063

A man from Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the brother of James Robinson, who was allegedly bewitched to death by Elizabeth Device. Device confessed to having made a clay image of Robinson at her familiar Ball's direction; she said she dried it by the fire and crumbled it over the course of the next week, and that he died not long after. She claimed that Robinson had "chidden and becalled this Examinate, for hauing a Bastard child with one Seller." Elizabeth's daughter, Jennet Device, claimed that Elizabeth asked Ball to help her kill Robinson. Elizabeth's son, James Device, also claimed that she had made a clay image of Robinson. James also claimed to have stolen a wether (a castrated goat or sheep) from Robinson.(F3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, F3v

John Robinson John Robinson Relative of Victim
1088

A woman from Green-head in Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the wife of Robert Nutter the younger. According to Elizabeth Southerns, she saw Anne Whittle and Anne Redfearne making clay images, including ones of Marie Nutter and of her husband Robert.(E-Ev)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E-Ev

Marie Nutter Marie Nutter Relative of Victim
1097

A man from Guilsborough in the county of Northampton, known to be the brother of Mistress Belcher, who allegedly witnessed his sister's torments and heard her cry out that Joan Vaughan and Agnes Brown were the cause. He tried to lure Vaughan and Brown from their home to scratch them, but encountered an invisible barrier and was unable to approach the house. Unable to help his sister, he returned to his home, but began to be tormented in the same way. This continued until Brown and Vaughan were apprehended and gaoled in Northampton. Avery was brought to them and allowed to scratch them, which ended his pain for a time. On the road back home from the gaol, Avery and Belcher suffered the loss of their horses after encountering a strangely gesturing man and woman; Avery praised God that it was their horses and not them that died.(B3-B4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B3-B4

Avery Master Avery Relative of Victim
1100

A boy from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the son of Edward Moore and his first wife, brother to five full brothers and a sister, half-brother to Sibilla Moore and step-brother to Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. This brother was present during Margaret Muschamp's first tormenting fit, and witnessed numerous others along with his father and siblings, in which she talked to angels, lost the use of her limbs, tongue and stomach, and vomited strange objects. He also heard Margaret say that she had been saved by two drops of John Hutton's blood, and that her brother George Jr.'s life would also be saved if he were brought the same. (2)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 2

Moore Moore (Sibing-Brother 1) Relative of Victim
1107

A woman from Higham in the county of Lancashire, known to be the wife of John Moore and mother of John Moore Jr. Anne Whittle claimed that Mrs. Moore sent for her to amended some drink which had been forespoken. Alison Device alleged that Whittle was suspected of having bewitched the drink herself, and that Whittle had also caused Moore's son to become sick for half a year and finally die. Device claimed to have seen Whittle sitting in her garden with a clay image of Moore's child.(E2v-E3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2v-E3

Moore Mrs. Moore Relative of Victim
1111

A child from Stathorne in the county of Leicestershire, known to be the child of John Patchett and Mrs. Patchett, and was allegedly bewitched to death along with its mother. Joan Willimott claimed that the child would have lived had John Patchett sought help for it in time. Ellen Green claimed that she had sent spirits to bewitch the child and Mrs. Patchett to death at Willimott's direction. According to Green, "the childe dyed the next day after she touched it."(E4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E4v

Patchett (Child) Relative of Victim
1112

A man from Green-head in Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be minor gentry and the husband of Marie Nutter, son of Christopher Nutter, grandson of Robert Nutter the older and Elizabeth Nutter, brother of John Nutter and half-brother to Margaret Crooke; he is said to have been bewitched to death by Anne Whittle and Anne Redferne. Whittle alleged in her confession that Nutter had desired her daughter, Anne Redferne, but that Redferne had refused his advances. He left in a rage, saying that "if euer the Ground came to him, shee should neuer dwell vpon his Land." When Whittle heard this, she called her familiar Fancie to her, and bid Fancie to revenge her of Nutter; three months later, he died. Whittle added that Nutter's grandmother Elizabeth had gathered together Whittle, Widow Loomshaw and Jane Boothman to request their help in killing Nutter so that the land would go to the women instead. Whittle was persuaded not to participate at that time by her son-in-law Thomas Redferne, but she thought that "the sayd Loomeshaws wife, and lane Boothman, did what they could to kill the sayd Robert Nutter, as well as this Examinate did." Elizabeth Southerns claimed to have seen Whittle and Anne Redferne making clay images of Nutter, his wife Marie and father Christopher. James Robinson gave deposition that Nutter had often complained that Whittle and Redferne were the cause of his illness and had threatened Thomas Redferne with eviction. Margaret Crooke claimed that Nutter was sick within two weeks of falling out with Anne Redferne and blamed her for his illness. John Nutter claimed that Nutter insisted he would have Whittle and Redferne imprisoned for bewitching him, but that their father Christopher told him "Thou art a foolish Ladde, it is not so, it is thy miscarriage. "(B4-B4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4-B4v

Robert Nutter Robert Nutter Relative of Victim
1113

A man from Salmsbury in the county of Lancashire, known to be a yeoman, the son of Hugh Walshman, a husband, and the father of an infant. Grace Sowerbutts accused her grandmother Jennet Bierley and aunt Ellen Bierley of taking his child from his home in the night to drive a nail into its navel and suck from the hole, causing it to become sick and die; Grace also accused them of cannibalizing the child's body and rendering the fat from its bones. Walshman gave deposition saying that he did have a child who had become sick and died at about one year of age, but that he did not know the cause. He added that Grace had recently been found in his father's barn under the hay, and that she had stayed in his home for the next day lying speechless as if dead. Grace later retracted her accusations.(Lv-L2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Lv-L2v

Thomas Walshman Thomas Walshman Relative of Victim
1204

A woman of Cleworth in the county of Lancashire in the parish of Leigh, known to be wife of Nicholas Starchie and the mother of Anne Starchie and John Starchie. During Lent, Mistress Starchie questioned her children on their well-being. They call her filthy names during their fits.(Image 5, 6)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 5, 6

Starchie Mistress Starchie Relative of Victim
1211

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, the wife of Richard Letherdall and mother of Elizabeth Letherdall, who accuses Ursula Kempe of bewitching her daughter, Elizabeth Letherdall, after she refused to give Kempes son (Anonymous 185) some scouring sand for her, knowing that Kempe was a "naughtie beast," despite the fact that Kempe had offered to dye a pair of women's hose for her in payment. Kempe muttered at Elizabeth and she developed a "great swelling in the bottome of the belly, and other priuie partes," Letherdall visited a cunning woman who diagnosed the girl as having been bewitched by Kempe. Kempe scoffed at Lethedall claiming that she "would lay her life that she the said Annis had not been with any [cunning folk]," so certain was she, that Kempe "requested a woman being in the house a spinning with the said Ursley, to beare witnesse what shee had said." Letherdall takes the child to Mother Ratcliffe's for treatment, however, at the time of Assize (March 1582), the child was "in most pitious sort consumed, and the privie and hinder partes thereof, to be in most strange and wonderfull case, as it seemed to berye honest women of good judgement, and not likely to live and continue any long time." Elizabeth Letherdall died on February 26, 1582. Despite the bad blood between the women, Letherdall is allowed to / asked to search Annis Glascocke for witch's marks. She, along with Margaret Simpson, discover spots on the the left side of Annis Glascocke's thigh, and some spots on her shoulder, which they conclude looked like they had been sucked. Kemp, believing that she would be afforded some lienance if she confessed, answered the specific questions Brian Darcey demanded of her, confessing to sending her familiar "Pigen [to torment] Letherdalls Childe" and begging "forgiuenesse of the sayde Letherdalls wife." (A2v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A2v

Annis Letherdall Annis Letherdall Relative of Victim
1258

A girl from Maldon in the county of Essex, known to be 4 years old and the daughter of Widow Webbe, who has a falling out with Ellen Smith's daughter; Smith allegedly came her home the next day and struck her on the face, causing her to becomes ill, and die two days later. During the days of her illness, Susan Webbe is said to have cried continually "awaie with the Witche, awaie with the Witch." Immediately after she died, her mother saw a thing like a black dog leave the house, which upset Widow Webbe out of her wits. Smith was tried at the Chelmsford assizes for Susan's death and found guilty.(9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 9

Susan Webbe Susan Webbe Relative of Victim
1294

An infant girl from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be the daughter of Elizabeth Francis and Christopher Frances, and a year and a half old at the time of her death. Elizabeth used her pregnancy with this child to convince Christopher Frances to marry her; their daughter was born within three months after the wedding. When the marriage proved prone to " much vnquietnes and moued to swearing and cursinge," Elizabeth asked her familiar Sathan to kill the child in the hope that their relationship would improve if it were just the two of them again.(9, 11-12)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 9, 11-12

Francis Francis (Child) Relative of Victim
1295

A man from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a yeoman, the husband of Elizabeth Francis and father of an infant girl. When Elizabeth desired Christopher as her husband, her familiar Sathan advised her to fornicate with him first; Elizabeth then used the resulting pregnancy to convince Christopher to marry her. Their daughter was born within three months after the wedding. When the marriage proved prone to "much vnquietnes and moued to swearing and cursinge," Elizabeth asked Sathan to kill the child in the hope that their relationship would improve if it were just the two of them again. The marriage continued unquiet after the child's death and Elizabeth had Sathan lie in wait in Christopher's shoe in the form of a toad. When Christopher found the toad with his toe, she had him kill it, giving Sathan the opportunity to inflict Christopher with "a lamenes wherof he can not healed"(9, 11-12)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 9, 11-12

Christopher Francis Christopher Francis Relative of Victim
1314

A man from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, whose wife Alice Newman is an accused witch and allegedly the "cause of her husbands great miserie and wretcher state." According to their neighbor, William Hooke, she allowed her familiars to torment him and possibly kill him.(A6-A6v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A6-A6v

William Newman William Newman Relative of Victim
1354

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be George Muschamp's niece and cousin to Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. Mary Moore left Margaret in Elizabeth's care one day when she had to go abroad; Margaret's voice was afflicted, leaving her only able to communicate with signs. Elizabeth brought Margaret into the garden at the child's request, and witnessed her cousin sit limply for a quarter hour and then suddenly jump up and run "thrice about the Garden, expressing a shrill voyce, but did not speake presently: she that was brought down in this sad condition came up staires on her owne legs, in her Cozens hands." She saw Margaret run to greet her mother on her return, and call out a welcome. Elizabeth also witnessed Margaret talking with her angels after receiving two drops of John Hutton's blood, and heard her say that her brother George Muschamp Jr., also afflicted by fits, needed the same if he were to live. (3-4)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 3-4

Elizabeth Muschamp Elizabeth Muschamp Relative of Victim
1366

A boy from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the son of Edward Moore and his first wife, brother to five full brothers and a sister, half-brother to Sibilla Moore and step-brother to Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. This brother witnessed numerous of Margaret Muschamp's tormenting fits along with his father and siblings, in which she talked to angels, lost the use of her limbs, tongue and stomach, and vomited strange objects. He also heard Margaret say that she had been saved by two drops of John Hutton's blood, and that her brother George Jr.'s life would also be saved if he were brought the same. (6-7)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 6-7

Moore Moore (Sibling-Brother 2) Relative of Victim
1367

A boy from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the son of Edward Moore and his first wife, brother to five full brothers and a sister, half-brother to Sibilla Moore and step-brother to Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. This brother witnessed numerous of Margaret Muschamp's tormenting fits along with his father and siblings, in which she talked to angels, lost the use of her limbs, tongue and stomach, and vomited strange objects. He also heard Margaret say that she had been saved by two drops of John Hutton's blood, and that her brother George Jr.'s life would also be saved if he were brought the same. (6-7)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 6-7

Moore Moore (Sibling-Brother 3) Relative of Victim
1368

A boy from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the son of Edward Moore and his first wife, brother to five full brothers and a sister, half-brother to Sibilla Moore and step-brother to Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. This brother witnessed numerous of Margaret Muschamp's tormenting fits along with his father and siblings, in which she talked to angels, lost the use of her limbs, tongue and stomach, and vomited strange objects. He also heard Margaret say that she had been saved by two drops of John Hutton's blood, and that her brother George Jr.'s life would also be saved if he were brought the same. (6-7)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 6-7

Moore Moore (Sibling-Brother 4) Relative of Victim
1369

A boy from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the son of Edward Moore and his first wife, brother to five full brothers and a sister, half-brother to Sibilla Moore and step-brother to Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. This brother witnessed numerous of Margaret Muschamp's tormenting fits along with his father and siblings, in which she talked to angels, lost the use of her limbs, tongue and stomach, and vomited strange objects. He also heard Margaret say that she had been saved by two drops of John Hutton's blood, and that her brother George Jr.'s life would also be saved if he were brought the same. (6-7)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 6-7

Moore Moore (Sibling-Brother 5) Relative of Victim
1370

A boy from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the son of Edward Moore and his first wife, brother to five full brothers and a sister, half-brother to Sibilla Moore and step-brother to Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. This brother witnessed numerous of Margaret Muschamp's tormenting fits along with his father and siblings, in which she talked to angels, lost the use of her limbs, tongue and stomach, and vomited strange objects. He also heard Margaret say that she had been saved by two drops of John Hutton's blood, and that her brother George Jr.'s life would also be saved if he were brought the same. (6-7)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 6-7

Moore Moore (Sibling-Brother 6) Relative of Victim
1371

A girl from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the daughter of Edward Moore and his first wife, sister to six full brothers, half-sister to Sibilla Moore and step-sister to Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. This sister witnessed numerous of Margaret Muschamp's tormenting fits along with her father and siblings, in which she talked to angels, lost the use of her limbs, tongue and stomach, and vomited strange objects. She also heard Margaret say that she had been saved by two drops of John Hutton's blood, and that her brother George Jr.'s life would also be saved if he were brought the same. (6-7)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 6-7

Moore Moore (Sibing-Sister) Relative of Victim
1378

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the husband of Mrs. Custerd, who was allegedly killed by Dorothy Swinow, Anonymous 234 and Anonymous 236.(9-10)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9-10

John Custerd John Custerd Relative of Victim
1379

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the wife of John Custerd, who was allegedly killed by Dorothy Swinow, Anonymous 234 and Anonymous 236.(9-10)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9-10

Custerd Mrs. Custerd Relative of Victim
1384

A man from Goswell Street, London who is the brother-in-law of Anonymous 224, a bewitched woman. Anonymous 236 is allegedly able to capture the evil spirit that has bewitched Anonymous 224 in a stone bottle that hung above the fire, after which he hears a roaring noise coming from the bottle.(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange and Wonderful News from Goswell-street: or, a Victory over the Devil. London: 1678, 6

Anonymous 236 Relative of Victim
1836

A man from and former Constable of Ramsey in the county of Essex, described as the husband to Mrs. Stock and father to at least two children, and witness for the state in the Essex Assize at Chelsmford, July 1645. Stock would testify three time at the Assize, first testifying that Elizabeth Harvey confessed to them she had been made a witch by Marion Hocket; a transmutation which was painful to her. He also spoke about how his wife and children would allegedly become victims in a vendetta between their family and the Hatting family. He allegedly "impressed William Hating, husband to the aforesaid Sarah Hating for a scolder, whereupon the said William threatened this Informant very much." His wife was soon bothered by a mysterious snake, and then becomes ill "with extraordinary fits, pains and burnings all over her body, and within one week dyed." She blamed Sara Hatting for her death. The condition which took her life would also take the lives of two of his children. Stock finally testified that he had heard from her sister, Sara Barton, that Marion Hocket had cut off her witch's marks to avoid detection. (31)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31

Francis Stock Francis Stock Relative of Victim
1873

A woman from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who is the sister of Richard Dugdale. Richard Dugdale is allegedly plagued by fits which are believed to be the cause of the Devil, during which he vomits many objects and foretells events. Mary Dugdale testifies that her brother's fits lasted about a year, that he visited two doctors: Dr. Chew and Dr. Crabtree, as well as several ministers including Mr. Jolly. She claims Richard Dugdale's final fit was on March 25th, 1690, a date he himself predicted. (59)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 59

Mary Dugdale Mary Dugdale Relative of Victim
1874

A woman from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who is the sister of Richard Dugdale. Richard Dugdale is allegedly plagued by fits which are believed to be the cause of the Devil, during which he vomits many objects and foretells events. Alice Dugdale testifies that her brother's fits lasted about a year, that he visited two doctors: Dr. Chew and Dr. Crabtree, as well as several ministers including Mr. Jolly. She claims Richard Dugdale's final fit was on March 25th, 1690, a date he himself predicted. (59)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 59

Alice Dugdale Alice Dugdale Relative of Victim
1875

A woman from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who is the mother of Richard Dugdale. Richard Dugdale is allegedly plagued by fits which are believed to be the cause of the Devil, during which he vomits many objects and foretells events. Ann Dugdale testifies that her son's fits lasted about a year, that he visited two doctors: Dr. Chew and Dr. Crabtree, as well as several ministers including Mr. Jolly. She claims Richard Dugdale's final fit was on March 25th, 1690, a date he himself predicted. (29)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 29

Ann Dugdale Ann Dugdale Relative of Victim
1876

A man from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who is the mother of Richard Dugdale. Richard Dugdale is allegedly plagued by fits which are believed to be the cause of the Devil, during which he vomits many objects, conjures stones and goose-dung from nowhere, changes weight from as light as a feather to "so heavy, that two or three strong Men could hardly lift it up," and foretells events. Thomas Dugdale testifies that his son's fits lasted about a year, that he went with his son to visit two doctors: Dr. Chew and Dr. Crabtree, as well as several ministers including Mr. Jolly. He claims Richard Dugdale's final fit was on March 25th, 1690, a date Richard Dugdale himself predicted. (49)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 49

Thomas Dugdale Thomas Dugdale Relative of Victim
1877

A man from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who Richard Dugdale calls upon during one of his violent fits to accompany him to the local doctor, Dr. Chew.(63)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 63

Dugdale Dugdale (Uncle) Relative of Victim
1901

A man from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be the husband of Anne Levinston who was accused of bewitching her aunt Lady Powel to death.(Image 1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Narrative of the Case so much Controverted between Mistress Anna Levingston. London: 1655, Image 1

Thomas Levingston Thomas Levingston Relative of Victim
1902

A man from Stock in the county of Essex. Roger Veale is the father of Christopher Veale who is allegedly bewitched by Agnes Sawen. ()

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011,

Roger Veele Roger Veele Relative of Victim
1903

A man from Purleigh in the county of Essex. Willson is the father of Anne Willson who was allegedly bewitched and murdered by Joan Cocke. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=338823)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=338823

Richard Willson Richard Willson Relative of Victim
1917

A man of Brookewalden in Essex (likely the environs of Manor of Brooke Walden in Saffron Walden), known to be the husband of Mrs. Petie and the father of a small child; Mrs. Petie was was allegedly visited by Mother Staunton, leaving in anger when her demands were not fulfilled. Shortly after Staunton's departure, the Petie child became so sick it nearly died, the illness lasting a week.(11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 11

Robert Petie Robert Petie Relative of Victim
1918

A man from Wimbish in Essex, known to be the VIcar, whose wife was allegedly asked for alms by Mother Staunton while the Vicar was out and denied the request; while visiting the house Staunton is said to have touched their little son causing him to become violently sick nearly unto death while Staunton sat by. Within an hour of the Vicar's return, his son recovered perfectly and resumed playing.(14)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 14

Anonymous 364 Relative of Victim
1919

A woman from Wimbish in Essex, known to be the VIcar's wife, who was allegedly asked for alms by Mother Staunton while her husband was away and denied the request; Staunton is said to have touched their little son causing him to become violently sick nearly unto death while Staunton sat by. Within an hour of the Vicar's return, their son recovered perfectly and resumed playing.(14)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 14

Anonymous 362 Relative of Victim
1922

A woman likely from Lamberd End (now Lambourne) in the county of Essex, known to be a tailor's wife, who allegedly had an affair with Mr. Nokes, husband to Mother Nokes; in revenge for the infidelity, Mother Nokes is said to have caused the tailor's wife's nursing child to die.(16)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 16

Anonymous 365 Relative of Victim
1950

A man from Penzance in the county of Cornwall, known to be the uncle of alleged demoniac John Tonken, who stayed by his nephew's bedside during his fits; Tonken would allegedly appeal to Plimrose to catch the woman tormenting him.(5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Account of a Strange and Wonderful Relation of John Tonken, of Pensans in Cornwall. London: 1686, 5

Edward Plimrose Edward Plimrose Relative of Victim
1967

A woman from Yowel in the county of Surrey, known to be the mother of Elizabeth Burgiss, who allegedly confronted Joan Buts and "fell foul upon her, and so evilly Treated her, that she fetcht out some of her Hellish Hellish Blood." The result of this altercation is not provided in the account.(5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange and Wonderful News from Yowel in Surry giving a True and Just Account of One Elizabeth Burgiss. London: 1681, 5-6

Burgiss Burgiss (Mother) Relative of Victim
1971

A woman of Lawrack (Landrake) in the County of Cornwall, known to be the mother of alleged demoniac Thomas Sawdie, who watched over her son during his fits and finally pressed him into confessing that he had made a compact with the Devil.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Return of Prayer: or A Faithful Relation of Some Remarkable Passages of Providence concerning Thomas Sawdie. London: 1664, 1

Dorothy Sawdie Dorothy Sawdie Relative of Victim
1973

A man of Lawrack (Landrake) in the County of Cornwall, known to be alleged demoniac Thomas Sawdie's uncle and the owner of an Estate, who took Sawdie to a cunning person named Condy in an effort to cure him of his possession.(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Return of Prayer: or A Faithful Relation of Some Remarkable Passages of Providence concerning Thomas Sawdie. London: 1664, 3

Anonymous 376 Relative of Victim
2005

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, mother to Charity Page, and wife of William Page. Mrs. Page appears in the narrative on three points. The legitimacy of one of her children is in question. She is referred to as the "base childe that Page and his wife haue in keepin" by Ursely Kempe. Kempe also accuses Annis Glascocke of bewitching this child to death and indeed Glascocke is tried for the crime. Mrs. Page also visits Kempe in prison, to inquiry if she was also bewitched. Kempe confirmed the diagnosis "did minister vnto [her] the foresaid medicine," which was bit of countermagic taught to Kempe by Mrs. Cocke's (circa 1571). It involved pricking dung and charnel three times, pricking a table three times, and drinking beer and taking three leaves of St. John's Wart. This cure provided Mrs. Page, as it had for Kempe a decade before, a "speedie amendement."(B2, B3v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, B2, B3v

Page Mrs. Page Relative of Victim
2016

A man from Herringswell in the county of Suffolk, known to be a Master of Arts, author of "A True and Fearefull Vexation of One Alexander Nyndge" and the brother of alleged demoniac Alexander Nyndge. Edward Nyndge presents himself in his account of Alexander's possession by the Irish spirit Aubon as instrumental in Alexander's dispossession, claiming that Alexander declared the spirit afraid of him. Edward is said to have led prayers over his brother, conjured the spirit to converse with him, and to have finally driven the spirit out by invoking Scripture and Jesus Christ.(Title Page, A3 - A4, A5, A7)

Appears in:
Nyndge, Edward. A True and Fearefull Vexation of one Alexander Nyndge being Most Horribly Tormented with the Deuill. London: 1615, Title Page, A3 - A4, A5, A7

Edward Nyndge Edward Nyndge Relative of Victim
2018

A young man from Herringswell in the County of Suffolk, known to be a younger brother of Edward Nyndge and Alexander Nyndge, who allegedly participated in prayer over Alexander during his possession, and declared to the spirit Aubon that "Wee will keepe him from th[ee] tho[u] foule Spirit, in spite of thy Nose."(A5, A8)

Appears in:
Nyndge, Edward. A True and Fearefull Vexation of one Alexander Nyndge being Most Horribly Tormented with the Deuill. London: 1615, A5, A8

William Nyndge William Nyndge Jr. Relative of Victim
2020

A man from Herringswell in the County of Suffolk, known to have been a wealthy gentleman and the father of Edward Nyndge, Master of Arts, and Alexander Nyndge, alleged demoniac. He witnessed the possession of his son Alexander, and exorcism through prayer conducted by his son Edward, and is known to have gathered the neighbors to assist Edward in praying.(A3, A4)

Appears in:
Nyndge, Edward. A True and Fearefull Vexation of one Alexander Nyndge being Most Horribly Tormented with the Deuill. London: 1615, A3, A4

William Nyndge William Nyndge Relative of Victim
2028

A man from West Chiltington in the county of Kent, who seeks help from a number of doctors and eventually Dr. Skinner for his daughter's mysterious illness. Dr. Skinner advises Mr. Woldredge to go home, which he does. His daughter becomes cured, and after Mr. Woldredge visits the doctor again, "she was in a short time made perfectly well."(14-12)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 14-12

Woldredge Mr. Woldredge Relative of Victim
2030

A woman from Hadlaw in Kent, who is the mother of a young servant boy of Henry Chowning, allegedly possessed by a devil in the form of a greyhound. Dr. Skinner orders her to visit him after medicine had been administered to the young servant, which she does, bringing "news he was much ammended."(9-14)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 9-14

Anonymous 386 Relative of Victim
2035

A man from Tunbridge in the county of Kent, who refuses to approach his sister upon "hearing how i was tempted and tortured with Witches and Devils," even after she is cured, he refuses to speak to her, "being still afraid of me, so that I have no comfort in them."(6-7)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 6-7

Gurr Gurr (Brother) Relative of Victim
2040

A man from Bow in the county of Devon, who tells his son when he runs away to the army and refuses to apprentice himself to a weaver in Crediton that "he would bin him Apprentice to the Devill, which rash and in considerate threatenings, he often times used and repeated." When his son still refuses to apprentice himself to the weaver, John Buxford "did fall a beating of him, so that by meere force compelled him along," in order to take him to Crediton. Along the road, the two encounter a carrier and his horses, that John Buxford "had often observed to frequend the Roade." The carrier inquires after their behaviour, and John Buxford explains his son's current predicament. The carrier offers to apprentice the boy, to which John Buxford "being very desirous to provide for his sons good, (as the naturall affection of all Parents towards Children doth greatly oblige) was content that he should goe a long with the Carrier, who condtioned with him to bring or send backe the Boy in eight daies time at the furthest." He leaves his son in the carrier's care. In eight days, however, he is called to Cannon Lee in Devon by the Justice Cullum, to verify his son's story that Joseph Buxford was apprenticed to the Devil and went to Hell. John Buxford verified that the boy Justice Cullum found was in fact his son, as well as the "manner of his departure, with other circumstances above rehearsed," lending credence to his son's confession.(2)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 2

John Buxford John Buxford Relative of Victim
2058

A man and self-described preacher from Beaumont in the county of Essex, then living in Little Oakley on his wife, Mrs. Harrison's property. Harrison is residing in London when his wife becomes convinced she has been bewitched by Annis Heard. As she grew increasingly frantic, the "said Richard, said to his wife, I pray you be content and thinke not so, but trust in God and put your trust in him onely, and he will defend you from her, and from the Diuell himselfe also: and said moreouer, what will the people say, that I beeing a Preacher shoulde haue my wife so weake in faith." But his wife did not get better. Harrison swore that he would see Heard hanged if she had in fact bewitched his wife. However, the next encounter between Harrison and Heard wad rather one sided, and entirely verbal, despite all this bravado. They saw one another in an orchard, and to Heard's request for some plums, he answered "I am glad you are here you vield strumpet, saying, I do think you haue bewitched my wife, and as truly as God doth liue, if I can perceiue y^ she be troubled any more as she hath been, I will not leaue a whole bone about thee, & besides I will seeke to haue thee hanged." He continues threatening her, claiming his father in law would also see her hang, and rehearsing all the crimes he attributed to her. Despite verbally berating her, he seemed surprised when Annis "did sodenly depart from him without having any plummes," taking her departure as a sign of guilt. Two days before his wife died, and with John Pollin and Bret's wife as witnesses, she claimed "I must depart from you, for now I am utterly consumed with yonder wicked Creature, meaning Annis Herd [...] repeating these wordes. Oh Annis Herd, Annis Herd she hath consumed me." (F2-F3v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, F2-F3v

Richard Harrison Richard Harrison Relative of Victim
2084

A man from Tichmarch in the county of Northampton, known to be a knight, the brother or brother in law of Robert and Mistress Throckmorton, and the uncle of Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Mary, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. On hearing about the afflictions of his nieces, he came to Warboys to visit and see it for himself. He went with the group who went to persuade Mother Alice Samuel to persuade her to visit the Throckmorton children; she refused due to the accusations that she had bewitched them and feared that the children would scratch her. Pickering and company forced her to come, along with her daughter Agnes Samuel and Cicely Burder; he overheard her tell Agnes not to confess to anything. He witnessed the children fall into fits when Mother Samuel entered the house, and assisted Jane in scratching her. When Pickering returned home to Tichmarch Grove, he brought the children with him. He observed that Elizabeth was unafflicted during the ride there, but fell into a fit as soon as she entered his home; these fits often affected coordination when she tried to eat. Pickering experimented with taking the children into the churchyard adjoining his home while they were in their fits. He noted that they would come out of the fit as soon as they entered the churchyard, but resume again on returning to the house. About 20 years later, Sir Gilbert Pickering apprehended Arthur Bill, Bill (Mother) and Bill (Father) on charges of witchcraft and delivered them to Northampton Gaol.(C3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C3

Gilbert Pickering Sir Gilbert Pickering Relative of Victim
2100

A woman from Bewdley in the county of Worcestershire, who was the wife of Mr. Hopkins, Chief Magistrate in the area, and a member of Parliament. Mrs. Hopkins helps pull a piece of wood that "came down into the rectum intestinum" of her husband, using her fingers. Her husband had complained for some time of pain "as he thought with the Spleen," believing he was "possest" or "bewitcht." She estimated the piece of wood "was of the length of ones finger:" but she was sure "he never swallowed any such thing." (60)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 60

Hopkins Hopkins (Wife) Relative of Victim
2121

A woman from an unknown area of London, whose husband returned home from a visit to a conjurer with a chip "into his Pocket." The same day, at night, when the family is sleeping, "all the Doors and VVindows in the House opened and clattered, as to awaken and affright them all." Mr. Barbor's wife turned to him then, and said, "you told me you was at Dr. Lamb's this Day, and I fear you medled with something." Her husband tells her that he took a wood chip from Dr. Lamb's, and she asks him to "fling it out," for fear, "we shall have no Quiet." After her husband does as she says, the "VVindows and Doors were presently shut, and all quiet," so the family was able to sleep again.(156)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 156

Barbor Barbor (Wife) Relative of Victim
2141

A woman from Totnes in the county of Devon, who was the sister of the father of Mr. Philip Furze, master of the servant, Francis Frey. When Francis Frey is visited by the ghost of Mr. Furze, the father of Mr. Philip Furze and brother to Anonymous 412, he is directed to "carry Twenty Shillings" to this gentlewoman, as this legacy was not fulfilled in the original testament. Francis Fey visits the gentlewoman in Totnes, "but she utterly refused to receive" the twenty shillings, as she feared it was "sent her from the Devil." She allows the young man to stay in her house overnight, however, and when he returns under the instructions of the ghost of Mr. Furze with a ring worth twenty shillings, bought in Totnes, for the gentlewoman, she receives this gift.(178)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 178

Anonymous 412 Relative of Victim
2167

A man from Salmsbury in the county of Lancashire, known to be a yeoman, the father of Thomas Walshman and grandfather to Thomas' infant child. Grace Sowerbuts was found in his barn under the hay; she claimed to have been put there by a black dog that robbed her of her speech and senses. She stayed in Walshman's home (or, according to Thomas Walshman, in his home) until her parents came to fetch her.(K4v-L)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K4v-L

Hugh Walshman Hugh Walshman Relative of Victim
2172

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, known to be minor gentry and the wife to old Robert Nutter, the mother of Christopher Nutter and the grandmother to young Robert Nutter and John Nutter. According to Anne Whittle, Elizabeth Nutter approached Whittle, Widow Lomeshaw and Jane Booth to request their assistance in killing her grandson Robert, so that the land would go to the women.(D4-D5)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, D4-D5

Elizabeth Nutter Elizabeth Nutter Relative of Victim
2182

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, known to be the daughter of Christopher Nutter, sister to Robert Nutter and John Nutter, and granddaughter of Elizabeth Nutter and old Robert Nutter. Crooke gave deposition alleging that Anne Redferne was responsible for the deaths of Robert and Christopher.(O-Ov)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, O-Ov

Margaret Crooke Margaret Crooke Relative of Victim
2200

A man from Great Gadson in the County of Buckinghamshire, known to be the father (Anonymous 429) of alleged demoniac Anonymous 28. He is said to have had a falling out with a woman with an "evil name" (Anonymous 430), after which his daughter became possessed by two evil sprits. These spirits claimed that they had been sent by two women (Anonymous 430 and Anonymous 431), and had been meant to possess him, but found him at prayer and could not enter; they had possessed the girl instead. Anonymous 429 persuaded five ministers to fast and pray over his daughter (one was unable to come, as the evil spirits predicted). He witnessed the spirits speak through his daughter, cause her to jump, and contort her into strange postures.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire. London: 1677, 4

Anonymous 429 Relative of Victim
2217

A woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be Agnes Browne's aunt and to oversee the family's milkhouse. When Agnes came to her claiming that a thing like a large black dog had demanded butter from her and gone into the milkhouse, Anonymous 87 called for a priest to have Agnes recite prayers. When Agnes claimed the next day that the thing had returned, Anonymous 87 took back the milkhouse key from Agnes and had the girl show her the print in butter Agnes claimed the thing had left on the cheese.(28-36)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 28-36

Anonymous 87 Relative of Victim
2226

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntington, known to be about ten years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, niece to Gilbert Pickering and sister to Joan, Elizabeth, Grace, Mary and Robert Throckmorton. Jane was the first of the Throckmorton children to become sick, be afflicted with fits and to accuse Mother Alice Samuel of being the cause. Her parents consulted Dr. Barrow on her initial illness; Dr. Barrow thought she had worms and sent medicine, but she did not improve. When consulted again a few days later, Dr. Barrow declared her to be clean of disease, and finally admitted that she might be bewitched. A consultation with Master Butler gave the same answer. Jane's four sisters all fell sick with the same illness within weeks of her affliction. It was said that they "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." When Gilbert Pickering brought Mother Samuel to the Throckmorton house, she fell into a severe fit and had to be carried to her bed, where her belly swelled massively and deflated again numerous times. She lay there scratching at the covers. Pickering covered her eyes and first touched her hand himself and then made Mother Samuel do so; Jane scratched Mother Samuel violently but would not scratch him. After Mother Samuel and Agnes Samuel were apprehended and imprisoned at Huntingdon, Jane and her sisters fell into fits in which their brother, Robert Throckmorton Jr., was the only person who could make himself understood to Jane, and Jane would relay the questions he asked to the other girls. By this means, the Jane and her sisters predicted Agnes Samuel's bail from gaol and arrival in the Throckmorton household. At this time, Jane also began to claim to talk to the spirit tormenting her. Once Agnes had lived with the Throckmortons for a few months, Jane and her sisters began to come out of their fits whenever Agnes said a "charm" stating that she was a witch, had killed Lady Cromwell and bewitched the girls. According to the spirit Smack, via Joan Throckmorton, Jane was tormented by the spirit Blew. Jane is also said to have been urged to suicide by Blew, and to have cast away knives while claiming he was urging her to kill herself, or to strain toward the fire and require restraint. She would have fits in which her mouth sealed shut repeatedly at meals, requiring Agnes to hold a knife at her lips to open it again, and other times would claim to see clothing and jewelry walking about of its own volition. Jane was among the girls who scratched Agnes severely. At his trial, John Samuel was made to say the same self-accusing charm as Agnes over Jane, which brought her out of her fits and was used as evidence that he had a part in the bewitchment of the Throckmorton girls. (3-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3-6

Jane Throckmorton Jane Throckmorton Relative of Victim
2228

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 12 or 13 years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, and sister to Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. She became afflicted by fits about a month after her younger sister, Jane, and all three "cryed out upon Mother Samuell: saying, take her away, looke where shee standeth here before us in a blacke thrumbd Cap, (which kind of Cap indeed shee did usually weare, but shee was not then present) it is shee (saide they) that hath bewitched us, and shee will kill us if you doe not take her away." It was said that once all five sisters were afflicted, they "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." She was thereafter afflicted by fits of "lamenesse, blindnesse, deafnesse, and want of feeling." While Agnes Samuel was living in the Throckmorton household, Mary had a fit in which she insisted it was the day she was to scratch Agnes and went after her eagerly and fiercely, then wept and claimed she didn't want to, but her spirit said she must. The next day, she claimed to speak to the spirit Smack, which had previously only conversed with Joan, and it told her she would have no more fits because she had scratched Agnes. Smack later told Joan that Mary had been assigned his cousin Smack (3).(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6

Mary Throckmorton Mary Throckmorton Relative of Victim
2229

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 12 or 13 years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, niece to Gilbert Pickering and sister to Joan, Jane, Mary, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. She became afflicted by fits about a month after her younger sister, Jane, at the same time as Mary, and all three "cryed out upon Mother Samuell: saying, take her away, looke where shee standeth here before us in a blacke thrumbd Cap, (which kind of Cap indeed shee did usually weare, but shee was not then present) it is shee (saide they) that hath bewitched us, and shee will kill us if you doe not take her away." It was said that once all five sisters were afflicted, they "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." When Elizabeth traveled to her uncle Gilbert Pickering's home in Tichmarch, Pickering noted that her fits ceased during the journey and resumed as soon as she entered the house. At dinner, she was prevented from eating, and she scratched, cried and sneezed during the evening prayers; the same happened when Pickering read from the Bible or she tried to pray herself. Pickering discovered that taking her out of the house ended her fits, but they resumed as soon as she reentered. Elizabeth remained with Pickering for months, as when she tried to return back to Warboys, her fits prevented her. Once Elizabeth had returned to Warboys and Mother Samuel was living in the Throckmorton household, Elizabeth had a fit in which she was unable to eat, drink or speak, and could not until her father, Robert Throckmorton, forbid Mother Samuel to eat until Elizabeth was able. While Agnes Samuel was living in the Throckmorton household, Elizabeth and her sisters had fits in which their mouths shut at meals, and would not reopen until Agnes Samuel ordered the spirits tormenting them to stop. Later, she had fit at dinner in which she declared she would scratch Agnes and did so viciously, then exhorted Agnes and faulted her for not confessing her bewitchments, for parting with her soul and for not praying in her heart, and demanded she make her confessions lest she go to hell. According to the spirit Smack, speaking through Joan, Elizabeth was tormented by his cousin Smack (2). After Joan had scratched Agnes's face bloody and burnt her blood-stained fingernail clippings, Joan assisted Elizabeth in scratching Agnes' right hand.(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6

Elizabeth Throckmorton Elizabeth Throckmorton Relative of Victim
2230

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 9 years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, and sister to Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. She became afflicted by fits a few weeks after her older sisters Jane, Elizabeth and Mary did. It was said that the sisters "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." She was thereafter afflicted by fits of "lamenesse, blindnesse, deafnesse, and want of feeling." When her sister Elizabeth first scratched Agnes Samuel, Agnes was comforting Grace, who was in the throes of a fit, in her arms; Grace was caught in Agnes' embrace for the duration while Agnes was viciously scratched. Grace tried to scratch Agnes herself some time later, but her nails were too short and her strength insufficient to cause Agnes any harm. According to the spirit Smack, speaking through Joan, Grace was tormented by the spirit White.(5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 5-6

Grace Throckmorton Grace Throckmorton Relative of Victim
2231

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 9 years of age, the son of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, and brother to Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Grace and Mary Throckmorton. He witnessed his sisters' affliction with fits, and was the only one for a time who could speak to Jane and have her understand him.(62-62)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 62-62

Robert Throckmorton Robert Throckmorton Jr. Relative of Victim
2232

A girl from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 15 years of age, the eldest daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, niece to Gilbert Pickering and Henry Pickering, and sister to Jane, Elizabeth, Grace, Mary and Robert Throckmorton. She was the last of the sisters to be afflicted by fits, and hers are said to have been worst of them. The fits "forced her to neese, screetch & grone verie fearefullie, sometime it would heaue up her bellie, and bounce up her bodie with such violence, that had she not bin kept upon her bed, it could not but haue greatly brused her body." It was said that the sisters "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." After Joan had been afflicted for some time, she began to claim that spirits would give her predictions; she foretold that 12 people in total would become afflicted within the household. A year later, when her uncle Henry Pickering came to visit, she reported the details of his surveillance of and conversation with Mother Samuel, which no-one in the household had known he was doing. Thereafter, she was able to report on whatever Mother Samuel said and did, claiming that her spirit told her. She claimed to converse extensively with various spirits, first one named Blew, and then primarily with Smack. Joan accused Agnes Samuel of renewing Mother Samuel's bewitchment of the Throckmorton girls, saying that the spirits told her so. Joan also said the spirits told her that she would have her worst fits when strangers visited the Throckmorton home, in order to prove that Agnes was bewitching her, for they promised she would not come out of her fits until Agnes said a "charm" over her stating that she was a witch, had killed Lady Cromwell, and had bewitched the Throckmorton girls. Robert Throckmorton would thereafter order Agnes to say those words over his daughters whenever they had a visitor, and they would miraculously recover. Through Joan, Smack also began to predict her fits, report on Mother Throckmorton, who was imprisoned at that time, accused John Samuel of being a witch and listed off which spirits were assigned to torment which girls, with Smack being hers. Smack also told her she should scratch Agnes, and gave Joan the words to have Agnes say to bring her and her sisters out of their fits. When she scratched Agnes, Smack bid her attack one side of Agnes' face for herself, and the other for her aunt Pickering, who Agnes allegedly also bewitched. He also instructed her to clip her bloody fingernails after, throw them on the fire, and throw the wash water on as well after cleaning blood from her hands. While at Huntingdon to prove that Agnes Samuel was a witch to the assembled judges, Joan was seen repeatedly to have shaking and groaning fits whenever Agnes said God or Jesus Christ, and Agnes was made to say the self-accusing "charm" repeatedly over Joan before the judges. Joan is said to have never suffered another fit after these demonstrations.(6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6-7

Joan Throckmorton Joan Throckmorton Relative of Victim
2233

A man from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be wealthy and maintain a large household, and be the husband of Mistress Throckmorton, the father of Jane, Elizabeth, Grace, Mary, Joan and Robert Throckmorton, and the neighbour of Mother Alice Samuel, John Samuel and Agnes Samuel. He and his family were "but newly come to the towne to inhabite" when his daughter Jane "fell uppon the sodaine into a strange kinde of sickenes and distemperature of body." Mother Samuel was among the neighbours to visit the Throckmorton home during Jane's illness; on seeing her, Jane cried out "looke where the old witch sitteth...did you euer see (said the Child) one more like a witch than she is?" Numerous consultations with Dr. Barrow showed no illness or disease to be affecting Jane. At a loss, Dr. Barrow told Throckmorton that "he verily thought that there was some kind of sorcerie & witchcraft wrought towards his childe." Within weeks, all five of his daughters were afflicted with fits and claiming to see apparitions of Mother Samuel tormenting them. Mother Samuel, in turn, said that Throckmorton's children misused her with their accusations, that they were "playing the wantons" and that if they were her children they would have been punished for it. He witnessed his daughter Joan report Henry Pickering's encounter with Mother Samuel down to their actions and exact words, and confirmed the accuracy of this report with Henry later that day. He dispersed his children to various relatives for a time, suspecting that the separation would reduce their fits; this proves to be the case. When the children were back together under his roof, he noticed that their fits were fewer when Mother Samuel was in the house, and approached her husband John Samuel, offering him money for Mother Samuel's hire. Mother Samuel refused, however, due to the accusations the children had leveled against her, but consented when Robert Throckmorton offered her refuge after John beat her severely with a cudgel for refusing. Robert began to believe his children were indeed bewitched, and ordered Mother Samuel to predict their fits, which he saw to come true. He also witnessed her chin bleeding, which Mother Samuel later told Henry Pickering was because her spirits had been sucking at it. When the children told him Agnes Samuel needed to be questioned but would hide if he tried to speak to her, Robert went to John Samuel's home to test this out. She was found to be hiding, as predicted, and would not admit she was there until he threatened to pry open the trap door she had piled with heavy sacks. At another time, he witnessed Elizabeth unable to eat until he threatened that Mother Samuel would not eat until Elizabeth could again. Not long after, he witnessed Mother Samuel suffer several days of tormenting fits of her own, including strange swellings of her belly. When his daughter Elizabeth claimed her fits would not ease until John Samuel spoke a self-accusing "charm" over her, like his daughter Agnes had been made to, Robert Throckmorton tried unsuccessfully to make John do so. He stood by his daughter Joan at the Assizes in Huntindon while she had fits before the judges and was brought out of them by Agnes' "charm." During the trial, Robert gave a deposition that was instrumental in sentencing Mother Samuel, Agnes Samuel and John Samuel to death.(3-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3-6

Robert Throckmorton Robert Throckmorton Relative of Victim
2234

A woman from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be the wife Robert Throckmorton, the mother of Jane, Elizabeth, Grace, Mary, Joan and Robert Throckmorton, and the neighbour of Mother Alice Samuel, John Samuel and Agnes Samuel. She and her family were "but newly come to the towne to inhabite" when her daughter Jane "fell uppon the sodaine into a strange kinde of sickenes and distemperature of body." Mother Samuel was among the neighbours to visit the Throckmorton home during Jane's illness; on seeing her, Jane cried out "looke where the old witch sitteth...did you euer see (said the Child) one more like a witch than she is?" Mistress Throckmorton rebuked her for this, but numerous consultations with Dr. Barrow showed no illness or disease to be affecting Jane. At a loss, Dr. Barrow told Robert Throckmorton that "he verily thought that there was some kind of sorcerie & witchcraft wrought towards his childe." Within weeks, all five daughters were afflicted with fits and claiming to see apparitions of Mother Samuel tormenting them. Some time later, Lady Cromwell confronted Mother Samuel on behalf of the Throckmorton family, and took from her a lock of hair and a hair net, which she gave to Mistress Throckmorton to burn.(3-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3-6

Throckmorton Mistress Throckmorton Relative of Victim
2237

A man from Warboys in Hampshire, known to be a Doctor of Divinity, the parish parson or town minister and brother in law to Robert Throckmorton. Dr. Dorington visited the Throckmorton house and prayed for them, but while he did all five of the Throckmorton daughters fell into fits of shrieking and sneezing. When he paused, their fits ended, and when he resumed, their fits started once more. When Mother Alice Samuel confesses to bewitching and causing the possessions of the Throckmorton girls and displays repentance, Robert Throckmorton sends for Dr. Dorington to give comfort to her and pray for her. He hears a second confession in which she begs all the neighbours to pray for her and forgive her. He convinced Throckmorton to give her leave to return home to her husband John Samuel and counseled her to reconcile with him. However, Mother Samuel retracted her confession immediately upon returning home, and Dr. Dorington assisted Throckmorton in convincing her to confess again. He interviewed her at length while Throckmorton gathered numerous witnesses to listen outside the room, and put her words to paper for posterity, leaving her no further room to deny being a witch. After Robert Throckmorton bailed Agnes Samuel from her imprisonment alongside Mother Samuel in Huntingdon Gaol, Dr. Dorington witnessed the children's cessation of fits for a time, and also the resumption, which they blamed on Agnes picking up where her mother left off. He also witnessed Elizabeth Throckmorton accuse John Samuel of being a witch as well, including John's refusal to say a self-accusing "charm" to bring the child out of her fits. He assisted Throckmorton in questioning John during this encounter. He also witnessed Joan Throckmorton thrash and groan whenever Agnes named God or Jesus Christ, and was present when Joan scratched Agnes. After the scratching, he told Agnes that she must be in some way complicit in the children's bewitching, or else God would not allow her to suffer scratchings and accusations. HIs deposition at the Huntingdon Assizes was instrumental in sentencing Mother Samuel, Agnes Samuel and John Samuel to death.(11-12)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 11-12

Dorington Dr. Dorington Relative of Victim
2249

A woman from Ellington in the county of Huntingdon, known to be the aunt of Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Mary, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. According to Joan Throckmorton, Agnes Samuel bewitched Mistress Pickering after Mother Alice Samuel was imprisoned. Joan claims the spirit Smack told her Agnes did so, and manipulated Agnes into saying she had.(90-96)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 90-96

Pickering MIstress Pickering Relative of Victim
2250

A man from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be married to Mistress Chappel and to be the next-door neighbour of John Samuel. According to the spirit Smack, John Samuel bewitched both Chappel and Mistress Chappel so that "woman not able to stirre her selfe, and then man was for a fitte or two in the same case that these children were in." Smack also claimed that John Samuel asked him to break Chappel's neck in a fall, so he "caused on the suddaine both his Pattins to be broken, and if he had fallen on the stones as he fell in the myre, he had beene maymed." Chappel, when asked, confessed that "confessed that he had once such a fall, as he met with old Samuell in the streetes, and both his Pattins were broken at one instant, and because he would not fall upn the causie (for it was but narrow) into the myre, wherin he was marveilously foyled, and if an other neighbor had not beene with him, he had beene in greater danger."(94-95)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 94-95

Chappel Relative of Victim
2251

A woman from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be married to Chappel and to be the next-door neighbour of John Samuel. According to the spirit Smack, John Samuel bewitched both Chappel and Mistress Chappel so that "woman not able to stirre her selfe, and then man was for a fitte or two in the same case that these children were in."(94-95)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 94-95

Chappel Mistress Chappel Relative of Victim
2257

A man from the vicinity of Huntingdon Gaol in the county of Huntingdon, known to be a Jailor/Gaoler. He gave deposition at Mother Alice Samuel's trial, alleging that she bewitched one of his men (Anonymous 445) so that he began to have fits much like the Throckmorton children, and died of it five or six days later. He also claimed that his son, Anonymous 446, became sick with fits as well. The child did not improve until the Jailor brought him to Mother Samuel's bedside and had him scratch her. After Mother Samuel, Agnes Samuel and John Samuel were executed, he stripped them for burial and found a lump of flesh on Mother Samuel's body "adioyning to so secrete a place, which was not decent to be seene."(59, 61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59, 61

Jailor of Huntingdon Relative of Victim
2260

A woman from the vicinity of Huntingdon Gaol in the county of Huntingdon, known to be the wife of the Jailor of Huntingdon and the mother of Anonymous 446. After Mother Alice Samuel's execution, her husband stripped the body for burial and noticed a lump of flesh on Mother Samuel's body "adioyning to so secrete a place, which was not decent to be seene," and showed it to her. Anonymous 448 took this teat in her hand and and strained it until issued a mix of yellow milk and water. The second time she strained it, it produced a substance like clear milk, and at the end it was seen to produce blood.(114)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 114

Anonymous 448 Relative of Victim
2261

A woman from an unknown part of the county of York, known to be a Lady and sister to the sons of the Earl of Moultgrave (Anonymous 118). While they were both guests of a gentleman of the county of York, Dr. Lambe told her "Madam, your Ladyship is very merry and pleasant, but within this few dayes your heart will ake, by occasion and accident of water." Three days later, her brothers all drowned.(5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 5

Fairfax Lady Fairfax Relative of Victim
2264

A woman from Nottingham in the county of Nottinghamshire, known to be the sister of William Sommers. She is said to have had fits and to have been possessed, much as Sommers was, and to have started her fits when his ended. John Darrell faced charges for allegedly instructing Mary Cooper, William Sommers and others to counterfeit their possessions and dispossessions. Darrell alleged in his defense that Cooper's belly was heard to make a whooping noise like the purr of a cat and swelled as if in pregnancy. (13-17)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 13-17

Mary Cooper Mary Cooper Relative of Victim
2271

A man from Thames Street near Broken Wharf in London, known to be the father of George, Anne and Joan Nayler. Anne Kirk allegedly tormented his son George to death, then his daughter Anne. Anne's torments came from an evil spirit, which caused her to have frenzied fits. Before Anne died, the spirit told Master Nayler that "one would come after who should discouer the causer, and the truth of all." This turned out to be his daughter Joan, who also became bewitched and possessed; she accused Anne Kirk of witchcraft during one of her fits. Master Nayler had Kirk apprehended, and witnessed Joan fall into torments whenever in Kirk's presence.(101-102)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 101-102

Nayler Master Nayler Relative of Victim
2272

A woman from the vicinity of Castle Alley near Broken Wharf in London, known to be the mother of two daughters. She had a falling out with Anne Kirk in the street, and that night one of her daughters gave a shriek while sitting in her lap by the fire. The child pined away and died thereafter. Not long after, her other daughter (Anonymous 458) met Kirk in the street, and began to suffer tormenting fits.(99-100)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 99-100

Anonymous 457 Relative of Victim
2273

A girl from the vicinity of Castle Alley near Broken Wharf in London, known to be the daughter of Anonymous 457 and to have a sister. Her mother had a falling out with Anne Kirk, which resulted in her sister being bewitched to death. Not long after the child died, Anonymous 458 met Kirk in the street, and was "stricken downe in a very strange maner; her mouth beeing drawne aside like a purse, her teeth gnashing togeather, her mouth foming, and her eyes staring the rest of her body being strangely disfigured." When Kirk left, she recovered, but often had similar fits thereafter. She gave deposition against Kirk, but claimed that she could not show how she was tormented until she had a fit.(99-100)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 99-100

Anonymous 458 Relative of Victim
2275

A man from the vicinity of Castle Alley near Broken Wharf in London, known to be an innkeeper and to be the father of a child. He had a falling out with Anne Kirk, and in revenge she bewitched his child so that it became strangely tormented. He tried to use physick to heal his child, but it did not work, so he consulted a cunning-man (Anonymous 461), who revealed that Anne Kirk was responsible but could not save the child. After his child died, Anonymous 459 saw Kirk coming out of a neighbour's house, and told that neighbour that Kirk had bewitched his child to death after she was gone. When he went home, he too fell sick, and died not long after.(100-101)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 100-101

Anonymous 459 Relative of Victim
2291

A girl from the parish of Little All Hallows in Thames street, London, daughter of Tim and Gawthren Glover, and the who sister of Mary Glover, a fourteen year demoniac. Her sister Mary was allegedly bewitched by the Elizabeth Jackson, a local charwoman. Although Anne was not herself a demoniac, at one time, Mary breathes on her during one of her fits. Mary Glover is described as having "exceeding wyde gapings, with her mouth, during the which, there did flie out of her mouth a great venemous and stinking blast." When she "did smyte her sister Anne upon the face," with this breath, it caused Anne's face to "blister and swell." When Mary is dispossessed, Anne accompanies her sister and the rest of her family to live at the house of the preacher, Mr. Lewis Hughes in St. Helen's Bishopsgate in London, for a year, a move made to protect Mary from further possession and bewitchment. (Fol. 7v - Fol. 8r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 7v - Fol. 8r

Anne Glover Anne Glover Relative of Victim
2298

A man from London, once the Somerset Herald and a victim of the persecutions of Queen Mary. Robert Glover was known as an Anglican martyr, who died by being being burned "at the stake in Smithfield," in Oxford. Upon his death, he allegedly cried out, "O he is come, he is come, the comforeter is come, the comforter is come, I am delivered, I am delivered!" Years later, his granddaughter, Mary Glover, experiences a number of violent fits, thought to be caused by the cursings of the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson. Eventually, an exorcism is performed on Mary Glover, in order to speed her dispossession. At the moment of her dispossession, Mary Glover allegedly cries these same words, causing her father to say "with a faultring voice," that "these were her Grandfather's words" when he "died on the pyre." This event was significant - it made Mary Glover "the central figure in a struggle between religious truth and official persecution."(14)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 14

Robert Glover Robert Glover Relative of Victim
2308

A man from London, who is both a sheriff and an alderman. William Glover is the uncle of Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl believed to be bewitched by the old woman, Elizabeth Jenkins, after being cursed and threatened. Elizabeth Jackson herself utters such a threat upon first hearing of the young girl's affliction, at the house of Alderman Glover, saying "I thanck my God he hath heard my prayer, and stopped the mouth and tyed the tongue of one of myne enemies." She repeats similar threats at other houses, including Elizabeth Burges. She is also heard to speak in the presence of Alderman Glover, saying, "The vengeance of God on her, and on all generation of them, I hope the Devill will stop her mouth." At another incident, Mary Glover is brought to her uncle's house, "to meet face to face with Elizabeth Jackson," on a day she was not expecting a fit. When in the presence of Elizabeth Jackson, "before she could speak six words," Mary Glover fell into a violent fit, worse than her expected fits. (Fol. 12r - Fol. 13r.)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 12r - Fol. 13r.

William Glover William Glover Relative of Victim
2345

A man from Bungay in the county of Norfolk, whose daughter was bewitched for over two years, resulting in "many strange Fits in day," during which she would vomited stones, crooked-pins, glass, a buckle, buttons, and other things. John Ballard takes these items, and presents them to the Mayor of Norfolk (Anonymous 101) as evidence of his daughter's bewitchment.(7 - 8)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 7 - 8

John Ballard John Ballard Relative of Victim
2349

A man from Old Gravel Lane, who is the husband of a woman (Anonymous 19) allegedly possessed by the Devil in the form of a spirit (Anonymous 240). She is possessed when she tries to convince her husband to become baptized. After her possession, although Anonymous 482 encourages his wife to eat, she cannot do so without choking because of the spirit possessing her.(2-3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. News from Old-Gravel Lane. London: 1675, 2-3

Anonymous 482 Relative of Victim
2355

A woman from Hertfordshire, whose husband's cow is bewitched by a familiar (Anonymous 241) in the shape of a cat, sent by Elizabeth Knott. She allegedly refused to pay Elizabeth Knott money to which she was due, prompting Elizabeth Knott to bewitch the cow as an act of revenge.(4 - 5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott. London: 1649, 4 - 5

Lamans Lamans (Wife) Relative of Victim
2358

A woman from Southwark in the city of London, who is the sister of Hannah Crump, a young woman allegedly possessed. It occurs to Hannah Crump's sister that a day of fasting and prayer might help Hannah Crump become dispossessed, and she sets up such an occasion with her family in her household to aid her sister.(18 - 20)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 18 - 20

Crump Crump (Sister) Relative of Victim
2362

A woman from Edmundbyres in the county of Durham, who is the sister of Margaret Hooper. Her brother-in-law, Stephen Hooper, and Margaret's husband, calls on her when Margaret Hooper experiences a fit so strong that "he was not able to keepe her in the bed." Together, Margaret's sister and Stephen Hooper keep her down on the bed, even though she shakes so bad that "the bed and chamber did shake and move." During this, Margaret Hooper's sister is also witness to foaming at the mouth. (5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Most Fearful and Strange News from Durham being a True Relation of one Margaret Hooper of Edenbyres. London: 1641, 5

Hooper Hooper (sister) Relative of Victim
2363

A man from Edmundbyres in the county of Durham, who is the brother of Stephen Hooper, the husband of demoniac Margaret Hooper. Stephen Hooper's brother is witness to the dispossession of Margaret Hooper, as well as the invasion of the Hooper household by a monster (Anonymous 245). During Margaret Hooper's dispossession, Stephen and his brother pull Margaret Hooper off of a window to which she is wrapped around, with fire at feet that stank horribly. "In the name of the Lord, they did charge the Devil," and commanded him "to depart from her, and to trouble her no more." After this, she looks out the window, and sees a child who is surrounded by bright light (Anonymous 246), and all fall "flat to the ground." The child vanishes, and Margaret Hooper seems cured of the evil spirit.(5 - 6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Most Fearful and Strange News from Durham being a True Relation of one Margaret Hooper of Edenbyres. London: 1641, 5 - 6

Hooper Hooper (brother) Relative of Victim