Go back
74 records returned.

List of all events occurring in the persontype of

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
1

Agnes Waterhouse is a woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex. She is known to be a widow, the mother of Joan Waterhouse, and sister of Elizabeth Francis. She was executed for witchcraft on July 29, 1566. Elisabeth Francis allegedly passed her familiar Sathan on to Mother Waterhouse; her first request of the familiar was to have him kill one of her hogs to see whether the cat could indeed do it. Sathan did, demanding a chicken and a drop of her blood in return. Sathan ate the chicken down to the bones and feathers, leaving no trace behind. The marks from where she pricked herself for drops of blood she gave him for his deeds are said show up red on her skin. Mother Waterhouse claimed to have sent Sathan to enact revenge on her neighbours for numerous slights, including drowning a cow, killing three geese, cause a brewing to fail, causing curds to be lost after she was denied butter, and kill a neighbour and his wife. She also had Sathan kill her husband. After each act, she would recite the Pater Noster in Latin. She turned Sathan into a toad by praying, kept him in a pot whenever she left home, and fed him in this form with milk. Sathan allegedly warned her about her apprehension in advance and predicted she would be hanged or burned. Joan Waterhouse claimed her mother tried to teach her witchcraft. Mother Waterhouse claimed not to have fed Sathan with blood in court, but confessed when numerous red spots were found on her face and nose, claiming instead that she had not fed him in over a fortnight. In the confession taken immediately before her execution, she claimed to have been a witch for 15 years, to desire to repent, and to have God's forgiveness for her evil ways. She alleged that she had once sent Sathan to destroy a tailor and his goods, but Sathan could not because the man was too strong in his faith. She also said that she had attended church services regularly and prayed often, but in Latin as Sathan would not tolerate prayers in English. According to the Essex Assize Records, Mother Waterhouse was accused of bewitching William Fynee to death, to which she confessed as well.(13)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 13

Agnes Waterhouse Agnes Waterhouse Relative of Witch
2

Elizabeth Francis is a woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be the granddaughter of Eve of Hatfield Peverel and the wife of Christopher Francis. Eve is said to have taught her granddaughter to be a witch at the age of twelve, bidding her to renounce God and "to geue of her bloudde to Sathan," a familiar in the shape of a white spotted cat. Eve taught her to feed Sathan with bread and milk and to keep it in a basket. Her first request was to "be ryche and to haue goodes" which the cat fulfilled by bringing her eighteen sheep but they "dyd all weare awaye." She wanted to marry Andrew Byles, which Sathan promised to help her do on the condition that she allow Byles to "abuse" her first; Byles refused to marry her after. In revenge, she had Sathan "waste his goodes" and later has Sathan kill him with a touch. Sathan demanded a drop of blood for every service, leaving red spots on her body. Francis found herself to be pregnant after Byle's death, which she ended by drinking a decoction of a herb Sathan recommended. When she was ready to try again for a husband, she successfully persuaded Christopher Francis by getting pregnant with his child; their daughter was born three months after the wedding. They fought often, leading Francis to have Sathan kill the child, now a year and a half old. The girl's death did not smooth their relationship, and Francis has Sathan lame her husband by appearing in his shoe in the shape of a toad and allowing Christopher to kill him. When she tired of Sathan, she allegedly passed him on to Mother Agnes Waterhouse, a woman who may have been her sister making her also the aunt of Joan Waterhouse. Francis is also said to have had a familiar in the shape of a dog bewitch Alice Poole for denying her yeast. She appears as tied to the legal pursuit of witchcraft in 1566, 1572, 1578, and 1579; she is mprisoned and pilloried. However, her alleged crimes eventually catch up with her. She is hanged for the bewitchment of Alice Poole. The Essex Assize records show her charged first with bewitching the infant John Auger, second with bewitching Mary Cocke, and the final time for bewitching Alice Poole to death.(9-11)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 9-11

Elizabeth Frauncis Elizabeth Francis Relative of Witch
3

Jone Waterhouse is a woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex known to be an eighteen years old spinster, the daughter of Mother Agnes Waterhouse, and the niece of Elizabeth Francis. She claimed Mother Waterhouse tried to teach her witchcraft, but that she had refused to learn it. She confessed in court that Mother Waterhouse had a familiar in the shape of a toad she called Sathan, which would appear suddenly whenever Mother Waterhouse had a task for him. Joan allegedly tried calling Sathan herself after a neighbour, Agnes Brown, refused her bread and cheese. Sathan appeared, demanding her body and soul in payment rather the red rooster she offered; Joan agreed and then went to Brown and made her afraid. The dog still haunted Joan, but she claimed to have never set it on anyone else. Mother Waterhouse, in her confession, corroborated Joan's story. Agnes Brown claimed in court that one day, while she was churning butter, a large black dog with an ape's face, a short tail, a chain and a silver whistle with the milkhouse key in its mouth; this creature demanded butter over the course of the next few days and claimed to belong to Mother Waterhouse. Joan was tried for the bewitchment of Agnes Brown so that Brown became disabled in her right leg and arm at the Essex Assizes, but is found not guilty.(18-20)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 18-20

Joan Waterhouse Joan Waterhouse Relative of Witch
40

Arthur Bill is a man from Raunds in the country Northampton and the son of two witches, Bill (Mother) and Bill (Father). Arthur Bill was accused of bewitching Martha Aspine and suspected of bewitching numerous cattle. He was "publiquely knowne to b[e]e of an euill life and reputation, together with his father and mother." He, along with his parents, was bound thumb to toe and tossed into water; it is said that all three floated, which was thought to confirm their guilt. Arthur was sent to the Northhampton Gaol by Sir Gilbert Pickering. There, he and his mother allegedly bewitched a round ball into his father's throat to prevent him from confessing. His father nevertheless became a witness against him. Arthur is said to have had three familiars, named Grissill, Ball, Jacke. While he was imprisoned, many tried to bring him back into the fold of the Church and pray for his confession and contrition, but he maintained his innocence unto his execution.(C2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C2

Arthur Bill Arthur Bill Relative of Witch
47

Margaret Flower is a woman from Belvoir in the County of Leicestershire. She is the daughter of Joan Flower and the sister of Phillip Flower. She was employed for a time as a charwoman, chicken-tender and laundress at Belvoir (Beaver) Castle, and was also given residence at the castle for her service. She was accused of bewitching Sir Francis Manners' family, including bewitching Henry Lord Rosse to death. Margaret was dismissed from service for theft and keeping unreasonable hours; Lady Rosse nonetheless gave her a severance of 40 shillings, a bolster and a mattress of wool. The Devil allegedly fostered her resentment against Sir Francis Manners and Lady Rosse, offering his services in exchange for Margaret's blood and soul. She is said to have caused Sir Francis' sons, Henry Lord Rosse and Francis Lord Rosse, to sicken strangely, and caused his daughter Lady Katherine to be struck by strange maladies and fits. She also allegedly bewitched Sir Francis and Lady Rosse to be unable to have more children. Margaret was apprehended, along with Phillip and their mother Joan, around Christmas, and imprisoned at Lincoln. According to her sister Phillip, she was responsible for stealing the glove used to bewitch Henry Lord Rosse to death; Margaret claimed her mother bid her to take it, plus a glove from Sir Francis Manners and a handkerchief from Lady Katherine, for the purpose of bewitchment. Phillip also claimed that the cat familiar Rutterkin would often be seen sitting on Margaret's shoulder and sucking on her neck, but Margaret alleged in her confession that " she hath two familiar Spirits sucking on her, the one white, the other black spotted; the white sucked vnder her left brest, and the blacke spotted within the inward parts of her secrets. When shee first entertained them she promised them her soule, and they couenanted to doe all things which she commanded them." She was visited by four spirits while imprisoned; one was a devil with a head like a black ape, and three she recognized as Little Robin, Spirit, and Rutterkin. She was executed at Lincoln on March 11th, 1618, for acting in the "destruction of Henry Lord Rosse, with their damnable practises against others the Children of the Right Honourable Francis Earle of Rutland." Joan Willimot claimed that she had met up with Margaret and Joan at Joan's home a week before their apprehension.(C2-C3v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C3v

Margaret Flower Margaret Flower Relative of Witch
70

Joan Flower is a woman from Belvoir in the county of Leicestershire, identified as the mother of Margaret and Philip Flower and described as a 'monstrous malicious woman, full of oathes, curses, and imprecations irreligious.' She was believed to be a witch in her own right as 'the whole course of her life gaue great suspition that she was a notorious Witch, yea some of her neighbours dared to affirme that shee dealt with familiar spirits, and terrified them all with curses and threatning of reuenge, if there were neuer so little cause of displeasure and vnkindnesse." Joan was apprehended with her daughters on suspicion of witchcraft and died in gaol after choking on bread and butter. Margaret would often steal items for her to bewitch, such a glove belonging to Henry Lord Rosse; this glove was boiled, pricked with a knife, rubbed on her familiar Rutterkin, and either buried to rot or burnt; Margaret claimed Joan also did this with one of Sir Francis Manners' gloves but it only made Sir Francis sick, and that an attempt with a handkerchief belonging to Lady Katherine failed entirely. Joan Willimot alleged in her examination that Joan Flower told her that she had stricken Henry Lord Rosse "to the heart." Willimot also claimed that she had met up with Margaret and Joan at Joan's home a week before their apprehension, that Joan was seen with an owl and an rat spirit that sucked from under her right ear and whispered to her that she would be neither hanged nor burnt, and that Joan took up some earth, spat on it, worked it with her fingers and tucked it into her purse.(C2-C4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C4v

Joan Flower Joan Flower Relative of Witch
74

Father Rosimond is a magician and wiseman from Windsor in the county of Berkshire, alias Osborne. He can allegedly transform himself into various animal shapes, and has a reputation for both curing the bewitched and causing bewitchments himself. Elizabeth Stile, in her confession, alleges that his daughter is also a witch.(15, 18)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579, 15, 18

Father Rosimond Father Rosimond Relative of Witch
119

A woman from the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be a widow and blind in her advanced age, who was apprehended on suspicion of witchcraft but died before she could be brought to trial. At the time of her death, she was about eighty years of age, and was thought to have been a witch for fifty. She had numerous children and grandchildren, with which she "tooke great care and paines to bring them to be Witches." Notable family includes daughter Elizabeth Device, son Christopher Howgate, and grandchildren Jennet Device, James Device and Alison Device. Southerns gave a confession at the time of her apprehension, claiming that twenty years before, she had met a spirit or devil in the shape of a boy who told her she could have anything she requested if she just gave him her soul, and told her his name was Tibb. She agreed, and he would appear at odd times threafter asking what she would have or have him do. Six years later, she lay drowsing with a small child on her knee when Tibb appeared in the shape of a brown dog and forced her to her knees to draw blood from under her left arm. Southerns woke, saying "Iesus saue my Child," which caused Tibb to vanish and left Southerns "almost starke madd for the space of eight weekes." She confessed to setting Tibb on Richard Baldwyn for refusing to compensate Southerns' daughter for her help with his mill. In her opinion, the best way to bewitch a man to death was to make an image of him out of clay, prick it and burn it. Anne Whittle (alias Chattox), matriarch of another alleged family of witches, claimed that Elizabeth Southerns had introduced her to witchcraft and persuaded her to make a malefic compact, and that Southerns' familar Tibb and another spirit named Fancie banqueted the two of them. Whittle and Southerns were rivals; Whittle also accused Southerns of bewitching to death Robert Nutter and Richard Ashton. Alison Device accused Southern of badgering her into accepting a familiar, bewitching John Nutter's cow to death, turning milk into butter without consuming the milk, cursing Richard Baldwyn and bewitching his daughter to death. James Device claimed to have heard strange sounds coming from Southerns' home. Elizabeth Device claimed Southerns "hath had a place on her left side by the space of fourty yeares." Southerns also gave witness against Whittle, claiming that she had made images of Christopher Nutter, his son Robert Nutter and Robert's wife Marie Nutter.(B1)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B1

Elizabeth Southerns Elizabeth Southerns Relative of Witch
120

Anne Whittle is an eighty year old woman woman from Pendle in the County of Lancaster. She is the mother of Anne Redferne. She was apprehended on suspicion of witchcraft, imprisoned at the Castle of Lancaster, found guilty of murder, and finally executed. Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, claimed to have been a witch 14 years, and to have been introduced to witchcraft by Elizabeth Southerns, alias Demdike. The Devil appeared to her in the shape of a man at Southerns' home and demanded her soul; she refused at first but was finally persuaded by Southerns. Whittle also agreed to take the Devil as a familiar under the name of Fancie and permit him to suck from her right side on her ribs. A spirit in the shape of a spotted dog then approached Southerns and offered her "Gould, Siluer, and worldly Wealth, at her will," and offered both of them their fill of " victuals, viz. Flesh, Butter, Cheese, Bread, and Drinke," but they never felt any fuller no matter how much they ate. Fancie and Southerns' Tibb carried away the remnants. She confessed to helping Southerns and Widow Lomshawe bewitch Robert Nutter to death. Whittle and Southerns later became rivals. Whittle claimed that Elizabeth Nutter, wife of Robert Nutter, tried to persuade her to kill young Robert Nutter, but that her son-in-law Thomas Redferne talked her out of it. Elizabeth Southerns alleged that she had seen Whittle and Anne Redferne making images of Christopher, Robert and Marie Nutter. James Robinson accused Whittle of spoiling all the drink in his home for several weeks straight, of causing young Robert Nutter to be sick, and of murdering old Robert Nutter. Whittle claimed to be able to help drink that had been forespoken with a prayer, to have used Fancie to kill a cow belonging to John Moore and one belonging to Anthony Nutter. Fancie would allegedly appear sometimes in the shape of a bear, and Whittle claimed he took away most of her sight. James Device accused Whittle of grave-robbing, taking three scalps and eight teeth for use alongside clay images. Alison Device claimed that her father, James Device, had made a deal with Whittle to give her a measure of meal yearly in exchange for not harming his family, but that Whittle had bewitched him to death. Alison also accused Whittle of bewitching Anne Nutter, John Moore's child, Hugh Moore and a cow of John Nutter's to death. John Nutter claimed that, 18 or 19 years before, Whittle and her daughter Anne both confessed to making clay images.(B4-B4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4-B4v

Anne Whittle Anne Whittle Relative of Witch
121

A woman from the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be a spinster, the daughter of Elizabeth Device and John Device, sister to James Device and Jennet Device, the granddaughter of Elizabeth Southerns, and niece of Christopher Howgate; she was imprisoned on suspicion of witchcraft in Lancaster Castle, tried and ultimately executed. Alison comes from a family long suspected of and collectively accused of witchcraft; Southerns alleged that miller Richard Baldwin once called both her and Alison whores and witches. Alison claimed in her confession that Southerns badgered her into accepting a familiar and letting it suck from her. She would often assist Southerns, who was blind, and gave witness against her, drawing on their close association to accuse her of bewitching various people, animals and food items. According to her brother James, Henry Bullocke once accused Alison of bewitching Bullock's child, and that she had not only admitted to it but begged Bullocke's forgiveness. Elizabeth Device was thought to have provided all her children with familiars to assist them. Both Jennet and James claimed during their examinations to have attended a gathering of witches at Southerns' home for the purpose of naming Alison's familiar, but that Alison had not attended; James also claimed that Alison was involved in a plot to kill the gaoler at Lancaster and to blow up the Assizes. Alison stood accused in court of bewitching a peddler named John Law so that he was lamed and his body wasted and consumed. She confessed to having a familiar in the shape of a black dog, and that she gave it her soul and permitted it to suck at her breast just below her nipples, where the skin became blue for the next six months. She claimed that when the peddler refused to sell her pins, the black dog offered to lame him for her, and she agreed. Law claimed that the dog had " fearefull firie eyes, great teeth, and a terrible countenance." Abraham Law, John Law's son, claimed that his father gave Alison the pins, not refused to sell to her, and that furthermore she had not had the money to pay for them. Alison was found guilty on the strength of her own confession, and condemned to death.(B2v-B3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B2v-B3

Alison Device Alison Device Relative of Witch
122

A man from the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be a labourer and the son of Elizabeth Device and John Device, the brother to Jennet and Alison Device, the grandson of Elizabeth Southerns, and the nephew of Christopher Howgate. James Device was tried at the Lancaster Assizes and declared guilty of murder by witchcraft. He was accused foremost of bewitching John Duckworth to death. During his examination, he claimed that his grandmother had sent him to attend communion, but take the bread rather than eat it; he ate it anyway. On the way back he met a spirit in the shape of a hare, which demanded the bread, became angered when he didn't have it, and vanished when he prayed. Four days later, a sprit appeared to him in the shape of a brown dog, which demanded his soul and told him he'd be revenged of anyone he wanted if he complied. James replied "his Soule was not his to giue, but was his Sauiour Iesus Christs, but as much as was in him this Examinate to giue, he was contented he should haue it." A few days after that, he argued with Mistress Townley and she struck him. A black dog appeared to him and bade him make a clay image of Townley so the dog (which James called Dandy) could kill or destroy her; James did so, dried the image by the fire and crumbled it a bit each day for a week. Townley died two days after the image was destroyed. James also admitted to setting Dandy on Duckworth, causing his death, after Duckworth promised him an old shirt and then retracted the offer. James' sister Jennet gave deposition against him, claiming he had been a witch three years, had used Dandy to kill Townley, and took instruction in witchcraft from their grandmother and mother. Jennet also gave deposition implicating James in the death of John Hargraves. James also claimed to have attended a gathering of witches at his grandmother's house for the purpose of naming his sister Alison's familiar, planning a break-in at the Lancaster Assizes to free the prisoners and blow up the castle, and to discuss assisting a woman in killing Master Lister of Westby. He named numerous other witches and their familiars. Jennet added that their mother taught them a prayer that James had used to get drink, and James knew another that would cure a bewitched person. James gave deposition against his sister Alison.(Hv-H2V)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Hv-H2V

James Device James Device Relative of Witch
123

A woman from the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be the daughter of Elizabeth Southerns, sister of Christopher Howgate, widow of John Device and mother of Jennet Device, Alison Device and James Device; her left eye was said to be lower than her right and always looking down when the other looked up. Elizabeth Device was indicted for witchcraft, with a final verdict of guilty of murder by witchcraft. Her children gave deposition against her, she gave deposition against her mother, and gave the names of numerous other witches. She was also implicated in a plot to blow up Lancaster Castle. Elizabeth allegedly raised her children to be witches, as she had been raised to be by her mother Elizabeth Southerns. She was charged with bewitching John Robinson, James Robinson and Henry Mytton to death. In her confession, she claimed to have a familiar named Ball which appeared in the shape of a brown dog; Ball instructed her to make a clay image of John Robinson, dry it in the fire and crumble it, resulting in his death. This was in retribution for harassing her for having a bastard child with a man named Seller. She also confessed to killing James Robinson, and to assisting Alice Nutter and her mother Southerns to bewitch Henry Mytton to death. Her son James claimed that she and her mother instructed and directed him in witchcraft.(C2-C3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2-C3v

Elizabeth Device Elizabeth Device Relative of Witch
126

A woman from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, known to be the grandmother of Grace Sowerbutts, mother of Henry Bierley, and mother-in-law to Ellen Bierley. She was indicted at the Lancaster Assizes, along with Ellen Bierley and Jane Southworth, for bewitching her granddaughter Grace so that her body wasted and was consumed. Jennet pleaded not guilty, and was eventually acquitted and released. Grace accused Jennet of numerous things. The accusations started with haunting and vexing her, drawing her by her hair, and laying her on top of a hay-mow. Grace also claimed that Jennet had shapeshifted into a black dog in front of her and picked her off a sty. Another time, Jennet came to Grace in dog shape and allegedly tried to persuade her to drown herself, but a spirit in a white sheet carried her away. Jennet-as-dog also buried Grace in hay and lay on top, robbing her of her speech, senses, and an entire day. Grace claimed to be unable to speak in Jennet's presence thereafter. Grace also accused Jennet and Ellen of stealing Thomas Walshman's child, driving a nail through its navel and sucking from the hole through a pen, then returning the child to its bed; the child languished and died thereafter. Once the child died, Jennet and Ellen allegedly took it from the churchyard, boiled it, ate it and rendered the fat from its bones to anoint themselves so they could change shape. Grace also said Jennet had brought her to attend a meeting of witches where four things like men carried them all across the water to eat strange meat, which Grace refused, and dance and "abuse their bodies." Thomas Walshman gave deposition confirming that he had a child who became sick and died, but he did not know the cause. Jennet accused Grace, in turn, of conspiring with the priest Master Thompson, who had been slandering her by calling her witch, and to whom Grace had been brought to by her mother. Grace retracted her accusations.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Jennet Bierley Jennet Bierley Relative of Witch
127

A woman from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, known to be the wife of Henry Bierley, aunt of Grace Sowerbutts, and daughter--in-law to Jennet Bierley. She was indicted at the Lancaster Assizes, along with Jennet Bierley and Jane Southworth, for bewitching her niece Grace so that her body wasted and was consumed. Ellen pleaded not guilty, and was eventually acquitted and released. Grace's accusations started with haunting and vexing her, drawing her by her hair, and laying her on top of a hay-mow. Later in the trial, Grace accused Ellen and Jennet of stealing Thomas Walshman's child, driving a nail through its navel and sucking from the hole through a pen, then returning the child to its bed; the child languished and died thereafter. Once the child died, they allegedly took it from the churchyard, boiled it, ate it and rendered the fat from its bones to anoint themselves so they could change shape. Grace also said she saw Ellen at a meeting of witches Jennet had brought Grace to, where four things like men carried them all across the water to eat strange meat, which Grace refused, and dance and "abuse their bodies." Thomas Walshman gave deposition confirming that he had a child who became sick and died, but he did not know the cause. Ellen accused Grace of conspiring with the priest Master Thompson in levelling the charges of witchcraft, but she could not say why, as she attended the church regularly. Grace retracted her accusations.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Ellen Bierley Ellen Bierley Relative of Witch
129

A girl from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, known to be 14 years old and the granddaughter of Jennet Bierley and the niece of Henry Bierley and Ellen Bierley. She accused her grandmother, aunt and Jane Southworth of bewitching her so that her body wasted and was consumed. Grace eventually admitted to faking her afflictions and making false claims; she accused priest Master Thompson of having convinced her to make the claims. Grace accused all three women of haunting and vexing her, drawing her by her hair, and laying her on top of a hay-mow. Grace also claimed that Jennet had shapeshifted into a black dog in front of her and picked her off a sty. Another time, Jennet came to Grace in dog shape and allegedly tried to persuade her to drown herself, but a spirit in a white sheet carried her away. Jennet-as-dog also buried Grace in hay and lay on top, robbing her of her speech, senses, and an entire day; she claimed to be unable to speak in Jennet's presence thereafter. Grace also accused Jennet and Ellen of stealing Thomas Walshman's child, driving a nail through its navel and sucking from the hole through a pen, then returning the child to its bed; the child languished and died thereafter. Once the child died, Jennet and Ellen allegedly took it from the churchyard, boiled it, ate it and rendered the fat from its bones to anoint themselves so they could change shape. She also alleged that Jennet had brought her to attend a meeting of witches, at which Ellen and Jane were also present, where four things like men carried them all across the water to eat strange meat, which Grace refused, and dance; the black things pulled the women down to "abuse their bodies." Thomas Walshman gave deposition confirming that he had a child who became sick and died, but he did not know the cause. Jennet accused Grace, in turn, of conspiring with the priest Master Thompson when Grace's mother, brought her to him out of concern for Grace's fits. Grace retracted all her accusations before the court.(K3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K3

Grace Sowerbutts Grace Sowerbutts Relative of Witch
130

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be the daughter of Anne Whittle and the wife of Thomas Redferne. She was charged with bewitching Robert Nutter to death and found guilty. Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, gave deposition stating that Nutter had propositioned her daughter, but that Redferne had denied him, which angered Nutter; he departed saying "in a great rage, that if euer the Ground came to him, shee should neuer dwell vpon his Land." Whittle claimed that she was responsible for Nutter's death, not her daughter, and that several other women had conspired with her to kill him. Elizabeth Southerns gave a contrary deposition, however, alleging that she had seen Redferne making images of Robert, Marie and Christopher Nutter. James Robinson gave a deposition stating that Redferne was commonly known to be a witch, Nutter claimed she had bewitched him, and that Nutter had said to Thomas Redferne "if euer he came againe he would get his Father to put the said Redferne out of his house, or he himselfe would pull it downe." James Device also implicated Redferne in a plot to blow up Lancaster Castle. Margaret Crooke, Robert Nutter's sister, claimed that Nutter languished ill a long time before dying, and that in his illness "he did a hundred times at the least say, That the said Anne Redferne and her associates had bewitched him to death." Despite Whittle's best efforts to protect her daughter, Anne Redferne was declared a particularly dangerous witch for the images she was said to have made. (D3-D4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, D3-D4

Anne Redferne Anne Redferne Relative of Witch
133

A man from Mosse-End in the County of Lancaster, known to be the son of Jane and Christopher Bulcocke. John and his mother Jane were jointly charged with bewitching Jennet Deane so that she wasted, consumed and became mad; he was acquitted at their trial.James Device alleged in his deposition that John was present for a meeting of witches at Elizabeth Southerns' home, and at a feast of witches at Malking Tower; Device and his mother Elizabeth Device also alleged that John confessed to giving consent at Malking Tower to join together with the other witches present to bewitch Leonard Lister to death. Jennet Device claimed to having seen John turning the spit at Malking Tower. John denied attending at Malking Tower, and pleaded not guilty of Deane's bewitchment. (C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

John Bulcock John Bulcock Relative of Witch
274

A woman from Mosse-End in the County of Lancaster, known to be the wife of Christopher Bulcocke and the mother John Bulcocke. Jane and her son John were jointly charged with bewitching Jennet Deane so that she wasted, consumed and became mad; she was acquitted at their trial.James Device alleged in his deposition that Jane was present for a meeting of witches at Elizabeth Southerns' home, and at a feast of witches at Malking Tower; Device and his mother Elizabeth Device also alleged that Jane confessed to giving consent at Malking Tower to join together with the other witches present to bewitch Leonard Lister to death. Jane denied attending at Malking Tower, and pleaded not guilty of Deane's bewitchment. (C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Jane Bulcock Jane Bulcock Relative of Witch
329

An old woman from Warboys in the county of Huntington, known to about 80 at the time of her death and the wife of John Samuel, mother of Agnes Samuel and a neighbour of Robert Throckmorton. Mother Alice Samuel was first accused of witchcraft when visiting the Throckmorton family while one of their daughters was sick; the child said "Grandmother looke where the old witch sitteth (pointing to the said mother Samuell) did you euer see...one more like a witch than she is." The child continued to be sick, as did the other four Throckmorton daughters within a few months. All five developed fits, claimed to be afflicted by Mother Samuel, and to see an apparition of her during their fits. Mother Samuel would frequently be invited to the Throckmorton home to visit the children; this was used in an attempt to persuade her to come so the children could scratch her. She refused and had to be forced to come, along with Agnes Samuel and Cicely Burder; Mother Samuel allegedly cautioned Agnes to confess nothing at that time. Three of the children fell into tormenting fits as soon as Mother Samuel entered the home, and one, who was bedridden, successfully scratched her. Elizabeth Throckmorton claimed to see an apparition of Mother Samuel with a black child on her shoulders. Lady Cromwell charged Mother Samuel with bewitching Elizabeth shortly thereafter; Mother Samuel denied it and Lady Cromwell took a lock of Mother Samuel's hair and her hairlace. She gave both to Mistress Throckmorton to burn; that night Lady Cromwell had a nightmare of Mother Samuel and a cat, after which she fell sick and died. Henry Pickering, uncle to the Throckmorton children, began to follow Mother Samuel and observe her errands. Henry spoke to her after one day of this, and she told him that the Throckmorton family abused her, that the children were faking their fits and that she would not permit her children to carry on like that without some punishment; she ended the conversation with the claim that her husband would beat her for tarrying. The eldest Throckmorton daughter, Joan, claimed to have a vision of her uncle observing Mother Samuel and described Mother Samuel's errands. Soon after, the girls all began to claim to see spirits that accused Mother Samuel. Not long after, Mother Samuel was midwife to an aunt of the Throckmorton children and the girls increased their accusations. Robert Throckmorton, noting that the girls had less fits when Mother Samuel was present, asked John Samuel for permission to hire Mother Samuel; John agreed but Mother Samuel did not and he beat her for it. She eventually agreed, and the children began to allege that the spirits that came to them were hers. While in the Throckmorton household, Mother Samuel was seen to have red marks like flea bites on her chin, which would bleed; she confessed that they were where her spirits sucked from her. She later alleged that a spirit had gotten into her belly, causing her pain and swelling. Robert Throckmorton joined his daughters in accusing her and bid her to confess. She was eventually imprisoned, and charged with bewitching Lady Cromwell to death along with her husband and daughter. In her confession, she claimed to have six familiars in the shape of chickens, three of which were named Pluck, Catch and White. She also accused John Samuel of both witching and unwitching, but refused to say anything against their daughter. While imprisoned, Throckmorton accused Mother Samuel of bewitching his livestock. She was also accused of bewitching a gaoler's servant to death, and causing her gaoler's son to become sick. Following her execution, she was stripped and searched. This search found her to have half-inch teat "adioyning to so secrete a place, which was not decent to be seene."(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3

Alice Samuel Alice Samuel Relative of Witch
383

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be the husband of Anne Redferne and the son-in-law of Anne Whittle, alias Chattox. According to Anne Whittle, he talked her out of bewitching Robert Nutter to death when Nutter's grandmother Elizabeth approached her about it, earning Widow Lomeshawe's wrath; Redferne gave Lomeshawe a capon for staying her hand against him. Elizabeth Southerns claimed to have seen Anne Whittle and Anne Redferne making clay images of Robert, Christopher and Marie Nutter at Redferne's home. When Robert Nutter claimed that Redferne's wife and mother-in-law had bewitched him and threatened to have his father put him Redferne out of his house, Redferne's response was a mild "when you come back againe you will be in a better minde."(D3-D4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, D3-D4

Thomas Redferne Thomas Redferne Relative of Witch
384

A man from Green-head in Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be minor gentry the father of Robert Nutter, John Nutter and Margaret Crooke, father-in-law of Marie Nutter, and the son of Elizabeth and old Robert Nutter. Anne Redferne was charged with and convinced of bewitching him to death; he died around 1594. Elizabeth Southerns alleged that she saw Anne Whittle and Anne Redferne making clay images of Christopher, Robert and Marie Nutter at Thomas Redferne's home. Margaret Crooke claimed that Christopher died the year after his son Robert, and that he said numerous times in his illness that he was bewitched. (E-Ev)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E-Ev

Christopher Nutter Christopher Nutter Relative of Witch
423

An eight year-old boy from St. Osyth in the county of Essex who informs against his mother, Ursula Kempe. He identifies her as a witch by claiming she owns four familiars: Tyffin, Tittey, Pigine, and Jack, who are given "beere to drinke, and of a white Lofe or Cake to eate, and saith that in the night time the said spirits will come to his mother, and sucke blood of her vpon her armes and other places of her body." Thomas also informs against Ales Newman, a woman he identifies as his Godmother, claiming the Newan left their home carrying spirits under her apron in an earthenware pot, one of which she presumably used to "plague Iohnson to ye death, and an other to plague his wife." (A3v-A4)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A3v-A4

Thomas Rabbet Thomas Rabbet Relative of Witch
470

A twenty-three year old man living in St. Osyth, in the county of Essex, who testifies that his mother, Joan Pechey, often forced him to sleep naked with her. Pechey denied the charges, only asserting that at times the shared the same bed, back to back. (C5, C6)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C5, C6

Phillip Barrenger Phillip Barrenger Relative of Witch
475

A man from Little Clacton in the county of Essex, husband of Cecily and father Henry Sellis Jr., John Sellis, and at least one daughter. There appears to be some conflict between Henry Sellis and Richard Rosse, one of his hired laborers, which leads to a wide spread conflict between the families, and eventually to his wife, Cecily Sellis being accused of witchcraft. Two of Rosse's horses died as Sellis plowed his field for him, making Rosse suspect that Henry or his wife, had bewitched them. Richard Rosse and Cecily had fought in the past over the price of malt, and Mrs. Rosse and Cecily had fought over Mrs. Rosse's treatment of her cattle, but after "many of [Rosse's] beaste were in a most straung taking" and after their son, admired the volume of corn in his barn before it burnt, Rosse came to the conclusion that these events were "wrought by some witchcraft, or sorcery by ye said He~ry or Cisly his wife." Rosse ensure that Henry and his wife were tried (and found guilty) for this arson. Rosse was not the only one who implicated Henry Sellis in witchcraft. His son John, who is allegedly injured by one of Cecily's familiars, claims his father not only knew about the existence of these imps, but did little, beyond yelling at his wife, to save his children. Moreover, he allegedly mocked John, but referring to the little black household demon as "John," because his name was [also] so." For his own part, Henry denies the charges brought against him, nor can he, he claims, really remember the incidents Rosse refers to. (C8-D)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C8-D

Henry Sellis Henry Sellis Sr. Relative of Witch
476

A nine year old boy from Little Clacton, in the county of Essex, and son of Henry and Cysly Sellis and brother to John Sellis and at least one sister. His main role in the narrative appears to be backing up his younger brother's story of the nocturnal attack by their mother's imps, an assault which evidently scared him so much "swett for feare, and that he coulde scarse get his shirt from his backe." His mother retorted withough sympathy, telling him "thou lyest whoresonne." Pressed to provide details on the familiars, his story coincided with John's to a point; there were two familars, he claims, a black and a white one, and he too had seen his mother feed her familiars from a wooden bowl by a crab apple tree. However, there are important differences between the two narratives. Henry genders and renames the familiars. The black, male familiar is named Hercules (alias Jack) and the white female familiar is names Mercuries. They sleep, he claims, on a bed of wool, tucked into the roots of the crabapple tree. Finally Selis claims that Hercules was used against Rosse's maid, a fact his mother made him keep quiet about until, of course, this confession. (D-Dv)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, D-Dv

Henrie Sellys Henry Sellis Jr. Relative of Witch
477

A six year old boy from Little Clacton in the county of Essex, and son of Henry and Cysley Sellis and the brother of Henry Sellis Jr. and at least one sister. John Sellis is described as having an imperfect toenail. While testifying against his mother in court, asserted that she allowed her imps to attack him. He complains that "one night there was a blacke thing like his sister, that tooke him by the legge." He cried out in fear for his father, "saying, father, father, come helpe me and defende mee, for there is a blacke thing that hath me by the legge." His father, Henry Sellis, rather than comfort his fearful son, allegedly turned his wrath against his wife calling her a "stinking whore" and demanding "can yee not keepe your imps from my children?" He demand that she put them away or kill them. Pushed to provide more details, Sellis notes that his mother had two familiars, one black, also named John and a one white, named Imp with eyes as large as his own, and which are fed, but both his mother and his father, from a wooden bowl with a spoon. John Sellis gives two stories of how his family rid themselves of these imps (and by extension are no longer a witching family). In one narrative, a man, likely named Wedon or Glascocke carried the imps away when his mother was already imprisoned at Colchester castle goal. In another narrative, his mother sells the familiar spirits for two pennies, one as he carried them away, and one penny which she could pick up later. (D2-D2v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, D2-D2v

John Sellis John Sellis Relative of Witch
478

A woman from Hatfield Peveral in the county of Essex, known to be the grandmother of Elizabeth Francis and Agnes Waterhouse, and great-grandmother to Joan Waterhouse. According to Elizabeth Francis, Grandmother Eve was the first witch in the family, and taught her granddaughter to be a witch at the age of twelve. Grandmother Eve bid her to renounce God and "to geue of her bloudde to Sathan," which was the white spotted cat that became Francis' familiar. Francis claims that Grandmother Eve taught her to feed Sathan with bread and milk and to keep it in a basket. Eve is an important figure in English witchcraft history as not only as a witch matriarch, but also for the way the story establishes through her the importance of the renunciation of God, and the care and employ of a familiar spirit, to the creation of a witch.(3-4)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 3-4

Eve Eve of Hatfield Peveral Relative of Witch
479

A eight year old girl from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, daughter to Ales Hunt, niece to Margery Sammon, and granddaughter to Widow Barnes. Despite the fact that her mother allegedly "charged her not to tell any thing," Febey Hunt testifies that Ales Hunt had two familiars, described as "two litle thinges like horses, the one white, the other blacke, the which shee kept in a litle lowe earthen pot with woll, colour white and black" placed by her bedside. Febey claims her mother "feede them with milke out of a blacke trening dishe." She also claims her mother sent her familars to "Hayward of Frowicke, but to what end shee can not tell, & shee being asked howe she knew the same, saieth, that shee hard her mother bid them to go."(A5v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A5v

Febey Hunt Febey Hunt Relative of Witch
508

A boy from Maldon in the county of Essex, known to be the thirteen-year-old son of Ellen Smith, who was chided away when he begged alms from John Estwood. He reported this incident to his mother, who sent one of her familiars to Eastwood to cause him pain. Smith's son confessed the names of and containers for three of his mother's familiars.(7-8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 7-8

Smith Smith (son) Relative of Witch
509

A man from Maldon in the county of Essex, known to be the husband of Alice Chaundler and the stepfather of Ellen Smith, who had a falling out with Smith over money Alice had given her after Alice's execution for witchcraft; Smith bewitched him to be unable to eat meat without bringing it up again, with the result that he wasted to death.(7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 7

Jhon Chaundeler John Chaundeler Relative of Witch
510

A woman from Maldon in the county of Essex, known to be the mother of Ellen Smith and wife to John Chaundeler, Alice Chaundleler executed for murder by witchcraft in 1574. After her death, Smith and John Chaundler had a falling out over money Alice had given her daughter that resulted in John Chaundler's death.(7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 7

Alice Chaundler Alice Chaundeler Relative of Witch
512

A woman from Lamberd End (now Lambourne) in the county of Essex, known to be the twenty-eight year old daughter of Alice Nokes, whose gloves were snatched by a servant of Thomas Spycer's (Anonymous 58); her mother allegedly robbed Anonymous 58 of the use of his limbs, and when another servant of Spycer's, Anonymous 366, is sent to return the gloves on Anonymous 58's behalf, Anonymous 366 was also afflicted. ()

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579,

Nokes Nokes (Daughter) Relative of Witch
544

A man from St. Osyth in the county of Essex and brother to Ursley Kempe. Lawrence Kempe testifies that "his late wife was taken in her backe, and in the priuie partes of her bodye, in a very extreame and most straunge sorte, and so continued about three quarters of a year. This origin of this bewitchment occurred circa 1580 when Ursley and Mrs. Kempe has a physical altercation when Ursley "tooke vp her clothes and did heat her vpon the hippes, and otherwise in wordes did misuse her greatly." Mrs. Kempe allegedly told her husband "seuerall times that Ursley kempe his sister, had forspoke her, and that shee was the onely cause of that her sicknesse." Mrs. Kempe's body grew cold before she died, and she lay in a kind of half life, "like a dead creature," until Ursley came one day, unannounced and again "lifted vp the clothes and tooke her by the arme, the which shee had not so soone doone, but presently after she gasped, and neuer after drew her breath and so dyed."(C4v-C5)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C4v-C5

Lawrence Kempe Lawrence Kempe Relative of Witch
587

A man from Stisted (or Braintree) in the county of Essex whose wife is bewitched by Joan Cunny's familiars Jill after she is refused alms (in the form of a beverage) at their home. (3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, 3

Harry Finch Harry Finch Relative of Witch
588

A ten or twelve year old boy from Stisted in the county of Essex, grandson to Joan Cunny and the son of either Margaret or Avice Cunny. The person serves as chief witness against his grandmother. He testifies that while on her way to Braintree Market, Cunny stopped by Harry Finches' house, "to demaund some drink, his wife being busie and a brewing, tolde her she had no leysure to giue her any." Cunny allegedly cursed Mrs. Finch for her poor manners; Mrs. Finch stricken by head and side pain, died within a week (Cunny allegedly confessed to sending her familiar Jill to torment her). He also blamed another boy for stealing a bundle of wood, which he was meant to have collected; an act of theft allegedly punished by laming the boy (who testified against her). The boy finally claimed that, on his grandmother's instructions, took her familiar Jack, to Sir Edward Huddlestone's property, where the familiar summoned a wind which blew his oak tree down, on an otherwise calm day. (3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, 3-4

Cunny (Grandson/Son) Relative of Witch
670

A girl from Keyston in the County of Huntingdon, known to be nine years old and the daughter of Mary Darnell and William Darnell, who was allegedly bewitched to death by Elizabeth Chandler. Katherine's mother claimed that Chandler had boxed Katherine's ear after their children had a falling out, and that the Katherine became sick soon thereafter. Katherine lay ill for three weeks before dying, complaining of pain in her ear and shrieking that Chandler had appeared to her and would kill her. Chandler denied striking Katherine, or having set a spirit on her.(8)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 8

Katherine Darnell Katherine Darnell Relative of Witch
675

A woman from Milton in the county of Bedford, known to be a widow and a hog-herder; she is the mother of Mary Sutton and grandmother of Henry Sutton. Mother Sutton, after twenty years of enjoying his patronage, fought with Master Enger and took revenge on his horses, causing them to die in their stables, and then his swine, causing them to fall mad, cannibalize one another, and drown themselves. A servant of Master Enger's (Anonymous 89) repeated stories he had heard of Mother Suttons' misdeeds and was stroked by a beetle (Anonymous 155), causing him to fall into a trance. She and Mary set their familiars Dicke and Jude on Master Enger's son and had him tormented to death after he threw stones and called Mother Sutton a witch. She is said to have a teat on her inner thigh, where she would suckle familiars. Mother Sutton was apprehended following Mary's confession and imprisoned in Bedford Gaol. On the strength of confessions taken from her, Mary and the child Henry, Mother Sutton was found guilty of witchcraft and executed on March 31, 1612.(A4-A4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, A4-A4v

Mother Sutton Mother Sutton Relative of Witch
681

A child from Milton in the county of Bedford, known to be the bastard son of Mary Sutton and the grandson of Mother Sutton. He was caught throwing stones and filth at other children while playing at the Mill dam, and struck on the ears by a servant of Master Enger's (Anonymous 89) when he would not desist. Henry went crying home to his mother; in revenge, she caused a black sow to madden Anonymous 89's carthorses on the way to the market the next day. Henry overheard his mother and grandmother discussing revenge on Master Enger, the confession of which was used as evidence to convict them. He also told of his mother and grandmother's familiar spirits.(B-B2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, B-B2

Henry Sutton Henry Sutton Relative of Witch
969

A man from the Bull-Hole in Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be minor gentry and the son of Christopher Nutter, brother to Robert Nutter and Margaret Crooke, grandson of Elizabeth Nutter and Robert Nutter the older, and father to a son. He is also the neighbour of Anne Whittle, alias Chattox. According to Alison Device, John Nutter once asked her grandmother Elizabeth Southerns to cure a sick cow, which Southerns agreed to do. Device also told of an encounter Nutter had with Anne Whittle's daughter Elizabeth. Whittle's daughter went to Nutter to beg a dish of milk and brought the milk to Whittle. While Whittle was churning it, Nutter's son came up to her and, disliking what she was doing, knocked over the can with the milk. The next day, Nutter's cow was found to be sick; it languished three or four days before dying.(C-Cv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C-Cv

John Nutter John Nutter Relative of Witch
981

A child from the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be nine years old and the granddaughter of Elizabeth Southerns, daughter of Elizabeth Device and John Device, sister of James Device and Alison Device and niece of Christopher Howgate. Jennet Device was the star witness in the witchcraft trials at Lancaster Assizes, and gave deposition against her entire family and several others, most notably Jennet Preston, whom Device picked out from the crowd at the trial. Her mother, Elizabeth Device, "outragiously cursing, cryed out against the child in such fearefull manner" at the trial for giving witness against her. Device provided a list of names of witches who attended a dinner at Elizabeth's home of Malking Tower, the names and shapes of familiars, and what she had overheard about who had bewitched to death whom. Device also recited two prayers she said Elizabeth had taught her, one to cure the bewitched and one to get drink. Twenty years later, in 1634, Jennet was herself accused of witchcraft. Two witches' marks were allegedly found, and she was convicted of bewitching Isabel Nutter to death; the charges were discredited, but she languished nevertheless in Lancaster Castle until August 1636.(F2-F3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, F2-F3

Jennet Device Jennet Device Relative of Witch
988

A man from Samlesbury in the county of Lancashire, known to be the cousin of Sir John Southworth and husband of Jane Southworth, an accused witch. According to John Singleton, Sir John said that "he was sorry for her husband, that was his kinsman, for he thought she would kill him." (L4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, L4v

John Southworth John Southworth Relative of Witch
1007

A man from Spittal in the county of Northumberland, known to be a military officer holding the rank of Colonel and husband of Dorothy Swinow. Colonel Swinow died while Dorothy was facing accusations of witchcraft. (6)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 6

Swinow Colonel Swinow Relative of Witch
1008

A girl from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the eldest daughter of Mary Moore and her first husband George Muschamp, the sister to Margaret Muschamp and George Muschamp Jr., and the half-sister to Sibilla Moore. After Margaret had been afflicted with her fits for about a year and her brother George Muschamp Jr. had also become afflicted with illness and pain, Margaret predicted that if there was no justice against Dorothy Swinow (the woman accused of being behind the afflictions), Betty too would became afflicted. This proved prophetic and Betty became the worst afflicted of the three. Margaret also claimed that if Swinow was brought to justice, all the afflictions would end, and if there were no justice, they would become sicker than ever before. Margaret White, in her confession, alleged that Swinow and Jane Martin were responsible for the afflictions of the Muschamp children. (14)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 14

Betty Muschamp Betty Muschamp Relative of Witch
1049

A man from Salmesbury in the county of Lancashire, known to be the husband of Ellen Bierley and uncle of Grace Sowerbutts. Grace accused Ellen of bewitching her along with three other women; she claimed that once they dragged her on top of a hay-mow in Henry Bierly's barn.(K4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K4v

Henry Bierley Henry Bierley Relative of Witch
1096

A woman from Milton in the county of Bedford, known to be a hog-herder, the daughter of Mother Sutton, and the mother of three bastard children, including Henry Sutton. When one of Master Enger's servants (Anonymous 89) struck Henry on the ears for throwing stones and filth, she caused a black sow to madden Anonymous 89's carthorses on the way to the market the next day. This same servant later repeated stories he had heard of her and Mother Sutton's misdeeds and was stroked by a beetle (Anonymous 155), causing him to fall into a trance. Anonymous 89, afflicted and bedridden, later reported Sutton habitually coming in through a window to knit at the foot of his bed or stare at him; she allegedly told him that he would be restored to health if he consented to bed her. He berated her for her behaviour and bastard children instead, and she left the way she came. The next day, Master Enger found her tending her hogs and tried to persuade her to come with him; when she refused he took her by force to Anonymous 89. Anonymous 89 drew blood from her and became well again for a short time. She and Mother Sutton set their familiars Dicke and Jude on Master Enger's son and had him tormented to death after the child threw stones and called Mother Sutton a witch. Master Enger apprehended her a second time, beating her over the head; he had her bound and thrown into water twice, where she was observed to float. He had her searched by women and found her teat, which her son Henry claimed was used to suckle various familiars in the shapes of cats, moles and more. She was forced to confess, and her confession was used as cause to arrest Mother Sutton as well. She allegedly had a teat on her inner thigh from which the familiars would suck. Mary Sutton was found guilty of witchcraft and executed on March 31, 1612.(A4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, A4

Mary Sutton Mary Sutton Relative of Witch
1104

A man from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be the husband of Mother Agnes Waterhouse and the father of Joan Waterhouse. According to Mother Waterhouse's confession, the two lived "somwhat vnquietly," and for that reason she had her familiar Sathan kill him about nine years before.(14-16 (B-Bii))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 14-16 (B-Bii)

Waterhouse Mr. Waterhouse Relative of Witch
1112

A man from Green-head in Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be minor gentry and the husband of Marie Nutter, son of Christopher Nutter, grandson of Robert Nutter the older and Elizabeth Nutter, brother of John Nutter and half-brother to Margaret Crooke; he is said to have been bewitched to death by Anne Whittle and Anne Redferne. Whittle alleged in her confession that Nutter had desired her daughter, Anne Redferne, but that Redferne had refused his advances. He left in a rage, saying that "if euer the Ground came to him, shee should neuer dwell vpon his Land." When Whittle heard this, she called her familiar Fancie to her, and bid Fancie to revenge her of Nutter; three months later, he died. Whittle added that Nutter's grandmother Elizabeth had gathered together Whittle, Widow Loomshaw and Jane Boothman to request their help in killing Nutter so that the land would go to the women instead. Whittle was persuaded not to participate at that time by her son-in-law Thomas Redferne, but she thought that "the sayd Loomeshaws wife, and lane Boothman, did what they could to kill the sayd Robert Nutter, as well as this Examinate did." Elizabeth Southerns claimed to have seen Whittle and Anne Redferne making clay images of Nutter, his wife Marie and father Christopher. James Robinson gave deposition that Nutter had often complained that Whittle and Redferne were the cause of his illness and had threatened Thomas Redferne with eviction. Margaret Crooke claimed that Nutter was sick within two weeks of falling out with Anne Redferne and blamed her for his illness. John Nutter claimed that Nutter insisted he would have Whittle and Redferne imprisoned for bewitching him, but that their father Christopher told him "Thou art a foolish Ladde, it is not so, it is thy miscarriage. "(B4-B4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4-B4v

Robert Nutter Robert Nutter Relative of Witch
1212

A boy from St. Osyth in the county of Essex described as the son of Ursley Kempe. who is sent to Annis Letherdall's house to procure scouring sand. Letherdall does not give him scouring sand, and Anonymous 185 thus returns to his mother empty handed. This may or may not be Thomas Rabbett. (A2v-A3)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A2v-A3

Anonymous 185 Relative of Witch
1294

An infant girl from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be the daughter of Elizabeth Francis and Christopher Frances, and a year and a half old at the time of her death. Elizabeth used her pregnancy with this child to convince Christopher Frances to marry her; their daughter was born within three months after the wedding. When the marriage proved prone to " much vnquietnes and moued to swearing and cursinge," Elizabeth asked her familiar Sathan to kill the child in the hope that their relationship would improve if it were just the two of them again.(9, 11-12)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 9, 11-12

Francis Francis (Child) Relative of Witch
1295

A man from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a yeoman, the husband of Elizabeth Francis and father of an infant girl. When Elizabeth desired Christopher as her husband, her familiar Sathan advised her to fornicate with him first; Elizabeth then used the resulting pregnancy to convince Christopher to marry her. Their daughter was born within three months after the wedding. When the marriage proved prone to "much vnquietnes and moued to swearing and cursinge," Elizabeth asked Sathan to kill the child in the hope that their relationship would improve if it were just the two of them again. The marriage continued unquiet after the child's death and Elizabeth had Sathan lie in wait in Christopher's shoe in the form of a toad. When Christopher found the toad with his toe, she had him kill it, giving Sathan the opportunity to inflict Christopher with "a lamenes wherof he can not healed"(9, 11-12)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 9, 11-12

Christopher Francis Christopher Francis Relative of Witch
1318

A woman from Raunds in the county of Northampton, known to be the mother of Arthur Bill, and allegedly both a witch and the wife of witch Bill (Father). When her son Arthur was suspected of bewitching a woman and some cattle, she was bound thumb to toe and tossed into water along with Arthur and Bill (Father). All three are said to have floated, which was though to confirm their guilt. The whole family was sent to Northampton Gaol, but she was permitted to visit Arthur in his cell; the two of them used the opportunity to bewitch a round ball into Bill (Father)'s throat to prevent him from confessing. While imprisoned, she feared being condemned to death by hanging so greatly that she cut her own throat. It is said that, before her death, she railed against her damnation and cursed her birth and conception.(C2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C2

Bill Bill (Mother) Relative of Witch
1319

A man from Raunds in the county of Northampton, known to be the father of Arthur Bill and husband of Bill (Mother), and alleged to be a witch. When his son Arthur was suspected of bewitching a woman and some cattle, he was bound thumb to toe and tossed into water along with Arthur and Bill (Mother). All three are said to have floated, which was though to confirm their guilt. The whole family was sent to Northampton Gaol. Arthur and Bill (Mother) allegedly bewitched a round ball into Bill (Father)'s throat to prevent him from confessing, but this did not prevent him from becoming the chief witness against Arthur after Bill (Mother) died. (C2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C2

Bill Bill (Father) Relative of Witch
1390

A woman from Chatton in the County of Northumberland, known to be the sister of Jane Martin. She made a confession claiming that she had been "the Divels servant these five yeares last past." The Devil first came to her at her home in the shape of a man in blue clothes; he grabbed her tightly by the hand and told her she should never want, then gave her one nip on the shoulder and another on her back. She added that her familiar took the form of a black greyhound, and that she had carnal relations with the Devil on numerous occasions. Margaret White claimed to have eaten, drunk and made merry at Martin's home with Dorothy Swinow and the Devil. With Martin and Swinow, she came to Edward Moore's home to "take away the life of MARGARET MUSCHAMP and MARY, and they were the cause of the Childrens tormenting, and that they were three severall times to have taken away their lives, and especially upon St. Johns day at night gone twelve moneths; And sayth that God was above the Divell, for they could not get their desires perfected." According to White, Swinow tried to consume Sibilla Moore in the womb, but could not and caused the infant to die after birth instead with White and Martin's help. White and Martin also bewitched Thomas Young to death. Martin was also said to be the cause of Richard Stanley's sore leg.(24-26)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 24-26

Margaret White Margaret White Relative of Witch
1391

A woman from Chatton in the County of Northumberland, known to be the sister of Margaret White. White accused Jane Martin of witchcraft in her confession, alleging that she had eaten, drunk and made merry at Martin's home with Dorothy Swinow and the Devil. White also claimed that she, Martin and Swinow came to Edward Moore's home to "take away the life of MARGARET MUSCHAMP and MARY, and they were the cause of the Childrens tormenting, and that they were three severall times to have taken away their lives, and especially upon St. Johns day at night gone twelve moneths; And sayth that God was above the Divell, for they could not get their desires perfected." According to White, Swinow tried to consume Sibilla Moore in the womb, but could not and caused the infant to die after birth instead with White and Martin's help. White and Martin also bewitched Thomas Young to death. Martin was also said to be the cause of Richard Stanley's sore leg.(24-26)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 24-26

Jane Martin Jane Martin Relative of Witch
1904

A yeoman from Halstead in the county of Essex. Bentall is the husband of Sybill Bentall who is believed to be a witch.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=333723)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=333723

Thomas Bentall Thomas Bentall Relative of Witch
1909

A young boy from Stisted in the county of Essex, grandson to Joan Cunny and the son of either Margaret or Avice Cunny. The person allegedly serves as one of the chief witness against his grandmother, although his testimony is not recorded. (A4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A4

Cunny Cunny (Grandson/Son 2) Relative of Witch
1910

A woman of Maldon in the county of Essex, known to be a widow and the mother of a daughter; her daughter had a falling out with the daughter of Ellen Smith, for which Smith struck Webbe's daughter on the face causing her to sicken and die. The morning after her daughter's death, Widow Webbe saw a black thing like a dog leave through her door, the sight upsetting her out of her wits.(9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 9

Webbe Widow Webbe Relative of Witch
1911

A child of Maldon in the county of Essex, known to be the daughter of Ellen Smith; when she had a falling out with the daughter of Goodwife Webbe, her mother caused the Webbe child to become sick and die.(8-9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 8-9

Smith Smith (Daughter) Relative of Witch
1921

A man of Lamberd End (now Lambourne) in the County of Essex, known to be the husband of Mother Nokes; he allegedly had an affair with a tailor's wife (Anonymous 365), for which Mother Nokes caused the tailor's wife's nursing child to die.(16)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 16

Nokes Mr. Nokes Relative of Witch
1981

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, wife of Lawrence Kempe and sister in law of Ursely Kempe. Mrs. Kempe is allegedly forespoken by Ursley Kempe so that she was "taken in her backe, and in the priuie partes of her bodye, in a very extreame and most straunge sorte, and so continued about three quarters of a year. This origin of this bewitchment occurred circa 1580 when Ursley and Mrs. Kempe has a physical altercation when Ursley "tooke vp her clothes and did heat her vpon the hippes, and otherwise in wordes did misuse her greatly." Mrs. Kempe allegedly told her husband "seuerall times that Ursley kempe his sister, had forspoke her, and that shee was the onely cause of that her sicknesse." Mrs. Kempe's body grew cold before she died, and she lay in a kind of half life, "like a dead creature," until Ursley came one day, unannounced and again "lifted vp the clothes and tooke her by the arme, the which shee had not so soone doone, but presently after she gasped, and neuer after drew her breath and so dyed."(C4v-C5)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C4v-C5

Kempe Mrs. Kempe Relative of Witch
2039

A young woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be a neighbor of Dorothy Durent and a kinswoman of Amy Denny. Durent gave deposition alleging that the day after Durent found a toad in her son William's blanket and had it held into the fire, Anonymous 389 told her that her aunt, Amy Denny, "was in a most lamentable condition having her face all scorched with fire, and that she was sitting alone in her House, in her smock without any fire."(9-10)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 9-10

Anonymous 389 Relative of Witch
2060

A seven year old girl from Little Oakley in the county of Essex, the daughter of Annis Heard, and the sister of one brother. Annis Dowsing is made to testify against her mother on March 18, 1582. She is lead through a series of questions, such as "whether her mother had any little things, or any little imps." Dowsing claims that her mother had two boxes of spirits; in one box, she had white and black speckled blackbirds. In another box, she had six spirits, "like Cowes" and as big as rats, crowned with "little short hornes, & they lie in the boxes upon white and blacke wooll." The bird spirits, she claims, are fed with wheat, barley, oats, bread & cheese, and the cow spirits, appropriately fed with "wheat straw, somtime wt barley straw, ote straw and wt hey," watered and given beer. Annis claims, in what must be a bit of confusion, that "her mother gave unto her one of the saide Cowes, whiche was called by teh name of Crowe, which us of colour black & white. and she saith, yt her mother gave to her brother one of them, which she called Donne, & that is of colour red & white." These spirits, she claimed, sucked on her mother, her brother, and herself. (F4-F4v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, F4-F4v

Annis Dowsing Annis Dowsing Relative of Witch
2061

A boy from Little Oakely in the county of Essex, the son of Annis Heard and the brother of Annis Dowsing. According to Dowsing, her brother was given one of his mother's six familiar cow spirits, a red and white rat sized bovine named Donne. Although this familiar, or one of his mother's familiars, allegedly sucked blood from his legs, Heard was not entirely a victimized by them. According, to his sister, Heard would play with the spirits, until their "tuitling and tetling," grew annoying, and he would "taketh them and put them into the boxes."(F4-F4v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, F4-F4v

Heard Heard (Son) Relative of Witch
2165

A man from Salmesbury in the county of Lancashire, known to be a knight and the deceased cousin of John Southworth. According to John Singleton, Sir John long suspected his cousin John's wife Jane of witchcraft, and thought her "an euill woman, and a Witch." He said that "ought an euill woman, and a Witch: and he said that he was sorry for her husband, that was his kinsman, for he thought she would kill him." Both Singleton and William Alker alleged that Sir John avoided Jane. (L4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, L4v

John Southworth Sir John Southworth Relative of Witch
2174

A man from the Forest of Pendle, known to be the husband of Elizabeth Device, the father of James, Jennet and Alison Device, and the son-in-law of Elizabeth Southerns. According to his daughter Alison, John Device was afraid of Anne Whittle, and made a deal to pay her a measure of meal every year in exchange for the safety of his family. John allegedly said on his deathbed that Whittle bewitched him to death for missing a payment.(E4-E4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E4-E4v

John Device John Device Relative of Witch
2182

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, known to be the daughter of Christopher Nutter, sister to Robert Nutter and John Nutter, and granddaughter of Elizabeth Nutter and old Robert Nutter. Crooke gave deposition alleging that Anne Redferne was responsible for the deaths of Robert and Christopher.(O-Ov)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, O-Ov

Margaret Crooke Margaret Crooke Relative of Witch
2183

A woman from Thurniholme (Thurnham) in the County of Lancashire, known to be the wife of Chrisopher Hargraves, who allegedly attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. (G3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G3v

Elizabeth Hargraves Elizabeth Hargraves Relative of Witch
2184

A man from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, known to be the husband of Elizabeth Howgate, son of Elizabeth Southerns, brother of Elizabeth Device and uncle of James, Jennet and Alison Device, who allegedly attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. (G3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G3v

Christopher Howgate Christopher Howgate Relative of Witch
2185

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, known to be the wife of Christopher Howgate, who allegedly attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. (G3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G3v

Elizabeth Howgate Elizabeth Howgate Relative of Witch
2187

A man from Thurniholme (Thurnham) in the County of Lancashire, known to be the husband of Elizabeth Hargraves, who allegedly attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. (G3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G3v

Christopher Hargraves Christopher Hargraves Relative of Witch
2224

An old man from Warboys in the county of Huntington, known to be the husband of Mother Alice Samuel, father of Agnes Samuel and a neighbour of Robert Throckmorton. When Mother Samuel refuses to go to the Throckmorton household after Robert Throckmorton arranges for her hire with John Samuel, he beats her with a cudgel until Robert Throckmorton convinces him to stop. Mother Samuel agrees to go with Throckmorton after the beating to escape John, and would not return home until he was out on an errand. When Robert Throckmorton came to question Agnes, he claimed to not know where she was while she hid above the parlour with sacks and tubs weighing down the trap door. After Mother Samuel was made to confess by the Throckmortons and Dr. Dorington convinced Robert Throckmorton to allow her to return home, John and Agnes convinced her to retract her confession. He called her a foul name the next day when he realized she had confessed all over again and had to be stopped from striking her; she fell into a faint when he tried. He later came to the Throckmorton house claiming to have heard Agnes was sick, and while there Elizabeth Throckmorton accused him of being a witch and demanded he speak a "charm" in which he confess to being a witch and that he had bewitched her; he refused. Hearing his wife deny involvement in Lady Cromwell's death in court, he said for all to hear "denie it not, but confesse the trueth: for thou didst it one way or other." Mother Samuel claimed he knew all about the death of Lady Cromwell, and that he had the skills of both a witch and an unwitcher himself. John Samuel was executed with Mother Samuel and Agnes Samuel following the trial.(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3

John Samuel John Samuel Relative of Witch
2225

A woman from Warboys in the county of Huntington, known to be the daughter of Mother Alice Samuel and John Samuel, and a neighbour of Robert Throckmorton. When Mother Samuel was taken to the Throckmorton home to be scratched by the afflicted children, Agnes was brought with her; Mother Samuel was overheard telling Agnes not to confess to anything. Later, Robert Throckmorton came to the Samuel home to question Agnes; she hid in a room above the parlour and blocked the trap door while John Samuel tried to convince Throckmorton she wasn't there. Agnes finally emerged when Throckmorton threatened to break into the room. She was imprisoned alongside Mother Samuel, but Throckmorton took pity, posted her bail and hired her to care for his children in their fits. The children began to claim to see spirits about the same time and accused Agnes of renewing their bewitchment on Mother Samuel's behalf with the old woman's familiars. Agnes denied having any familiars for some time. Throckmorton, at the urging of his kin, forced her to say "I charge thee thou diuell, as I loue thee, and haue authoritie ouer thee, and am a Witch, and guiltie of this matter, that thou suffer this childe to be well at this present;" it was observed that the children came out of their fits every time she did so. The Throckmorton children began to scratch her routinely as well. Agnes eventually confessed to having numerous familiars, each of which tormented a particular child, and to consenting to the death of Lady Cromwell. When urged to say the Lord's Prayer and the Creed, she could not, nor could she be taught to. Agnes was charged and stood trial for bewitching Lady Cromwell to death, joining her parents in court. She denied being a witch and refused to claim pregnancy to stay her execution. She was searched after her execution, but no witches' marks were found.(B)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, B

Agnes Samuel Agnes Samuel Relative of Witch
2317

A man from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire and husband of accused witch Jenet Hargraves. (276-278)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 276-278

Hargraves Mr. Hargraves Relative of Witch
2318

A husbandman from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire and husband of accused witch Frances Dickenson.(276-278)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 276-278

John Dickenson John Dickenson Relative of Witch