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List of all events occurring in the persontype of

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
1

Agnes Waterhouse is a woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex. She is known to be a widow, the mother of Joan Waterhouse, and sister of Elizabeth Francis. She was executed for witchcraft on July 29, 1566. Elisabeth Francis allegedly passed her familiar Sathan on to Mother Waterhouse; her first request of the familiar was to have him kill one of her hogs to see whether the cat could indeed do it. Sathan did, demanding a chicken and a drop of her blood in return. Sathan ate the chicken down to the bones and feathers, leaving no trace behind. The marks from where she pricked herself for drops of blood she gave him for his deeds are said show up red on her skin. Mother Waterhouse claimed to have sent Sathan to enact revenge on her neighbours for numerous slights, including drowning a cow, killing three geese, cause a brewing to fail, causing curds to be lost after she was denied butter, and kill a neighbour and his wife. She also had Sathan kill her husband. After each act, she would recite the Pater Noster in Latin. She turned Sathan into a toad by praying, kept him in a pot whenever she left home, and fed him in this form with milk. Sathan allegedly warned her about her apprehension in advance and predicted she would be hanged or burned. Joan Waterhouse claimed her mother tried to teach her witchcraft. Mother Waterhouse claimed not to have fed Sathan with blood in court, but confessed when numerous red spots were found on her face and nose, claiming instead that she had not fed him in over a fortnight. In the confession taken immediately before her execution, she claimed to have been a witch for 15 years, to desire to repent, and to have God's forgiveness for her evil ways. She alleged that she had once sent Sathan to destroy a tailor and his goods, but Sathan could not because the man was too strong in his faith. She also said that she had attended church services regularly and prayed often, but in Latin as Sathan would not tolerate prayers in English. According to the Essex Assize Records, Mother Waterhouse was accused of bewitching William Fynee to death, to which she confessed as well.(13)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 13

Agnes Waterhouse Agnes Waterhouse Witch
2

Elizabeth Francis is a woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be the granddaughter of Eve of Hatfield Peverel and the wife of Christopher Francis. Eve is said to have taught her granddaughter to be a witch at the age of twelve, bidding her to renounce God and "to geue of her bloudde to Sathan," a familiar in the shape of a white spotted cat. Eve taught her to feed Sathan with bread and milk and to keep it in a basket. Her first request was to "be ryche and to haue goodes" which the cat fulfilled by bringing her eighteen sheep but they "dyd all weare awaye." She wanted to marry Andrew Byles, which Sathan promised to help her do on the condition that she allow Byles to "abuse" her first; Byles refused to marry her after. In revenge, she had Sathan "waste his goodes" and later has Sathan kill him with a touch. Sathan demanded a drop of blood for every service, leaving red spots on her body. Francis found herself to be pregnant after Byle's death, which she ended by drinking a decoction of a herb Sathan recommended. When she was ready to try again for a husband, she successfully persuaded Christopher Francis by getting pregnant with his child; their daughter was born three months after the wedding. They fought often, leading Francis to have Sathan kill the child, now a year and a half old. The girl's death did not smooth their relationship, and Francis has Sathan lame her husband by appearing in his shoe in the shape of a toad and allowing Christopher to kill him. When she tired of Sathan, she allegedly passed him on to Mother Agnes Waterhouse, a woman who may have been her sister making her also the aunt of Joan Waterhouse. Francis is also said to have had a familiar in the shape of a dog bewitch Alice Poole for denying her yeast. She appears as tied to the legal pursuit of witchcraft in 1566, 1572, 1578, and 1579; she is mprisoned and pilloried. However, her alleged crimes eventually catch up with her. She is hanged for the bewitchment of Alice Poole. The Essex Assize records show her charged first with bewitching the infant John Auger, second with bewitching Mary Cocke, and the final time for bewitching Alice Poole to death.(9-11)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 9-11

Elizabeth Frauncis Elizabeth Francis Witch
3

Jone Waterhouse is a woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex known to be an eighteen years old spinster, the daughter of Mother Agnes Waterhouse, and the niece of Elizabeth Francis. She claimed Mother Waterhouse tried to teach her witchcraft, but that she had refused to learn it. She confessed in court that Mother Waterhouse had a familiar in the shape of a toad she called Sathan, which would appear suddenly whenever Mother Waterhouse had a task for him. Joan allegedly tried calling Sathan herself after a neighbour, Agnes Brown, refused her bread and cheese. Sathan appeared, demanding her body and soul in payment rather the red rooster she offered; Joan agreed and then went to Brown and made her afraid. The dog still haunted Joan, but she claimed to have never set it on anyone else. Mother Waterhouse, in her confession, corroborated Joan's story. Agnes Brown claimed in court that one day, while she was churning butter, a large black dog with an ape's face, a short tail, a chain and a silver whistle with the milkhouse key in its mouth; this creature demanded butter over the course of the next few days and claimed to belong to Mother Waterhouse. Joan was tried for the bewitchment of Agnes Brown so that Brown became disabled in her right leg and arm at the Essex Assizes, but is found not guilty.(18-20)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 18-20

Joan Waterhouse Joan Waterhouse Witch
5

Ellen Smythe is a woman from Maldon in the county of Essex known to be the daughter of Alice Chaundler, stepdaughter of John Chaundler, and mother to two children, alleged to be a witch and keep three spirits named Great Dicke, Little Dicke and Willet. She was tried for witchcraft at the Chelmsford Assizes and found guilty. After Alice Chaundler was executed for witchcraft, John Chaundler allegedly demanded the money Smith had received from her mother, resulting in a falling out. In anger, Smith bewitches John Chaundeler to bring up any meat he tries to eat, causing him to "wasted awaie to his death." Smith is also alleged to have bewitched John Eastwood for refusing alms to her son, and caused Goodwife Webbe's daughter to die over a falling out with her own daughter.(7-9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 7-9

Ellen Smith Ellen Smith Witch
6

Mother Staunton is a woman from Wimbish in the county of Essex who is alleged to have performed word and image magic on her neighbors in revenge for their poor behavior and lack of charity. She is eventually arraigned, but not executed, due to a wrongly drafted indictment. When accused of being a witch she claimed "I am none in deede, although I can tell what belongeth to that practise."(11, 12, 14-15)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 11, 12, 14-15

Mother Staunton Mother Staunton Witch
7

Mother Nokes is a woman from Lamberd End (now Lambourne) in the county of Essex believed to have a daughter and a familiar spirit named Tom. She was tried for witchcraft at the Chelmsford assizes and found guilty. Nokes allegedly used witchcraft to cripple a boy in Thomas Spycer's service (Anonymous 366); a servant of Spycer's (Anonymous 58) had snatched a pair of gloves from her daughter's pocket and ignored Alice Noke's demands to return them, then later sent Anonymous 366 to return the gloves on his behalf. Nokes nevertheless crippled the boy's limbs in revenge. At another occasion, Nokes allegedly caused a tailor's wife's nursing child to die in retaliation for an affair with Noke's husband. She is also said to have caused a plow horse belonging to Thomas Spycer to die when the plowman would not answer her question. Mother Nokes was hanged for murder by witchcraft in April 1579.(15-17)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 15-17

Alice Nokes Alice Nokes Witch
8

A mother from St. Osyth, in the county of Essex mother to Thomas Rabbett and sister to Lawrence Kempe. Ursula or Ursley Kempe (alias Grey) who claims "shee coulde vnwitche shee coulde not witche," meaning she was an unwitcher or a cunning woman, rather than a witch. Annis Glascock, whom Kempe accused of the murder of Micheal's child, Fortune's child, and the Page's ward, called her used "outragious wordes," against Kempe, "calling the sayde Ursley whore, saying, shee would scratch her: for shee was a Witch, and that shee was sure shee had bewitched her: For that shee coulde not nowe weepe." According to her eight year old son, Thomas Rabbett, she has four familiars: Tyffin "a she, like a white Lambe," Tyttey "a hee like a gray Cat," Pigine, "a hee like a black toad, and Jacke, "a hee like a black Cat", the hees were to plague to death, & the shees to punish with bodily harme, & to destroy. Kempe allegedly cures Davie Thurlowe but later bewitches his sister, killing her, and re-witches his mother, Grace Thurlowe, who had come to her for a cure "a lamenesse in her bones, & specially in her legges," but who failed to pay up. She is accused of having bewitched Annis Letherdall's "gyrle" so that the "childe was taken as it lay very bigge, with a great swelling in the bottome of the belly, and other priuie partes." She is also accused of having bewitched her brother, Lawrence Kempe's wife, causing her to have the same sorts of symptoms; Mrs. Kempe was "taken in her backe, and in the priuie partes of her bodye, in a very extreame and most straunge sorte, and so continued about three quarters of a yeere, and then died." Kempe is indicted the malefic murder of Edna Starron, Elizabeth Letherdall, and Joan Thurlowe, crimes committed in conspiracy with Alice Newman. She is found guilty on these charges, but remanded. (A-A2v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A-A2v

Ursley Kempe Ursley Kempe Witch
9

Joan Pechey is a woman who lived in St. Osyth, in the county of Essex for at least eleven years and who claims to be somewhere above sixty years old before and the mother of Phillip Barrenger. She is allegedly described by Widow Barnes, via her daughter Margerie Sammons, as "skilfull and cunning in witcherie," and a woman who could both do "as much as the said mother Barnes," or "any other in this towne of S. Osees." She allegedly bewitched Johnson, the Collector and distributer of alms after her gave her "bread was to hard baked for her," she being an old woman, presumably should have received a softer loaf and the harder bread should have been given to "a gyrle or another, and not to her." She denies any involvement in witchcraft and denies Mother Barnes had any either. She also denies the accusations of incest between herself and her twenty three year old son, Phillip Barrenger, who confessed that "manye times and of late hee hath layne in naked bed with his owne mother, being willed and commaunded so to doe of her." Although Margarey Sammon allegedly sent her familiars (formerly her mother's two familiars) Tom and Robbyn skipping and leaping off to Pechey's home, and Ales Hunt claimed that she had heard Pechey scolding her spirits, saying"yea are you so sawsie? are yee so bolde? you were not best to bee so bolde with mee: For if you will not bee ruled, you shall haue Symonds sause, yea saide the saide Ioan, I perceiue if I doe giue you an inch, you you will take an ells," Pechey likewise denied these charges. She claimed she indeed had pets, a kitten and a dog, but no "Puppettes, Spyrites or Maumettes." Although she was "committed to prison for suspicion of felony and upon inquisition," she was released by proclamation. (C5-C6)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C5-C6

Joan Pechey Joan Pechey Witch
10

Ales Hunt is a woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, mother or step mother of Febey Hunt, sister of Margery Sammon, and the daughter of Widow Barnes. According to her daughter, Hunt keeps two familiars, Jack and Robbin, next to her bed in an earthen pot with woll. She feeds them "with milke out of a blacke trening dishe," and sent them at least once to Hayward of Frowicke. Urlsey Kempe picks up this narrative and suggests that "shee asked Tyffin her white spirite, what Hunts wiues spririte had done: And then it told this examinate, that it had killed Heywarde of Frowicke sixe beastes which were lately dressed of the gargette. And sayeth, that her sayde spirite tolde her, that Huntes wiues spirite had a droppe of her blood for a rewarde: but shee sayeth, that shee asked not her spirite vpon what place of her body it was." Kempe appears again in Hunt's narrative, claiming that Hunt and her mother, the Widow Barnes, had bewitched Elizabeth Durrant after her father, Henry, a local butcher, denied them pork. At first, Hunt denies all charges against her. Brian Darcy claims that Hunt, falling on her knees and with tears streaming down her face, confessed to having had Jack and Robbin only six days before she was examined. The two spirits allegedly told her that "the sayde Ursley Kempe woulde bewray her this Examinate, and willed her therefore to shift for her selfe. And so they went from her, and sithence this Examinate saith shee sawe them not." She also informed against her sister, claiming she too kept familiars. Hunt is indicted on the charges of bewitching six of William Hayward's cows to death and bewitching Elizabeth Durrant to death. She pleads not guilty and is found not guilty on both charges. (A5)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A5

Alice Hunt Alice Hunt Witch
11

Ales Newman is a woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex who is accused of bewitching at least four people: Thorlow's wife (on the knee), John Stratton's wife (on the back -- to her death), Letherdalls' child, Johnson (the tax / alms collector) and his wife (unto the death), Bulter (who languished still in pain), the "late Lorde Darcey, (whereof hee dyed)", and her "ownher husband, William Newman. (Ales) Newman confessed nothing herself and was accused of being obstinate. She is condemned but remanded. She is found guilty and remanded to prison. As of August 2, 1582, she is still imprisoned, along with Cecily Sellis, Ellen Southern, and Agnes / Annis Glascock at the Colchester Goal. (Image 53)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, Image 53

Alice Newman Alice Newman Witch
12

Elizabeth Bennet is a woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex and the wife of a dairy farmer. Acording to Ursely Kempe, Elizabeth Bennet has a hungry ferret familiat laying over a pot in her house, and according to Kempe's own familar, Tyffyn, she had two familiars: one was a "blacke Dogge, and the other redde like a Lyon, and that their names were Suckin and Lyerd." Kempe later accused Bennet of sending her spirit "Suckin to plague one Willingall (to death), William Willes' wife (who lingered for years) and sending her "spirite Lyerd to plague Fortunes wife and his chylde" and Bonners' wife "to plague her" in the knee. Bonnet confirmed that his wife and Bennet had been Elizabeth Bennet "were lovers and familiar friendes, and did accompanie much together." However, there appeared to be a falling out between the women and Mrs. Bonnet experienced a lamness in her knee, and later after speaking with and kissing Bennet found "her vpper Lippe swelled & was very bigge, and her eyes much sunked into her head, and shee hath lien sithence in a very strange case." Bennet's own confession came from behind a veil of tears. She had been neighbors with William Byet and his wife, and live peacefully so for a year. However, they eventually began to argue. "Byet calling her oftentimes olde trot and olde witche, and did banne and curse this examinat and her Cattell, to the which this examinat saith, that shee called him knaue saying, winde it vp Byet, for it wil light vpon your selfe." Following this altercation, Bennet admits that two of Byet's cattle died, and a third dropped to the ground where he began to beat it it to death. Beating animals was common practice in Byet's home; his wife beat Bennet's swine "seuerall times with greate Gybets, and did at an other time thrust a pitchforke through the side of one of this examinats swine." Bennet explains her malefic compact as happening only two years prior (1580) and taking place as she went through the many long steps needed to make bread. Suckin grabbed her by the coat as she was coming from the mill and would not release her for over two hours until she "prayed deuoutly to Almightie God to deliuer her from it: at which time the spirite did depart from her." He returning closer to her home, he held her fast again, until she again prayed and as released. Within hours, Suckin appeared again, once by the well where she was presumably collecting water and once as she was shifting her "meale" and was again exorcised. The next day as Bennet kneaded her bread, Suckin returned with the spirit Lyerd; they grew bold, and scolded her for being "so snappish" but were again exorcised. They returned again as she made the fire and were again made to depart. They returned again as she stoked the fired and, growing increasingly bold, grabbed her leg, but were exorcised. Lyerd and Suckin came one final time as Bennet was stroking the fire in her oven. They seized her by the hips and said "seeing thou wilt not be ruled, thou shalt haue a cause, & would haue thrust this examinat into ye burning Ouen." Bennet struggled and used the fire fork as a wedge to keep her out of the oven, or to beat off the spirits, but she would suffer burns up and down her arms. They would come to her two more times while she was in a barn, once while milking, and again she would exorcise them. It was not until the falling Elizabeth Bennett fell out with William Byet, however, that the spirits would act against others. Bennet claims that "shee caused Lyard in ye likenes of a Lion to goe & to plague the saide Byets beastes vnto death, but that "the spirit called, Suckin," reported to her that he had, of his own accord, "plagued y^ said Byets wife to the death." She did however send "Suckin, to goe and plague the sayde Willyam Byette where that woulde: The which the sayd spyrite did," because Byet had "abused her, in calling her olde trot, old whore, and other lewde speaches." Bennett supposes that Suckin and Lyerd, which she fed with milk and housed in an earthen pot lined with wool were sent by Joan Turner after Bennet "had denyed the sayde Mother Turner of mylke." Bennet is held, indicted, and tried for the malefic murder of Mrs. Byet and "acknowledges" the felony. She is condemned to be hanged in 1582.(A6v-A7)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A6v-A7

Elizabeth Bennet Elizabeth Bennet Witch
14

Margery Sammon is a woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, sister to Alice Hunt, and daughter of Mother Barnes. She allegedly keeps two familiars which appear in the form of toads by the names of Tom and Robbyn. She also informs against Joan Pechey.(Image 23)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, Image 23

Margery Sammon Margery Sammon Witch
15

Ales Manfield is a sixty-three year old woman from Thorpe in the county of Essex who for approximately twelve years allegedly shared two male and two female familiars in the shape of black cats with Margaret Grevell: Robin, Jack, William, Puppet (alias Mamet) for twelve years which she keeps in a wool lined box on her shelf. Manfield serves as witness against Mother Ewstace, claiming that she had a white, a gray, and a black feline familiar which she used to kill a child. She also stands as witness against Mother Grevell, claiming that Grevell had plagued Mother Ewstance's husband to death. However, more often than not, she claims to have worked with Grevell. Manfield allegedly sends Robin to lame Robert Cheston's bull (circa 1575) and Grevell sends Jack to lame Cheston himself (circa 1580) beginning on his toe, but causing his death. After Joan Cheston refused to give Manfield her curds, she claims to have sent Puppet (alias Mamet) "foure of her Beastes," and after John Sayer ruined her yard with his cart, she has Puppet ensure that the same cart became stuck and would not move (as Sayer tells the story, the cart became stuck when the man thatching his barn refused to thatch Manfield's oven until he got permission to do so). Around Michaelmas, all four familiars allegedly took a trip together to assist Cecily Sellis in the burning of Ross' barn and cattle. Her familiar, William, allegedly gave notice to Manfield for the whole group, claiming that since she would soon be apprehended, they would go to work for Urseley Kempe, Margery Sammon, Ales Hunt, or Mother Torner (aka Joan Turner). Lynd's wife would not give her milk, that her cow would not feed her twenty day old calf (which died). She is indicted as a witch, but not charged as one. Rather, she is charged for arson. She is found guilty of co-conspiring with Cecily Sellis to burn Richard Ross's barn and "field of grain worth 100 marks."(D5-D8)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, D5-D8

Alice Manfield Alice Manfield Witch
16

Margaret Grevell is a fifty five year old woman from Thorpe in the county of Essex who, according to Alice Manfield, shares four feline familiars with her for seven years: Robin, Jack, William, Puppet (alias Mamet). Again according to Manfield, Grevell "caused her impes to destroy seuerall brewinges of beere," belonging to Reade and Carter (Carter likewise testified against Grevell on this charge) a number of "batches of bread." Nicholas Stickland accuses her of preventing his wife's butter from churning and causing the untimely demise of a calf. Although Grevell is accused (again by Mansfield) of the murder of Elizabeth Ewstace's husband, she is indicted for the malefic murder of Robert Cheston. She is searched as a witch, but the witch-searchers "say that they cannot judge her to haue any sucked spots vpon her body." She is found not guilty of causing Cheston's death, and acquitted. (D5-D8)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, D5-D8

Margaret Grevell Margaret Grevell Witch
17

Elizabeth Ewstace is a fifty-four year old woman from Thorpe (now Thorpe-le-Soken) in the county of St. Osyth and mother of Margaret Ewstace. Elizabeth Ewstace is accused of bewitching Robert Sannuet so that "his mouth was drawne awrye, well neere vppe to the vpper parte of his cheeke," after he "used threatning speeches" on her daughter Margaret, who was workinf as his servant at the time (circe 1567). This was not the only crime she was accused of committing against Sannuet, however. She also went after his family and his livelihood. She allegedly bewitched his wife, so that she developed a "most straunge sicknes, and was deliuered of childe, which within short time after dyed," a crime which found its origins in the bewitchment of his brother, Thomas Crosse, Felice Oakely's late husband. Crosse originally blamed his illness on Margaret Ewstace, and after Sannuet swore he'd be avenged on her, if it was true, Elizabeth allegedly bewitched Sannuet's wife and his livestock. Crosse, who before (circa 1579) was "verye sickly, and at tymes was without any remembrance" soon "pyned," and who "coulde neyther see, heare, nor speake, and his face all to bee scratched" and "woulde alwayes crye out vpon the sayde Elizabeth euen vnto his dying day." She was accused of having "iii. Impes or spirits, of coulour white, grey and black," which she denied and she also denied being in any co-conspiracy with Ales Newman."()

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582,

Elizabeth Eustace Elizabeth Eustace Witch
18

Annis Herd is a woman from Little Oakely in the county of Essex and mother to Annis Dowsing and at least one son, Annis Heard is, according to Andrew West, "ill thought of for witchcraft" and described by Mrs. Harrison as a "light woman, and a common harlot." Head is a mother or at least one child; Bennet Lane references "the girle of the said Annis Herds," speaking to her mother. Having been accused of being a witch, Annis Heard allegedly spoke to John Wade and "prayed him to be a meanes to helpe her, that she might answere the same when the dayes were longer." Wade suggested that he could not help her, and but suggested that she see that "Regester dwelt at Colchester, saying, it must be hee that therein may pleasure thee. Wade recounted that since the investigation into Heard began "he hath had not so fewe as twentie sheepe and lambes that haue died, and e lame and like to die: & hee saith, that hee hath lost of his beasts & other cattell, which haue dyed in a strange sort." Wade was not the only one to speak against Herd, nor was he the only one to suffer. Five more households would speak out against Herd. Two of Thomas Cartwrite's cows died after he annoyed Heard by moving her makeshift road repair; Bennet Lane (William Lane's wife) lost the ability to spin after demanding a dish back and lost the ability to make cream after demanding two pence back from Herd; Andrewe West, having rescinded on a deal to give her a pig, found one of his went mad; having accused her of having an "unhappie tongue," his wife could not brew; Edmond Osborne and his wife also lost the ability to brew, after calling in a loan "iii. d. the which shee owed her for a pecke of Aples." Richard Harrisons' loss, however, was the most heartwrenching. While he was in London, his wife accused Herd of stealing duckling from their nest underneath a cherry tree. Mrs. Harrison did not only lose her ducklings, however. Having gone to Herd to "rate" and "chid" her, Mrs. Harrison soon grew ill, convinced Herd had bewitched her. Within two months, she implored to her husband "I pray you as euer there was loue betweene vs, (as I hope there hath been for I haue v. pretie children by you I thanke God) seeke som remedie for me against yonder wicked beast (meaning the saide Annis Herd). And if you will not I will complaine to my father, and I thinke he wil see som remedie for me, for (said she) if I haue no remedie, she will vtterly consume me." Herd was not charged for Harrison's bewitchment, nor does she even acknowledge it in her confession, although she acknowledges the other charges against her. Despite all the hoolpa, the myriad of witnesses who testify against her (or about strange occurrences which appear to gesture towards her), and her inclusion amongst the "witches" in the March 29, 1582 Assize record, Herd is only indicted on one charge, that of having "bewitched a cow, ten sheep and ten lambs worth 4, belonging to John Wade, to his great damage." She pleads not guilty, is found not guilty. She is therefore3 acquitted. (E6-E7)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, E6-E7

Annis Heard Annis Heard Witch
19

Joan Robinson is a woman from St. Osyth, in the county of Essex who is accused of bewitching beasts, horses, and swine. She is described (or the description appears in the context of the accusations against Robinson) as having "one of her eares lesse the~ ye other, & hath also a moole vnder one of her armes, and hath also in her yard a great woodstacke," she allegedly fed her (familiar?) cat with blood from her nose, made the wind nearly blow down Thomas Rice's home, and made his goose not roost her eggs, Margery Carter's mare to sicken and die, made Alice Walter's sow go made (and not suckle its piglets) Allen Ducke's horses to get stuck in water and two of his pigs to die, one of John Brasyer's pigs to die and one of his cows to drown. She denied accusations against her. Robinson appears to have been discharged. (F5v-F8v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, F5v-F8v

Joan Robinson Joan Robinson Witch
20

Joan Cunny is an eighty year old mother and widow from Stysted in the County of Essex. She is described as having lived "very lewedly," and having likewise produced "two lewde Daughters," Margaret and Avice Cunny who were themselves "no better then naughty packs," and grandmother to their two "Bastard Children: beeing both boyes" ten and twelve years old. Cunny allegedly uses magic to conjure the devil and familiars, in the likeness of black frogs, Jack and Jill (who can kill livestock but not men), and to practicing witchcraft. She confesses to learning magic (and conjurations) from Mother Humfrey of Maplested.(Image 3 - Image 4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, Image 3 - Image 4

Joan Cunny Joan Cunny Witch
21

Joan Upeny is a mother of two girls from Dagenham, in the county of Essex. She allegedly has a number of relatively sickly and disobedient familiars -- her first being a mole, given to her by Mother Arnold (alias White-cote), a witch from Barking, and a number of different moles and toads, one of which allegedly killed Alice Foster and one of which allegedly killed Joan Harwood/ Harrolde. The last of two died of starvation when she ran away, having heard John Harrolde and Richard Foster "say she was a witch, and such other woordes." Upney denied being a witch until she reached the gallows, where fearing for her soul, (and likely with a fear of fire and brimstone Mater Ward instilled in her) she finally confessed.(Sig. Aiiiv, B, Biii-Biiii)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, Sig. Aiiiv, B, Biii-Biiii

Joan Upney Joan Upney Witch
22

Joan Prentice is a woman from Hinningham Sibble, in the county of Essex. She claims that she became a witch circa 1583 when the Devil appeared to her in the shape of a ferret with fiery eyes and demanded her soul saying: "Joan if thou will haue me doo any thing for thee, I am and wilbe alwaies ready at thy commaundement." She accepted and named the familiar Bidd. Prentice confessed to allowing Bidd to suck blood from her cheek, and sending him to spoil "William Adams' wife (of Hinningham Sibble) brew. In the course of her examination, Prentice also accused Elizabeth Whale and Elizabeth Mott or being "acquainted" with Bidd, but does not go so far as suggesting they had killed or harmed anyone with him; the women were brought to the Assize on the weight of this claim, but freed on insufficient proof. Prentice also confessed to sending Bidd to Glascock's house to "nippe one of his Children a little, named Sara, but hurt it not," after being refused alms at the Glascock home (disregarding the fact that it was a servant, not a relation which refused her). Bidd allegedly returned, claiming he had followed her, giving the two year old Sara Glascock a nip which would soon kill her. Prentice and Bidd soon fell out; she called him a villain and he disappeared never to return. Prentice was tried for the malefic murder of Sara Glascock. Prentice was hung in Chelmsford in July 5th, 1589.()

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589,

Joan Prentice Joan Prentice Witch
23

Annis Dell is woman from Hatfield in the county of Hertfordshire, who is executed for the murder of Anthony James Jr. After having ransacked the James family home and killed the parents, a group of nine robbers kidnap the children and take them to the Inn run by Annis Dell. After discussing at length and showing Annis Dell the riches, she decides that the boy should be murdered and the girl have her tongue cut out. the plan is executed that night, Dell cutting out the girls tongue herself. Three weeks later, the murdered boy's body (Anthony James jr.) is found in a pond by men out with their dogs. The boy is recognized as having been at the Dells' Inn three weeks prior and so Annis Dell is questioned. Dell denies everything but is nevertheless suspected of foul play. She is brought to the assizes on several occasions because of this, but without further proof, is not convicted. It is only years later when Elizabeth James who had her tongue cut out is able to speak again and testify against Annis Dell that this woman is convicted and executed for her crimes.(16-17)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 16-17

Annis Dell Annis Dell Witch
24

George Dell is a man from Hatfield in the county of Hertfordshire and the son of Annis Dell, a woman who runs an inn. When a group of robbers show up to the inn one evening with the two James children they kidnapped, the Dells help them determine what to do with the children. It is determined that the boy (Anthony James Jr.) will be murdered and the girl (Elizabeth James) will have her tongue cut out. George Dell executes the murder of Anthony James Jr. who is drowned in a lake. George Dell is executed years later after Elizabeth James regains the ability to speak and miraculously tells the story of her family. (16-17)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 16-17

George Dell George Dell Witch
25

Johane Harrison is a suspected witch from Royston in th couthy of Hertfordshire (formerly Hartford) and mother of A. Harisson (also a suspected witch). Harrison allegedly did magic "by the helpe of her spirits, which she reported to haue 2 attending on her, one for men, another for cattell," and having committed her malefic acts using an inscribed parchment, 4 human bones, and human hair (thus establishing Harrison as a necromancer). Harrison and her daughter are both executed for having committed malefic murder on August 4th, 1606. (Image 11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, Image 11

Johane Harrison Joan Harrison Witch
26

John walsh is a man from Netherberry in the county of Dorsetshire, who is accused of witchcraft and sorcery. John Walsh claims to practice physics and surgery.(Image 5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination of John Walsh before Master Thomas Williams. London: 1566, Image 5

John Walsh John Walsh Witch
27

Stubbe Peeter is aman from the town of Bedbur, near the city of Collin, in the country of Germany who is accused of sorcery and executed on 31 October, 1589.(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Discourse. Declaring the Damnable Life and Death of one Stubbe Peeter, a Most Wicked Sorcerer. London: 1590, 3

Peter Stubbe Peter Stubbe Witch
29

Agnis Sampson is an elder witch from Haddington, Scotland. She is accused by Geillis Duncane of practicing witchcraft and taken into custody for torturous questioning.(10)

Appears in:
Carmichael, James. News from Scotland, Declaring the Damnable Life and Death of Doctor Fian a Notable Sorcerer. London: 1592, 10

Agnes Sampson Agnes Sampson Witch
30

Agnis Tompson is a woman from Edinburgh, Scotland who denies being involved in a devilish plot meaning to destroy the King of Scotland.(12)

Appears in:
Carmichael, James. News from Scotland, Declaring the Damnable Life and Death of Doctor Fian a Notable Sorcerer. London: 1592, 12

Agnes Tompson Agnes Tompson Witch
32

Palue Gamperle is a man from Munich, Germany who is trained in witchcraft by his grandmother and accused of murdering many people.(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Strange Report of Six Most Notorious Witches. London: 1601, 6

Paule Gamperle Paule Gamperle Witch
33

Anne Gamperle is a woman from Munich, Germany and the alleged the wife of Paule Gamperle-- a man accused of witchcraft and murder.(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Strange Report of Six Most Notorious Witches. London: 1601, 6

Anne Gamperle Anne Gamperle Witch
34

Simon Gamperle is a young man from Munich, Germany and allegedly the son of Paule Gamperle-- a man accused of witchcraft and murder.(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Strange Report of Six Most Notorious Witches. London: 1601, 6

Simon Gamperle Simon Gamperle Witch
35

Jacob Gamperle is a young man from Munich, Germany. He is the son of Paule Gamperle who is accused of witchcraft and murder.(Image 3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Strange Report of Six Most Notorious Witches. London: 1601, Image 3

Jacob Gamperle Jacob Gamperle Witch
36

Ullrich Sehelltibaum is a man from Detwang, Germany. He confesses to robbery and murder by witchcraft.(10)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Strange Report of Six Most Notorious Witches. London: 1601, 10

Ullrich Sehelltibaum Ullrich Sehelltibaum Witch
37

George Smaltes is a man from Munich, Germany, described as a tailor who confesses to robbery, arson, murder, and witchcraft.(11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Strange Report of Six Most Notorious Witches. London: 1601, 11

George Smaltes George Smaltes Witch
38

Agnes Browne is a woman from Guilsborough in the county of Northampton, identified as the mother of Joan Vaughan. She is allegedly of "poore parentage and poorer education, one that as shee was borne to no good, was for want of grace neuer in the way to receiue any, euer noted to bee of an ill nature and wicked [dis]position, spightfull and malitious, and many yeeres before shee died both hated, and feared among her neighbours." She and Joan Vaughn feuded with Mistress Belcher after Belcher struck Vaughn and reproached her unseemly behaviour. The two of them are said to have caused Belcher to feel an intolerable pain and become disfigured. Belcher's brother Master Avery, hearing her call out Brown's and Vaughan's names as her tormentors, tried to lure the two out of their home to be scratched, but was barred from approaching the house by an invisible force. He, too, allegedly became tormented for his trouble; this lasted until Brown and Vaughan were apprehended and gaoled in Northampton. While Brown and Vaughan were imprisoned, Belcher and Avery were permitted to scratch them, ending their torments. Brown was indicted for bewitching Belcher and Avery, and for causing the death of an unnamed child, and though she pleaded innocence, was sentenced to execution. Two weeks prior to her apprehension, Brown was supposedly seen riding a sow with Katherine Gardener and Joan Lucas to visit an old witch named Mother Rhoades.(B2-B4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B2-B4

Agnes Brown Agnes Brown Witch
39

Joane Vaughan is a woman from Guilsborough in the country of Northampton. She is the daughter of Agnes Browne and described as "Ioane Vaughan or Varnham a maide (or at least vnmaried) as gratious as the mother, and both of them as farre from grace as Heauen from hell." Vaughan allegedly offended Mistress Belcher with her unseemly behavior, who in response, "sodainely rase vp and strooke her, howbeit hurt her not," and drove her out of Belcher's company. Vaughan complained of this to her mother, and the two of them allegedly conspired to bewitch Belcher in retribution, causing her intolerable pain and to become disfigured. Belcher is said to have cried out Brown and Vaughan's names during her torment, spurring her brother, Master Avery, to try to lure the two out of their home to be scratched, but he was barred from approaching the house by an invisible force. Avery allegedly became tormented for his trouble in the same way as his sister; this lasted until Brown and Vaughan were apprehended and gaoled in Northampton. While Brown and Vaughan were imprisoned, Belcher and Avery were permitted to scratch them, ending their torments. Vaughan was indicted for bewitching Belcher and Avery, and for causing the death of an unnamed child, and though she pleaded innocence, was sentenced to execution.(B2-B4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B2-B4

Joan Vaughan Joan Vaughan Witch
40

Arthur Bill is a man from Raunds in the country Northampton and the son of two witches, Bill (Mother) and Bill (Father). Arthur Bill was accused of bewitching Martha Aspine and suspected of bewitching numerous cattle. He was "publiquely knowne to b[e]e of an euill life and reputation, together with his father and mother." He, along with his parents, was bound thumb to toe and tossed into water; it is said that all three floated, which was thought to confirm their guilt. Arthur was sent to the Northhampton Gaol by Sir Gilbert Pickering. There, he and his mother allegedly bewitched a round ball into his father's throat to prevent him from confessing. His father nevertheless became a witness against him. Arthur is said to have had three familiars, named Grissill, Ball, Jacke. While he was imprisoned, many tried to bring him back into the fold of the Church and pray for his confession and contrition, but he maintained his innocence unto his execution.(C2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C2

Arthur Bill Arthur Bill Witch
41

Hellen Jenkenson is a woman from Thrapston in the county of Northampton, who is alleged to be "of an euill life and much suspected of this crime before her apprehension, for bewitching of Cattle and other mischiefes," and of having "liued many yeares poore, wretched, scorned, and forsaken of the world." Jenkenson was apprehended by Sir Thomas Brooke for bewitching a child to death. Prior to her apprehension, Jenkenson had been searched by Mistress Moulsho and a jury of women. The jury found witch's marks on her body. The next day, Moulsho's maid (Anonymous 402) finds that the laundry, and especially Moulsho's smock, has been covered in images of toads, snakes and other ugly creatures in retribution. When Anonymous 402 reported this, Moulsho went straight to Jenkenson's home and threatened to scratch her eyes out unless she returned the linen to its former state; on her return, the linen was white once again. Jenkenson pleaded not guilty to bewitching the child and maintained her innocence until her execution.(D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, D2

Hellen Ienkenson Hellen Jenkenson Witch
42

Mary Barber is a woman from Stanwicke in the county of Northampton allegedly born of "mean parents" and described as licentious, malicious, envious, cruel, monstrous and hideous, and a slave to the passions of the flesh. She was accused of bewitching a man to death and causing harm to a variety of cattle, for which she was committed to Northampton Gaol by Sir Thomas T[...]ham. Barber was ultimately found guilty and, though she maintained her innocence to the end, executed for these crimes. (D3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, D3

Mary Barber Mary Barber Witch
43

Anne Baker is a spinster from Bottesford in the county of Leicestershire who would allegedly have visions and hear voices from thin air. She described a vision in which a blue planet struck Thomas Fairebarne, for which William Fairebarne beat her and broke her head. Another time, she heard a voice say that the next day she and her master would die; the next day a crow beat her master to death, but she prayed him back to life and he was sick for two weeks instead. She was charged of witchcraft on suspicion of bewitching Anne Stannidge's child; Stannidge claimed that, after she consulted with Baker on the child's illness, she needed to burn some of the child's hair and nail parings in order to get Baker to bring the child home and let her go. She was also charged with bewitching Elizabeth Hough to death for give her inferior bread as alms, and of saying Joan Gylle's child was forespoken. She denied causing any deaths, but admitted to diagnosing Gylle's child. Henry Milles accused her of causing him two or three poor nights to which she responded "you should haue let me alone then." She confessed that Mrs. Peakes and Mrs. Dennis told her that a rotting glove belonging to Lord Henry had been found, that it was thought that it was buried so that his liver would rot and waste as the glove did. Baker also claimed to have a "white Dogge, which shee calleth her good Spirit."(E1-E2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E1-E2

Anne Baker Anne Baker Witch
44

Joan Willimott is a woman from Goadby in the county of Leicestershire, known to be a widow and a servant, who gave witness against Joan Flower, Margaret Flower, and Gamaliel Greete. She also claimed to have received a spirit named Pretty from William Berry, whom "she serued three yeares." Berry is said to have"willed her to open her mouth, and hee would blow into her a Fairy which should doe her good; and that shee opened her mouth, and he did blow into her mouth." Pretty acted as a consultant, meeting with Willimott weekly to tell her who was "stricken or fore-spoken;" she said she would go to those people and cure them with "prayers." Although she is explicitly clear that this is a benign fairy she is working with, and not a familiar, Pretty "did aske of her her Soule, which shee then promised vnto it." Willimott reported during her examination that Joan Flowers told her she had stricken Henry Lord Rosse. She also said that a week before the Flower women were apprehended, she had met with Joan and Margaret Flower at Joan's home; there, Joan Flower allowed an owl-spirit and a rat-spirit to suck from below her left ear, and said they had whispered to her that she would be neither hanged nor burnt. Willimott added that Joan Flowers took up some earth, spat on it, worked it with her fingers, and tucked it in her purse. Ellen Green alleged in her examination that Willimott had persuaded her to forsake God and gave her two spirits; Green also claimed that Willimott had a spirit in the shape of a white dog sucking on her under her left flank.(E2v-E3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E2v-E3

Joan Willimott Joan Willimott Witch
45

Ellen Greene is a woman from Stathorne in the county of Leicestershire, who gave witness against Joan Willimott. Ellen Greene claimed that Willimott had persuaded her to forsake God six years before while she still lived in Watham, and had given her two spirits, one in the likeness of a kitlin, or kitten, and one in the likeness of a Moldiwarp, or mole; Willimott named the kitten Pusse, and the mole Hisse Hisse. The would suck from Greene on her neck under her ears, and she gave them her soul in exchange for their service. Greene claimed to have immediately sent Pusse to bewitch a baker to death, and sent Hisse Hisse to bewitch Anne Dawse to death; both died within a fortnight. The baker is said to have called her a witch, and Dawse to have called her a witch, whore and jade. Greene said that later, she sent both spirits to bewitch to death a husbandman named Willison and his son Robert; they died within ten days. Three years later, Greene moved to Stathorne, where she claimed to have bewitched John Patchett's wife and child to death at Willimott's direction; the child died the next day, and Patchett's wife lingered for over a month. Greene added that Willimott had a spirit in the shape of a white dog that would suck under her left flank. (Fv-F2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv-F2v

Ellen Greene Ellen Greene Witch
46

Phillip Flower is a woman from Belvoir in the County of Leicestershire, known to be the daughter of Joan Flowers and the sister of Margaret Flowers, who was employed for a time as a charwoman at Belvoir (Beaver) Castle, and was accused of bewitching Sir Francis Manners' family, including bewitching Henry Lord Rosse to death. Phillip was dismissed from service for theft and for bewitching Thomas Simpson so that he became altered in body and mind, having no power to leave her. The Devil allegedly fostered her resentment against Sir Francis Manners and Lady Rosse, offering his services in exchange for Phillip's blood and soul. She is said to have caused Sir Francis' sons, Henry Lord Rosse and Francis Lord Rosse, to sicken strangely, and caused his daughter Lady Katherine to be struck by strange maladies and fits. She also allegedly bewitched Sir Francis and Lady Rosse to be unable to have more children. Phillip was apprehended, along with Margaret and their mother Joan, around Christmas, and imprisoned at Lincoln. She claimed in her confession to have witnessed her mother cursing Sir Francis and Lady Rosse, then boiling blood and feathers together and making strange speech and gestures over it. Phillip also claimed to have a familiar in the shape of a white rat, which she would allow to suck from her left breast; when the rat first came for her, it promised to make Thomas Simpson love her and help her in other ways if she would give it her soul. She was executed at Lincoln on March 11th, 1618, for acting in the "destruction of Henry Lord Rosse, with their damnable practises against others the Children of the Right Honourable Francis Earle of Rutland."(C2-C3v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C3v

Phillip Flower Phillip Flower Witch
47

Margaret Flower is a woman from Belvoir in the County of Leicestershire. She is the daughter of Joan Flower and the sister of Phillip Flower. She was employed for a time as a charwoman, chicken-tender and laundress at Belvoir (Beaver) Castle, and was also given residence at the castle for her service. She was accused of bewitching Sir Francis Manners' family, including bewitching Henry Lord Rosse to death. Margaret was dismissed from service for theft and keeping unreasonable hours; Lady Rosse nonetheless gave her a severance of 40 shillings, a bolster and a mattress of wool. The Devil allegedly fostered her resentment against Sir Francis Manners and Lady Rosse, offering his services in exchange for Margaret's blood and soul. She is said to have caused Sir Francis' sons, Henry Lord Rosse and Francis Lord Rosse, to sicken strangely, and caused his daughter Lady Katherine to be struck by strange maladies and fits. She also allegedly bewitched Sir Francis and Lady Rosse to be unable to have more children. Margaret was apprehended, along with Phillip and their mother Joan, around Christmas, and imprisoned at Lincoln. According to her sister Phillip, she was responsible for stealing the glove used to bewitch Henry Lord Rosse to death; Margaret claimed her mother bid her to take it, plus a glove from Sir Francis Manners and a handkerchief from Lady Katherine, for the purpose of bewitchment. Phillip also claimed that the cat familiar Rutterkin would often be seen sitting on Margaret's shoulder and sucking on her neck, but Margaret alleged in her confession that " she hath two familiar Spirits sucking on her, the one white, the other black spotted; the white sucked vnder her left brest, and the blacke spotted within the inward parts of her secrets. When shee first entertained them she promised them her soule, and they couenanted to doe all things which she commanded them." She was visited by four spirits while imprisoned; one was a devil with a head like a black ape, and three she recognized as Little Robin, Spirit, and Rutterkin. She was executed at Lincoln on March 11th, 1618, for acting in the "destruction of Henry Lord Rosse, with their damnable practises against others the Children of the Right Honourable Francis Earle of Rutland." Joan Willimot claimed that she had met up with Margaret and Joan at Joan's home a week before their apprehension.(C2-C3v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C3v

Margaret Flower Margaret Flower Witch
48

Doctor John Lambe is a man from Worcester in the county of Worcestershire, known to be an astrologer, cunning-man, teacher of gentleman's children, magician and juggler, and to style himself a physician. He employed Anne Bodenham as a maid. He stood charges at the Worcester Assizes for "two seuerall Inditements; one for vnchristian and damnable practises against the person of an Honourble Peere of this Realme; and the other for damnable inuocation and worship of euill Spirits." The first charge referred to an attempt to disable or weaken the Thomas, sixth Lord Windsor. He was found guilty on both charges, but judgement was suspended in the case of the first. Dr. Lambe allegedly drew Mr. Wayneman into his practice of conjuration and promised to show him an angel, but summoned a spirit instead. He is said to posses the skill to "intoxicate, poyson, and bewitch any man so as they should be disabled from begetting of children," and to have four spirits trapped in a crystal glass. He called the chief sprit Benias. He also predicted the drowning of Lady Fairfax's brothers. While at a gentleman's house entertaining guests with juggling tricks, Anthony Birch saw shapes in his crystal ball. Through the use of his spirits, he could "vndertake any difficult thing, and did very often discouer and bring to light goods and chattels although they had for a long time beene lost," tell whether someone was a witch or not, what disease afflicted a person whether he had seen them or not, and show women their future husbands in his crystal ball. He could also tell what private marks a person had on their body and personal details they had kept secret. 40 people involve in his arraignment allegedly died within two weeks after. Dr. Lambe was indicted a second time on charges of luring Joan Seager, an 11-year-old girl, to his home and raping her. He was found guilty and sentenced to death for this violation, but was pardoned by the crown. Some evidence surfaced suggesting that Seager's father owed Dr. Lambe money, and that the rape charge was laid shortly after he tried to collect on the debt. A year later, Dr. Lambe attended a play at the Fortune Theatre in London and was mobbed when he left. The mob pursued him and beat him to death with stones and cudgels.(2-3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 2-3

John Lambe John Lambe Witch
51

Joane Williford is a woman from Feversham in the County of Kent. In her confession, she claimed to have signed a contract with the Devil in which he promised to be her servant for 20 years and she gave him some blood. That contract was almost up. In addition, seven years before, the Devil appeared to her in the shape of a little dog and asked her to forsake God and rely on him instead, but she was loathe to forsake Him. Nevertheless, he promised that she would lack for nothing and would bring her money thereafter; she called him by the name of Bunne. She also confessed to desiring revenge on Thomas Letherland and Mary Woodrafe, and that Bunne had carried Thomas Gardler out a window to fall on his backside. Williford accused Jane Hot, Elizabeth Harris and Joan Argoll of being her fellow witches, and claimed that Bunne told her Harris had cursed John Woodcott's boat several years before. Harris counter-accused her, claiming that Williford " did many times make meetings with Goodwife Williford and with Goodwife Hott." Williford also claimed that Argoll had cursed Robert Greenstreet, Major of Feversham, and John Manning. Finally, the Devil came to her twice while she was in prison to suck from her in the form of a mouse. Williford pled guilty and was executed on charges of witchcraft on September 29th, 1645.(1-2 )

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott. London: 1645, 1-2

Joan Williford Joan Williford Witch
52

Joan Cariden is a woman from Feversham in the County of Kent, identified as the widow of William Argoe. During her examination, Joan Cariden, alias Argoll, claimed that, nine months before, a "rugged soft thing" lay on her chest in the night; she thrust it off her. This incident left her thinking that God had forsaken her, for "she could never pray so well since as she could before." Some time later, the Devil came to her in the shape of a "blacke rugged Dog" and crept mumbling into her bed. It returned the next night and demanded her to "deny God and leane to him, and that then he would revenge her of any one she owed ill will to." She agreed and promised him her soul. He then sucked from her and had many times since; the sucking caused her no pain. She also claimed that Jane Hott told her there was a meeting at Goodwife Pantery's home, which Goodwife Dadson attended and Goodwife Gardener had been expected for but missed; the Devil also attended this meeting and sat at the upper end of the table. Joan Willford claimed that Cariden was her fellow, while Elizabeth Harris claimed she had a "bad tongue". Cariden was executed on charges of witchcraft on September 29th, 1645.(1, 2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott. London: 1645, 1, 2

Joan Cariden Joan Cariden Witch
53

Jane Hott is widow from Feversham in the County of Kent. She claimed in her confession that a thing like a hedgehog started visiting her 20 years before to suck from her, and if it came at night the pain of it sucking would awaken her from sleep. It would come once or twice a month, and when she struck it off her breast it felt soft like a cat. When gaoled, Hott convinced the other accused witches to confess their guilt while insisting on her own innocence. She claimed that, if put in water, she would certainly sink, but when she was swum, she was seen to float on the surface. A gentleman asked how she could have spoken so confidently that she would sink to which she answered "the Divell went with her all the way, and told her that she should sinke; but when she was in the Water he sate upon a Crosse-beame and laughed at her." Joan Carriden claimed that Hott told her there was a meeting at Goodwife Pantery's home, which Goodwife Dadson attended and Goodwife Gardener had been expected for but missed; the Devil also attended this meeting and sat at the upper end of the table. Elizabeth Harris claimed that Hott often met with Goodwife Pantery and Joan Williford. Hott was executed on charges of witchcraft on September 29th, 1645.(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott. London: 1645, 3

Jane Hott Jane Hott Witch
54

Elizabeth Harris is a woman from Faversham in the County of Kent identified as the mother of a son who drowned. Elizabeth Harris claimed during her examination that the Devil appeared to her in the form of a mouse 19 years before; she called him her Imp and told him that she had a desire for revenge. The Devil promised she should have it, and she sent him to Goodman Chilman, who had accused her of stealing a pig. Chilman pined away and died. Harris said that the Devil demanded she forsake Christ to lean on him instead, so she scratched her breast with her nails and gave it to him to write the covenant with. About a fortnight later, the Devil sucked from her, but caused her no pain; her Imp would suck every three or four nights thereafter. When asked how many witches were in the town, she replied that Goodwife Dadson, Joan Cariden (alias Argoll) and Goodwife Cox all had "bad tongues." Harris also wanted revenge on Goodman Woodcott's High for the drowning of her son, and so when High was cast away; she though her Imp was responsible. Lastly, Harris claimed that Joan Williford told her a boat would "not come so chearfully home," that Goodwife Pantery met many times with Williford and Joan Hott, and that Goodwife Gardiner also had an ill tongue. Williford claimed that Harris was her fellow and had cursed John Woodcott's boat. Harris was convicted on charges of witchcraft, but not yet executed at the time of the account's publication.(1, 2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott. London: 1645, 1, 2

Elizabeth Harris Elizabeth Harris Witch
55

Mother Lakeland is a woman from Ipswich in the county of Suffolk, described as "a professour of Religion, a constant hearer of the Word for these many years, and yet a Witch She as first corrupted by the devil who promised her that is if 'she would serve him she should want nothing.'" The Devil allegedly gives her three Imps, two little dogs and a mole which she employed to do numerous acts of maleficium, including bewitching her husband, tormenting and killing Mr. Lawrence and his child (from Ipswich in the county of Suffolk), to torment and kill a "Maid of one Mrs. Jennings (from Ipswich in the county of Suffolk), and to torment and destroy the property of Mr. Beale (from Ipswich in the county of Suffolk), making half his body "consumes and rot." She confesses to these and diverse other crimes and is condemned and burned to death (the punishment for petty treason for the murder of her husband) on Tuesday the 9th of September, 1645.(7-8)

Appears in:
Lakeland, Mother. The Laws Against Witches and Conjuration. London: 1645, 7-8

Mother Lakeland Mother Lakeland Witch
56

Anne Ashby is a woman from Maidstone in the county of Kent who is charged and executed for witchcraft.(3-4)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 3-4

Anne Ashby Anne Ashby Witch
57

Anne Martyn is a woman from Maidstone in the county of Kent who claims to be pregnant by the Devil. She is charged and executed for witchcraft. (6)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 6

Anne Martyn Anne Martyn Witch
58

Mary Browne is a woman from Maidstone in the county of Kent who is charged and executed for witchcraft.(3-4)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 3-4

Mary Brown Mary Brown Witch
59

Mildred Wright is a woman from Maidstone in the county of Kent who is charged and executed for witchcraft.(3-4)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 3-4

Mildred Wright Mildred Wright Witch
60

Anne Wilson is a woman from Maidstone in the county of Kent who is charged and executed for witchcraft.(3-4)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 3-4

Anne Wilson Anne Wilson Witch
61

Mary Read is a woman from Maidstone in the county of Kent described as a witch. She is charged with witchcraft, found guilty, and subsequently executed. She allegedly had a witch's mark under her tongue which she shows to many, including E. G. Gent.(3)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 3

Mary Read Mary Read Witch
62

She is a fourteen-year old girl from the Petticoat Lane area of London in the county of Greater London described as a Maidservant of Mr. Freeland who works for him on Petticoat lane, a street in East London. She was suspected of bewitching her master's goods, so that they flew, windows were broken, and beer lost. She was fired and searched for witch's marks; protuberances in the "likeness of Warts (I will not say duggs) very flesh and red" were found. (4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Shee-devil of Petticoat-Lane, or, A True and Perfect Relation of a Sad Accident which Befel Mr. Freeland. London: 1666, 4

Maid Servant Anonymous 1 Witch
64

Elizabeth Stile is a widow from Windsor in the county of Berkshire. She is alleged to be one of a cabal of witches practicing image and word magics in Windsor. She is said "to be a leude, malitious, and hurtfull woman." Stile serves as a key witness against Mother Dutton, Mother Devell, and Father Rosimond. She allegedly keeps a rat named Philip as her familiar. She is executed on January 28, 1579.(Image 4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579, Image 4

Elizabeth Stile Elizabeth Stile Witch
65

A woman from Clewer in the county of Berkshire, who is allegedly part of a cabal of witches that included Elizabeth Stile, Mother Margaret, Mother Nelson, and Mistress Audrey. Dutton allegedly initiated Stile into the group. Richard Galis alleges that Dutton bewitched and tormented his brother James. Dutton allegedly has a precognition, can do image magic, and keep a familiar in the shape of a toad. She is executed on January 28, 1579.(Av, Bv)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579, Av, Bv

Mother Dutton Mother Dutton Witch
66

Mother Devell is a woman from Windsor in the county of Berkshire who is allegedly part of a cabal of witches that includes Elizabeth Stile, Mother Dutton, Mother Margaret, Mother Nelson, and Mistress Audrey. Devell is described as "very poor" and as keeping a familiar feline name Gille. She allegedly would beg alms of her neighbors and cause mischief to their cattle when denied. She could both witch and unwitch. She allegedly initiated Stile into the group of witches and then bewitched her.(4, Bv, B2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579, 4, Bv, B2v

Mother Devell Mother Devell Witch
67

Mother Margaret is a woman from Windsor in the county of Berkshire described as being a part of a cabal of women which allegedly included Elizabeth Stile, Mother Dutton, Mother Devell, Mother Nelson, and Mistress Audrey. Mother Margaret keeps a familiar kitten named Ginnie, and lives at an Alms house, but allegedly had the resources to attempt to bribe Elizabeth Stile, once she was arrested, to keep quiet about the women. She is said to be lame.(A2v, A3v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579, A2v, A3v

Mother Margaret Mother Margaret Witch
70

Joan Flower is a woman from Belvoir in the county of Leicestershire, identified as the mother of Margaret and Philip Flower and described as a 'monstrous malicious woman, full of oathes, curses, and imprecations irreligious.' She was believed to be a witch in her own right as 'the whole course of her life gaue great suspition that she was a notorious Witch, yea some of her neighbours dared to affirme that shee dealt with familiar spirits, and terrified them all with curses and threatning of reuenge, if there were neuer so little cause of displeasure and vnkindnesse." Joan was apprehended with her daughters on suspicion of witchcraft and died in gaol after choking on bread and butter. Margaret would often steal items for her to bewitch, such a glove belonging to Henry Lord Rosse; this glove was boiled, pricked with a knife, rubbed on her familiar Rutterkin, and either buried to rot or burnt; Margaret claimed Joan also did this with one of Sir Francis Manners' gloves but it only made Sir Francis sick, and that an attempt with a handkerchief belonging to Lady Katherine failed entirely. Joan Willimot alleged in her examination that Joan Flower told her that she had stricken Henry Lord Rosse "to the heart." Willimot also claimed that she had met up with Margaret and Joan at Joan's home a week before their apprehension, that Joan was seen with an owl and an rat spirit that sucked from under her right ear and whispered to her that she would be neither hanged nor burnt, and that Joan took up some earth, spat on it, worked it with her fingers and tucked it into her purse.(C2-C4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C4v

Joan Flower Joan Flower Witch
71

Elizabeth Lord is a widow from Hatfield in the county of Essex who allegedly gave John Francis a drink that made him become sick and die of it. She also gave Jone Roberts a piece of apple cake from which she too became sick and died.(5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 5-6

Elizabeth Lord Elizabeth Lord Witch
75

A magician in a dream who preforms witchcraft(5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Magical Vision, or, A Perfect Discovery of the Fallacies of Witchcraft. London: 1673, 5

Anonymous 3 Witch
76

Mary Forster is a woman from Estoat near Fosters-Booth in Northhamptonshire, identified as the wife of a translator or shoemaker and the neighbour of Joseph Weedon. When she tried to buy mutton from Weedon, who had slaughtered several sick sheep, and offered less than Weedon was asking for the meat, Weedon refused. At this, Mary/Ann was heard to mutter "You had been better let me have it, for you shall have more Mutton shortly lye upon your hands then you know what to do with." The next day, Weedon found seven of his soundest sheep had shattered legs, and this repeated night after night until over 30 had been destroyed. When he burned the bodies, Mary/Ann "came up to the fire, and asked them what they were doing," though she had no business in the area. Weedon tried to scratch her with his fingernails, and when they proved too blunt, cut the back of her hand with his knife. Mary/Ann threatened to sue him for the damage to her person, and Weedon gave her 20 shillings in reparation. She boasted thereafter that "it was the devil in her shape that received it of Weedon, and that now she had thereby power to do him further mischief." She was suspected in the burning of Weedon's hay barn, corn barn and house, and was examined before a Justice of the Peace. She would not confess until after she was searched by a Jury of Women, who found her to have "five several strange and unusual excrescencies which appeared exactly like a Sows Teats, and seemed to be usually suckt by something." During her next examination, she confessed to lighting the barns on fire and claimed she used a lighted torch and the Devil had carried her to the roof. She also claimed responsibility for the destruction of Weedon's sheep, and said there were several other witches active in the area, but would not name them. She was imprisoned in Northampton Gaol and, when visited by Weedon, said it was all in revenge for him refusing to sell her mutton. At her trial, she denied being a witch. She is said to have flown about her cell in a basin. She was executed on charges of witchcraft.(3-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Relation of the Most Remarkable Proceedings at the late Assizes at Northampton. London: 1674, 3-7

Mary Foster Mary/Ann Foster Witch
77

Anonymous 4 is a woman from Newbury in the county of Berkshire who allegedly walks on water without aid and is executed by army soldiers.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Most Certain, Strange, and True Discovery of a Witch. Unknown: 1643, 4

Anonymous 4 Witch
79

Temperance Lloyd is a woman from Bideford, in the county of Devon who is accused using image magic to cause suffering and death. Lloyd was tried as a witch three times. On March 14, 1670, she was "Accused, Indicted, and Arraigned, [and acquitted of] practising of Witchcraft upon the Body of one William Herbert, late of Biddiford aforesaid, Husbandman," at Exeter Castle. On May, 15th 1679, before the "Mayor and Justices of the Town of Biddiford" she was accused of and acquitted of "practising Witchcraft upon the Body of one Anne Fellow the Daughter of Edward Fellow of Biddiford Gent." Having been "searched by four Women of the Town of Biddiford aforesaid," the physical proof (in the form of witch marks), was not "so clear and conspicuous" and she was released 1679. However in 1682, Lloyd would be prosecuted against, predominately for the bewitching of Grace Thomas through image magic and for consorting with a devil. Lloyd would again be examined by a group of citizens (her accusers) and Mr. Michael Ogilby, the local rector. It is at this point that Lloyd begins to admit to all the crimes of which she has been accused. She admits to using image magic against Grace Thomas; although she was accused of pricking a doll with a thorn to do so, Lloyd only admitted to using a piece of leather. She also admitted killing William Herbert, Anne Fellow, and Linda Burman, and blinding Jane Dallyn in one eye. Ogliby made Llyod recite "the Lords Prayer and her Creed" as a test, which she did, but "imperfectly." Lloyd admitted to having a familiar in the shape of a black man, wearing "blackish Clothes, and was about the length of her Arm. That he had broad Eyes, and a Mouth like a Toad." Anne Wakely searched Lloyd, and found in her "secret Parts two Teats hanging nigh together like unto a piece of Flesh that a Child had suckt. And that each of the said Teats was about an Inch in length." She asked Lloyd "whether she had been suckt at that place by the black Man? (meaning the Devil)." Lloyd acknowledged that "she had been suckd there often times by the black Man; and the last time that she was suckd by the said black Man was the Friday before she was searchd" (ibid.). She later admitted that the black man did "suck her Teats which she now hath in her Secret Parts ... [and] did suck her again as she was lying down; and that his sucking was with a great pain unto her" (15). Temperance Lloyd was tried and convicted, along with Marry Trembles and Susana Edwards, at the Bideford assizes on August 14th, 1682, one of the last witch trials. She was executed on August 25th, 1682.(2, 10-13, 13-15, 16-19, 19-21, 20-22, 25,)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 2, 10-13, 13-15, 16-19, 19-21, 20-22, 25,

Temperance Lloyd Temperance Lloyd Witch
80

Alice Fowler is a woman from the London parishes of Shadwell and Wapping, described as a widow of ancient mariner of "about the Age of Forescore Years." She is well known as a "malicious ill-natured woman and for many years had been reputed a witch," having so badly frightened a girl she nursed circa 1664 that she never fully recovered and maintained all her life that Fowler was a witch. This girl was not the only one who accused Fowler of being a witch -- her own son, Walter Fowler, did as well. (Walter) Fowler was also a person of ill repute; he was transported to Barbados and eventually hanged there for robbing a house and killing his wife. Alice Fowler was generally seen as a woman who "generally got Drunk, and being a very Debauched and Leud Woman," who is "despised and slighted by the Neighbourhood." Her reputation was further damaged by the fact that she supplements the income she gets by selling biscuits to bawdy houses and by accepting alms from Trinity House. Fowler is discovered dead one day. Her body was cold as clay and her thumbs and toes tied (a sign she had been swum). Her nosy neighbours search strangely stinking body and discover "teats" on her body, "four small ones and one very big, and that they were all of them as black as a Coal."(1-3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange News from Shadwell being a True and Just Relation of the Death of Alice Fowler. London: 1684, 1-3

Alice Fowler Alice Fowler Witch
85

A woman in Penzance in the county of Cornwall, who allegedly appears to John Tonken before his vomiting fits; Tonken claims that she sometimes appears in the form of a cat, and would tell him what he would vomit or put things into his mouth. Tonken is the only person who can see her, and describes her as wearing a blue jerkin and a red petticoat patched in yellow and green. At one time, when Tonken was having a particularly violent fit, he reported that she had told him she would kill him if it were in her power to do so. The last time she appeared to him, she was accompanied by two other women (Anonymous 373), and bid him farewell, saying she would trouble him no more. Two women were arrested on suspicion of witchcraft on Tonken's testimony: Jane Noal, and Betty Seeze.(2-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Account of a Strange and Wonderful Relation of John Tonken, of Pensans in Cornwall. London: 1686, 2-6

Anonymous 6 Witch
86

A cunningwoman from Pannier Alley, a street in the city of London, who appears to a maid, tells her fortune, and sells her a love powder(4-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. News from Pannier-alley, or, A True Relation of some Pranks the Devil hath Play'd with a Plaster-pot There. London: 1687, 4-5

Anonymous 7 Witch
88

A woman from Edmonton in the County of Middlesex, now part of the London Borough of Enfield, thought to be a spinster, though some sources say she was married with children. She was missing an eye, ghostly-pale, and bent over at the waist. She was apprehended on charges of witchcraft after an old custom allegedly proved her a witch: thatching was taken from her home, and she was observed to frequent the home of whomever burnt some of it. She was arraigned and indicted at the Justice Hall in the Old Bailey in London on April 14, 1621. She stood accused of causing the deaths of her neighbor's infants and cattle and bewitching Agnes Radcliffe to death for striking Sawyer's sow (after it ate her soap. A jury of three women, led by Margaret Weaver, searched Sawyer though she "behaued her selfe most sluttishly and loathsomely towards them" and found her to have a teat the size of a little finger and half a finger in length which branched into a red upper part and a blue lower; the upper part appeared to have been sucked. This teat was said to be located "a little aboue the Fundiment." Sawyer made a full confession, which was transcribed and she confirmed verbally to be true on the day of her execution. In this confession, she claimed that the Devil first came to her eight years before when she was cursing and blaspheming, that he would come to her three times a week, and that he would do harm on her behalf, including causing the deaths of two nursing children. She denied, however, any involvement in Agnes Radcliffe's death. The Devil came to her in the shape of a dog, sometimes white, sometimes black. She agreed to give him her soul, permitted him to suck her blood from a teat to nourish him, and called him by the name of Tom. Sawyer claimed the Devil did not visit her once in prison. She was executed on April 19, 1621.(A4-B1)

Appears in:
Goodcole, Henry. The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton. London: 1621, A4-B1

Elizabeth Sawyer Elizabeth Sawyer Witch
99

Elizabeth Weed is a widow from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon. She was examined before Justices Robert Bernard and Nicholas Pedley for witchcraft. In her confession, Weed alleged that 21 years before, three spirits appeared to her in the shape of a young man and two puppies, and that the spirit in the shape of a young man asked her to renounce God and Christ. She signed a covenant in blood taken from her armpit giving her soul in exchange for the spirits' assistance for 21 years; the spot developed a large lump. The 21 years was almost at an end at the time of her examination. The man-shaped spirit's purpose was said to be to have carnal relations with her as often as she liked. She named the white puppy Lilly, and the black puppy Priscill, which sucked teats on her body. Lilly' s purpose was said to be to hurt men, women and children, while Priscill was for the hurting of cattle. Weed alleged that she used Lilly to kill Henry Bedell's child, though she did not recall why; she also said that she had used Priscill to kill two horses belonging to Edward Musgraves, one horse belonging to John Musgraves, one cow belonging to William Musgraves, and another cow belonging to Thomas Thorps. At the end of her confession, Weed indicated a desire to rid herself of the burden of the spirits and her pleasure at Mr. Poole's preaching. In addition, Francis Moore alleged in her possession that Weed had bid her to renounce God and gave her a white cat named Tiffy, which would harm anyone she chose to curse.(1-2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 1-2

Elizabeth Weed Elizabeth Weed Witch
100

A man from Molesworth in the county of Cambridgeshire, known to be a farm labourer, who allegedly signed a covenant with three spirits and agreed to worship them after he lost a purse containing 7 s. The first spirit appeared to him while he was swearing, cursing and raging at the loss and offered its assistance in retrieving the purse if he forsook God and Christ and agreed to worship it instead. In appearance, it was "blacke and shaggy, and having pawes like a Beare, but in bulk not fully so big as a Coney," and was later joined by two other spirits "one like a white Cat, the other like a grey Coney." The bear spirit pricked his head for blood and had him sign a covenant. All three sucked of his body where marks were found. Winnick claimed that he never set the spirits on anyone, except for a maid-servant of Mr. Say's to convince her to steal food for him from her master's house.(3-4)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 3-4

John Winnick John Winnick Witch
102

A woman from Dunwich in the county of Suffolk, described as a witch and a bastard. Aubrey Grinset, alias Thrower due to her illegitimate birth, is accused of witching John Collet and Henry Winson to death, and of causing the fits of Thomas Spatchet. She is tried in Suffolk, but it is found that there is insufficient evidence to do anything to her under the law. During one of Spatchet's fits, he seemed to catch a hand and bit the thumb, which ended the fits. After this, Aubrey Grinset was seen to wear an unusually large shoe and was found to have a saw-like impression on her toe. A year later, Spatchet suffered fits in which he felt as if someone was holding him and groping his crotch, also attributed to her. In the fall of 1665, Aubrey Grinset confessed that she had afflicted Thomas Spatchet and many others, that she had made league with the Devil and had been a witch for twenty years, and bewitched John Collet of Cookly and Henry Winson of Walpool to death. The Devil had appeared first in the form of a handsome young man and later in the form of a blackish grey cat or kitten, and sucked blood from a teat. She admitted to employing an imp and sending it to Spatchet. When searched by a jury of women, her teat was found where she had said it would be, but no other marks. A second search a few days later found her covered in scratches; many nights she was seen wandering far from her cell. She was called before gentlemen to confess, and credible persons offered testimony. Questioned a third time, she confessed to hurting Spatchet, but denied killing anyone. Spatchet was urged to scratch her, but was too tender-hearted. A week before her death, she was visited by Thomas Spatchet at the urging of Mr. R., a Conformist, but Spatchet was unable to get close. When he tried, he met resistance and was forced to curtsey back away from her again. After this, Mr. R. visited her in Spatchet's place. He found her ill, with the skin of her hands and arms torn off. She told him that it was too late for her to repent, that she was damned. When he asked why she had two cudgels on her bed, she answered that they were to fight the Devil, for he would wait until she was alone and drag her out of the bed, under and back again. Before her death, she said that Spatchet would not be free on her death as others had him in hand as well. She died around Easter of 1667.(17-20, 23, 27, 28)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 17-20, 23, 27, 28

Aubrey Grinset Aubrey Grinset Witch
106

A woman from Yowell in the county of Surrey, who was brought to trial in Southwark on charges of being a common witch and enchantress; she allegedly bewitched Mary Farmer, causing her to become sick and die, and tormented Elizabeth Burgiss through witchcraft, causing stones and household goods to fling themselves at her, and sticking a wad of clay full of pins to her back. She pleaded innocent, and is found not guilty due to insufficient evidence.(1, 2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. An Account of the Tryal and Examination of Joan Buts, for being a Common Witch and Inchantress. London: 1682, 1, 2

Joan Buts Joan Buts Witch
107

A woman from Keyston in the County of Huntingdon, known to be a widow, who denied the witchcraft accusations leveled against her and claimed that she was a victim herself. She allegedly had a spirit appear to her over five weeks, making a roaring and puffing. She claimed that she found the bottom of her belly to be sore after the spirit came to her last, and that she had never willingly invoked or employed it. She was accused of striking or sending a spirit to harm Goodwife Darnell's child Katherine, and of spoiling Darnell's furmity; Chandler denied both. She claimed that Goodwife Darnell had turned Chandler into a duck for a time two years before, and that the roaring thing has started to torment her six month later. She was also accused of having two imps named Beelzebub and Truillibub, which she also denied, adding that Beelzebub was the name she had given her log and that Truillibub was a stick.(7-8)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 7-8

Elizabeth Chandler Elizabeth Chandler Witch
108

A woman from Molesworth in the county of Huntingdon, known to be the wife of labourer William Shepherd, who claimed that a spirit like a rat, but smaller and iron grey in colour, appeared to her at her home one day when she was "swearing and cursing about the discords of her children." She claimed that this spirit had bid her to go with it, but she sent it away. Not long after, she went into the field, swearing, cursing and blaspheming once again, and the same spirit came to her with three more spirits also like rats, demanding that she renounce God and Christ to worship them instead and promising happiness in exchange. She agreed, and they told her they must have her body and soul when she died, and blood from her while she lived, which she also consented to. The spirits sucked "upon and about her hippes, and they have used very often to come to her since." She claimed that she never set them on any creature, but that they had tormented her that afternoon. When asked whether she had enjoyed any happiness as a result of her agreement, she said she had not, and that she intended to cease her habit of cursing and swearing.(9-10)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 9-10

Ellen Shepheard Ellen Shepherd Witch
109

A woman from Bythorn in the County of Huntingdon, known to be a widow who allegedly confessed to have been a witch for 30 years before Thomas Becke and Joseph Coysh from some thirty years; she is said to have two mouse-spirits named Tib and Fone which hurt men and cattle respectively. According to Becke and Coysh, she confessed that a brown spirit somewhat larger than a mouse had appeared to her and nipped her while she slept. The spirit then demanded her soul; she prayed to God and it left. Five or six days later, the same mouse-spirit came to her again, this time in the company of another mouse-spirit, and demanded that she permit them to suck her blood. She accepted, and three days later forsook God and Christ and agreed to allow them to take her soul when she died. They would visit her daily thereafter to suck on her body.(10-11)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 10-11

Anne Desborough Anne Desborough Witch
118

A woman from Marseille that allegedly uses charms of gold and silver to bewitch a woman named Magdalene(320)

Appears in:
Machaelis, Sebastien. The Admirable History of the Posession and Conversion of a Penitent Woman. London: 1613, 320

Blanche Blanche of Marseille Witch
119

A woman from the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be a widow and blind in her advanced age, who was apprehended on suspicion of witchcraft but died before she could be brought to trial. At the time of her death, she was about eighty years of age, and was thought to have been a witch for fifty. She had numerous children and grandchildren, with which she "tooke great care and paines to bring them to be Witches." Notable family includes daughter Elizabeth Device, son Christopher Howgate, and grandchildren Jennet Device, James Device and Alison Device. Southerns gave a confession at the time of her apprehension, claiming that twenty years before, she had met a spirit or devil in the shape of a boy who told her she could have anything she requested if she just gave him her soul, and told her his name was Tibb. She agreed, and he would appear at odd times threafter asking what she would have or have him do. Six years later, she lay drowsing with a small child on her knee when Tibb appeared in the shape of a brown dog and forced her to her knees to draw blood from under her left arm. Southerns woke, saying "Iesus saue my Child," which caused Tibb to vanish and left Southerns "almost starke madd for the space of eight weekes." She confessed to setting Tibb on Richard Baldwyn for refusing to compensate Southerns' daughter for her help with his mill. In her opinion, the best way to bewitch a man to death was to make an image of him out of clay, prick it and burn it. Anne Whittle (alias Chattox), matriarch of another alleged family of witches, claimed that Elizabeth Southerns had introduced her to witchcraft and persuaded her to make a malefic compact, and that Southerns' familar Tibb and another spirit named Fancie banqueted the two of them. Whittle and Southerns were rivals; Whittle also accused Southerns of bewitching to death Robert Nutter and Richard Ashton. Alison Device accused Southern of badgering her into accepting a familiar, bewitching John Nutter's cow to death, turning milk into butter without consuming the milk, cursing Richard Baldwyn and bewitching his daughter to death. James Device claimed to have heard strange sounds coming from Southerns' home. Elizabeth Device claimed Southerns "hath had a place on her left side by the space of fourty yeares." Southerns also gave witness against Whittle, claiming that she had made images of Christopher Nutter, his son Robert Nutter and Robert's wife Marie Nutter.(B1)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B1

Elizabeth Southerns Elizabeth Southerns Witch
120

Anne Whittle is an eighty year old woman woman from Pendle in the County of Lancaster. She is the mother of Anne Redferne. She was apprehended on suspicion of witchcraft, imprisoned at the Castle of Lancaster, found guilty of murder, and finally executed. Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, claimed to have been a witch 14 years, and to have been introduced to witchcraft by Elizabeth Southerns, alias Demdike. The Devil appeared to her in the shape of a man at Southerns' home and demanded her soul; she refused at first but was finally persuaded by Southerns. Whittle also agreed to take the Devil as a familiar under the name of Fancie and permit him to suck from her right side on her ribs. A spirit in the shape of a spotted dog then approached Southerns and offered her "Gould, Siluer, and worldly Wealth, at her will," and offered both of them their fill of " victuals, viz. Flesh, Butter, Cheese, Bread, and Drinke," but they never felt any fuller no matter how much they ate. Fancie and Southerns' Tibb carried away the remnants. She confessed to helping Southerns and Widow Lomshawe bewitch Robert Nutter to death. Whittle and Southerns later became rivals. Whittle claimed that Elizabeth Nutter, wife of Robert Nutter, tried to persuade her to kill young Robert Nutter, but that her son-in-law Thomas Redferne talked her out of it. Elizabeth Southerns alleged that she had seen Whittle and Anne Redferne making images of Christopher, Robert and Marie Nutter. James Robinson accused Whittle of spoiling all the drink in his home for several weeks straight, of causing young Robert Nutter to be sick, and of murdering old Robert Nutter. Whittle claimed to be able to help drink that had been forespoken with a prayer, to have used Fancie to kill a cow belonging to John Moore and one belonging to Anthony Nutter. Fancie would allegedly appear sometimes in the shape of a bear, and Whittle claimed he took away most of her sight. James Device accused Whittle of grave-robbing, taking three scalps and eight teeth for use alongside clay images. Alison Device claimed that her father, James Device, had made a deal with Whittle to give her a measure of meal yearly in exchange for not harming his family, but that Whittle had bewitched him to death. Alison also accused Whittle of bewitching Anne Nutter, John Moore's child, Hugh Moore and a cow of John Nutter's to death. John Nutter claimed that, 18 or 19 years before, Whittle and her daughter Anne both confessed to making clay images.(B4-B4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4-B4v

Anne Whittle Anne Whittle Witch
121

A woman from the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be a spinster, the daughter of Elizabeth Device and John Device, sister to James Device and Jennet Device, the granddaughter of Elizabeth Southerns, and niece of Christopher Howgate; she was imprisoned on suspicion of witchcraft in Lancaster Castle, tried and ultimately executed. Alison comes from a family long suspected of and collectively accused of witchcraft; Southerns alleged that miller Richard Baldwin once called both her and Alison whores and witches. Alison claimed in her confession that Southerns badgered her into accepting a familiar and letting it suck from her. She would often assist Southerns, who was blind, and gave witness against her, drawing on their close association to accuse her of bewitching various people, animals and food items. According to her brother James, Henry Bullocke once accused Alison of bewitching Bullock's child, and that she had not only admitted to it but begged Bullocke's forgiveness. Elizabeth Device was thought to have provided all her children with familiars to assist them. Both Jennet and James claimed during their examinations to have attended a gathering of witches at Southerns' home for the purpose of naming Alison's familiar, but that Alison had not attended; James also claimed that Alison was involved in a plot to kill the gaoler at Lancaster and to blow up the Assizes. Alison stood accused in court of bewitching a peddler named John Law so that he was lamed and his body wasted and consumed. She confessed to having a familiar in the shape of a black dog, and that she gave it her soul and permitted it to suck at her breast just below her nipples, where the skin became blue for the next six months. She claimed that when the peddler refused to sell her pins, the black dog offered to lame him for her, and she agreed. Law claimed that the dog had " fearefull firie eyes, great teeth, and a terrible countenance." Abraham Law, John Law's son, claimed that his father gave Alison the pins, not refused to sell to her, and that furthermore she had not had the money to pay for them. Alison was found guilty on the strength of her own confession, and condemned to death.(B2v-B3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B2v-B3

Alison Device Alison Device Witch
122

A man from the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be a labourer and the son of Elizabeth Device and John Device, the brother to Jennet and Alison Device, the grandson of Elizabeth Southerns, and the nephew of Christopher Howgate. James Device was tried at the Lancaster Assizes and declared guilty of murder by witchcraft. He was accused foremost of bewitching John Duckworth to death. During his examination, he claimed that his grandmother had sent him to attend communion, but take the bread rather than eat it; he ate it anyway. On the way back he met a spirit in the shape of a hare, which demanded the bread, became angered when he didn't have it, and vanished when he prayed. Four days later, a sprit appeared to him in the shape of a brown dog, which demanded his soul and told him he'd be revenged of anyone he wanted if he complied. James replied "his Soule was not his to giue, but was his Sauiour Iesus Christs, but as much as was in him this Examinate to giue, he was contented he should haue it." A few days after that, he argued with Mistress Townley and she struck him. A black dog appeared to him and bade him make a clay image of Townley so the dog (which James called Dandy) could kill or destroy her; James did so, dried the image by the fire and crumbled it a bit each day for a week. Townley died two days after the image was destroyed. James also admitted to setting Dandy on Duckworth, causing his death, after Duckworth promised him an old shirt and then retracted the offer. James' sister Jennet gave deposition against him, claiming he had been a witch three years, had used Dandy to kill Townley, and took instruction in witchcraft from their grandmother and mother. Jennet also gave deposition implicating James in the death of John Hargraves. James also claimed to have attended a gathering of witches at his grandmother's house for the purpose of naming his sister Alison's familiar, planning a break-in at the Lancaster Assizes to free the prisoners and blow up the castle, and to discuss assisting a woman in killing Master Lister of Westby. He named numerous other witches and their familiars. Jennet added that their mother taught them a prayer that James had used to get drink, and James knew another that would cure a bewitched person. James gave deposition against his sister Alison.(Hv-H2V)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Hv-H2V

James Device James Device Witch
123

A woman from the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be the daughter of Elizabeth Southerns, sister of Christopher Howgate, widow of John Device and mother of Jennet Device, Alison Device and James Device; her left eye was said to be lower than her right and always looking down when the other looked up. Elizabeth Device was indicted for witchcraft, with a final verdict of guilty of murder by witchcraft. Her children gave deposition against her, she gave deposition against her mother, and gave the names of numerous other witches. She was also implicated in a plot to blow up Lancaster Castle. Elizabeth allegedly raised her children to be witches, as she had been raised to be by her mother Elizabeth Southerns. She was charged with bewitching John Robinson, James Robinson and Henry Mytton to death. In her confession, she claimed to have a familiar named Ball which appeared in the shape of a brown dog; Ball instructed her to make a clay image of John Robinson, dry it in the fire and crumble it, resulting in his death. This was in retribution for harassing her for having a bastard child with a man named Seller. She also confessed to killing James Robinson, and to assisting Alice Nutter and her mother Southerns to bewitch Henry Mytton to death. Her son James claimed that she and her mother instructed and directed him in witchcraft.(C2-C3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2-C3v

Elizabeth Device Elizabeth Device Witch
126

A woman from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, known to be the grandmother of Grace Sowerbutts, mother of Henry Bierley, and mother-in-law to Ellen Bierley. She was indicted at the Lancaster Assizes, along with Ellen Bierley and Jane Southworth, for bewitching her granddaughter Grace so that her body wasted and was consumed. Jennet pleaded not guilty, and was eventually acquitted and released. Grace accused Jennet of numerous things. The accusations started with haunting and vexing her, drawing her by her hair, and laying her on top of a hay-mow. Grace also claimed that Jennet had shapeshifted into a black dog in front of her and picked her off a sty. Another time, Jennet came to Grace in dog shape and allegedly tried to persuade her to drown herself, but a spirit in a white sheet carried her away. Jennet-as-dog also buried Grace in hay and lay on top, robbing her of her speech, senses, and an entire day. Grace claimed to be unable to speak in Jennet's presence thereafter. Grace also accused Jennet and Ellen of stealing Thomas Walshman's child, driving a nail through its navel and sucking from the hole through a pen, then returning the child to its bed; the child languished and died thereafter. Once the child died, Jennet and Ellen allegedly took it from the churchyard, boiled it, ate it and rendered the fat from its bones to anoint themselves so they could change shape. Grace also said Jennet had brought her to attend a meeting of witches where four things like men carried them all across the water to eat strange meat, which Grace refused, and dance and "abuse their bodies." Thomas Walshman gave deposition confirming that he had a child who became sick and died, but he did not know the cause. Jennet accused Grace, in turn, of conspiring with the priest Master Thompson, who had been slandering her by calling her witch, and to whom Grace had been brought to by her mother. Grace retracted her accusations.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Jennet Bierley Jennet Bierley Witch
127

A woman from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, known to be the wife of Henry Bierley, aunt of Grace Sowerbutts, and daughter--in-law to Jennet Bierley. She was indicted at the Lancaster Assizes, along with Jennet Bierley and Jane Southworth, for bewitching her niece Grace so that her body wasted and was consumed. Ellen pleaded not guilty, and was eventually acquitted and released. Grace's accusations started with haunting and vexing her, drawing her by her hair, and laying her on top of a hay-mow. Later in the trial, Grace accused Ellen and Jennet of stealing Thomas Walshman's child, driving a nail through its navel and sucking from the hole through a pen, then returning the child to its bed; the child languished and died thereafter. Once the child died, they allegedly took it from the churchyard, boiled it, ate it and rendered the fat from its bones to anoint themselves so they could change shape. Grace also said she saw Ellen at a meeting of witches Jennet had brought Grace to, where four things like men carried them all across the water to eat strange meat, which Grace refused, and dance and "abuse their bodies." Thomas Walshman gave deposition confirming that he had a child who became sick and died, but he did not know the cause. Ellen accused Grace of conspiring with the priest Master Thompson in levelling the charges of witchcraft, but she could not say why, as she attended the church regularly. Grace retracted her accusations.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Ellen Bierley Ellen Bierley Witch
128

A woman from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, known to be the widow of John Southworth. She was indicted at the Lancaster Assizes, along with Jennet Bierley and Ellen Bierley, for bewitching Grace Bierley so that her body wasted and was consumed. Jane pleaded not guilty, and was eventually acquitted and released. Grace's accusations started with haunting and vexing her, drawing her by her hair, and laying her on top of a hay-mow. Grace also said she saw Jane at a meeting of witches Jennet had brought Grace to, where four things like men carried them all across the water to eat strange meat, which Grace refused, and dance and "abuse their bodies." John Singleton and William Alker both gave deposition alleging that Jane was "thought an euill woman, and a Witch," and that Sir John Southworth (kin to Jane's husband) feared she would kill or bewitch him. Jane said, during her examination, that she had spoken to the priest Master Thompson a month or so before her imprisonment, and challenged him for slandering her as a witch; she accused him of being the origin of the claims against her, and of trying to drive her out of the Church. Grace eventually retracted her charges.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Jane Southworth Jane Southworth Witch
130

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be the daughter of Anne Whittle and the wife of Thomas Redferne. She was charged with bewitching Robert Nutter to death and found guilty. Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, gave deposition stating that Nutter had propositioned her daughter, but that Redferne had denied him, which angered Nutter; he departed saying "in a great rage, that if euer the Ground came to him, shee should neuer dwell vpon his Land." Whittle claimed that she was responsible for Nutter's death, not her daughter, and that several other women had conspired with her to kill him. Elizabeth Southerns gave a contrary deposition, however, alleging that she had seen Redferne making images of Robert, Marie and Christopher Nutter. James Robinson gave a deposition stating that Redferne was commonly known to be a witch, Nutter claimed she had bewitched him, and that Nutter had said to Thomas Redferne "if euer he came againe he would get his Father to put the said Redferne out of his house, or he himselfe would pull it downe." James Device also implicated Redferne in a plot to blow up Lancaster Castle. Margaret Crooke, Robert Nutter's sister, claimed that Nutter languished ill a long time before dying, and that in his illness "he did a hundred times at the least say, That the said Anne Redferne and her associates had bewitched him to death." Despite Whittle's best efforts to protect her daughter, Anne Redferne was declared a particularly dangerous witch for the images she was said to have made. (D3-D4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, D3-D4

Anne Redferne Anne Redferne Witch
131

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be the wife of Richard Nutter, and the mother of Myles Nutter. She was charged with bewitching Henry Mytton to death and pronounced guilty. She was elderly, wealthy and of good reputation, and maintained her innocence to the end. Alice is said to be "a rich woman; had a great estate, and children of good hope: in the common opinion of the world, of good temper, free from enuy or malice." According to James Device, Alice conspired with Elizabeth Southerns and Elizabeth Device in Mytton's death after Mytton refused to give Southerns a penny, that Alice had been seen attending a meeting at Southerns' home, and that she had been at a feast of witches held at Malking Tower.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Alice Nutter Alice Nutter Witch
132

A woman from Coine in the County of Lancaster, known to be the wife of clothier John Hewit; Katherine was charged with bewitching Anne Foulds to death and was declared guilty. James Device alleged in his deposition that Hewit confessed to it at a meeting of witches at Malkin Tower, and that she had also claimed to have "then in hanck a child of Michael Hartleys of Colne." Elizabeth Device claimed that, at that same meeting, Hewit "gaue her consent with the said Prestons wife for the murder of Master Lister."(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Katherine Hewit Katherine Hewit Witch
133

A man from Mosse-End in the County of Lancaster, known to be the son of Jane and Christopher Bulcocke. John and his mother Jane were jointly charged with bewitching Jennet Deane so that she wasted, consumed and became mad; he was acquitted at their trial.James Device alleged in his deposition that John was present for a meeting of witches at Elizabeth Southerns' home, and at a feast of witches at Malking Tower; Device and his mother Elizabeth Device also alleged that John confessed to giving consent at Malking Tower to join together with the other witches present to bewitch Leonard Lister to death. Jennet Device claimed to having seen John turning the spit at Malking Tower. John denied attending at Malking Tower, and pleaded not guilty of Deane's bewitchment. (C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

John Bulcock John Bulcock Witch
135

A woman from Paddiham in the County of Lancaster, known to be the wife of Edward Pearson, who was charged with witchcraft and sentenced to be pilloried for four market days with a paper on her head declaring her crimes, followed by one year's imprisonment. She was generally thought to be "A very dangerous Witch of long continuance, generally suspected and feared in all parts of the Countrie, and of all good people neare her, and not without great cause: For whosoeuer gaue her any iust occasion of offence, shee tormented with great miserie, or cut off their children, goods, or friends." She was charged with several counts of witchcraft, including bewitching a horse, the goods and chattel belonging to Dodgeson. Anne Whittle gave deposition alleging that Pearson had a familiar in the shape of a cloven-footed man, and that this familiar had aided Pearson in bewitching Dodgeson's mare to death. Whittle also claimed that Pearson had confessed to her that she had bewitched Childer's wife and daughter to death. Jennet Booth alleged that, a week after Pearson was imprisoned, Booth was carding wool in Pearson's home; while there, she found a toad sitting in the fire. (C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Margaret Pearson Margaret Pearson Witch
137

A woman from Evesham in the county of Worcestershire, who is a "single Woman," beiieved to be around forty years old, and allegedly a witch. Children, including Mary Ellins, throw stones at her, calling her "Witch." It is believed that Catherine Huxley is responsible for causing the young Mary Ellins to become ill, for she yells after the young girl, "Ellins, you shall have stones enough in your ---", even though Mary Ellins was "so affrighted," she could not throw stones at Huxley. When Mary Ellins falls ill, she is "so weak and Languishing," that her friends feared she would not recover, and she voids "stones by the urinary passages." The voiding of stones is accompanied by extreme pain, and after "one or two months" passed, Huxley is apprehended "upon some strong suspitions of Witchcraft." Huxley is examined and searched, and it was found that "at [her] Beds Head there was found several stones, such as the said Mary voided." Huxley is sent to Wocester, where at the Summer Assizes in 1652, "she was upon the Prosecution of the Friends of the said Mary, Condemned and Executed," resulting the "perfect recovery" of Mary Ellins.(44)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 44

Catherine Huxley Catherine Huxley Witch
143

A maid from Erskine, Renfrewshire who allegedly says words about the devil thus bewitching Christian Shaw into flying around the room (1-2)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 1-2

Catherine Campbell Catherine Campbell Witch
145

A man from Glasgow, Scotland, who allegedly torments Christian Shaw.(7)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 7

Alexander Anderson Alexander Anderson Witch
146

A man from Glasgow, Scotland who allegedly torments Christian Shaw(7)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 7

James Anderson James Anderson Witch
153

A woman from Shepton Mallet who allegedly bewitches a young boy named Richard Jones(118-119)

Appears in:
Glanvill, Joseph. Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts. London: 1681, 118-119

Jane Brooks Jane Brooks Witch
155

A woman from Shepton Mallet in the county of Somerset, who allegedly bewitches a young boy names Richard Jones.(123)

Appears in:
Glanvill, Joseph. Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts. London: 1681, 123

Alice Coward Alice Coward Witch
156

A woman from Wincaunton in the county of Somerset, who confesses to keeping company with Elizabeth Stile. (147)

Appears in:
Glanvill, Joseph. Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts. London: 1681, 147

Alice Duke Alice Duke Witch
157

A woman from Brewham, Somerset who convinces Christian Green to give her soul to the devil(156)

Appears in:
Glanvill, Joseph. Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts. London: 1681, 156

Catherine Green Catherine Green Witch
158

A woman from Cork, Ireland who is found guilty of bewitching Mary Longdon(168)

Appears in:
Glanvill, Joseph. Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts. London: 1681, 168

Florence Newton Florence Newton Witch
161

A seventy year old woman from Taunton, Somerset who is found guilty of practicing witchcraft on a young maid(191)

Appears in:
Glanvill, Joseph. Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts. London: 1681, 191

Julian Cox Julian Cox Witch
167

A woman from Burneley in the County of Lancaster, known to be a widow. According to Anne Whittle, Widow Lomshawe was allegedly approached, along with Whittle and Elizabeth Southerns, by Elizabeth Nutter to bewitching Robert Nutter to death. Whittle claimed that, when her son-in-law Thomas Redferne persuaded Whittle not to participate, Lomeshawe was angry with Redfearne but the local schoolmaster M. Baldwyn talked her out of hurting him. Redferne gave her a capon for staying her hand against him. Whittle went on to say that she thought that Lomshawe and Jane Boothman both did what they could to kill Nutter. Lomshawe is said to have died well before the apprehensions for witchcraft and trials at Lancaster Assizes.(B4-B4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4-B4v

Lomshawe Widow Lomeshaw Witch
169

A woman accused of bewitching a little girl and executed for witchraft(27)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 27

Margaret Lang Margaret Lang Witch
170

A woman from Pollok, Scotland who is accused of pricking a young boy with a pin and making wax pictures used for the purposes of witchcraft(2-3)

Appears in:
Sinclair, George. Satan's Invisible World Discovered. Edinburgh: 1685, 2-3

Jennet Mathie Jennet Mathie Witch
171

A woman from Pollok, Scotland who allegedly meets with the devil; together they do image magic. They make wax dolls and stick pins in them(11-12)

Appears in:
Sinclair, George. Satan's Invisible World Discovered. Edinburgh: 1685, 11-12

Bessie Weir Bessie Weir Witch
172

A woman from Pollok, Scotland who allegedly meets with the devil; together they do image magic. They make wax dolls and stick pins in them(11-12)

Appears in:
Sinclair, George. Satan's Invisible World Discovered. Edinburgh: 1685, 11-12

Marjorie Craig Marjorie Craig Witch
173

A woman from Pollok, Scotland who allegedly meets with the devil who sits with her. Togther they do image magic, by making wax dolls and stick pins in them(11-12)

Appears in:
Sinclair, George. Satan's Invisible World Discovered. Edinburgh: 1685, 11-12

Margaret Jackson Margaret Jackson Witch
174

A man and witch from Pollok, Scotland who allegedly meets with the devil and makes wax pictures to stick pins in(11-12)

Appears in:
Sinclair, George. Satan's Invisible World Discovered. Edinburgh: 1685, 11-12

John Stewart John Stewart Witch
175

A woman from Ipswich in the county of Suffolk described as prisoner of witchcraft who confesses that Devil possessed her to avoid repentance.(12)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 12

Anonymous 15 Witch
179

A woman who confesses that her imps convinced her to get revenge (13)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 13

Sarah Boatman Sarah Boatman Witch
180

A woman that causes her neighbour's cows to become ill and who sends her child in the form of a cow to cause more damage to the cows.(14)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 14

Anonymous 18 Witch
181

A woman who had acted as Dr. Lamb's domestic servant in London circa 1622?, a role for which she earned the moniker "Dr. Lamb's darling," and the place where she claims to have first learned the mystical arts and gained Dr. Lambe's book. In the 1650s, she is in Fisherton Anger, a suburb of Salisbury in the county of Wiltshire, and the wife of Edward Bodenham. Here she evidently worked as a teacher, was seen as a papist, a gossip, cunning woman and a wisewoman, willing to "undertake to cure almost any diseases, which she did for the most part by charms and spels, but sometimes used physical ingredients, to cover her abominable practices." Her bread and butter came from "procur[ing] things that were lost, and to restore [stolen] goods. Bodenham practices image, familiar, and word magic. She claims she can control demons, but uses image magic, and basic psychological manipulation, to do her work. She evidently makes the strategic mistake of trying to recruit Anne Styles, a young servant girl with whom she had a number of encounters. In one account, she gave her soul to the Devil "sealed in a bloody scroule," and under his instruction, seduced the maid Anne Styles into also signing over her soul. Mistress Bodenham uses a looking glass to conjure. Anne Styles comes to her afterwards, and says to Mistress Bodenham that "she would flye" to London, which Mistress Bodenham agrees too. Mistress Bodenham also travels to Stockbridge when Anne Styles is there, immediately alleviating Anne Styles' torments caused by the Devil. Mistress Bodenham tries to convince the Gentleman to let her impart "all her art," to him, which he refuses. Bodenham allegedly helps Richard Goddard's lost spoon, helps find three pieces of Thomas Mason's lost gold, helps determine if Elizabeth Rosewel's sister and daughter in law, Sarah Goddard, was trying to poison her, makes a charm protect Master Mason from Master Rawley's mischief and foretells if Mason would win a law suit against Richard Goodard, predicts who Mistriss Rosewel would marry, sends Styles again to Bodenham who have her visit a local apothecary to buy Arsenic to burn as a bit of counter magic to protect Mistress Goddard and provides poison to use against Mistriss Sarah and Mistriss Anne Goddard. Her final mistake is offering Anne Styles, who had been discovered to be the person who bought the arsenic meant to be used against Mistress Goddard, and thus, an attempted murderer, an apprenticeship. Styles soon acted like a woman possessed and shortly thereafter, Anne Bodenham was arrested. She was sentanced to be hanged as a witch. She is executed on March 19, 1653, after she boasts "she knew full well, She should be a great Lady in hel," and refuses to repent. During her execution, "she did nought but curse and sware," as she went to the gallows drunk. When she was allowed to go up the ladder, she attempted to throw herself off the platform. When asked to forgive her executioner, she replied, "Forgive thee? A pox on thee, turn me off; which were the last words she spake."(1)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 1

Anne Bodenham Anne Bodenham Witch
182

A woman from Burton Agnes in the County of York, who allegedly had the reputation for being a witch. She is employed by the Corbet family to take care of "small matters" such as tending to the turkeys. She is accused of bewitching Faith Corbet after Faith's gloves go missing from the kitchen, and she suspects that Huson, "the Old Witch had gotten them." Faith has fits that are said to be a result of Huson's witchcraft. (54)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 54

Alice Huson Alice Huson Witch
185

A woman from Norfolk, described as the wife of glover Henry Smith and a cheese merchant of her own accord, Mary Smith allegedly attracted the devil's attention with the heat of her wrath against her neighbors. He appears in the shape of a black man and promised her that if she "should continue in her malice, enuy, hatred, banning and cursing; and then he would be reuenged for her vpon all those to whom she wished euill." She agreed. Smith is implicated in the bewitchment of John Orkton, Cecily Bayles, Elizabeth Hancocke, and Edmund Newton. She is executed January 12, 1616?(45-47)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 45-47

Mary Smith Mary Smith Witch
201

A woman from Stopham who destroys stores of beer and kills three hogs through witchcraft after a maidservant refuses to give her these items.(2-3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Signs and Wonders from Heaven. With a True Relation of a Monster Born in Radcliffe Highway. London: 1645, 2-3

Anonymous 22 Witch
202

A witch from Suffolk causes a young woman to give birth to two pieces of flesh after she is offered a cake broken in two.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Signs and Wonders from Heaven. With a True Relation of a Monster Born in Radcliffe Highway. London: 1645, 4

Anonymous 23 Witch
213

A woman from Stradbrook in the county of Suffolk, known to have numerous familiars, including Gyles, J. , Tom and three unnamed toads. She allegedly had a falling out with Joan Jorden when Jorden refused to give her some of Symon Fox's goods. Bartham first sent three toads to torment Jorden and keep her from sleeping, but the first was thrown out the window, and the next two burnt in the fire. She then sent her cat, Gyles, to Jorden. He made strange noises in the night, would pin her down and kiss her, and talked often both to her and to anyone who would hear him. Gyles told the onlookers that he came for Jorden's life, to have belonged to Doll Barthram for as long as 20 years, and that Barthram gave him her life and her soul. He also said that he, Tom and J. hanged Caver's wife at Barthram's command. Barthram also ordered Gyles to kill a child in its mother's womb, kill a man by entering him and tearing his heart to pieces, tear John Sheereman to pieces, and kill Symon Fox, plus his wife, children and cattle. Bartham also caused Jorden to have fits in which a lump arose and moved about her body and she struggled so hard she broke a chair and needed six men to restrain her. During one of her fits, Jordan cried out " Barthram, thou hast killed mee" before numerous witnesses. Barthram was apprehended and tried on charges of witchcraft. She was executed on July 12, 1599.(92-98)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 92-98

Doll Bartham Doll Bartham Witch
215

A woman from Castle Alley near Broken Wharf in London, who was allegedly long suspected of being a witch. She is said to have had a falling out with a woman in the street, and shortly thereafter the woman's child shrieked, pined away and died. The woman's other child met Anne Kirk on the street not long after, and immediately began to suffer tormenting fits, only to recover as soon as Kirk had left. Kirk also tormented a child whose parents had not invited her to its christening; the child remained afflicted until Mother Gillam advised the parents to burn a piece of Kirk's coat with the child's underclothes. She also bewitched an innkeeper's child to death, but not before the innkeeper went to a cunning-man, who identified her as the source of the child's illness. The innkeeper died himself not long after confronting her about it. She also tormented George Nayler and his sister Anne Nayler to death. Master Nayler had money given to the poor at Anne's burial, and Kirk was angered that none was given to her. Kirk began to torment another of Nayler's daughters soon after. Joan Nayler began to be visited by an evil spirit the next night, and began suffering tormenting fits. She accused Kirk of bewitching her while in her fits, and her father procured a warrant from Sir Richard Martin for Kirk's apprehension. Joan was seen to fall into a trance as soon as Kirk came in the door, witnessed by Martin. While Kirk was imprisoned, Martin tried to have her hair cut, having heard that witches' hair could not be. Kirk's hair blunted and spoiled the scissors, proving her a witch. She faced trial on November 30, 1599, and was executed on December 4, 1599 at Tyburn.(99-103)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 99-103

Anne Kerke Anne Kirk Witch
234

A woman from Nottingham in the county of Nottinghamshire, known to be a kinswoman of the Alderman of Nottingham, whom William Sommers accuses of being a witch. The Alderman of Nottingham is offended by this allegation and makes a counter-accusation against Sommers, which results in Sommers being imprisoned for witchcraft himself. John Darrell, during his trial, claimed that Sommers accused Freeman out of malice.(Image 6)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 6

Doll Ffreeman Doll Freeman Witch
249

A man of Cleworth in the county of Lancashire within the parish of Leigh, known to be a conjurer, who allegedly bewitches several women and the Starchie children in Lancashire. NIcholas Starchie hired him to use charms and herbs to help his children. For a year and a half, the Starchie children suffered no fits, until Hartley pretended he was leaving the county, at which time John Starchie began bleeding and would not stop until Hartley had been fetched back. After this incident, Nicholas Starchie offered Hartley a retainer, but Hartley demanded a house and land, which Starchie refused. A supernatural loud whupping noise is allegedly conjured by Hartley, and the children's fits began anew. When Master Hopwood, a Justice of Peace, came to take testimony against Hartley, his four youngest victims refused, saying that Hartley would not suffer them to speak against him. Hartley is also alleged to have caused Jane Ashton to have barking fits and become sick, and Marg Byrom to be vexed by accidents. He is condemned to death at the assizes of Lancaster and hanged.(Image 5-6, 7)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 5-6, 7

Edmund Hartley Edmund Hartley Witch
255

A woman from the London Borough of Southwark, known to be the wife of a water-man, who quarreled with her husband and allegedly bewitched Richard Hathaway when he was hired to make a second key to fit her home's lock. Hathaway initially refused to accept a drink from Morduk when working on the lock, but eventually accepted, and is said to have become unable to eat, drink or see thereafter. Friends of Hathaway's eventually brought Morduk to Hathaway and convinced him to scratch her, which restored his vision and ability to eat and see, but left him passing pins in his stool.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 1

Sarah Morduck Sarah Morduck Witch
260

Rebecca West, a young woman from Lawford in the county of Essex, and daughter to accused witch Anne West. West confessed to being at a meeting of witches, convened by Mother Benfield and Mother Goodwin, numerous other women, and a number of small familiar kittens and puppies. After agreeing to keep their council, and reciting a malefic compact, "the Divel in the shape of a little blacke dog leaped into her lap, & kissed her three times," kisses she claimed were cold. Later that night, the Devil (later legally treated as a familiar spirit), she claimed, appeared to her again, in "the shape of a hand some young man, saying that he came to marry her." He conducted an impromptu marriage ceremony in her bed chamber, where she promised to be an "obedient wife till death, faithfully to performe and observe all [his] commands, she took him to bed. Although she likewise swore to Mother Miller "shee would confesse nothing, if they pulled her to pieces with pincers," upon imagining herself surrounded by flames, "confessed all shee ever knew." Her big revelation, beyond testifying against numerous other women (including Anne Leech, Elizabeth Gooding, Hellen Clark, Anne West, and Elizabeth Clark), was that the "devel can take any shape, and speake plaine English." West had obviously struck a deal with Hopkins and/ or the state. She testified against her own mother, Anne West, on the charge that Anne had bewitched John Cutler Jr. to death. She testified against Elizabeth Gooding on charges of having bewitched John Edwards to death. Moreover, although indicted as a witch, and accused of entertaining, employing and feeding three evil spirits, one in the likeness 'of a grey catt' called Germany, the second like 'a white katt' called Newes and the third like 'a young man' called 'her husband,' with the intention of getting their help in withcraft and sorcery," she was not prosecuted for witchcraft, nor had she confessed to committing any crimes. (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex. London: 1645, 1

Rebecca West Rebecca West Witch
261

A sixty five year old widow from Chich, St. Osyth in the county of Essex. Rose Hallybread first became a witch, or almost become one, when Goodwife Hagtree gave her an imp (she "fed it with oatmeale and suckled it on her body, for the space of a yeer and a halfe," before she lost it. She was later given another imp by Joyce Boanes (a small gray hawk named Tom Boy) which she used to kill Thomas Toakley's son and which (along with Susan Cook, Margaret Landish, and Joyce Boanes's imps) she used to torment Robert Turner's servant, giving him a made illness where he "barked like a Dog." Rose Hallybread dies in the goal in Chelmsford, circa July 17, 1645. However, Hallybread would not rest peacefully. She would be resurrected in print in 1690 in the largely fictional _The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches_. In this text, Rose Hallybread is accused of witchcraft that caused the torment of Mary Peak, John Peak, and the Children of Obadiah Peak of Preston; the evidence supporting this charge comes from Abraham Chad and Elin Shearcraft. Hallybread is also accused by Abraham Chad of making wax figures of the Children of Obadiah Peak, with one of the figures being put on a spit and the other stuck with pins. Finally, Hallybread is accused of keeping imps that appear in the form of mice. She is tried for witchcraft and burned at the stake.(33-34)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 33-34

Rose Hallybread Rose Hallybread Witch
262

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, an accused witch, and maybe a relative of Mary Cook, an accused witch who died in the goal at Chelmsford, 1645. Susan Cook allegedly had a familiar named Bess, and conspired with Rose Hallybread, Margaret Landish, and Joyce Boanes, to torment Robert Turner's servant, because" hee had refused to give unto her this Examinant, the said Susan Cocks, Margaret Landish and Joyce Boanes a few chips." With the help of thier familiars, they made him fall "sick, and oftentimes barked like a Dog: And this Examinant saith, that shee believeth that the said four Imps were the cause of his barking and sicknesse." In _The full Trualls, Examinations and Condemnations of Four Notorious Witches, At the Assizes held at Worchester on Tuesday the 4th of March_ she is accused of murdering Mary Peak a crime for which she is burned at the stake. (5)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 5

Susan Cock Susan Cock Witch
263

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, Margaret Landish, aka Pegg the witch, Landish is accused of numerous acts of familiar magic and conspiracy to do harm. Landish, along with Rose Hallybread, Susan Cook, and Joyce Boanes allegedly used their familiars to torment Robert Turner's servant, because "hee had refused to give [them a few chips]. This servant "oftentimes crowed like a Cock, backed like a Dogge sung tunes, and groaned" it was Margaret Landish's imp which allegedly "made him groan in such an extraordinary manner." Landish also allegedly sent her familiar to John Spall's home, "where the said Imps killed tens or twelve [of his] Sheep." Margaret Landish sent her imp (without impish company) to kill "six or seven shoots or hogges" of the Thomans Mannock's hogs. Both Spall and Mannock, she punished, for lack of charity. Landish confessed to having a familiar, but claimed she entered into a malefic against he will only compact "eight or nine weekes" before her examination. It was done to her when she was "lying sicke by the fire side in her owne house, something came up to her body, and sucked on her privie parts, and much pained and tormented her." The thing which tormented her was an imp sent by Susan Cock. She denied all other charges. (3-4)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 3-4

Margaret Landish Margaret Landish Witch
264

A woman from Renfrew in the county of Renfrewshire, who is sent to prison for allegedly threatening malfeasance.(7)

Appears in:
P., T.. A Relation of the Diabolical Practices of above Twenty Wizards and Witches of the Sheriffdom of Renfrew in the Kingdom of Scotland. London: 1697, 7

Agnes Foster Agnes Foster Witch
265

A woman from Renfrew in the county of Renfrewshire, who is known for being pious, grave, and penitent. She is sent to prison for threatening and malfeasance; A woman who talks to Christian Shaw. Christian Shaw starts having fits shortly after; A woman accused by Christian Shaw of bewitching her and cutting her side.(3)

Appears in:
P., T.. A Relation of the Diabolical Practices of above Twenty Wizards and Witches of the Sheriffdom of Renfrew in the Kingdom of Scotland. London: 1697, 3

Agnes Nasmith Agnes Nasmith Witch
266

A widow from Wivenhoe in the county of Essex Alice Dickson allegedly bewitched Thomas Mumford's son to death. She also allegedly discovered that Mary Johnson was responsible for the suffering and death of Elizabeth Otely's child. This act of murder administered through familiar magic: Johnson set her imp, a thing in the shape of a rat with no ears to attack Otely's child; and through contamination: Johnson gave the child an apple and a kiss which made it sicken and die. When Dixon accused Johnson to her face of causing this harm, she allegedly responded: "that if she did it, she did it, she could but receive punishment for it." Alice Dixon was hanged at Chelmsford July 17, 1645. (21-22)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 21-22

Alice Dixon Alice Dixon Witch
269

A widow from Mistely in the county of Essex accused of witchcraft She admits having a gray imp she used, along with the familiars of Elizabeth Gooding and Elizabeth Clarke to cause harm to the animals of Mr. Edwards, Mr. Bragge, and to murder John, the infant son of Richard Edwards and the daughter of Widow Rawlyns. Anne Leech also admits to reading from a book "wherein she thinkes there was no goodnesse." She was executed 27th of August, 1645.(Cover, 7-8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover, 7-8

Anne Leech Anne Leech Witch
270

A woman who confesses to conspiring with the devil(156)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 156

Christian Green Christian Green Witch
271

A seventeen year old girl from Renfrew in the county of Renfrewshire, who confesses to tormenting Christian Shaw.(8)

Appears in:
P., T.. A Relation of the Diabolical Practices of above Twenty Wizards and Witches of the Sheriffdom of Renfrew in the Kingdom of Scotland. London: 1697, 8

Elizabeth Anderson Elizabeth Anderson Witch
273

A woman from Manningtree in the county of Essex described as impoverished and having only one leg, Elizabeth Clarke is a implicated in witchcraft by a number large number of her neighbors, and is examined by Matthew Hopkins and watched by John Sterne. She is accused of bewitching John Rivet's wife, who was made sick and lame by a number of violent fits a suspicion backed up by a Suffolk cunning woman and Clarkes' malefic pedigree. She allegedly killed Robert Okes, a Clothiers childe of Dedham, William Cole's wife of Manningtree, and Thomas Turner. According to Matthew Hopkins, Clarke enjoyed six or seven years of tri-weekly "carnall copulation with the Devil six or seven yeares, who, "in shape of a proper Gentleman, with a laced band, having the whole proportion of a man, and would say to her, Besse I must lye with you, and shee did never deny him." She also allegedly kept five white imps and a number of familiars, including: a white thing, which is possibly Holt, Jarmara, Vinegar Tom, "a black Impe," and a "Polcat." Clarke herself only confesses to having two thinks come to her every night, a gray and a white thing, "and sucked upon the lower parts of her body." She allegedly confesses to sending an imp to kill cows belonging to Mr. Edwards, murdering Mr. Edward's hogs and to having sexual relations with the devil regularly. She also allegedly read from a book containing "no goodnesse" with Anne Leech, Elizabeth Gooding, and Anne West. Elizabeth Clarke was executed the 27. day of August 1645 at Chelmsford in Essex.(5-10)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 5-10

Elizabeth Clarke Elizabeth Clarke Witch
274

A woman from Mosse-End in the County of Lancaster, known to be the wife of Christopher Bulcocke and the mother John Bulcocke. Jane and her son John were jointly charged with bewitching Jennet Deane so that she wasted, consumed and became mad; she was acquitted at their trial.James Device alleged in his deposition that Jane was present for a meeting of witches at Elizabeth Southerns' home, and at a feast of witches at Malking Tower; Device and his mother Elizabeth Device also alleged that Jane confessed to giving consent at Malking Tower to join together with the other witches present to bewitch Leonard Lister to death. Jane denied attending at Malking Tower, and pleaded not guilty of Deane's bewitchment. (C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Jane Bulcock Jane Bulcock Witch
275

A woman from Renfrew in the county of Renfrewshire, who is tried for allegedly having practiced image magic by pricking a picture with pins and playing a pipe.(18)

Appears in:
P., T.. A Relation of the Diabolical Practices of above Twenty Wizards and Witches of the Sheriffdom of Renfrew in the Kingdom of Scotland. London: 1697, 18

John Lindsay John Lindsay Witch
276

A woman from Renfrew in the county of Renfrewshire, who is found to have witch's marks.(3)

Appears in:
P., T.. A Relation of the Diabolical Practices of above Twenty Wizards and Witches of the Sheriffdom of Renfrew in the Kingdom of Scotland. London: 1697, 3

Margaret Fulton Margaret Fulton Witch
277

A woman accused of bewitching Christian Shaw and another young girl(27)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 27

Martha Semple Martha Semple Witch
278

A woman from Bideford in the county of Devon, who is tried for allegedly causing a neighbour's cow to give blood instead of milk. She is found guilty and executed.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial, Condemnation, and Execution of Three Witches. London: 1682, 1

Mary Floyd Mary Floyd Witch
279

A woman from Bideford in the county of Devon who had allegedly been a witch since 1679, corrupted by Susanna Edwards, who promised her she would never want for Money, Meat, Drink, nor Clothes, if she became a witch. Trembles agreed and soon after the Devil in the shape of a Lyon" came to her, "and lay with her, and had carnal knowledge of her Body. He did "suck her in her Secret parts, and that his sucking was so hard, which caused her to cry out for the pain thereof. In making this compact, Edwards became a "Servant unto" Susanna Edwards as Edwards was a "Servant unto the Devil." She was accused of helping bewitch Grace Barnes having been seen standing outside her house with a White-pot in her hands, as though she had been going to the common Bakehoute and was thereafter identified by Barnes as one of them that did torment her, and that she was come now to put her the said Grace out of her Life. Mary Trembles verbally attacked Susanna Edwards, according to Joan Jones, saying O thou Rogue, I will now confess all: For 'tis thou that hast made me to be a Witch, and thou are one thy self, and my Conscience must swear it. Unto which the said Susanna replied unto the said Mary Trembles, I did not think that thou wouldest have been such a Rogue to discover it. She was tried on Aug. 14, 1682 and executed on August 25, 1682.(29-35)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 29-35

Mary Trembles Mary Trembles Witch
281

A woman from Bideford in the county of Devon, described as a widow who is accused of a helping bewitch Dorcas Coleman, William Edwards, and Grace Barnes. She allegedly bewitched Dorcas Coleman, whose strange and unusual manner of sickness, as manifest through tormenting pains Dr. Beare for medically concluded was bewitchment; although Dorcas was too ill to stand, she managed to fall from her chair in an attempt to attack Edwards. William Edwards, heard her admit that the Devil had carnal knowledge of her Body; and that he had suckt her in her Breast and in her Secret parts. Joane Jones claims she heard Edwards confess to participating (with Mary Trembles and Temperance Lloyd) in the bewitchment of Grace Barnes, and to confessing that she was suckt in her Breast several times by the Devil in the shape of a Boy lying by her in her Bed; and that it was very cold unto her. And further saith, that after she was suckt by him, the said Boy or Devil had the carnal knowledge of her Body Four several times. Edwards could gripe and twinkle her Hands upon her own Body, said unto her, to torment Grace Barnes with great pain with prickings and stabbings unto her Heart and Anthony Jones. The genesis of her malfeasance seems to have been an act of prostitution around 1680: one night at Parsonage Close a Gentleman dressed all in black drew nigh unto her; whereupon she was in good hopes to have a piece of Mony of him. He disappeared, however, and soon after a devil in the shape of a little Boy did lie with her, and that he did suck her at her breast and in the shape of a Lyon. She was tried on Aug. 14, 1682 and executed on August 25, 1682.(27)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial, Condemnation, and Execution of Three Witches. London: 1682, 27

Susanna Edwards Susanna Edwards Witch
282

A widow from Lowestoft in the county of Essex who was accused, along with Amy Denny, of bewitching Elizabeth and Ann Durent, Jane Bocking, Susan Chandler, William Durent, and Elizabeth and Deborah Pacey. She pleaded not guilty at her trial, but was found guilty of thirteen counts of witchcraft and sentenced to hang; her execution was carried out March 17, 1662. Numerous people gave deposition against her: Samuel Pacey, father to Elizabeth and Deborah, alleged that his daughters saw Cullender and Denny's apparitions during their fits of soreness, deafness, dumbness, blindness, or coughing pins and nails. He also claimed that the apparitions threatened the girls with torments ten times worse if they told what they had seen. Pacey's sister Margaret Arnold, alleged that the Pacey girls were tormented by imps directed by Cullender and Denny. Edmond Durent, father of Ann Durent, alleged that Cullender caused Ann to have swooning fits and vomit pins after his wife refused to sell Cullender some herrings. Ann Durent is said to have had a violent fit in court when brought before Cullender. Mary Chandler, mother of Susan Chandler, alleged that Cullender was revealed during a search to have an inch-long teat on her belly that appeared to have been sucked and could be made to secrete milky white matter; Cullender claimed it was the result of a strain from carrying water. She allegedly also had three smaller teats on her privy parts. Susan Chandler is said to have been afflicted with sickness and fits of blindness, dumbness, and the vomiting of pins; Susan allegedly saw Cullender accompanied by a large dog during her fits. John Soam and Robert Sherringham both alleged that Cullender had bewitched their carts; Sherringham also claimed she killed four horses and numerous piglets, caused him to be lame and afflicted him with swarms of unusually large lice.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 4

Rose Cullender Rose Cullender Witch
283

A young boy who was apprehended under suspicion that he practiced withcraft(24)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 24

Thomas Lindsay Thomas Lindsay Witch
284

A woman from Chipping Campden in the county of Gloucestershire, described as a widow who along with her sons (Anonymous 92 and Anonymous 93), allegedly rob and murder William Harrison. Perry is brought to trial on these accusations, found guilty, and executed by hanging. Before her execution, Widow Perry predicts that William Harrison will return in seven years time, a prophecy which comes to pass.(5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Power of Witchcraft being a Most Strange but True Relation of the Most Miraculous and Wonderful Deliverance of One Mr. William Harrison. London: 1662, 5-6

Widow Perry Widow Perry Witch
285

A woman from London, who was indicted at the Old Bailey on charges of performing witchcraft and several diabolical acts, including the alleged murder of Elizabeth Chamblet, whom she is said to have bewitched to death, and of the bewitchment of the girl's mother, Mrs. Chamblet. Mr. Chamblet also alleged in court that she had bewitched his swine after he refused to sell her two without first being paid. Prior to the proceedings, Kent was searched by a woman (Anonymous 128) who gave deposition that Kent had a witch's teat on her back, and strange holes behind her ears. Nonetheless, she was able to provide evidence that she had lived an honest life, and thus was found not guilty of witchcraft.(3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Proceedings at the Sessions of Oyer and Terminer. London: 1682, 3-4

Jane Kent Jane Kent Witch
286

A woman from Great Clacton in the county of Essex and wife of Thomas Hare, Elizabeth Hare is supposed to have had a familiar spirit in the shape of a squirrel. Hare is accused by Mary Smith of providing her with two familiar spirits; Hare responds to this slander by raising her arms to the heaven, exclaiming that if this is so, that God should give her a sign. She begins to shake, quiver, and fall to the ground. She remains in this state. She appears to have been condemned to die as a witch, but reprieved. (23)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 23

Elizabeth Hare Elizabeth Hare Witch
287

A woman from Manningtree in the county of Essex and wife of Edward Goodwyn of Manningtree, a labourer, Elizabeth Gooding described as a "lewd woman" who keeps company with Elizabeth Clark, Anne Leech, and Anne West. Gooding who allegedly falls out with Robert Talyer after he refuses to give her a half a pound of cheese on credit. Although she returns with money enough to buy a whole pound of cheese, and does just that: one of Tailor's horses "was taken in a strange manner sick and lame." Despite being looked at by four Farriers the horse, "did violently beat himself to death," a crime attributed to Gooding (by Elizabeth Clark and Anne Leech. Goodling also allegedly sends her imps, along with Anne Leech's imps, to kill two horses of Mr. Bragge, and two cows of Mr. Edwards. She allegedly sends imps "to vex and torment Mary the wife of John Tayler of Mannyntree," after Mary Tayler refused her some beer. Elizabeth Gooding also allegedly read from a book with Anne Leech, Elizabeth Clarke and Anne West from a book containing "no goodnesse." She is indicted on charges of "murder and raising spirits," specifically, entertaining and feeding "'evill spirittes,' one in the form of a 'younge catt' and the other of a mouse, and one was called 'pease.'" She is accused of sending her imps bewitch John Edwards, making him have "very strange fire, extending the limbs, and rowling the eyes," and otherwise "destroy the child of the said Mr. Edwards" a crime for which she is indicted, found guilty, and executed as a witch at Chelmsford in 1645.(10- 11, 11-12, 12, 13, 16)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 10- 11, 11-12, 12, 13, 16

Elizabeth Gooding Elizabeth Gooding Witch
288

A woman from Maningtree in the county of Essex, daughter of Anne Leech and housekeeper of Elizabeth Clarke. Hellen Clarke confesses to keeping a familiar spirit named Elimanzer which she feeds with milk-pottage. Elimanzer demanded that Clarke deny Christ, promising if she did, that she should never want; Hellen agreed. s accused of being in a kabal of witches which includes Anne West, Rebecca West, Elizabeth Clarke, Anne Leech, and Elizabeth Gooding who fratenized, read from the Devil's book, and corrupted Rebecca West. Helen Clarke is also accused of bewitching Mary, the daughter of Edward and Mary Parsley; she speead this bewitchment simply by passing by the Parsely's door after she had a disagreement with Mary Parsely Sr. Passing by the Parsely's door, she was heard to mutter, "that Mary the daughter of the said Edward and Mary Parsley should rue for all, whereupon, presently the said Mary the daughter, fell sick, and died within six weeks after." She denied this charge, however it appears that Clarke was hanged at Manningtree, having been found guilty of this crime. (14, 17-18)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 14, 17-18

Hellen Clark Hellen Clark Witch
289

A woman from Great Clacton, the wife of John Cooper, the mother of Sara Cooper, and the daughter of Joan Cooper. Anne Cooper allegedly keeps three black mole shaped familars, Wynowe, Jeso, and Panu or (Winne, Jezo, and Panne), a crime for which she is indicted and found guilty, which suck from witch's marks in her nether regions. She likewise allegedly attempts to give her daughter Sara "an Impe in the likenes of a gray Kite." She allegedly "cursed a Colt of one William Cottingams of Clacton aforesaid, and the said Colt broke his neck presently after going out of a gate." Following a disagreement with Joan Rous, she allegedly bewitched her daughter Mary, so that the "said child was strangely taken sick, and languishing, within a short time died." It is not for this murder that she is indicted, however. Cooper was indicted for bewitching two children to death Mary Knights and James Curstissurre. She is found guilty of causing Mary Knight's death. According to one record, Anne is found "dead in gaole," however, this is likely her eighty year old mother, Joan who has died. Anne Cooper appears to be hanged as a witch in 1645. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341138)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341138

Anne Cooper Anne Cooper Witch
290

A widow from Thorpe-le-Soken in the county of Essex and mother of Judith Moone and an un-named daughter, Margaret Moone is described as a "be a woman of a very bad fame and suspected for a Witch." She is accused of keeping (up to) twelve familiars, some of which were named Jesus, Jockey, Sandy, Mris. Elizabeth, and Collyn, and using them to kill three of Stephen Cook's cows, one of Henry Robertson's pigs, one of Philip Daniels' horses, and three of Mr. Edwards' brews, and spoiling Philip Berriman's bread. She is also accused of two murders Mr. Edward's child and Joan Cornwall. Joan became sick as her father and mother did by virtue of a kind of malefic disease spread via a half a peck of apples; Moone was hanged for this crime. Moone did not seems to need to use a vector to transmit bewitchment, however; her presence alone was enough to cause a malefic infestation. Having been kicked out of a second home, that of Thomas Turner, who evicted her because Rawbood and his wife were willing to pay "ten shillings more for the said house," she appeared to curse the couple, saying that they should not have "medled with the house." Rawbood and his wife became lame and sick thereafter Mrs. Rawbood was, for instance, on Easter day, suddenly "so filled with Lice, that they might have been swept off her cloaths with a stick" they couple died. Moone could also fill a room with stink; while being watched all nigh one night she appears to have shit on the floor; her examiner, desirous to see a familiar, described it thusly: "a thing drop from under her coats (as they thought) in the likenesse of a Rat for bignesse and shape, but of a grayer colour; And presently there was such an extreame offensive stink in the Roome, that these Informants were scarce able to endure to stay in it." When she was asked "what it was that dropped from her, she bids them coop it up and catch it if they could." This would not be the only humiliation she would suffer; Moone's privy parts would be opened up by Francis Miller, who would find "three long teats or bigges in her secret parts. Moone was hanged as a witch in 1645 (25-32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 25-32

Margaret Moone Margaret Moone Witch
291

A woman from Alresford in the county of Essex and mother to one daughter. Mary Greenliefe has an "ill name" in her community and in 1615, she shared a home with Susan Sparrow, their adolescent daughters, and a spooky leveret (which sat menacingly by her front door). Mary Greenleife's daughter "cry out in a fearefull manner; Oh Mother, now it comes, it comes, oh helpe mother, it hurts me, it hurts me." Sparrow warned Greenliefe to wake her shrieking child up, lest the neighbors, who already though Greenleife has "an ill name already" thought she was "suckling [her] Impes upon it." Greenliefe snapped back "I will fee with them (meaning her said Impes,) that they shall suck my daughter one night, and thine another," a statement which made matters worse: the next night Sparrow's daughter cried out that "shee was nipped and pinched on her thigh" an attach made manifest by the large "black and blew spot" on her leg (which remained sore for a month). Sparrow also claimed to see a leveret which she suggested to Anthony Sharlock, the father of a child allegedly bewitched by Greenleife, that he have his greyhound hunt the leveret down. Sharlock's dog chase it away, and Goodman Merrill's dog ran at it, and soon languished and dyed. Greenliefe was searched by Elizabeth Hunt and Priscilla Brigs who claimed they found "bigges or teates in her secret parts," marks they believed were "teates sucked by her Impe." Greenleife claimed she did not know where or when she came to have those marks, "not unlesse she were born with them," denied ever letting any imp suck on "these teats," and admitted to only seeing a leveret once at her door. Mary Mary Greeneliffe is "delivered by proclamation, to appear at the next Gaol Delivery and to be of good behaviour."(19-21)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 19-21

Mary Greenliefe Mary Greenliefe Witch
292

A woman from Wivenhoe in the county of Essex, and wife of Nicholas Johnson, Mary Johnson is accused of killing Elizabeth Otley's two year old child and tormenting her, as well as killing Annaball Durrant's two year old child and tormenting her and her husband. Johnson allegedly took her familiar (an imp in the shape of a rat with no ears) from out of her pocket, shoved it through a hole in Otley's door, and told it to "go rock the Cradle, and do the businesse she sent it about, and return to her again." Johnson also took a hands on approach to this attack, arriving at Otely's door, presumably unseen by her, and giving this child an apple and a kiss the child soon thereafter sickened and died; its demise is pinned on Johnson. When Alice Dixon accused Johnson of this murder, she allegedly replied: "that if she did it, she did it, she could but receive punishment for it." Dixon builds be accusation against Johnson, at least in part as a counter-attack: Johnson suggested that "Alice Dixon did the mischief to [Elizabeth Otely's] child her self." Johnson is also accused of making Elizabeth Otley herself suffer from extreme pain, loss of appetite, and insomnia, presumably to weaken her enough, physically and psychologically, that she would believe Johnson's many claims of innocence. Otley, however, decided she was witched and unwitched herself through a long fist fight where she made Johnson's teeth bleed. Johnson declared herself innocent of the charges laid against her in these matters. The Otley family were not the only ones to suffer from Johnson's attacks however; the Durrant family would also soon find itself under attack while traveling Wivenhoe to Fingerhoe. Johnson allegedly approached Durrant and her daughter, told her it "was a pretty child; and stroaked it upon the face, and gave it a peece of bread and butter." The child ate her snack and soon thereafter "shricked and cried out" and continued suffering for just over a week before it died. Although the Annaball and Nicholas Durrant did not die, they both experienced suffering attributed to Joohnson; Annaball suffers a kind of labour-like pain for around eight months and a lameness and stiffness; Nicholas, imaging Johnsons imps are after him falls down and lies "in great extremity." Despite the elaborate nature of these accusations, she is indicted on other crimes. She is found not guilty of bewitching George Durrell, a sailor from Fingerhoe seaman. She is found guilty of the malefic murder of Elizabeth Occlam. In 1645 Mary Johnson was found guilty, and sentenced to be hung, but was reprieved.(21-22)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 21-22

Mary Johnson Mary Johnson Witch
293

A widow from Ramsey in the county of Essex and sister of Sara Barton, Marion Hocket is accused of supplying her sister with three familiars names Littleman, Pretty-man, and Dainty, and supplying Elizabeth Harvey with three red rodent-like familiars. Hockett was searched for witchmarks, but none were found on her. Her sister, from the goal in Harick suggested that Hocket had excised the marks to remove corporeal proof of her malfeasance and healed the wounds with plaisters. Hocket denied all the charges laid against her. She was executed as a witch in 1645. (30-33)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 30-33

Marian Hockett Marian Hockett Witch
294

A widow from St. Osyth in the county of Essex and formerly as servant to a John Bishop, of Much-Clacton in the County of Essex. Rebecca Jones confesses that sometime circa 1620, she had a handsome young man, a person she later came to believe was the devil, had come to her door, prick her wrist and carried a drop of blood away on his finger tip. Around three months later, as she traveled to St. Osyth to sell Bishop's butter, she met a man with great eyes who wore a ragged suit who "gave her three things like to Moules having foure feete apiece, but without tayles, and of a blacke colour," named Margaret, Amie, and Susan. The ragged man instructed her to nurse the said three things, untill he did desire them againe," to feed them milk, and to use them for acts of vengeance, and murder, including killing a pig, tormenting Mistris Darcy's child (of St Osyth) and killing Thomas Bumstead of St. Osyth (the crime she was hanged for) and well as his wife, Katherine (a crime she was found guilty of). Rebecca Jones indicted for having "committed for two murders vy incanton," and hanged as a witch in 1645 at Chelmsford. (36-38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 36-38

Rebecca Jones Rebecca Jones Witch
295

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex and the wife of William Boanes. Joyce Bones became a witch some thirteen years before her examination (circa 1632); her malefic compact was done to her two imps "came into the bed to her in the likenesse of Mouses," and "sucked on [her] body." From this point on, she began to attack her neighbors with these familiars, one of whom was named Jockey and one who was names Rug. Rug would be used to kill ten or twelve of Richard Welch's lambs, and later to kill a Calf, a Sheep and a Lamb which belonged to Thomas Clynch. She would also send Rug, along with the familiars of Margaret Landish, Susan Cock, and Rose Hallybreak, by making him bark like a dog, and eventually endeavoring to kill him. She would allegedly send one of her imps, a dun-colored mouse, along with Rebecca Jones's imp Margaret, to kill Thomas Bumstead. She is indicted on charges of feeding and entertaining Jockey and Rug. Bones is hanged as a witch in 1645.(35=37)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 35=37

Joyce Boanes Joyce Boanes Witch
296

A woman from Ramsey in the county of Essex who is accused of being a witch and is found to have three witch's marks, or Bigges. Harvey claims she was made a witch by Marion Hocket, who in around 1638-1639 had given her three reddish familiars, two small like mice, and one slightly larger, promising her that "if shee would receive them, shee should never want so long as she lived." Since receiving, her and Hocket had a falling out, and Harvey claimed to have wanted to send these familiars, Littleman, Pretttyman, and Daynty, back to their mistress, but was unable to. They tormented her, causing her to pained, and "much torn and troubled in her privy parts," as if these malicious imps "had pulled her in pieces." Harvey is indicted, tried, and found guilty on charges of having entertained, employed, and fed, "three evil spirits in the form 'of a red mousse.'" She is found guilty on these charges; however, Harvey is "reprieved after judgement and to remain to gaol until the next Gaol Delivery." (29-31, 32-33)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 29-31, 32-33

Elizabeth Harvey Elizabeth Harvey Witch
299

A widow from Suffolk who believed the Devil was in her. She also received a toad which would suck on her thigh.()

Appears in:
Unknown, . British Museum Add. MS. 27402 f. 109b. Unknown: 1645,

Margaret Mixter Margaret Mixter Witch
325

A woman from Ledston executed for witchcraft is 1603.(98)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 98

Mary Pannell Mary Pannell Witch
329

An old woman from Warboys in the county of Huntington, known to about 80 at the time of her death and the wife of John Samuel, mother of Agnes Samuel and a neighbour of Robert Throckmorton. Mother Alice Samuel was first accused of witchcraft when visiting the Throckmorton family while one of their daughters was sick; the child said "Grandmother looke where the old witch sitteth (pointing to the said mother Samuell) did you euer see...one more like a witch than she is." The child continued to be sick, as did the other four Throckmorton daughters within a few months. All five developed fits, claimed to be afflicted by Mother Samuel, and to see an apparition of her during their fits. Mother Samuel would frequently be invited to the Throckmorton home to visit the children; this was used in an attempt to persuade her to come so the children could scratch her. She refused and had to be forced to come, along with Agnes Samuel and Cicely Burder; Mother Samuel allegedly cautioned Agnes to confess nothing at that time. Three of the children fell into tormenting fits as soon as Mother Samuel entered the home, and one, who was bedridden, successfully scratched her. Elizabeth Throckmorton claimed to see an apparition of Mother Samuel with a black child on her shoulders. Lady Cromwell charged Mother Samuel with bewitching Elizabeth shortly thereafter; Mother Samuel denied it and Lady Cromwell took a lock of Mother Samuel's hair and her hairlace. She gave both to Mistress Throckmorton to burn; that night Lady Cromwell had a nightmare of Mother Samuel and a cat, after which she fell sick and died. Henry Pickering, uncle to the Throckmorton children, began to follow Mother Samuel and observe her errands. Henry spoke to her after one day of this, and she told him that the Throckmorton family abused her, that the children were faking their fits and that she would not permit her children to carry on like that without some punishment; she ended the conversation with the claim that her husband would beat her for tarrying. The eldest Throckmorton daughter, Joan, claimed to have a vision of her uncle observing Mother Samuel and described Mother Samuel's errands. Soon after, the girls all began to claim to see spirits that accused Mother Samuel. Not long after, Mother Samuel was midwife to an aunt of the Throckmorton children and the girls increased their accusations. Robert Throckmorton, noting that the girls had less fits when Mother Samuel was present, asked John Samuel for permission to hire Mother Samuel; John agreed but Mother Samuel did not and he beat her for it. She eventually agreed, and the children began to allege that the spirits that came to them were hers. While in the Throckmorton household, Mother Samuel was seen to have red marks like flea bites on her chin, which would bleed; she confessed that they were where her spirits sucked from her. She later alleged that a spirit had gotten into her belly, causing her pain and swelling. Robert Throckmorton joined his daughters in accusing her and bid her to confess. She was eventually imprisoned, and charged with bewitching Lady Cromwell to death along with her husband and daughter. In her confession, she claimed to have six familiars in the shape of chickens, three of which were named Pluck, Catch and White. She also accused John Samuel of both witching and unwitching, but refused to say anything against their daughter. While imprisoned, Throckmorton accused Mother Samuel of bewitching his livestock. She was also accused of bewitching a gaoler's servant to death, and causing her gaoler's son to become sick. Following her execution, she was stripped and searched. This search found her to have half-inch teat "adioyning to so secrete a place, which was not decent to be seene."(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3

Alice Samuel Alice Samuel Witch
347

A woman allegedly from Spruce Island, near Wapping in Greater London, who is approached by the Anne Hook to testify during trial that she gave Anne Levingston seeds and powder with which to murder Lady Anne Powel; she is allegedly able to turn into a cat and is hung for witchcraft. One alternate account alleges that she conspired with an unnamed Gentlewoman to give a potion or posset to Lady Powel; another alleges that she can turn into a black cat and has a squirrel familiar. She is also found guilty of "washing" Christopher Wilson "by witchcrafte." She denied any part in Lady Powel's death; a search of her home for images of clay, hair and nails found nothing. When examined by a jury of women, she was found to have "a Teat of flesh in her secret parts more then other women usually had." She is found innocent in the death of Lady Powel but guilty of bewitching Wilson, for which she is sentenced to be hanged; she pleaded to be pregnant, but the jury found that she was not. Peterson is also known to have taken in Margaret Austin into her home out of charity, until Austin was ejected for stealing goods from her home. Joan Peterson "was condemned for practising witch-craft, and sentenced to be hanged at Tyburn, on Munday the 11th. of April, 1652."(Title Page, 4-6, 7, 8-9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, Title Page, 4-6, 7, 8-9

Joan Peterson Joan Peterson Witch
353

A woman accused by Katherne Malpas of bewitching her()

Appears in:
Anonymous. Examinat[i]o . . . Attorn[atus] gen[er]alis quer[ens] v[e]r[su]s Tho[mas] Saunders et Kathere[n] Malpas senior def[endan]tes. The National Archives (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), Star Chamber (STAC) 8 32/13, fol. 1v.: 1622,

- White Goodwife White Witch
354

A woman accused by Katherne Malpas of bewitching her()

Appears in:
Anonymous. Examinat[i]o . . . Attorn[atus] gen[er]alis quer[ens] v[e]r[su]s Tho[mas] Saunders et Kathere[n] Malpas senior def[endan]tes. The National Archives (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), Star Chamber (STAC) 8 32/13, fol. 1v.: 1622,

Elizabeth Heldyn Elizabeth Heldyn Witch
357

A woman accused of bewitching the girl, Mary Glover. Mary Glover visits Elizabeth Jackson one day on an errand for her mother. The "old woman" Elizabeth Jackson holds a grudge against Mary Glover, "for discovering to one of her Mistresses a certaine fashion of her subtile and importunat begging." Elizabeth Jackson traps the young girl in the house, and utters a threat against her, "It had byn better that you had never medled with my daughters apparrell." These continue for an hour, as Elizabeth Jackson wishes "an evill death to light upon her." Elizabeth Jackson is heard to utter many threats against Mary Glover, by many witnesses, including her neighbour Elizabeth Burges, and the Sheriff Glover, Mary Glover's uncle. Almost immediately after Eventually, rumour of these threats reaches Gawthren Glover, the mother of Mary Glover, who seeks out Elizabeth Jackson and confront her on these accounts. This enrages Elizabeth Jackson, who denies having given threats, but threatens Gawthren Glover there and then, saying, "You have not crosses ynow, but I hope you shall have as many crosses, as ever fell upon woman and Children." Mary Glover's fits persist for over three months, during which time several events unfold. The first of these is when Elizabeth Jackson visits Mary Glover's house, allegedly searching for Gawthren Glover. Mary Glover informs the old woman that her mother is away, and immediately finds when returning to her food that she cannot eat for her throat is so swollen. At another time, Elizabeth Jackson sends an orange to Mary Glover, who interprets this as a gesture of good will. Mary Glover keeps the orange with her for the length of the day, smelling it often. However, at the end of the day, the "same hand, arme and whole side," which Mary Glover held the orange with were "deprived of feeling and moving in all her long fitts, and not before." Elizabeth Jackson also happens upon Mary Glover, once in the city, and once in Church, both times causing the young girl to fall into a fit, and required to be taken to her father's house. Eventually, word spreads of Mary Glover's illness, and how she falls into fits in the presence of Elizabeth Jackson. This causes for "shows" to arise, where numerous witnesses gather and bring Elizabeth Jackson into the same room as Mary Glover, making the young girl fall into a fit, where a voice often came out of her nostrils saying "hang her, hang her." As well, when Elizabeth Jackson touches Mary Glover, the girl is "cast" towards her. Such episodes are performed in front of Sir John Harte, Alderman Glover, and Lady Brunckard. During one of these episodes, Elizabeth Jackson expresses amazement at the condition of Mary Glover, and all present believe she is lying. Directed by Bishop Bancroft, who was sympathetic to Elizabeth Jackson's case, on November 13, 1602, the old woman petitions the College of Physicians, naming Dr. Bradwell, Dr. Mounford, and Dr. Herring as her accusers. These men are examined by fellows of the College as a consequence, and Elizabeth Jackson gains many supports amongst them. When the Recorder of London, Sir John Crook, is ordered to validate Mary Glover's fits, he does so in the presence of Elizabeth Jackson. Elizabeth Jackson dresses up as an anonymous woman, and yet, when she presents herself to Mary Glover, Mary Glover still falls into a fit. The Recorder of London, Sir John Crook, attempts to burn Elizabeth Jackson, who cries out when Mary Glover did not. She further subjected to testing, when the Recorder of London bids her repeat the Lord's Prayer, and she is unable to say the line, "Deliver us from evil." Elizabeth Jackson is then thrown into Newgate Prison until her trial can be held, with Sir John Crook convinced she is responsible for the bewitching of Mary Glover. At the trial, Elizabeth Jackson is placed in the prisoner's bench, and simply by being in the same room as her, Mary Glover falls into another fit. Many testimonies are heard against Elizabeth Jackson, including those of two doctors, Dr. Herring and Dr. Spencer, who claim that Mary Glover is bewitched. Other witnesses that spoke against Elizabeth Jackson include the young preacher, Mr. Lewis Hughes, who claims that when he went to admonish Elizabeth Jackson for her hateful words, she sent him such a menacing glance, that he was unable to speak for a full two hours after his visit. Elizabeth Burges also testifies against Elizabeth Jackson, once her neighbour. Allegedly, Elizabeth Burges falls ill when recounting how Elizabeth Jackson caused her to be unable to eat meat when she sided with Mary Glover in an argument. Further, the results of Elizabeth Jackson's cursings, including against one of Lady Bond's men whose leg was broken when Elizabeth Jackson wished it would be; as well as the fact that marks "not likely caused by dissease" were found on her body seemed to suggest Elizabeth Jackson was a witch. However, Elizabeth Jackson is supported by many important figures as well, including the Bishop Bancroft, who claims that Mary Glover counterfeit her symptoms. Two doctors from the College of Physicians also testify in support of Elizabeth Jackson, including Dr. Edward Jorden and Dr. John Argent. They are supported also by the noted divine, James Meadowes. However, Lord Chief Justice Anderson is strongly against Jackson, and counsels the jury to judge Elizabeth Jackson a witch. The jury do so, and Elizabeth Jackson is sentenced to a year's imprisonment, "during which she was several times to stand in the pillory and endure the abuse of the crowd." This was the maximum penalty for witchcraft at the time. It is likely Elizabeth Jackson was quickly released from prison due to her powerful supporters, and she "probably received a royal pardon; she certainly escaped punishment." (Fol. 3r - Fol. 8r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 3r - Fol. 8r

Elizabeth Jackson Elizabeth Jackson Witch
391

A woman from York in the county of Yorkshire. She and Anonymous 43 stood accused of bewitching two young girls, Anonymous 9 and Anonymous 10, so that they vomited wool, crooked pins and the hafts of knives. The Jury was satisfied with the evidence against them, but the Judges were not wholly convinced and "thought it requisite to give some respite of time for a more deliberate determination" to decide whether the girls' affliction was diabolical in origin or a deceit orchestrated by the Anonymous 9 and 10.(3-4)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 3-4

Anonymous 44 Witch
392

A woman from York in the county of Yorkshire. She and Anonymous 44 stood accused of bewitching two young girls, Anonymous 9 and Anonymous 10, so that they vomited wool, crooked pins and the hafts of knives. The Jury was satisfied with the evidence against them, but the Judges were not wholly convinced and "thought it requisite to give some respite of time for a more deliberate determination" to decide whether the girls' affliction was diabolical in origin or a deceit orchestrated by the Anonymous 9 and 10.(3-4)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 3-4

Anonymous 43 Witch
395

A woman from Luyck in Brussels, known to be a beggar. She is said to have begged at the home of Anonymous 11 for bread and beer, and to have given the girl a sorrel leaf. Shortly after Anonymous 11 ate the leaf, she began to suffer suffer convulsive fits and "did fall down as dead." After a priest prayed over the child, she began to contort violently and vomit horse dung, pins, hair, feathers, knots of thread, nails, pieces of broken glass, eggshells and more. Anonymous 11's family noticed that when Anonymous 12 came near or looked toward their home, Anonymous 11 became all the more tormented. Anonymous 12 was apprehended for bewitchment and hanged for it when she confessed. Anonymous 12 claimed at her hanging that two other witches were also practicing their art on the child.(5-7)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-7

Anonymous 12 Witch
404

A woman from Gisborn in the County of York, known to be the wife of William Preston. Jennet Preston was tried and executed for the murder of Master Thomas Lister at the York Assizes. The trial occurred after Preston was accused of attending Elizabeth Device's Good Friday feast at Malking Tower for the purpose of recruiting help to murder Lister, who had tried to have her put away at the last York Assizes on charges of killing a child. According to James Device, she had a familiar in the shape of a white foal with a black spot on its forehead. Device also claimed that she had agreed to host the next Good Friday meeting. Lister is said to have cried out that she stood over him during his sickness, and to have cried that she was lying atop him on his death bed. Lister's body allegedly bled anew in her presence. Jennet Device identified her as missing from the witches imprisoned for their participation in the Good Friday feast, and her husband William, attending the trial as an observer, recognized her description and left, allegedly convinced of her guilt. Yet, she and her family insisted on her innocence to the end, and that she was the victim of malicious prosecution.(C2v-C3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2v-C3v

Jennet Preston Jennet Preston Witch
441

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, the wife of John Glascocke and the sister of Edward Wood. Accusations against Glascocke appear to come from a few sources; one of her former tenants or roommates, according to Michael the shoemaker, reported that Glascocke was "a naughtie woman, and a dealer in witchcrafte," and another person named Sparrow also living with Glascocke complained of "a straunge noise or rumbling since Christmas." However, most of the accusations against her come courtesy of Ursley Kempe. Kempe notes that the same shoemaker said Glascocke "had bewitched his Chylde, whereof it dyed," an accusation confirmed by Kempe's familiar Tyffin. Tyffin also evidently claimed that Glascock had killed Charity Page, described as "the Base childe that Page and his wife haue in keeping." And Kempe herself accused Glacocke of bewitching Fortune's child. Glascocke represents herself as a victim of paranormal events and witchcraft, as opposed to a perpetrator of them. She suggests that when she was twenty years old, that she had been "haunted by" (bewitched or forspoken by) Mrs. Arnold, who "was accompted a witch' and who she suspected of causing "certain ledde~ weights and great stones were cast into the house, and diuers straunge noyses of rumblinges hearde" as a way to scare Glascocke's husband away. Glascocke suggests that she was also "consumed by the space of two or three yeares," by "straung aches in her bones, and otherwise." She saught the help of man named Herring (named to bee a Cawker [or a person who water proofs a ship]) who gave her a poultice, in the form of a "lynnen bagge of the breadth of a groate, full of small thinges like seedes, and willed her to put the same where her payne was most, the which shee proued by sewing it vppon her garmente, neare the place where her greefe was." She is searched by Annis Letherdall and Margaret Sympson did "affyrme vppon their credites, that vpon the left side of the thighe of this Examinate, there be some spots, and vpon the left shoulder likewise one or two Which spottes bee like the sucked spots, that Ursley Kempe hath vppon her bodie." Glascocke is actually charged with bewitching Charity Page, Abraham Hedg, and Martha Stevens. She is condemned but remanded. She is found guilty and remanded to prison. As of August 2, 1582, she is still imprisoned, along with Ales Newman, Ellen Southern, and Cecily Sellis at Colchester Goal. (Cv-C3)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, Cv-C3

Annis Glascocke Annis Glascocke Witch
442

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex and the mother of Ales Hunt and Margary Sammon, Mother Barnes is alternately described as "a notorious Witch" and as "no witch" by Joan Pechey. She allegedly gave her daughter, Margery Sammon two familiar spirits, in the shape of toads, instructing her to feed and care for them, or to give them to Mother Pechey if she would not. Mother Barnes is accused of conspiring with her daughter Ales Hunt to bewitch Rebbecca Durrant, after her father Henry refused to give them some pork. Rebbecca Durrant died November 24th. Although her Hunt was indicted for the malefic murder of Rebbecca Durrant (and found not guilty) Mother Barnes never made it to court. She died on February 12, 1582. (C4-C4v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C4-C4v

Mother Barnes Witch
447

A woman from Chelmsford in the county of Essex, known to be a widow, who Elizabeth Francis alleges to be a witch during her examination. Osborne approached Francis for assistance treating her lame leg, which bore a mark on the outside that Francis identified as a familiar's nipple.(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 6

Osborne Mother Osborne Witch
456

A woman from Much Holland (now Great Holland) in the county of Essex who confesses to having been a witch for some twenty two years. Sometime around 1623, her mother allegedly gave her four imps, James, Prickeare, Robyn, which are mice shaped and Sparrow which was named for its form. These familiar spirits allegedly instructed Cate to "deny God and Christ, which this Examinant did then assent unto," and after which she used them freely to maim and murder. Cate allegedly used these familiars to kill Robert Freeman, John Rawlins's daughter, John Tillet, George Parby's wife, and to kill Samuel Ray's wife and child. These murders avenge the apparent lack of Christian charity in Much Holland. Parby denyed to give this Examinant a pint of Milk. Moreover, they spoke to the critical importance of money to those who have so little. The Rays, mother and child, were killed over Mrs. Ray's refusal to pay back two shillings. Anne Cate was hanged as a witch in Chelmsford in 1645. (34-35)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 34-35

Anne Cate Anne Cate (Maidenhead) Witch
468

An old woman from Beckenton in Somersetshire, known to be about 80 years old and to live in the Alms-House. She was allegedly taunted by William Spicer, who "would call her Witch, and tell her of her Buns;" enraged, she appealed to a Justice of the Peace. Spicer was "so frightened, that he humbled himself to her, and promised never to call her so again." A few days later, Spicer began to have strange fits lasting two weeks in which he vomited crooked pins and claimed to see Anonymous 8 laughing at him and striking with her fist. Anonymous 8 also fell afoul of Mary Hill, who demanded Anonymous 8's ring and threatened her for it. Hill later refused to escort Anonymous 8 to Froom to look for work, and to give her an apple; the girl began to have fits days later in which she, too, vomited up strange objects. The townsfolk, moved to pity by Hill's condition, apprehended Anonymous 8 and brought her to Hill's home; Hill, despite not knowing that Anonymous 8 was present, was observed to fall into a violent fit. On this evidence, a Justice of the Peace ordered Anonymous 8 searched by a jury of women. The jury of women found several purple spots on her body that felt no pain when pricked by a needle. Anonymous 8 was also found in the search to have "other Marks and Tokens of a Witch." She was sent to the count gaol to await the next assizes. Later, Anonymous 8 was taken to the river and thrown in with her legs tied; she was allegedly seen to "lie upon her Back, and did Swim like a piece of Cork." She was swum three times, each with the same result. One account claims Hill identified Anonymous 8 as Elizabeth Carrier, while another claims it was actually two women, Margery Coombes and Ann More.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Great News from the West of England being a True Account of Two Young Persons Lately Bewitched in the Town of Beckenton in Somerset-shire. London: 1689, 1

Anonymous 8 Witch
469

A woman from Little Clacton, the wife of Henry Sellis, and the mother of Henry Sellis Jr., John Sellis, and at least one daughter. Sellis is accused of conspiring with Ales Newman (to commit arson against Richard ) and Mary Barker (to bewitch Mary Death) and a number of other crimes by her neighbors and by her own sons. Her sons, John and Henry both alleged that she had familiars which she pampered, feeding them with milk and tucking them into sleep on a bed of wool, nestled into the roots of a crab apple tree. They also suggest that she allowed or did not prevent at least one of these familiars from attacking her own son John; he was plagued, they attested, by the black male familiar named Hercules, and had an imperfect toe as proof of the assault. Relations became strained inside her family as a result, but they also became strained outside of her family and between her family and her neighbor Richard Rosse's family. Following the death of two of his plow horses, which died while her husband worked them, Rosse began to suspect the Sellis family of witchcraft. This suspicion was supported by two verbal altercations. One where Sellis used "hard words" against Richard, when their negotiation over the cost of malt when sour, and one where, in a "great anger," Cecily have his wife "lewd speeches," after Mrs. Rosse beat Sellis' cattle out of her pasture. Although Rosse could not confirm the Sellis' involvement in the burning of his barn, he did heat the "youngest sonne of the saide Henrie and Cisley, should say heere is a goodly deale of corne, and a man vnknowen shoulde answere there was the diuell store." Cecily and Henry Sellis are tried and found guilty of this arson. Ales Manfield, however, did confirm that Cecily Sellis was involved in that arson. She suggested that her own imps implored that they should be allowed to "goe vnto little Clapton to Celles, saying, they woulde burne Barnes, and also kill Cattell." They were allegedly "fedde at Cels house by her al ye time they were away," and fed with Manfield's beer and blood when they returned. It was property damage for which Sellis was in the most trouble, however. Sellis was implicated in the causing the Joan and Robert Smith's child to die, John Death to die, and Mary Death to sicken. The death of the Smith child is the most tenuous accusation, Joan herself seems to be relating the narrative reluctantly, suggesting that she would not accuse the Sellis' over overs-peaking her child, but would pray God forgive them if they had. In the case of the Death family, Cecily Sellis plays a staring role. The death of four year old John Death (circe 1580) is recorded as happening following and disagreement between Mrs. Death and Cecily Sellis over who would act as wet nurse to George Battell's infant. His death is recorded as one aspect in a series of tragedies: John was well and then he was dead. However, the narrative weight given to the swine which had been well before the leap and skipped to death, and the weight given to the fat calf who had been well and then was dead, suggests that John's death was one of a series of debilitating attacks against the Death family; its importance is illustrated legally, as opposed to textually; it is for this death that Cecily is found guilty and remanded. The narrative which follows Mary Death's illness, however is both long and complicated; it helps that she is old enough to tell some of the tale herself and that it drags on long enough to create some narrative tension. Mary becomes, for all intents and purposes, a hysterical demoniac; suffering in an incurable "most pitious" condition. Only after Thomas Death visits a cunning man who presumably forces Cecily Sellis and Mary Barker to appear before her (as corporeal beings, or as apparitions) is she cured. For her own part, Sellis denies all charges against her, including the allegation that she accused Mother Tredsall of making her a witch. She is searched as one, however, and "vpon her body many spots very suspitious [were seen], and the said Margaret [Simpson] saith, that they bee much like the sucked spots, that shee hath seene vpon the body of Ursley Kempe and seuerall other[s]." She is found guilty of her crimes and remanded. She is found guilty and remanded to prison. As of August 2, 1582, she is still imprisoned, along with Ales Newman, Ellen Southern, and Agnes / Annis Glascock, at Colchester Goal.(C8-D)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C8-D

Cecily Sellis Cecily Sellis Witch
471

A woman from Thorpe (aka Thorpe-le-Soken) in the county of Essex and daughter of accused witch, Elizabeth Eustace, described as having "lewde dealynges, and behauiour." Margaret Eustace was Robert Sannuet's servant (circa 1567) and after "vsed some threatning speeches vnto her," he found his "mouth was drawne awrye, well neere vppe to the vpper parte of his cheek," an afflication he blamed on her mother. Margaret Eustace is also accused of bewitching Robert Sanneuet's brother, a man named Crosse, was "taken verye sickly, and at tymes was without any remembrance." For this alleged crime, Sanneuet "wished a spyt red hotte [be put in] her buttocks. Margaret Eustace does not appear to have been examined by Brian Darcey in February of 1582 with the other alleged witches. (Image 27)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, Image 27

Margaret Ewstace Margaret Eustace Witch
475

A man from Little Clacton in the county of Essex, husband of Cecily and father Henry Sellis Jr., John Sellis, and at least one daughter. There appears to be some conflict between Henry Sellis and Richard Rosse, one of his hired laborers, which leads to a wide spread conflict between the families, and eventually to his wife, Cecily Sellis being accused of witchcraft. Two of Rosse's horses died as Sellis plowed his field for him, making Rosse suspect that Henry or his wife, had bewitched them. Richard Rosse and Cecily had fought in the past over the price of malt, and Mrs. Rosse and Cecily had fought over Mrs. Rosse's treatment of her cattle, but after "many of [Rosse's] beaste were in a most straung taking" and after their son, admired the volume of corn in his barn before it burnt, Rosse came to the conclusion that these events were "wrought by some witchcraft, or sorcery by ye said He~ry or Cisly his wife." Rosse ensure that Henry and his wife were tried (and found guilty) for this arson. Rosse was not the only one who implicated Henry Sellis in witchcraft. His son John, who is allegedly injured by one of Cecily's familiars, claims his father not only knew about the existence of these imps, but did little, beyond yelling at his wife, to save his children. Moreover, he allegedly mocked John, but referring to the little black household demon as "John," because his name was [also] so." For his own part, Henry denies the charges brought against him, nor can he, he claims, really remember the incidents Rosse refers to. (C8-D)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C8-D

Henry Sellis Henry Sellis Sr. Witch
478

A woman from Hatfield Peveral in the county of Essex, known to be the grandmother of Elizabeth Francis and Agnes Waterhouse, and great-grandmother to Joan Waterhouse. According to Elizabeth Francis, Grandmother Eve was the first witch in the family, and taught her granddaughter to be a witch at the age of twelve. Grandmother Eve bid her to renounce God and "to geue of her bloudde to Sathan," which was the white spotted cat that became Francis' familiar. Francis claims that Grandmother Eve taught her to feed Sathan with bread and milk and to keep it in a basket. Eve is an important figure in English witchcraft history as not only as a witch matriarch, but also for the way the story establishes through her the importance of the renunciation of God, and the care and employ of a familiar spirit, to the creation of a witch.(3-4)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 3-4

Eve Eve of Hatfield Peveral Witch
480

A man from Renfrew in the county of Renfrewshire, who allegedly causes a girl to have fits by his touch.(2)

Appears in:
P., T.. A Relation of the Diabolical Practices of above Twenty Wizards and Witches of the Sheriffdom of Renfrew in the Kingdom of Scotland. London: 1697, 2

James Lindsay James Lindsay Witch
481

An eighty year old widow from Much-Holland in the county of Essex and a self confessed witch of twenty years. She may be the mother of Anne Cooper and grandmother of Sara Cooper. Joan Cooper allegedly kept three familiars: two mouse shaped familiars named Jack, and Prickeare, and a frog-shaped familiar aptly named Frog. Cooper confessed to the murder of Thomas Woodward's child, two of John Cartwright's children, and George Parby's wife. Joan Cooper "died about 10 a.m. on 7 May [1645] by divine visitation" while awaiting her trial.(38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38

Joan Cooper Joan Cooper Witch
484

A woman from Bideford in the county of Devon, who confesses to being in league with the devil for twenty years and practicing magic on humans and animals.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial, Condemnation, and Execution of Three Witches. London: 1682, 2

Temperance Floyd Temperance Floyd Witch
492

A woman who teaches Joan Cunny the art of witchcraft and how to pray to the Devil by kneeling and making a circle on the ground.()

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589,

Mother Humfrey Mother Humfrey Witch
510

A woman from Maldon in the county of Essex, known to be the mother of Ellen Smith and wife to John Chaundeler, Alice Chaundleler executed for murder by witchcraft in 1574. After her death, Smith and John Chaundler had a falling out over money Alice had given her daughter that resulted in John Chaundler's death.(7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 7

Alice Chaundler Alice Chaundeler Witch
515

A woman presumably from Little Clacton who appears to have be named as a witch during the March 1582 Assize at Chelmsford as the woman who initiated Cecily Sellis into witchcraft. Sellis confirmed that she knew Mother Tredsall, but denied ever claiming that Tresdall was a witch or that she had made her one. This short reference is the only reference to Mother Tresdall in the pamphlet; she does not appear in the records of the Assize.(D3v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, D3v

Mother Tredsall Witch
534

A woman who was accused by Mildred Norrington, during her possession, of being a witch, and sending her familiars to kill and steal. The voice of her accuser was that of her Partner, which spoke through Norrington(72)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 72

Old Alice Witch
566

A woman from Stisted in the county of Essex, daughter of Joan Cunny, and sister to Avice Cunny, Margaret Cunny is described as a "lewde Daughter," who was "no better then a naughty pack" and mother to a ten or twelve year old bastard son (who turns, as does his cousin, witness against his mother, aunt, and grandmother. who has a falling out with Father Hurrill and curses him. Joan Cunny claims that she may have sent her familiars to her daughter to facilitate this bewitchment. Margaret Cunny is found "guilty of witchcraft and to be remanded in prison for a year and pilloried."(A3, A3V-A4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A3, A3V-A4

Margaret Cunny Margaret Cunny Witch
584

A man from Waltham in the county of Leicestershire, known to be a shepherd, who Joan WIllimott claimed could cause harm by looking at it with the intent to hurt. He is said to have a spirit in the shape of a white mouse, which was put into him as a result of his habit of swearing, and to have a mark on his left arm that had been cut away.(E4v-F)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E4v-F

Gamaliel Greete Gamaliel Greete Witch
591

A woman from Barking in the county of Essex who allegedly gives Joan Upney a familiar that resembles mole and "tolde her if she ought any body any ill will, if she did bid it, it would goe clap them." This could be Mother Arnold, whose story is recorded in _The Examination and Confession of a Notorious Witch named Mother Arnold, alias Whitecote, alias Glastonbury, at the Assise of Burntwood [Brentwood] in July 1574._(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, 4

Arnold Mother Arnold (alias White-coate) Witch
592

A woman from Henningham Sibble (aka Sible Hedingham) and the wife of a laborer named Michael Whale. Joan Prentice accuses Elizabeth Whale of being "as well acquainted with her Bidd as her selfe is," suggesting that Whale is a practicing witch, although Prentice provides no mention of crimes Whale is meant to have done. Whale is brought to court and presumably examined. She "appeared upon [her] bail and discharged, because no wrong was found against [her]."(B, B2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, B, B2v

Elizabeth Whale Elizabeth Whale Witch
593

A woman, and the wife of John Mott, who is well acquainted with Joan Prentice's familiar Bidd; it is unknown if she uses Bidd to harm any of her own neighbours.(8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, 8

Elizabeth Mott Elizabeth Mott Witch
612

A woman from Brenchly in Kent, and the wife of John Simons, who is accused by John Ferrall of bewitching his son (Anonymous 74) after the boy attacks Simons' dog with a knife.(3-4)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 3-4

Margaret Simons Margaret Simons Witch
615

A cunning woman and witch, from Rochester in the county of Kent, she is known as 'the great witch of Rochester,' but described by Reginald Scot as a "cousening queane." Bungy is renown for her ability to foretell and prophesy.(80, 116, 125, 126, 324, 341-342)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 80, 116, 125, 126, 324, 341-342

Bungy Mother Bungy Witch
617

A woman from Ware in the county of Hertfordshire, who is the wife of a cunning man (Anonymous 487) and neighbour to Jane Stretton. Anonymous 322 is angry on her husband's behalf, when he gets into an argument with Thomas Stretton. Within a month of this argument, Anonymous 322 comes to visit Jane Stretton, Thomas Stretton's daughter, sharing for a pot of drink. Almost immediately after, the girl is taken by a violent fit. Later, Anonymous 322 visits Jane Stretton, asking for a pin. After Jane Stretton gives a pin to the woman, Jane Stretton is again taken with a violent fit, this time her body swelling painfully. When it is discovered that Thomas Stretton had an argument with Anonymous 487, he and his wife are taken before Jane Stretton, who has been suffering from fits thought to be caused by witchcraft for some nine months. Upon being brought to see Jane Stretton, Anonymous 322 proclaims that "she could not have stayed any longer from her."(3 - 4)

Appears in:
Y., M.. The Hartford-shire Wonder. London: 1669, 3 - 4

Anonymous 322 Witch
618

An archer, of the town Malling in Kent, who is accused of playing with a fly devil or familiar that enhances his skill in archery. The archer won two or three shillings as a result of his advanced abilities, and was then severely punished by authority figures to appease the other angered archers and to overthrow witchcraft.(52)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 52

Anonymous 75 Witch
634

A renown magician who worked with a trained dog. Among his many other (sleight of hand) practices, he allegedly pretended he could speak with the dead and conjure familiars (for sale) (97)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 97

Thomas Hllles Thomas Hilles (aka Feats) Witch
661

A woman from Catworth in County of Huntingdon, who allegedly gave Frances Moore a familiar spirit named Pretty and instructed her to keep it her whole life. Simon told Moore that if Moore cursed cattle and set Pretty on them, they would die.(5)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 5

Margaret Simon Margaret Simon Witch
671

A woman from Keyston in the County of Huntingdon, known to be the wife of blacksmith William Darnell and the mother of Katherine Darnell, who alleged that Elizabeth Chandler had bewitched Katherine to death after their children had a falling out. Darnell claims that Katherine told her Chandler had boxed her ear, which troubled her until her death three weeks later. Furthermore, Katherine was said to have shrieked often that Chandler had come to her and would kill her. Darnell also alleged that, a year later, she had pulled a pot of furmity off the fire only to have it continue boiling for an hour and run over the side no matter what she did, and that Lewis Carmell had told her that Chandler confessed to causing her familiar Beelzebub to spoil it. Chandler alleged that she had no part in Katherine's death or the furmity, and that, on the contrary, Darnell had bewitched Chandler by turning her into a duck for a time and causing a roaring spirit to come to her in the night.(8)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 8

Mary Darnell Mary Darnell Witch
675

A woman from Milton in the county of Bedford, known to be a widow and a hog-herder; she is the mother of Mary Sutton and grandmother of Henry Sutton. Mother Sutton, after twenty years of enjoying his patronage, fought with Master Enger and took revenge on his horses, causing them to die in their stables, and then his swine, causing them to fall mad, cannibalize one another, and drown themselves. A servant of Master Enger's (Anonymous 89) repeated stories he had heard of Mother Suttons' misdeeds and was stroked by a beetle (Anonymous 155), causing him to fall into a trance. She and Mary set their familiars Dicke and Jude on Master Enger's son and had him tormented to death after he threw stones and called Mother Sutton a witch. She is said to have a teat on her inner thigh, where she would suckle familiars. Mother Sutton was apprehended following Mary's confession and imprisoned in Bedford Gaol. On the strength of confessions taken from her, Mary and the child Henry, Mother Sutton was found guilty of witchcraft and executed on March 31, 1612.(A4-A4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, A4-A4v

Mother Sutton Mother Sutton Witch
680

A man from Keyston in the county of Cambridgeshire, whom John Browne claims confessed to being a witch when they met on the road to Keyston. According to Browne, Clarke was in a hurry, and said that he and his parents had been accused of being witches. Browne said that he, too, had been accused, and that the searchers had claimed to find marks on his body. Clarke berated him for lacking the wits to cut off his marks, as he had done three days before he was searched. Browne alleged that after some further conversation, Clarke said that Browne couldn't be a witch because he had not seen him at any meetings; Brown responded that he met in different places, and they parted. Clarke denied the confession; in his account, he says that while he did overtake a man and three women on the road, he never said anything about being a witch, cutting off any marks, attending any meetings, or making any kind of compact with the Devil.(13)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 13

John Clarke John Clarke Jr. Witch
685

A boy from Gloucester in the county of Gloucestershire, described as the son of Widow Perry who, along with his mother and brother (Anonymous 93), allegedly robs and murders William Harrison. Anonymous 92 is brought to trial on these accusations, found guilty, and executed by hanging. (5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Power of Witchcraft being a Most Strange but True Relation of the Most Miraculous and Wonderful Deliverance of One Mr. William Harrison. London: 1662, 5-6

Anonymous 92 Witch
686

A boy from Gloucester in the county of Gloucestershire, described as the son of Widow Perry and servant of William Harrison who, along with his mother and brother (Anonymous 93), allegedly robs and murders William Harrison. Anonymous 93 is brought to trial on these accusations, found guilty, and executed by hanging from chains; his body is left on display after death for others to see. (5-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Power of Witchcraft being a Most Strange but True Relation of the Most Miraculous and Wonderful Deliverance of One Mr. William Harrison. London: 1662, 5-7

Anonymous 93 Witch
688

A widow from Lowestoft in the county of Essex who was accused, along with Rose Cullender, of bewitching Elizabeth and Ann Durent, Jane Bocking, Susan Chandler, William Durent, and Elizabeth and Deborah Pacey. She pleaded not guilty at her trial, but was found guilty of thirteen counts of witchcraft and sentenced to hang; her execution was carried out March 17, 1662. Numerous people gave deposition against her: Dorothy Durent alleged that Denny caused her infant son William to become sick, and that she also bewitched her daughter Elizabeth to death. Samuel Pacey, father to Elizabeth and Deborah, alleged that his daughters saw Cullender and Denny's apparitions during their fits of soreness, deafness, dumbness, blindness, or coughing pins and nails. He also claimed that the apparitions threatened the girls with torments ten times worse if they told what they had seen, and that Denny prevented the girls from saying Lord, Jesus or Christ. Pacey's sister Margaret Arnold, alleged that the Pacey girls were tormented by imps directed by Cullender and Denny. Denny was brought to Elizabeth Pacey by order of the judge, while Elizabeth's eyes were closed to see if the girl could detect the witch's presence; Elizabeth was seen to attack Denny as soon as their hands touched. Richard Spencer alleged that he heard Denny say that the Devil would not let her rest until she was revenged on Ann Sandeswell; Sandeswell alleged that Denny had killed geese of hers, caused a chimney to fall, and a firkin of fish to be lost into the sea.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 4

Amy Denny Amy Denny Witch
719

A woman called Margaret, one of three women, or "a crew of women" called Margaret or Maggi. In Shaw's representation these women are represented as a conflation of harpies, familiars, and witches. This Margaret shrieks like a woman possessed, and, as such, seems to be represented as bewitching as she is bewitched. According to Shaw, these women are poised to "carry her out of the House that they might drown her in the Well, where there were eighteen more waiting for her."(14)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 14

Margaret Margaret Witch
720

A young girl with scabs on her face who appears along with Christian Shaw's tormentors. (14)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 14

Anonymous 95 Witch
722

A woman wearing a red coat who is seen walking in the Shaws' garden.(17)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 17

Anonymous 97 Witch
723

A man who comes to Bargarren and who is immediately accused by Christian Shaw of being one of her tormentors.(21-22)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 21-22

Anonymous 98 Witch
725

An elderly woman, Elizabeth Anderson's grandmother, who is apprehended under suspicion of being a with because she cursed and was allegedly involved in mischief.(23)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 23

Jean Fulton Jean Fulton Witch
733

A woman from East-Basham in the county of Norfolk, known as Teecle's wife, who allegedly has a familiar (Toad 2) whom she uses to bewitch Jane Walter, causing her tongue to be tied up, and for her to be "full of Pins," and suffering from "many strange Fits, sometimes 20 or more in a day." Teecle's wife has long been suspected of being a witch. When it is offered to burn the toad, the familiar mysteriously vanished.(7)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 7

Teecle (Wife) Witch
751

A man from Maidstone in the county of Kent, described as the doctor of Ann Ashby. Dr. Gresham is imprisoned and not allowed to speak with anyone. (4-5)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 4-5

Gresham Dr. Gresham Witch
753

A man from Maidstone in the county of Kent, who was tied, as a witch along with his wife, to property damage, animal damage, and murder.(6)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 6

Renyolds Mr. Renyolds Witch
754

A woman from Maidstone in the county of Kent, who was tied, as a witch along with her husbamd, to property damage, animal damage, and murder.(6)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 6

Renyolds Mrs. Renyolds Witch
755

A man from Maidstone in the county of Kent, who was tied, as a witch along with his wife, to property damage, animal damage, and murder.(6)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 6

Wilson Mr. Wilson Witch
756

A woman from Maidstone in the county of Kent, who was tied, as a witch along with her husband, to property damage, animal damage, and murder.(6)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 6

Wilson Mrs. Wilson Witch
761

A woman from Salisbury in the county of Wilshire, described as a servant who visits Anne Bodenham numerous times acting a a go-between for Richard Goddard's family and Anne Bodenham. However, after Styles' purchase of arsenic (purportedly to be used as countermagic, but read as the poison to be used by Sara and Anne Goodard against their mother) is discovered, Styles is considered a criminal, an attempted murderer, who flees to London. Before she goes, she allegedly becomes Anne Bodenham's apprentice when she is seduced by the old witch into giving the Devil her soul "seald with her blood," in exchange for "wisdome and true grace" and "wealth and ease," found by using a looking glass. After having signed over her soul, Anne Styles is repentant "as she understood That she must loose the joyes of heaven." In one account, with Mistress Bodenham's understanding, Anne Styles flees to London, only to be taken at Stockbridge by the Devil and "cast to and froe," in front of a great number of witnesses. A Gentleman prays for Anne Stiles for four days, during which she is tormented by the Devil in the shape of a snake. She confesses to her contract with the Devil, and to the nature of Mistress Rodnam. When Mistress Rodnam comes to Stockbridge, Anne Stiles can finally sleep and when "she walkt againe, She praised God she felt no paine." Another account explains that all of this confession comes out when Mr. Chandler (son in law to Mris. Goddard) caught up with the Styles and who, in "a great trembling and shaking," was carried "between Sutton and Stockbridge," where she "did confesse and acknowledge all the transactions and passages between the Witch and her." The next night, at an Inn in Stockbridge, Styles had her first fit. These fits, fits which made her into a penitent victim of witchcraft, rather than an attempted murder, would continue for the three weeks Styles was in prison in Salisbury. She had "such strange fits that drew both pity and admiration from the beholders" they came "as frequent as violent," lasting thirty to sixty minutes, with only a fifteen minute respite, and while she was in them, she exhibited such strength that "six men, sometimes more could not keep her." While in her fits, she would be "miserably groaning and skrieking, being deprived of her speech and sight, and many times she grinded her teeth, and sweat in her fits continually, constantly in motion, seeking to tear her self." She could hear but not speak, and might sit "in a very senselesse idle manner" or be found "lying foaming, raving, groaning, skrieking, trembling in an unheard of manner." Styles represented herself as a ever penitent sinner who cried out "Oh very damnable, very wretched; this hand of mine writ my name in the Devils book, this finger of mine was pricked, here is yet the hole that was made, and with my blood I wrote my own Damnation, and have cut my self off from Heaven and Eternall life," who is more than willing to be saved. She participates in the normal tests demoniacs do, reacting to Bodenham, with out knowing she was there. Styles temporarily recovers from her fits, "but began to relapse into her former fits, and was tormented as formerly" the night before Bodenham's execution, as if to once more protest her innocence. After Bodenham's execution, Style's made a final assertion of her new godly self: "I am this day to go away home, I hope now to begin a holy life."(7-8, 15-16)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 7-8, 15-16

Anne Styles Anne Styles Witch
771

A woman from Bridgeford in the county of Nottinghamshire, who William Sommers identifies as being a witch. Mr. Darrell and Mr. Aldred carried her to Mr. Parkins to be examined. Joan Pie hears Sommers speak the details of Horselie's examination, though there is no way he could know it.(Image 15)

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, Image 15

Millicent Horselie Millicent Horselie Witch
776

An old woman from Yarmouth, a known begger, and an alleged witch, who did work for Henry Moulton. Bradwell is suspected of bewitching John Moulton. Bradwell allegedly kept a familiar in the shape of a black bird, and wrote her name, at the behest of a 'tall black Man' in his book.(46-47)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 46-47

Elizabeth Bradwell Elizabeth Bradwell Witch
780

An elderly woman from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, described as a vagrant who allegedly bewitched a boy by scaring him. She was accused, imprisoned, and tried in short order on the weight of a boy's brief bewitchment, although the town may have been looking for an excuse to be rid of her, seeing her as drain of the parish's charity. (51-52)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 51-52

Anonymous 107 Witch
784

A woman (Anonymous 111) from Tewkesbury in the county of Gloucestershire who is tried as a witch (circa 1649?) because she allegedly transformed into a pole-cat like creature and stole sow's milk.(51-52)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 51-52

Anonymous 111 Witch
797

A woman implicated in the fits suffered by demoniac Faith Corbet. It is unclear when and why Corbet began accusing Bilby of tormenting her-- she is first mentioned in relation to events in 1663. Alice Huson implicates Bilby during her confession.(54, 56-57, 58)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 54, 56-57, 58

Doll Bilby Doll Bilby Witch
799

A woman, described as a prodigal daughter, who becomes a witch after her husband leaves her, and their seven year old child penniless.(48-49)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 48-49

Anonymous 113 Witch
803

A woman from Knaresborough in the county of North Yorkshire, who came to live in York, arriving with the reputation for witchcraft and theft; her husband was executed as a witch.(32)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 32

Margaret Waite Margaret Waite Witch
804

A young woman, the daughter of Margaret Waite, from Knaresborough in the county of North Yorkshire, who described as 'imprudent and lewd.'(32-33)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 32-33

Margaret Waite Margaret Waite (Jr.) Witch
805

An elderly woman, around eighty years old, who was allegedly a witch in the county of York for 40 years and whose who family, including Margaret Thorpe, were allegedly witches as well.(33)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 33

Jennit Dibble Jennit Dibble Witch
806

A young woman, the daughter of Margaret Thorpe, who is called 'an obedient child and docile scholar' of witchcraft. She is recognized by a spot on her face -- a witch's mark -- which she trys to give Helen and Elizabeth Fairfax(33, 84-84)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 33, 84-84

Margaret Thorpe Margaret Thorpe Witch
807

A woman, and daughter of the infamous Grace Foster, and alleged witch.(34)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 34

Elizabeth Fletcher Elizabeth Fletcher Witch
808

A renown witch in the county of York, so powerful that all the wealthiest families would attempt to feed and please her. Mother of Elizabeth Fletcher.(34)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 34

Grace Foster Grace Foster Witch
809

A woman from the county of York, wife of William Dickenson, who was an alleged witch.(34)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 34

Elizabeth Dickenson Elizabeth Dickenson Witch
810

A woman from the county of York, called 'the strange woman' who allegedly tormented Edward Fairfax's children, but who was never identified. She could turn herself, according to Helen Fairfax, into a hare and a cat.(34)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 34

Anonymous 116 Witch
837

Marsh of Dunstable is a man who, according to John Palmer, is allegedly the head of the College of Witches coven; Marsh is sometimes thought of as a good or white witch, although this is considered to be simply the "blackest" cover of the Devil, in order for him to accomplish his evil deeds.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott. London: 1649, 2

Marsh of Dunstable Witch
838

A man from Norton, near the town of Sheffield in the county of Hertfordshire, whom the Devil allegedly takes advantage of, and thus practices witchcraft for fifty to sixty years. Plamer writes the Devil's symbol into the ground and keeps two familiars, one in the form of a dog whom he calls George, and the other in the form of a woman who is named Jezabell. It is also known that Palmer "notoriously seduced Elizabeth Knott his kinswoman, to consort with him in his viliany." Palmer also confesses to murdering Goodwife Pearls of Norton through the use of clay pictures, a form of instrumental magic that caused Goodwife Pearls to "lay in miserable torments," after which she "immediately dyed." Palmer further confessed to seeking revenge upon Mr. Cleavers by killing his horse through the use of his familiars. Palmer also confesses to Sampson Clark, the Keeper of the Prison, that he once transformed a young man (Anonymous 124) into a toad as an act of revenge; the boy had kicked Palmer in the shin, causing him great pain. The young man was bewitched for many years, "to his great woe and torment." He is executed on July 16, 1649, after having revealed that Marsh of Dunstable is a coven leader to witches in England.(3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott. London: 1649, 3-4

John Palmer John Palmer Witch
841

A woman from Norton, near the town of Sheffield in the county of Hertfordshire, who, along with John Palmer, allegedly uses instrumental magic to bewitch and murder Goodwife Pearls of Norton. Knott is known to keep a familiar, which, "when she was cast upon the water [came out and] sucked upon her breast, but after she came out of the water she never saw it anymore." Knott is also known to have "bewitcht a Cow of John Lamans by sending an evil spirit unto her, which was in the likeness of a Catt." Knott is executed on July 16, 1649. (4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott. London: 1649, 4

Elizabeth Knott Elizabeth Knott Witch
861

A man from Guilsborough in the county of Northampton, known to have ridden double on a black horse with a woman (Anonymous 126), whom Master Avery and Mistress Belcher encountered on the road home from Northampton Gaol. He and Anonymous 126 are seen to gesture strangely, causing Avery to cry out that either he and Belcher, or the horses drawing their coach, would presently miscarry. The horses immediately fell down dead.(B4-B5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B4-B5

Anonymous 125 Witch
862

A woman from Guilsborough in the county of Northampton, known to have ridden double on a black horse with a man (Anonymous 125), whom Master Avery and Mistress Belcher encountered on the road home from Northampton Gaol. She and Anonymous 125 are seen to gesture strangely, causing Avery to cry out that either he and Belcher, or the horses drawing their coach, would presently miscarry. The horses immediately fell down dead.(B4-B5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B4-B5

Anonymous 126 Witch
879

A woman identified as a witch, in person, and as an apparition, by Helen Fairfax.(75, 78)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 75, 78

Peg Waite Peg Waite Witch
880

A reputed witch who allegedly lived a few miles from Edward Faifax's home.(85)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 85

Umpleby Mrs. Umpleby Witch
881

A witch who allegedly appeared as an apparition to Helen and Elizabeth Fairfax; they allegedly witnessed her nurse her familiar spirit at her breast. (85, 86)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 85, 86

Umpleby Umpleby (Daughter) Witch
911

An old woman from Maidstone in the county of Kent, who asks Katherine Atkins for a pin. When Atkins offers her victuals and pins as well, the old woman predicts that she will disappear.(7)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 7

Anonymous 138 Witch
914

A witch who is also able to identify who bewitched the young maid Stuppeny. The young maid of Stuppeny's parents come to see Mother Baker is order to find out who bewitched their daughter. They suspect their neighbour and Mother Baker confirms this suspicion.(146)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 146

Baker Mother Baker Witch
920

A woman (potentially Margaret Russell) from Thistleworth (now the London Borough of Islington) who unexpectedly arrives at her door and begs Elizabeth Jennings for a pin. This moment is seen as the genesis of Jennings' physical and spiritual malaise, and the woman comes to be read as having bewitched Jennings.()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

Anonymous 139 Witch
921

A woman who is accused of bewitching Elizabeth Jennings.()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

Katherine Stubbs Katherine Stubbs Witch
924

A woman who lived in London. In an attempt to save Elizabeth Jennings, Margaret Russell appears to attempt to access a network of female physicians and cunning women, but would come to be accused of, examined for, and imprisoned for bewitching Jennings. She is accused blaming Jennings' possession on a conflict between the Jennings' and Higgins' houses. ()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

Margaret Russell Margaret Russell (Countess) Witch
940

A woman from Stapenhill in the county of Staffordshire, who is found to have large black teats on her body and allegedly bewitches Thomas Darling. According to John Darrell, Gooderidge set her familiar Minny on Darling, and confessed to being a witch.(4)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 4

Alice Gooderidge Alice Gooderidge Witch
944

A person possibly from Stapenhill in the county of Staffordshire, described as a stranger who visits Thomas Darling and greatly upsets him by questioning his belief in God, and by proposing that witches do not exist. Darling falls into another set of fits in the strangers presence; it is possible that the stranger is the Devil himself.(15-16)

Appears in:
D., I.. The Most Wonderfull and True Story, of a Certain Witch named Alice Gooderige of Stapen hill. London: 1597, 15-16

Anonymous 142 Witch
974

A woman from Windle in the County of Lancaster, who was tried for witchcraft at the Lancaster Assizes and pronounced guilty. Peter Chaddock gave deposition alleging that Isabel Robey was displeased with his choice of wife, and that he had "called the said Isabel Witch, and said that hee did not care for her." Two days later, he was afflicted with a pain in his bones, but mended not long after. Four years after that, his wife argued with Isabelle, and he was afflicted with a pain in his neck for five days, was intensely thirsty, and felt hot throughout his body. He claimed that he only mended when James the Glover brought him a drink and prayed for him. The pain in his bones reoccured the year before the trial, and he was convinced Robey was behind it. Jane Wilkinson claimed that Robey once asked her for milk, but she would not give any, and when she next met Robey, she was afraid of her, and became sick and so pained she could not stand. The next day, Wilkinson was pinched suddenly on her thigh while on the road to Warrington, and became so sick she had to ride home but soon mended. Margaret Lyon gave deposition alleging that Robey once told her Peter Chaddock would not mend until he asked her for forgiveness, but that he never would. Lyon also claimed that Chaddock's wife told her that Chaddock was satisfied that Robey was no witch, but also said that she thought he would not mend until he asked for forgiveness, but that he was fearful because Robey had done him much hurt. Margaret Parre alleged that Robey once told her she had bewitched both Chaddock and Wilkinson, and threatened her too.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Isabel Robey Isabel Robey Witch
975

A woman from the County of Lancaster, who was tried for witchcraft at the Lancaster Assizes and found to be not guilty.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Elizabeth Astley Elizabeth Astley Witch
976

A man from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, who was tried for witchcraft at the Lancaster Assizes and found to be not guilty.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

John Ramesden John Ramesden Witch
977

A woman from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, who was tried for witchcraft at the Lancaster Assizes and found to be not guilty.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Alice Grey Alice Grey Witch
978

A woman from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, who was tried for witchcraft at the Lancaster Assizes and found to be not guilty.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Isabell Sidegraves Isabell Sidegraves Witch
979

A man from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, who was tried for witchcraft at the Lancaster Assizes and found to be not guilty.(C4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C4

Lawrence Hayes Lawrence Hayes Witch
1002

A little boy whom Edmund Robinson Jr. witnesses transforming from the form of a brown greyhound, to a human, and then to a white horse.(347-348)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 347-348

Anonymous 148 Witch
1003

A Pendle Hill witch who chases after Edmund Robinson Jr. after he witnesses a group of witches pulling on ropes in a barn.(348)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 348

Loind's Wife Witch
1004

A boy whom Edmund Robinson Jr. has a physical altercation with. According to Robinson Jr., Anonymous 149 has a cloven foot.(348)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 348

Anonymous 149 Witch
1006

A woman from Chatton in the County of Northumberland, known to be the wife of Colonel Swinow. Dorothy Swinow was accused and gaoled for bewitching Mary Moore's children from her first marriage, Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp, and bewitching Moore's infant daughter from her second marriage, Sibilia Moore, to death. Swinow was accused initially by Margaret, who was seen to write "Jo Hu. Do. Swo. have beene the death of one deare friend, consume another, and torment mee." Mary Moore's niece claimed that Swinow had visited the children when Moore was away and had spoken harshly of Moore to them. Swinow was also accused by John Hutton, the man also implicated in Margaret's writing, when Hutton told Moore "DOROTHY SVVINOVV wife then to Colonell SVVINOVV, was the party that had done all the mischiefe to her child, and was the cause of all her further crosses." Hutton also accused her of causing the death of Lady Margery Hambleton. Margaret later accused her of causing James Fauset's fits as well. Swinow was apprehended and gaoled not long after; her husband the Colonel died around the same time. She was released on bail, then reapprehended to await trial in the Common Gaol at Morpeth.(5-6)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 5-6

Dorothy Swinow Dorothy Swinow Witch
1013

A man from Sunderland in the County of Northumberland, known to be "one it was suspected that could do more then God allowed of." During one of her fits, Mary Muschamp wrote an abbreviation of his name, and the undeciphered abbreviation of one other person's name. Mary Moore sent to him shortly therafter, demanding that he confess who had afflicted Margaret and threatening to apprehend him if he would not. Moore's servant reported back his answer: "DOROTHY SVVINOVV wife then to Colonell SVVINOVV, was the party that had done all the mischiefe to her child, and was the cause of all her further crosses." John Hutton also blamed Swinow for the death of Margery Hambleton. When Hutton heard that Margaret wanted two drops of his blood to save her life, he tried to do it himself privately; instead "the child nickt him halfe a dozen times in the forehead, but no bloud appeared; then he put forth his right arme and that was not till her mother threatned his heart bloud should goe before she wanted it; then he layd his thumb on his arme, and two drops appeared, which she wip'd off with a paper." Margaret later claimed two more drops would save her brother, George Muschamp Jr.; her mother Mary Moore hunted Hutton down and took more of his blood. Margaret's fits were observed to not trouble her in Hutton's company, and she fell into a terrible one when he left. Moore had Hutton apprehended, and he died in prison. Margaret claimed that he was her greatest tormentor, and had he lived, he would have given them the names of two more witches. He is said to have been able to call up storms, and is credited with nearly blowing a ship off course as it entered Berwick Harbour.(7-11)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 7-11

John Hutton John Hutton Witch
1033

A woman whom Edmund Robinson Jr. sees taking down pictures from a beam in a barn; the pictures have thorns stuck in them.(349)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 349

Anonymous 152 Witch
1034

A woman whom Edmund Robinson Jr. sees taking down pictures from a beam in a barn; the pictures have thorns stuck in them.(349)

Appears in:
Webster, John. The Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft. London: 1677, 349

Anonymous 153 Witch
1035

A woman of sixty years of age from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who often confessed to being a witch, but often faltered in the details of her stories detailing her magical acts. She is searched by William Harvey's team of surgeons and midwives at Surgeon's Hall in the city of London. According to the medical report she is found to have "two things which may be called teats, the firstin shape like the teat of a bitch, but in their judgment nothing but the skin drawn out as it will be after the piles on application of leeches ; the second is like the nipple or teat of a'woman's breast, but without any hollowness or issue for any blood or juice to come from thence."(http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=53166)

Appears in:
, William Farrer & J. Brownbill (editors). Townships: Goldshaw Booth. Unknown: 1911, http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=53166

Margaret Johnson Margaret Johnson Witch
1036

A woman from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire and the wife of Mr. Hargraves. She is accused of witchcraft by Edmund Robinson Jr. She is searched and not found to have any strange marks on her body.(http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=53166)

Appears in:
, William Farrer & J. Brownbill (editors). Townships: Goldshaw Booth. Unknown: 1911, http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=53166

Jennet Hargreaves Jennet Hargreaves Witch
1045

A woman from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, wife of John Dickonson, who is accused, along with six other people, of witchcraft by Edmund Robinson. She was also accused by Stevenson of Stainscomb, of witchcraft who appears to have been irate with Dickonson, over the price of butter. Dickenson is examined by the king's surgeons (under orders by William Harvey), ten midwives, and five other participants. No usual marks are found on her body.(http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=53166)

Appears in:
, William Farrer & J. Brownbill (editors). Townships: Goldshaw Booth. Unknown: 1911, http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=53166

Frances Dickenson Frances Dickenson Witch
1046

A woman from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, who alleged that she received a familiar in the form of a little black puppy from Margaret Simson, and a familiar in the form of a white cat from Elizabeth Weed; Weed is said to have also enticed Moore into renouncing God and affirming it in blood in exchange for the white cat's services. Moore said that Simson had named the dog Pretty, and told her he would kill any cattle she cursed. Weed named the cat Tiffy and said that Tiffy would kill any person Moore cursed. Moore allowed Tiffy to lick her blood from her pricked finger when she denied God. She set Tiffy on William Foster for threatening to hang two of Moore's children when they tried to take bread; he lay sick and in pain for seven or eight days before dying. She also set Pretty onto a cow belonging to Edward Hull and another cow belonging to Peter Brown when their animals got into her field and ate her crop. Moore claimed that she had killed both familiars the year before, but that they were haunting her; when she was apprehended for witchcraft, they were said to have "crept under her cloathes, and tortured her so that she could not speake, to confesse freely." Peter Slater claimed that Moore confessed to having killing Slater's wife with a curse 21 years before; he had visited her in prison specifically to ask whether she had done so. William Searle claimed to have heard her confess to being a witch, that she had set Pretty on his chickens after he refused her bread, and that she had killed one of his hogs in revenge for some of his servants setting a dog on hers.(5-6)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 5-6

Frances Moore Frances Moore Witch
1053

An old woman who claims to be a witch and who has a familiar in the shape of a toad.()

Appears in:
Bickley et al., A.C.. The Gentleman's Magazine Library. London: 1884,

Anonymous 154 Witch
1057

One of four women who Elizabeth Jennings, while in a fit, accuses of bewitching her.()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

Jane Flower Jane Flower Witch
1058

A woman from Keyston in the County of Huntingdon, known to be a spinster, who alleged that six weeks before a spirit appeared to her in the shape of a man wearing black clothes while she was making her bed. When she greeted him, he introduced himself as Blackeman and asked if she was poor, which she said he was. At this, he told her he would send her Grissell and Greedigut; she noticed then that he had ugly feet and became afraid as he seemed to be tall, then less, and then vanished altogether. When asked whether she had ever lay with Blackeman, she claimed that "shee would not suffer him." Three or four days later, he reappeared with two spirits in the shape of large dogs with horsehair bridles, who introduced themselves as Grissell and Greediguts, and said that Blackeman had bid them to do whatever she asked of them. She replied that she lacked nothing, but when they asked her for food she said she had none to give them, and they left. Willis claimed that the three returned to her many times after, bringing two or three shillings each time. Edward Wingfield alleged that Willis told him and John Guylet somewhat differently; he said that Blackeman first came to her a year before, sometimes appearing as an old man, that Grissell and Greediguts came in several shapes but most commonly as hounds with bristles on their backs, that Blackeman had use of her body as often as three times a week, and that the other two sucked of her body where marks had been found rather than her breasts where she had requested. He added that Grissell and Greediguts once pulled a man from his horse and robbed him to bring Willis money.(12-13)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 12-13

Jane Willis Jane Willis Witch
1089

A woman from Lancaster in the county of Lancashire, who is arrested for being a witch based on the testimony of Edmund Robinson Jr. She is examined at Surgeon's Hall in the city of London by William Harvey's team of surgeons and midwives. No unusual marks are found on her body.(http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=53166)

Appears in:
, William Farrer & J. Brownbill (editors). Townships: Goldshaw Booth. Unknown: 1911, http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=53166

Mary Spencer Mary Spencer Witch
1090

A woman from Bolling in York (now part of Bradford in West Yorkshire) who is accused of arriving through a hole in the floor of Sara Rode's bedroom, taking her by the neck, and ramming her fingers down Sara's throat to prevent her from speaking. She would "come to" Rodes often, arriving as Rodes began to have fits which lasted a half hour long and which were accompanied by "paines and benummednes, by six tymes of a day, in greate extremity, the use of her joynts being taken from her, her hart leapeing, the use of her tongue being taken away, and her whole body neare unto death." She also allegedly took "holde of [Rodes] by the apron, and gathered itt by the bottom into her hands, and puld her soe hard by itt thatt she puld some of the gatherings out. Sykes is also accused of bewitching Henry Cordingley's livestock and causing their death. She is searched by a jury of six women, including Isabella Pollard, and "upon the side of her seate [they discovered] a redd lumpe about the biggnes of a nutt, being wett." The jury of women who searched Sykes then "wrung it with theire fingers, moisture came out of it like lee" They also " founde upon her left side neare her arme a litle lumpe like a wart, and being puld out it stretcht about halfe an inch." (28-29)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 28-29

Mary Sykes Mary Sykes Witch
1096

A woman from Milton in the county of Bedford, known to be a hog-herder, the daughter of Mother Sutton, and the mother of three bastard children, including Henry Sutton. When one of Master Enger's servants (Anonymous 89) struck Henry on the ears for throwing stones and filth, she caused a black sow to madden Anonymous 89's carthorses on the way to the market the next day. This same servant later repeated stories he had heard of her and Mother Sutton's misdeeds and was stroked by a beetle (Anonymous 155), causing him to fall into a trance. Anonymous 89, afflicted and bedridden, later reported Sutton habitually coming in through a window to knit at the foot of his bed or stare at him; she allegedly told him that he would be restored to health if he consented to bed her. He berated her for her behaviour and bastard children instead, and she left the way she came. The next day, Master Enger found her tending her hogs and tried to persuade her to come with him; when she refused he took her by force to Anonymous 89. Anonymous 89 drew blood from her and became well again for a short time. She and Mother Sutton set their familiars Dicke and Jude on Master Enger's son and had him tormented to death after the child threw stones and called Mother Sutton a witch. Master Enger apprehended her a second time, beating her over the head; he had her bound and thrown into water twice, where she was observed to float. He had her searched by women and found her teat, which her son Henry claimed was used to suckle various familiars in the shapes of cats, moles and more. She was forced to confess, and her confession was used as cause to arrest Mother Sutton as well. She allegedly had a teat on her inner thigh from which the familiars would suck. Mary Sutton was found guilty of witchcraft and executed on March 31, 1612.(A4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, A4

Mary Sutton Mary Sutton Witch
1110

A woman (one of four) who is accused of bewitching Elizabeth Jennings and implicated in the bewitchment of her siblings.()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

Nan Wood Nan Wood Witch
1125

A woman from Kirkethrope in Yorkshire who is suspected of practicing witchcraft and the mother of Margaret Morton. Her reputation as a witch is used as evidence against Margaret Morton in the case where she allegedly bewitches a four year old boy. (38)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 38

Anonymous 158 Witch
1126

A woman from Kirkethrope in Yorkshire who is suspected of practicing witchcraft and the sister of Margaret Morton. Her reputation as a witch is used as evidence against Margaret Morton in the case where she allegedly bewitches a four year old boy. (38)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 38

Anonymous 159 Witch
1130

A woman from Hostersfielde in Yorkshire (possibly Huddersfield, Yorkshire) who stands trial for witchcraft at the castle of York. Hester Spivey alleges that upon coming home, her servant, Elizabeth Johnson, explained ot her how France had come to the house. While tending to the dire, France told her (Johnson) that " itt was a good deede to scare her lipps with itt.." France then left, but allegedly came back to curse Elizabeth Johnson. Johnson was then unable to speak or stand from six to eight--except for one occasion when she asked her brother to send for Hester France. (51-52)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 51-52

Hester France Hester France Witch
1139

A woman from Gargreave in the county of Yorkshire who allegedly practices witchcraft and who, in John Tatterson's opinion, is in need of salvation. Tatterson testifies (before John Assheton and Egdar Coats) that two weeks before last Christmas, he was "disabled in body." On another night, he was "troubled with ill spiretts" who told him to worship the enemy-- all of which were visible, save Anne Greene, a reputed witch. He was tormented at least four times (possibly on different occasions), but did not give in to their persuasions. Tatterson then approaches Anne Greene, telling her that he was convinced that he needed to purify and sanctify her heart and "worketh out the carnal part," leading her to salvation. During the same trial, Jeannette Hudson of Gargreave claimes that Anne Greene told her that Thomas Tatterson (presumably still John Tatterson) was "overgone with ill tongues." Margaret Wade said that her daughter Elizabeth fell from her bed and when she, her mother, came to attend to her, she saw big dog with a dish in its mouth and which had two feet, sitting at the foot of the bed. She then saw three dogs and claimed that Anne Greene was one of them. Then, Anne Greene said of herself that she sometimes used charms to cure the heart. She claims to have used it twice on John Tatterson. She claims to also be able to cure head pains with water and a lock of the sufferer's hair, which she boils together and then throws into a fire to burn. She does not "meddle" with other diseases. (64-65)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 64-65

Anne Greene Anne Greene Witch
1145

A woman, presumably from Gargreave in the county of Yorkshire, who allegedly appears to Margaret Wade in the shape of a dog. According to Margaret Wade, her daughter Elizabeth fell from her bed one evening. When Wade came to attend to her daughter, she noticed at the foot of the bed a great big dog with a dish in its mouth. Afterwards, Wade says she saw two dogs, one of which was Anne Greene and another was Mary Nunweeke.(64)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 64

Mary Nunweeke Mary Nunweeke Witch
1148

A woman, presumably from Beverley in the county of Yorkshire, who is tried for witchcraft. She is allegedly able to transform into a cat and a bee. At her trial, John Greendife claims that on one occasion, Roberts came to her in her normal shape, but then vanished by turning herself into a cat, which vanished swiftly, leaving Greendife with a pain at his heart. Then a few days later, a cat struck him in the head, causing him to fall into a trance. After the blow, he saw Roberts escaping in her usual clothes. Then, the next day, she allegedly appeared to him in the likeness of a bee, which affected him so much that five or six people could barely hold him down.(67)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 67

Elizabeth Roberts Elizabeth Roberts Witch
1149

A woman from York in the county of North Yorkshire, Katherine Earle is accused bewitching a gentleman name Rodwell and his horse (circa August 1653) by striking them both on the neck. Rodwell's horse "imediately fell sicke and dyed, and he himselfe was very sore troubled and perplexed with a paine in his necke." In addition, her daughter Ann allegedly teased the man, asking him "Doth the divell nipp the in the necke? but he will nipp the better yet." Katherine Earle also stands accused of the bewitchment of "one Mr. Franke, late of Rhodes, betwene the shoulders with her hand," asking him, as she stroke him "You are a pretty gentleman; will you kiss mee?" Mr. Frank became ill, an illness that lasted, according to one witness, thee years, all the while he languished indoors, and on his death bead, continued to blame Earle. Katherine Earl is searched for witch's marks by female witch searchers from the village; two witch-marks were found upon her a wart behind her ear, and another upon her thigh, one of which is described as being "in the likenesse of a papp." On another occasion, Earle allegedly tapped a man named Mr. Frank between the shoulders and said "You are a pretty gentleman; will you kissemee?" Mr. Frank became ill almost imeediately (before he got home) and died shortly thereafter. On his deathbed, he blamed Katherine Earle. (69)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 69

Katherine Earle Katherine Earle Witch
1152

A woman from Wakefield in the county of York who tried for witchcraft along with her son, George Benton. According to Richard Jackson, Jennet Benton and her son George Benton "pretended" to have a a route belonging to their farm which passed through Mr. Stringer's property. Being the tenant of the property, Jackson, along with his servant Daniel Craven, endeavoured to hinder the Benton's passage, at which point George Benton threw a stone at Craven, cutting his upper lip and breaking two of his teeth. At that point, there came into effect an action against the Benton's trespassing. In response, the Bentons said that "it should be a deare day's worke unto the said Rich. Jackson, to him or to his, before the yeare went about." From that moment on, Jackson's wife could no longer hear, his child was strangely taken with fits in the nighttime and Jackson himself began to suffer from pain in his shoulders, back, and heart as well as hearing noises such as the ringing of bells accompanied by singing and dancing and which sometimes included a deep groaning. Apparitions also began appearing to the house in the shape of black dogs and cats. Since Jennet and George Benton threatened Jackson, he lost eighteen horses and mares, the deaths of which he blames on Jennet and George Benton. Susanna Maude of Snow Hill claims that Jennet Benton came to her house seeking her son and asking him to come home with her to which her son replied: Mother, which way shall I goe? You know I can goe thorrow the stone wall if yow would have me." He went on to say his father or the Devil came to their house at all times of the night. Jennet then replied: "Villaine, did it ever doe the any hurt? it will doe soe at the noone time." Despite the fact that two other witnesses also reported suspicious circumstances about Jennet and George Benton, the two deny all accusations.(74-75)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 74-75

Jennet Benton Jennet Benton Witch
1153

A boy from the outskirts of Wakefield in the county of York who tried for witchcraft along with his mother, Jennet Benton. According to Richard Jackson, Jennet Benton and her son George Benton "pretended" to have a a route belonging to their farm which passed through Mr. Stringer's property. Being the tenant of the property, Jackson, along with his servant Daniel Craven, endeavoured to hinder the Benton's passage, at which point George Benton threw a stone at Craven, cutting his upper lip and breaking two of his teeth. At that point, there came into effect an action against the Benton's trespassing. In response, the Bentons said that "it should be a deare day's worke unto the said Rich. Jackson, to him or to his, before the yeare went about." From that moment on, Jackson's wife could no longer hear, his child was strangely taken with fits in the nighttime and Jackson himself began to suffer from pain in his shoulders, back, and heart as well as hearing noises such as the ringing of bells accompanied by singing and dancing and which sometimes included a deep groaning. Apparitions also began appearing to the house in the shape of black dogs and cats. Since Jennet and George Benton threatened Jackson, he lost eighteen horses and mares, the deaths of which he blames on Jennet and George Benton. Susanna Maude of Snow Hill claims that Jennet Benton came to her house seeking her son and asking him to come home with her to which her son replied: Mother, which way shall I goe? You know I can goe thorrow the stone wall if yow would have me." He went on to say his father or the Devil came to their house at all times of the night. Jennet then replied: "Villaine, did it ever doe the any hurt? it will doe soe at the noone time." Despite the fact that two other witnesses also reported suspicious circumstances about Jennet and George Benton, the two deny all accusations.(74-75)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 74-75

George Benton George Benton Witch
1159

A man from Studley Hall, from near Ripon, North Yorkshire, who is tried for witchcraft in 1656. He is married to Mary Wade who is accused of bewitching the fourteen year old Elizabeth Mallory, daughter of the Lady Mallory, of Studley Hall. Elizabeth Mallory suffered from violents fits during which she directly accuses Mary Wade and claims that Mary Wade does not confess to doing her wrong, she would become much more violent again. William Wade, as well as his wife, deny all accusations made against them. (75-78)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 75-78

William Wade William Wade Witch
1160

A woman from Studley Hall, from near Ripon, North Yorkshire, who is accused of bewitching and tormenting fourteen year old Elizabeth Mallory, daughter of the Lady Mallory, of Studley Hall. Mary Wade claims the only time she ever gave something to Elizabeth Mallory was three or four years ago and that was a dish of nuts when Lady Mallory and her children came to her house. Nevertheless, Elizabeth Mallory, at the age of fourteen, languished for twelve weeks, the use of her limbs being taken from her. Elizabeth Mallory would sometimes cry out "she comes, she comes" during her fits and when asked to whom she was referring, Mallory would reply "Mary, Mary." During her fits, Mallory would claim that Mary Wade appear in the shape of a cat sitting on the window sill or a tall woman standing at the end of her bed. After naming Mary Wade as her tormentor, Elizabeth Mallory began vomiting various things. Mary Wade was allegedly able to make Elizabeth Mallory better by confessing and asking forgiveness, which she did. At that moment, Elizabeth Mallory got better. At that moment, Wade denied that she had done her wrong. Elizabeth Mallory then immediately becomes ill and threatens her, saying that either she should confess or be tried before a justice and punished. (75-78)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 75-78

Mary Wade Mary Wade Witch
1168

A woman from Wapping in the county of Greater London, who is accused by Abraham Vandenbemde of hiring Joan Peterson to bewitch her long sick aunt and godmother, Lady Powel. Levingston was thought to have "received from her (the said Peterson) certain powders, and bags of seeds, to help her in her law suits and to provoke unlawfull love." Lady Powel, who had no children of her own, left her estate to Mrs. Levingston. After the accusations of using witchery to gain Lady Powel's estate, Levingston was publicly disgraced and lost the inheritance. After several physicians and surgeons testified that Lady Powel had been afflicted with numerous serious illnesses for many years and that she had therefore died of natural causes, Levingston was vindicated and proclaimed innocent.(3-4, 6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 3-4, 6-7

Anne Levingston Anne Levingston Witch
1191

A woman, allegedly a witch, from Honiton in the county of Devon, who approaches Elizabeth Brooker, a servant of Mistress Heiron (who worked in her mercer's shop), and asks her for a pin. The woman is unsatisfied with Brooker's gift of a pin from her sleeve, wanting a specific one, leaves in a "great Fume and Rage, and told the Maid, she should hear farther from her, she would e'er long wish she had given her the Pin she desired; with many threatning Speeches."(66, 67, 68, 69)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 66, 67, 68, 69

Anonymous 179 Witch
1220

A widow from Lawford in the county of Essex and the mother of Rebecca West, Anne West is described as "the old Beldam Weste," a reputed which who is tried for witchcraft in 1641 and in 1642. Although she is twice acquitted, she is popularly believed to be a witch, and is at the center of the Matthew Hopkins / John Sterne witch-hunt, 1645, when her daughter becomes a key-witness and testifies against her. She allegedly read from a book containing "no goodnesses" with Anne Leech, Elizabeth Gooding, and Elizabeth Clark. She is also believed to have "three or foure little things in the shape of black rabbits," which would be seen "leaping and skipping" by an unnamed man from Manningtree, and may be represented by the image of Sacke and Sugar in the woodcut of Matthew Hopkins, Anne West, and Elizabeth Clark. She is indicted on the charge, however, of having of two familiars, one in the shape of "'a dogg" and another in the form of a kitten with the intention of procuring their help in "withcrafts.'" She would be found guilty of entertaining these two familiars in 1645. Found guilty on the charge of having "bewitched John son of John Culter yeo., whereby he died instatly," a crime in which her own daughter, Rebecca West served as witness, she would be and hanged as a witch in Manningtree, August 1, 1645, (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex. London: 1645, 2

Anne West Anne West Witch
1222

A woman and reputed witch who allegedly keeps imps in the form of kittens, which she states "she had by as handsome a man as any was in England," a possible reference to the devil. Benefield also, along with Mother Goodwin, Anne West, and Rebecca West, allegedly sends the imps to kill a cow and an unnamed child (Anonymous 193). (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex. London: 1645, 2

Mother Benefield Witch
1223

A woman and reputed witch who allegedly prays with other witches from a non-Christian text, after which their imps appear in several forms. Goodwin, along with Mother Benefield, Anne West, and Rebecca West, also allegedly sends her imps to kill a cow and a unnamed child (Anonymous 193).(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex. London: 1645, 2

Mother Goodwin Witch
1225

A woman and alleged witch who is present with Rebecca West when she is travelling to the Grand Inquest. West claims that she told Mother Miller that she would not tell the Inquest anything, even "if they pulled her to pieces with pincers."(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex. London: 1645, 4

Mother Miller Witch
1226

A woman from Ipswich in the county of Suffolk described as a witch who sends her maid (Anonymous 195) to collect herbs. Anonymous 194 cuts up the herbs and strews them about a room. The following day Anonymous 194's husband (Anonymous 196) discovers twelve or fourteen dead hogs in the yard, which he suspects to be the work of Anonymous 194 and Anonymous 195.(4-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex. London: 1645, 4-5

Anonymous 194 Witch
1229

A man from Romsey in Hampshire whom Anne Bodenham identifies as a a witch. According to Bodenham, Withers could do the most tricks of any one she knew. He is also the man who, according to Bodenham, has her "Red Book" (a malefic ledger where all of the witches in the region allegedly wrote their names). (26, 34-35)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 26, 34-35

Withers Mr. Withers Witch
1234

A woman and reputed witch who calls upon God as her witness to pass judgment on her, and is presently struck to the ground on her back because of this declaration. Anonymous 197 then suffers in a most lamentable condition, trembling and crying for two days, after which she confesses to having a malefic compact with the devil, stating that he usually appeared to her in the form of a squirrel. (6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex. London: 1645, 6-7

Anonymous 197 Witch
1238

A woman from Windsor in the county of Berkshire, who is accused of bewitching Richard Galis. Audrey dies under mysterious circumstances. Elizabeth Stile alleged under examination that Audrey was "the chef Mistresse" of the group that included Elizabeth Stile, Mother Devell, Mother Dutten, Mother Margaret, and Mother Nelson. (Image 6, 10, 14)

Appears in:
Galis, Richard. A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates. London: 1572, Image 6, 10, 14

Audrey MIstress Audrey Witch
1250

A man from Norfolk, described as a glove maker who is married to Mary Smith. Smith appears to be inculcated in his wife's witchcraft and be able to do some of his own, having cursed Thomas Younge.(45-46, 50-51, 58-59)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 45-46, 50-51, 58-59

Henry Smith Henry Smith Witch
1252

A woman from the London Borough of Camden, described as a gypsy of the Parish of St. Giles in the Fields who is tried at the Old Bailey for having stolen seven pounds and ten shillings from one Robert Walburton. Walburton testifies that she had come to his house last January and after having asked for six pence promising to return it. After she returned the money, he put it in his pocket but she "conjectured it there" and showed him some juggling tricks until she had "juggled away his Money." Then, at the same trial, another man testifies that Mary Poole is a witch for having bewitched him and his horse seven years ago after they had met on a road.(1-2)

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Mary Poole, Theft > grand larceny, 13th December 1699. . London: 1699, 1-2

Mary Poole Mary Poole Witch
1259

A witch who restores John Ferralls son (Anonymous 74) back to perfect health after he had allegedly been bewitched by Margaret Simons. (3-4)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 3-4

Anonymous 206 Witch
1273

A witch who, allegedly sensing that her "spells were being interfered with" as Grace Matthew was applying the remedy to her husband, instantly shows up at Grace Matthew's and her husband's (Anonymous 209).(150)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 150

Joan Baker Joan Baker Witch
1276

A witch who allegedly commits arson to Mr. Ezekiel Trible's house, renders him unable to properly smoke his pipe, and makes a boy ill. She also allegedly made Mrs. Dicker's child sick after the latter allegedly called her an old witch when Crosse had come to her begging. Other similar testimonies reaffirm that family members and acquaintances became sick after the appropriate accuser refused Crosse when she begged them. Crosse was pricked twelve times by Mary Cleake but did not draw blood. (250)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 250

Diana Crosse Diana Crosse Witch
1309

A woman who is accused of bewitching a man named Greene. The man allegedly suffers from fits and becomes unable to speak normally unless Furnace is present. She is also accused of bewitching Greene's child.(152)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 152

Johan Furnace Johan Furnace Witch
1317

A woman from Dagenham, in the county of Essex, the youngest daughter of Joan Upney, this daughter "would handle them, and vse [Joan Upney's familiars] as well as her selfe." The use of her mother's familiars makes Upney Daughter 2 a witch in practice. (Sig B)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, Sig B

Upney Upney (Daughter 2) Witch
1318

A woman from Raunds in the county of Northampton, known to be the mother of Arthur Bill, and allegedly both a witch and the wife of witch Bill (Father). When her son Arthur was suspected of bewitching a woman and some cattle, she was bound thumb to toe and tossed into water along with Arthur and Bill (Father). All three are said to have floated, which was though to confirm their guilt. The whole family was sent to Northampton Gaol, but she was permitted to visit Arthur in his cell; the two of them used the opportunity to bewitch a round ball into Bill (Father)'s throat to prevent him from confessing. While imprisoned, she feared being condemned to death by hanging so greatly that she cut her own throat. It is said that, before her death, she railed against her damnation and cursed her birth and conception.(C2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C2

Bill Bill (Mother) Witch
1319

A man from Raunds in the county of Northampton, known to be the father of Arthur Bill and husband of Bill (Mother), and alleged to be a witch. When his son Arthur was suspected of bewitching a woman and some cattle, he was bound thumb to toe and tossed into water along with Arthur and Bill (Mother). All three are said to have floated, which was though to confirm their guilt. The whole family was sent to Northampton Gaol. Arthur and Bill (Mother) allegedly bewitched a round ball into Bill (Father)'s throat to prevent him from confessing, but this did not prevent him from becoming the chief witness against Arthur after Bill (Mother) died. (C2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C2

Bill Bill (Father) Witch
1320

An old woman from Well-Close in London, who was long suspected of being a witch and afflicting children of the neighbourhood with illnesses such as unknown distempers, vomiting of pins, strange contortions, and afflicting people with strange apparitions of Cats. She forespoke Mr. John ---'s Apprentice and shop, resulting in a disordered shop and illness in the apprentice. When the apprentice and other men swam her into the river, she touched the young apprentice, leaving him marked with her hand print black as coal. The Apprentice grew sick and died. Mr. John --- took her to the Constable, and although she pleaded innocent, she was committed to Bridewel.(1)

Appears in:
Greenwel, Thomas. A Full and True Account of the Discovery, Apprehending and taking of a notorious witch,. London: 1704, 1

Sarah Griffith Sarah Griffith Witch
1324

A woman from London who is accused of being a witch and feeding evil spirits. (265)

Appears in:
Le Hardy, William. County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16. Middlesex: 1937, 265

Margaret Wellam Margaret Wellam Witch
1325

A woman from Padstow, in the county of Cornwall, and possibly to wife of one John Piers, described as a "pirate," who is under investigation for having been a practicing witch. Over the course of this investigation, court examines a number of her neighbors of the "better sort and of most credit of the town," in effort to collect evidence against her or to refute the accusation. (29)

Appears in:
Everett Greene, Mary Anne. Calendar of State Papers, Domestic: Edward VI, Mary Elizabeth I, James I: 1581-1590, Volume 2. London: 1865, 29

Anne Piers Anne Piers Witch
1330

A widow from Stepney, in the county of Middlesex (now part of the London Borough of Tower Hamlets), described as a "common witch and inchantrix," who allegedly practices witchcraft "upon and against Elizabeth Gyan." As a result, Elizabeth Gyan "languished in her body and "was wasted consumed pined and lame and likewise speechless" from the said 17th of June "until the day of the taking of this inquisition, to witt the twelfth day of July then next following." Barbara Bartle is tried and pleads not guilty.()

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 3: 1625-67. Middlesex: 1888,

Barbara Bartle Barbara Bartle Witch
1332

A woman from Whitechapel, in the county of Middlesex (now in London) who allegedly practices witchcraft. She is accused of bewitching John Gale, Elizabeth Gale, and James Gale so that the three languish and become deaf and dumb. She is also alleged to have bewitched a Joan Holland. She is tried and found guilty, but her punishment is no longer legible on the parchement.()

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 3: 1625-67. Middlesex: 1888,

Elizabeth Newman Elizabeth Newman Witch
1338

A woman, described as a "lewd woman" and a "notable witch," likely from Flamstead, in the county of Hertfordshire, who is committed to the goal in Hertford (a town in the parish of Hertfordshire) accused of inflicting "her witchery upon [Mr. Amyce] in such a manner that he was almost consumed to the bone" as retribution for some unexplained slight or crime.()

Appears in:
Roberts, R. A.. Calendar of the Cecil Papers in Hatfield House, Volume 10: 1600. Unknown: 1904,

Anonymous 225 Witch
1339

A widow from Enfield (now the London Borough of Enfield), Berry (Berry alias Whyttingberry) is hanged "for exercising witchcrafts, enchantments, charms and sorceries upon Grace Halsey." ()

Appears in:
Le Hardy, William. County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16. Middlesex: 1937,

Agnes Berry Agnes Berry Witch
1341

A woman who allegedly bewitches Anne Waldron. Prowting is indicted, but the notes suggest that Waldron faked her illness and she (Waldron) eventually confessed.()

Appears in:
Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, . Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, Reign of Charles: 1633-1634. Vol 6. Unknown: 1635,

Mary Prowting Mary Prowting Witch
1342

A woman from Tottenham, in the county of Middlesex, and the wife of Thomas Branch (labourer), Emma Branch is accused of committing "witchcrafts, enchantments, charms and sorceries" against nine-month old Edward Wheeler (who dies), Anne Howell (who languishes in a wasting illness), and Joan Aldridge (who lives still, but wastes away at the time of Branch's indictment). Although Emma Branch is committed, she is freed on bail, and eventually found not-guilty, due to insufficient evidence.()

Appears in:
Le Hardy, William. County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16. Middlesex: 1937,

Emma Branch Emma Branch Witch
1362

A "poor and base" woman who is sent to prison for allegedly being "the first mover of a mutiny." She is suspected to be witch by her neighbours. In addition, she is sent to prison immediately because hse is too base and poor to appear before Lords.(150)

Appears in:
Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, . Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, Reign of Charles 1: 1637. H. M. Stationery Office: 1868, 150

Anonymous 229 Witch
1376

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a miller's wife and one of the two "bad women" who kept Dorothy Swinow's company. She, along with Swinow and the Webster's wife (a weaver; Anonymous 235), allegedly caused the deaths of John Custerd and Mrs. Custerd.(9-10)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9-10

Anonymous 234 Witch
1377

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a weaver's wife and one of the two "bad women" who kept Dorothy Swinow's company. She, along with Swinow and a miller's wife (Anonymous 234), allegedly caused the deaths of John Custerd and Mrs. Custerd.(9-10)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9-10

Anonymous 235 Witch
1390

A woman from Chatton in the County of Northumberland, known to be the sister of Jane Martin. She made a confession claiming that she had been "the Divels servant these five yeares last past." The Devil first came to her at her home in the shape of a man in blue clothes; he grabbed her tightly by the hand and told her she should never want, then gave her one nip on the shoulder and another on her back. She added that her familiar took the form of a black greyhound, and that she had carnal relations with the Devil on numerous occasions. Margaret White claimed to have eaten, drunk and made merry at Martin's home with Dorothy Swinow and the Devil. With Martin and Swinow, she came to Edward Moore's home to "take away the life of MARGARET MUSCHAMP and MARY, and they were the cause of the Childrens tormenting, and that they were three severall times to have taken away their lives, and especially upon St. Johns day at night gone twelve moneths; And sayth that God was above the Divell, for they could not get their desires perfected." According to White, Swinow tried to consume Sibilla Moore in the womb, but could not and caused the infant to die after birth instead with White and Martin's help. White and Martin also bewitched Thomas Young to death. Martin was also said to be the cause of Richard Stanley's sore leg.(24-26)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 24-26

Margaret White Margaret White Witch
1391

A woman from Chatton in the County of Northumberland, known to be the sister of Margaret White. White accused Jane Martin of witchcraft in her confession, alleging that she had eaten, drunk and made merry at Martin's home with Dorothy Swinow and the Devil. White also claimed that she, Martin and Swinow came to Edward Moore's home to "take away the life of MARGARET MUSCHAMP and MARY, and they were the cause of the Childrens tormenting, and that they were three severall times to have taken away their lives, and especially upon St. Johns day at night gone twelve moneths; And sayth that God was above the Divell, for they could not get their desires perfected." According to White, Swinow tried to consume Sibilla Moore in the womb, but could not and caused the infant to die after birth instead with White and Martin's help. White and Martin also bewitched Thomas Young to death. Martin was also said to be the cause of Richard Stanley's sore leg.(24-26)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 24-26

Jane Martin Jane Martin Witch
1392

A woman from Stebbing, in the county of Essex and wife of John Hull who allegedly bewitching Margaret Hull so that she languished and died. The jury determines that the murder was premeditated. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Margaret Hodgin Margaret Hodgin Witch
1404

A spinster from Little Baddow who is indicted at the Essex Assize for four separate separate charges on March 2, 1570. She is firstly indicted for bewitching Alice, the wife of William Basticke who languished and then died. Swallow pleads not guilty, but is found guilty. Her punishment is unknown. Next she is indicted (on the same day) for allegedly bewitching John Daggnell of Little Baddow, a husbandman, so that "his life was despaired of". Swallow pleads not guilty. Next, she is indicted for allegedly bewitching four horses worth twenty marks belonging to John Frank, causing their deaths. She pleads not guilty, but is found guilty. Finally, Swallow is indicted for allegedly bewitching Elizabeth, daughter of William Goores, causing her death. She pleads not guilty, but is found guilty. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=9)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=9

Alice Swallow Alice Swallow Witch
1407

A widow from West Tilbury who is indicted for allegedly bewitching and destroying three colts belonging to Robert Smyth,(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Susan Havering Susan Havering Witch
1409

A woman from Coven Garden in London and the county of Greater London, who is described as an old woman, and the matron for a group of witches living at Queen-Street in Coven-Garden, who falsely accept confessions claiming they have been ordained by Father Ciprian, thereby engaging herself in anti-Catholic activities as well as a con. She is therefore a con artist as well. She collects the money from confessors, for either confession or "distraction" by the other six women living at the abode. (1-5)

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Seven Women Confessors or a Discovery of the Seven White Divels which Lived at Queen-Street in Coven-Garden. London: 1641, 1-5

Katherin Wels Katherine Wells Witch
1410

A woman from Coven-Garden in London and the county of Greater London, who is one among seven "young and handsome" witches living at Queen-Street in Coven-Garden, who falsely accept confessions under several articles enforced on confessors. She also provided possible "distraction" to confessors, when in rooms together alone, or with any of the other women living with her. By these anti-Catholic activities, she was involved in a con.(1-5)

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Seven Women Confessors or a Discovery of the Seven White Divels which Lived at Queen-Street in Coven-Garden. London: 1641, 1-5

Susan Baker Susan Baker Witch
1411

A woman from Coven-Garden in London and the county of Greater London, who is one of seven witches living at Queen-Street in Coven-Garden. She is described as being "young and handsome," and falsely accepts confessions for a monetary fee and after enforcing several articles on confessors. She, and possibly some of the other women living with her, would provide confession and "distraction" to clients in private rooms. Therefore, she was involved in anti-Catholic activities, as well as a con. They may have all been involved in prostitution as well.(1-5)

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Seven Women Confessors or a Discovery of the Seven White Divels which Lived at Queen-Street in Coven-Garden. London: 1641, 1-5

Anne Parker Anne Parker Witch
1412

A woman from Coven-Garden in London and the county of Greater London, who is one of seven "young and handsome" witches residing at Queen-Street in Coven-Garden. She falsely accepts confessions for monetary gain and by swearing confessors to certain articles. Once with clients in a private room, either alone or with some of the other women living at the abode, she would provide confession and "distraction." Katherine Smith was therefore involved with anti-Catholic activities, a con, and possibly prostitution.(1-5)

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Seven Women Confessors or a Discovery of the Seven White Divels which Lived at Queen-Street in Coven-Garden. London: 1641, 1-5

Katherin Smith Katherine Smith Witch
1413

A woman from Coven-Garden in London and the county of Greater London, who is one of seven witches living at Queen-Street in Coven-Garden. She is described as being "young and handsome," and falsely accepts confessions for a monetary fee and after enforcing several articles on confessors. She would take clients to a private room, sometimes with some of the other women living with her, and provide confession and "distraction" to the client. She was involved in a con, and anti-Catholic activities. She may have also been involved with prostitution.(1-5)

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Seven Women Confessors or a Discovery of the Seven White Divels which Lived at Queen-Street in Coven-Garden. London: 1641, 1-5

Elinor Hall Eleanor Hall Witch
1414

A woman from Coven-Garden in London and the county of Greater London, who is one of seven "young and handsome" witches residing at Queen-Street in Coven-Garden. She falsely accepts confessions for monetary gain and by swearing confessors to certain articles. This was often done, alongside "distraction" for the client in rooms alone, or with other women living at the abode. She was thus involved in anti-Catholic activities, and a con. She may have also been involved in prostitution.(1-5)

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Seven Women Confessors or a Discovery of the Seven White Divels which Lived at Queen-Street in Coven-Garden. London: 1641, 1-5

Maior Jones Maior Jones Witch
1415

A woman from Coven-Garden in London and the county of Greater London, who is one of seven witches living at Queen-Street in Coven-Garden. She is described as being "young and handsome," and falsely accepts confessions for a monetary fee and after enforcing several articles on confessors. She would also possibly provide "distraction" to clients, alone or alongside other women living with her, when in rooms alone with the client. She and the women living with her were involved in an anti-Catholic con, and possibly prostitution.(1-5)

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Seven Women Confessors or a Discovery of the Seven White Divels which Lived at Queen-Street in Coven-Garden. London: 1641, 1-5

Dorathie Marsh Dorothy Marsh Witch
1417

A spinster from Berley in Essex who, along with Joan Norfolk, who allegedly bewitched John Furmyn so that he languished vehemently and died. The jurors say that Margaret and Joan killed and murdered Furmyn by witchcraft, "contrary to the peace, etc."(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1

Margaret Ganne Margaret Ganne Witch
1418

A spinster from Borley who, along with Margaret Ganne, allegedly bewitched John Furmyn so that he languished and died. The jurors determine that Ganne and Norfolk murdered Furmyn by witcheraft, "contrary to the peace, etc."(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1

Joan Norfolk Joan Norfolk Witch
1422

A woman from Hatfield in the county of Essex, wife of "Jeromie" and a noted witch, who is indicted in 1566 for allegedly bewitching a cow, six sheep, and four pigs belonging to William Higham. She pleads not guilty and is ultimately found to be not guilty.( http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Lora Wynchester Lora Wynchester Witch
1424

A women from Boreham in the county of Essex who confesses to (under examination/ compelled by) Archdeacon Cole that she was as witch. She flees shortly thereafter. ()

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011,

Anonymous 242 Witch
1427

A woman from Pinner in the county of Middlesex, described as an allegedly notorious witch credited with "many and sundry like actions of extreame rage and crueltie." She works with the familiars of the hare and a monstrous black cat, which she sends to startle people. She is accused of bewitching the servant Richard Burt for four days into a black place full of fire as well as rendering him mute. Richard Burt scratches her, and is cured of his bewitchment. She is also accused of ruining the cream of Master Burbridge of Pinner and killing two lambs of Gregory Coulson's, both of whom refused her charity. ()

Appears in:
B., G.. A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England) . London: 1592,

Mother Atkins Witch
1433

A woman who is suspected of witchcraft. she is the daughter of Joan Cocke, from Kelvedon (a suspected witch). She is aligned with two acts of witchcraft: property damage and animal damage. Both crimes are concerned with cows/ dairy and both accusations come courtesy of Noble (wife) This woman (Noble's wife) claimed she could not churn butter -- an unfortunate circumsatnce she blamed on Cocke. Noble (wife) also claimed that Cocke (daughter) was responsible for the death of one of Belffilde's wife's cattle (a woman from Linford, Stanford-le-Hope, in the county of Essex) and for causing the other to give "milke of all colour."()

Appears in:
Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, . Report of the Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, Part 4. H.M. Stationery Office: 1885,

Anonymous 243 Witch
1436

A woman from Hatfield Peverel in the county of Essex for allegedly bewitching Anne, "daughter of Richard Willson of Purleigh smith," who died. Cocke pleads not guilty and is found not guilty.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=332210)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=332210

Joan Cocke Joan Cocke (Hatfield) Witch
1440

A spinster from Wimbish in the county of Essex who is believed to practice witchcraft on both men and beasts "and other things." She is indicted in 1578 at the assizes in Chelmsford for having allegedly "cunningly bewitched and enchanted a white gelding worth 3 and a cow worth 40s." The gelding and cow "languished" and then died. The jurors said that she killed them contrary to the justice of the peace.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Margaret Stanton Margaret Stanton Witch
1443

A woman from Stock in the county of Essex, described as a spinster who allegedly practices witchcraft on men, cattle and other things. She is indicted at the Assize for allegedly bewitching Christopher Veele. Veele's feet became lamed and curved so that he was in great pain and could barely walk. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1

Agnes Sawen Agnes Sawen Witch
1450

A woman from the town of Cambridge in the county of Cambridgeshire, described as "an honest woman (so always formerly reputed)" who was executed at Cambridge (1645). She appears to have been prosecuted, at least in part, as a witch, because she allegedly had a familiar. Thomas Addy represents this as "keeping a tame Frogge in a Box for sport and Phantasie."(135)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 135

Anonymous 249 Witch
1452

A woman from Elsenham in the county of Essex, described as a spinster who is said to allegedly be a witch and enchantress of men, beast and other things. She is indicted at the Easter assize in Chelmsford in 1576 for allegedly enchanting a one and a half year old infant named Thomas Barlee. Barlee languished for about three days after which his body was so vexed and troubled that his life was essentially "despaired of."(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=3)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=3

Agnes Berden Agnes Berden Witch
1456

A woman from Braintree in the county of Essex, described as the wife of a shoemaker named Thomas Aylett and a spinster. Alice Aylett is charged with "being a witch and enchantress as well of men as of animals and other things" at the Assize in Chelmsford in the county of Essex. She is also indicted at the same assize for allegedly enchanting Margery Egles, daughter of Thomas Egles in August of 1589 so that Margery languished until November; enchanting Rachel Skynner, daughter of William Skynner, in August of 1589 so that she too languished until November; and for enchanting Henry Joye in November of 1589, so that he "gravely languished until 1 December"; finally, she is also indicted for allegedly enchanting a child name Susan Parman in March of 1579-80, so that she (Parman) languished and then died. The jurors find Alice Aylett guilty of using enchantments and charms to bewitch and murder "the said Susan and Simon." (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1

Alice Aylett Alice Aylett Witch
1460

A woman from Newmarket in the county of Suffok who is asked by Sir Martin Stuteville to go visit a man, Thomas Paman, who suspects he is bewitched (possibly by her). Read is "presumed to be a witch," and violently attacked by Paman upon arrival. Read appears to leave the attack somewhat unscathed and is never prosecuted as a witch; Paman retracts his bewitchment.(198-199)

Appears in:
, Great Britain. Public Record Office. Calendar of State Papers: Domestic Series, of the Reign of Charles I, 1629-1631. London: 1830, 198-199

Alice Read Alice Read Witch
1467

A woman from Little Gaddesden in the county of Hertforshire who is accused of sending two spirits to bewitch Mary Hall. The spirits speak through Hall and suggest that Harwood "gave them her Soul to come into Mary Hall." Although Harwood denies the accusations, an act which makes the spirits rage "Let Gfe Harwood be hanged, if she will, because she denyed us," she did appear at the Hall home when Dr. Woodhouse hung Mary Hall's finger nails in a bag by the chimney, an act of folkloric countermagic. Harwood's fate is not recorded. (32, 32-33, 34, 34-35, 37)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 32, 32-33, 34, 34-35, 37

Harwood Goodwife Harwood Witch
1471

A woman from Bedford in the county of Bedforshire, and an accused curser, Goodwife Rose's weapon of choice appears to be worms and lice. She allegedly bewitched a "Maid's Pease [porridge when she] that had denied her some. by wishing it to become all "worm-eaten." She also allegedly bewitched lice to plague a man, "though [he] shifted every day." She, along with her female accuser, were swum as witches. Goodwife Rose floated, and was deemed witch-like, while Anonymous 252 "sank presently, and they could scarce bring her to life with all their hast and Arts."(41)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 41

Rose Goodwife Rose Witch
1473

A woman from St. Albans in the county of Herrfordshire, nicknamed Mary by chance, who suffers through a myriad of witch-testing. She is swum as a witch and "thrust down with Poles," but she "could not be made sink." She allegedly attempted to put "head under the Water" and "got Iron next her to make her sink" in an attempt to save herself, according to one witness. She was made to show examiners her "Teats" and say the Lord's Prayer, although she could "not say Our Father, but [could only say] Your Father." She evidently confessed to everything she was accused of. (40)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 40

Mary Mary-by-chance Witch
1474

A man from St. Albans in the county of Hertforshire who is imprisoned (presumably for witchcraft) along with Mary-by-chance. When the two of them are made to "shew their Teats," it is revealed hat he "had like a Breast on his side," a protuberance read as a witch's mark. (40)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 40

Anonymous 252 Witch
1477

A woman from the county of Hertfordshire allegedly claimed that regardless of what happened to her in court, she was "sure not to die yet: for all the mischief she had done, was in transforming her self into the shape of a Bumble Boe; and biting the Maids thread often is pieces as she spun; which Maid came in against her."(18-19)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 18-19

Anonymous 256 Witch
1497

A woman from Lutterworth in the county of Leicestershire who is allegedly scratched to force her into unwitching a child (Anonymous 260) whom she had witched.(21)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 21

Margaret Bell Margaret Bell Witch
1501

A woman from the county of Essex who is imprisoned at Colchester Castle on July 29th, 1639 for being accused and suspected of being a witch.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Anne Lamperill Anne Lamperill Witch
1515

A man of Brandon, Suffolk who was tried, convicted and condemned to death by the judge and justices at "a sessions holden at St. Edmunds-bury in Suffolke." He confessed to: bewitching a ship near Harwidge, so that the ship capsized, killing all passengers; many "most hanous, wicked, and accursed acts" with the daily help of six imps; preaching "threescore sermons" after making a Covenent with the Devil; and having several teats. His execution took place the 27th of August, 1645.(Cover, 3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover, 3

Lowes Parson Lowes Parson Witch
1516

A cooper from Halesworth, Suffolk, who was one among eighteen witches tried, convicted, and condemned to death by the judge and justices at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk for witchcraft. Thomas Evererd was employed at a brewhouse, and confessed along with his wife to: bewitching beer so "that the odiousnesse of the infectious stinke of it was such & so intollerable that by the noysomnesse of the smel or tast many people dyed"; that he had several imps that he gave suck to; and that he had "perpetrated and acted by the witchcrafts and damnable Sorceries." He was executed on the 27 of August, 1645.(Cover, 3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover, 3-4

Thomas Evererd Thomas Evererd Witch
1517

The wife of Thomas Evererd, a cooper from Halesworth, Suffolk, she was one among eighteen witches tried, convicted, and condemned to death by the judge and justices at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk for witchcraft. Mary Evererd was employed at a brewhouse with her husband, and confessed along with him to: bewitching beer so "that the odiousnesse of the infectious stinke of it was such & so intollerable that by the noysomnesse of the smel or tast many people dyed"; that she had several imps that she gave suck to; and that she had "perpetrated and acted by the witchcrafts and damnable Sorceries." She was executed with her husband on the 27 of August, 1645.(Cover, 3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover, 3-4

Mary Evererd Mary Evererd Witch
1518

A woman from Suffolk who is tried, convicted, and condemned to death by the judges and justices at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk for witchcraft. She is one among eighteen witches present at the session. Her execution took place the 27th of August, 1645.(Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Mary Bacon Mary Bacon Witch
1519

A woman from Suffolk who is tried, convicted, and condemned to death by the judges and justices at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk for witchcraft. She is one among eighteen witches present at the session. Her execution took place the 27th of August, 1645.(Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Anne Alderman Anne Alderman Witch
1520

A woman from Suffolk who is tried, convicted, and condemned to death by the judges and justices at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk for witchcraft. She is one among eighteen witches present at the session. Her execution took place the 27th of August, 1645.(Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Rebecca Morris Rebecca Morris Witch
1521

A woman from Suffolk who is tried, convicted, and condemned to death by the judges and justices at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk for witchcraft. She is one among eighteen witches present at the session. Her execution took place the 27th of August, 1645.(Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Mary Fuller Mary Fuller Witch
1522

A woman from Suffolk who is tried, convicted, and condemned to death by the judges and justices at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk for witchcraft. She is one among eighteen witches present at the session. Her execution took place the 27th of August, 1645.(Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Mary Clowes Mary Clowes Witch
1523

A woman from Suffolk who is tried, convicted, and condemned to death by the judges and justices at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk for witchcraft. She is one among eighteen witches present at the session. Her execution took place the 27th of August, 1645.(Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Margery Sparham Margery Sparham Witch
1524

A woman from Suffolk who is tried, convicted, and condemned to death by the judges and justices at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk for witchcraft. She is one among eighteen witches present at the session. Her execution took place the 27th of August, 1645.(Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Katherine Tooley Katherine Tooley Witch
1525

A woman from Suffolk who is tried, convicted, and condemned to death by the judges and justices at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk for witchcraft. She is one among eighteen witches present at the session. Her execution took place the 27th of August, 1645.(Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Sarah Spinlow Sarah Spinlow Witch
1526

A man from Suffolk who is tried, convicted, and condemned to death by the judges and justices at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk for witchcraft. He is one among eighteen witches present at the session. His execution took place the 27th of August, 1645.(Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Iane Limstead Ian Limstead Witch
1527

A woman from Suffolk who is tried, convicted, and condemned to death by the judges and justices at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk for witchcraft. She is one among eighteen witches present at the session. Her execution took place the 27th of August, 1645.(Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Anne Wright Anne Wright Witch
1528

A woman from Suffolk who is tried, convicted, and condemned to death by the judges and justices at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk for witchcraft. She is one among eighteen witches present at the session. Her execution took place the 27th of August, 1645.(Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Mary Smith Mary Smith (2) Witch
1529

A man from Suffolk who is tried, convicted, and condemned to death by the judges and justices at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk for witchcraft. He is one among eighteen witches present at the session. His execution took place the 27th of August, 1645.(Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Iane Rivert Ian Rivert Witch
1530

A woman from Suffolk who is tried, convicted, and condemned to death by the judges and justices at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk for witchcraft. She is one among eighteen witches present at the session. Her execution took place the 27th of August, 1645.(Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Susan Manners Susan Manners Witch
1531

A woman from Suffolk who is tried, convicted, and condemned to death by the judges and justices at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk for witchcraft. She is one among eighteen witches present at the session. Her execution took place the 27th of August, 1645.(Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Mary Skipper Mary Skipper Witch
1534

An old woman from Suffolk, who confesses at a session held in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk to being "a Witch the space of above fifty yeares," during which time she bewitched both cattle and corn, and gave suck to her imps "which came to her in severall shapes". She also confessed to bewitching "seven persons of one family to death" of a man (Anonymous 284), his wife (Anonymous 285) and their five children (Anonymous 286, Anonymous 287, Anonymous 288, Anonymous 289, Anonymous 290). She may be any of: Mary Bacon, Anne Alderman, Rebecca Morris, Mary Fuller, Mary Clowes, Margery Sparham, Katherine Tooley, Sarah Spinlow, Anne Wright, Mary Smith, Susan Manners or Mary Skipper. She is tried, convicted and condemned by the judge and justices at the session, one among eighteen others. She is executed August 27, 1645.(Cover, 3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover, 3

Anonymous 271 Witch
1542

A woman from Suffolk, described as "another of the women witches" who confesses at a session held in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk to: being a witch "above five and twenty yeares,"; bewitching a child (Anonymous 283) to death; bewitching cattle and corn; and many other "such like evill deeds." She may be any of: Mary Bacon, Anne Alderman, Rebecca Morris, Mary Fuller, Mary Clowes, Margery Sparham, Katherine Tooley, Sarah Spinlow, Anne Wright, Mary Smith, Susan Manners or Mary Skipper. She is tried, convicted and condemned by the judge and justices at the session, one among eighteen others. She is executed August 27, 1645.(Cover, 4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover, 4

Anonymous 272 Witch
1548

A woman from Suffolk imprisoned with 120 others at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk as a suspected witch in 1645. She confessed that she "had carnall copulation with the Devill," while her husband was still alive, and by the Devil, conceived twice. As soon as the offspring was born, "they run away in most horrid long and ugly shapes."(5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 273 Witch
1549

A woman from Suffolk imprisoned with 120 others at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk as a suspected witch in 1645. She confessed that had a grudge against a gentleman (Anonymous 281) and his wife (Anonymous 282), and so send "one of her impes in the likenesse of a little black smoth dog" to play with their only son (Anonymous 275). The imp drowned the boy "to the great grief of the parents."(5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 274 Witch
1555

A woman in prison at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk in 1645 for witchcraft, who is sentenced to be burned. She is penitent for her "former lewd and abominable indevours," and asks for "Petitions put up to divers godly Ministers that they would be pleased to pray in their severall Congrefations," so that her imps will have no further power to hurt others.(5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 276 Witch
1558

A man from Little Wakerlng in the county of Essex who, along with his wife Margery Skelton, is indicted at the Assizes for allegedly bewitching John Churcheman who died instantly. Both plead not guilty, but are found guilty. ()

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011,

William Skelton William Skelton Witch
1559

A woman from Little Wakering in the county of Essex who, along with her husband William Skelton, is indicted at the assize for allegedly bewitching John Churcheman so that he died immediately. Both pleaded not guilty, but were found guilty.()

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011,

Margery Skelton Margery Skelton Witch
1567

A woman from Stoke in Ipswich, Suffolk who allegedly exchanges imps with Anne Leech, her sister-in-law.(7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 7

Anne Pearce Anne Pearce Witch
1584

A woman from Halstead in the county of Essex who is indicted at the assize in Chelmsford for three crimes. Firstly, she allegedly bewitched SIbyl Bentall. Bentall was violently ill for twelve days and despaired for her life. She is also indicted for bewitching a cow belonging to Owen Norman causing it to become violently ill. Thirdly, Steadman is indicted for allegedly bewitching three cows belonging to John Rome so that for three days they languished. In all three cases, Steadman pleads not guilty, but is found guilty(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=2)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=2

Agnes Steadman Agnes Steadman Witch
1589

A widow from Gravesend in the county of Kent, Neale is indicted at the Kent assizes in Maidstone in March of 1676 for bewitching and murder. She allegedly bewitched (on separate occasions) Elizabeth Morgan, William Eason, and Walter Warren so that all three languished and then died. In all three cases, the bill was endorsed by different people, but was unable to move forward because of insufficient evidence. (3-16)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 3-16

Anne Neale Anne Neale Witch
1611

A woman (Anonymous 269) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of nine women accused of causing the long, violent, and troubling fits suffered by John Smyth. Six of the alleged witches had familiar spirits; Anonymous 269 has been alotted a spirit in the likenes of a horse, which made John Smyth "whinny" when it tormented him. The alleged witch would be brought before John Smyth and made to unwitch him by calling their spirits off. Anonymous 269 would, for instance, be made to say "I such a one chardge the hors, yf I be a wiche, that thou com forthe of the chilld." Anonymous 269 is executed on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth. (6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 269 Witch
1612

A woman (Anonymous 292) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of nine women accused of causing the long, violent, and troubling fits suffered by John Smyth. Six of the alleged witches had familiar spirits; Anonymous 292 has a familiar spirit in the shape of a dog. As with the other nine witches, Anonymous 292 is asked to identify herself as a witch, and one able to call her own spirit out of John Smyth. If she complies, Smyth is able to rest; if she refuses to unwitch him in this way, he would "be myghtyly tormented." Anonymous 292 is executed on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth.(6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 292 Witch
1613

A woman (Anonymous 293) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of nine women accused of causing the long, violent, and troubling fits suffered by John Smyth. Six of the alleged witches had familiar spirits; Anonymous 293 has a familiar spirit in the shape of a cat. As with the other nine witches, Anonymous 293 is asked to identify herself as a witch, and one able to call her own spirit out of John Smyth. If she complies, Smyth is able to rest; if she refuses to unwitch him in this way, he would "be myghtyly tormented." Anonymous 293 is executed on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth.(6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 293 Witch
1614

A woman (Anonymous 294) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of nine women accused of causing the long, violent, and troubling fits suffered by John Smyth. Six of the alleged witches had familiar spirits; Anonymous 294 has a familiar spirit in the shape of a pullemar (fullmart?). As with the other nine witches, Anonymous 294 is asked to identify herself as a witch, and one able to call her own spirit out of John Smyth. If she complies, Smyth is able to rest; if she refuses to unwitch him in this way, he would "be myghtyly tormented." Anonymous 294 is executed on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth.(6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 294 Witch
1615

A woman (Anonymous 295) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of nine women accused of causing the long, violent, and troubling fits suffered by John Smyth. Six of the alleged witches had familiar spirits; Anonymous 295 has a familiar spirit in the shape of a fish. As with the other nine witches, Anonymous 295 is asked to identify herself as a witch, and one able to call her own spirit out of John Smyth. If she complies, Smyth is able to rest; if she refuses to unwitch him in this way, he would "be myghtyly tormented." Anonymous 295 is executed on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth.(6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 295 Witch
1619

A woman (Anonymous 297) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of nine women accused of causing the long, violent, and troubling fits suffered by John Smyth. Six of the alleged witches had familiar spirits; Anonymous 297 has a familiar spirit in the shape of a code (cod?). As with the other nine witches, Anonymous 295 is asked to identify herself as a witch, and one able to call her own spirit out of John Smyth. If she complies, Smyth is able to rest; if she refuses to unwitch him in this way, he would "be myghtyly tormented." Anonymous 297 is executed on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth.(6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 297 Witch
1620

A woman (Anonymous 298) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of nine women accused of causing the long, violent, and troubling fits suffered by John Smyth. Anonymous 298 is executed on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth.(6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 298 Witch
1621

A woman (Anonymous 299) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of nine women accused of causing the long, violent, and troubling fits suffered by John Smyth. Anonymous 299 is executed on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth.(6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 299 Witch
1622

A woman (Anonymous 300) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of nine women accused of causing the long, violent, and troubling fits suffered by John Smyth. Anonymous 300 is executed on July 18, 1616, at Husbands Bosworth.(6-9)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 6-9

Anonymous 300 Witch
1623

A woman (Anonymous 301) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of six women imprisoned and examined before Mr. Mair, the Justices (including Sir Humphry Winch and Serjeant Crew) and a Dr. Lambe, in the town hall on October 16, 1616. One woman, allegedly admitted to the jailer that she was working in concert with her familiar, and with the other accused witches, to bewitch Smyth. She begged him not to reveal her secret, lest the other women torment her for speaking against them. In very short order, five of these women were released after James I's examination of John Smyth prompted him to retract his accusations. One woman, however, Anonymous 301, died in jail before this happened, evidently within hours of confessing her crimes.(271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

Anonymous 301 Witch
1624

A woman (Anonymous 302) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of six women imprisoned and examined before Mr. Mair, the Justices (including Sir Humphry Winch and Serjeant Crew) and a Dr. Lambe, in the town hall on October 16, 1616. One woman died in jail before the other five were released after James I's examination of John Smyth prompted him to retract his accusations. Anonymous 302 was one of the women who was released.(271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

Anonymous 302 Witch
1625

A woman (Anonymous 303) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of six women imprisoned and examined before Mr. Mair, the Justices (including Sir Humphry Winch and Serjeant Crew) and a Dr. Lambe, in the town hall on October 16, 1616. One woman died in jail before the other five were released after James I's examination of John Smyth prompted him to retract his accusations. Anonymous 303 was one of the women who was released.(271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

Anonymous 303 Witch
1626

A woman (Anonymous 304) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of six women imprisoned and examined before Mr. Mair, the Justices (including Sir Humphry Winch and Serjeant Crew) and a Dr. Lambe, in the town hall on October 16, 1616. One woman died in jail before the other five were released after James I's examination of John Smyth prompted him to retract his accusations. Anonymous 304 was one of the women who was released.(271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

Anonymous 304 Witch
1627

A woman (Anonymous 305) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of six women imprisoned and examined before Mr. Mair, the Justices (including Sir Humphry Winch and Serjeant Crew) and a Dr. Lambe, in the town hall on October 16, 1616. One woman died in jail before the other five were released after James I's examination of John Smyth prompted him to retract his accusations. Anonymous 304 was one of the women who was released.(271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

Anonymous 305 Witch
1628

A woman (Anonymous 306) from Husbands Bosworth in the county of Leicestershire, described as one of six women imprisoned and examined before Mr. Mair, the Justices (including Sir Humphry Winch and Serjeant Crew) and a Dr. Lambe, in the town hall on October 16, 1616. One woman died in jail before the other five were released after James I's examination of John Smyth prompted him to retract his accusations. Anonymous 306 was one of the women who was released.(271)

Appears in:
Nichols, John . A Letter from Alderman Robert Heyrick, of Leicester, to his brother Sir William, in the year 1616. London: 1898, 271

Anonymous 306 Witch
1629

A woman from Ramsgate in the county of Kent and the wife of a cordwainer named John Foster, Mary is indicted at the Kent Assizes in Maidstone in 1679 for allegedly murdering Michael Jordan and Margery Rigden by using witchcraft.(87-91)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 87-91

Mary Foster Mary Foster Witch
1643

A man from Hoo in the county of Kent who allegedly bewitches Sarah Curtis so that her body was "greatly wasted, pined and consumed."(150-157)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 150-157

Thomas Whiteing Thomas Whiteing Witch
1664

A woman from Cranbrook in the county of Kent. Scott is indicted at the Kent Assizes at Maidstone for allegedly murdering John Colman by use of witchcraft so that he languished for one week before he died.(141-145)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 141-145

Elizabeth Scott Elizabeth Scott Witch
1670

A woman from Hockham in the county of Norfolk, described as "a witch old and crazed, and hurt by a fall," Mother Frauncis had allegedly been a witch for more than thirty years, a died at about eighty years old. She was accused of, and imprisoned for, allegedly bewitching Joan Harvey who signified this maelific torment by becoming half out of her wits when Fraunces was in the same room. Moreover, when the maid was well, the witch was tormented; and when the witch was well the maid was tormented. She was also accused of bewitching and murdering the cows of three men from Hockham: Barnaby Francis, Edmund Fall, and Willimot, as well as the cow of Oliver (of Breckles) and William Blaynes (of Liittle Hockham). Fraunces' magic was not reserved for livestock, however. She also evidently bewitched six people over her long career as a witch. Four people she vexed: Swater's wife (Illington) and Payne's child, Eade's daughterm and Manning's wife (of Hockham). The remaining two people, Edmund Fall and Fit's Wife, she "bewitched to death" Frauncis died of compound injuries after she supposedly fell down, two weeks after being released from prision.(192)

Appears in:
Ewen, L'Estrange C.. Witchcraft and Demonism. London: 1922, 192

Margaret Fraunces Margaret Fraunces Witch
1673

A woman from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is wife to Mr. Pigeon. Mrs. Pigeon is compared to a siren, being not a woman but "charming with the musick of their fained speeches, a silly old man, and suddenly seising and devouring both him and all his family." She is the chief contriver in the downfall of the Goodwin family, including plotting the arrest of Mr. Goodwin's eldest son. She is described as being able to "transforme her self into an Angell of light," and passing off false Gospel. She was married to Mr. Starkey, and apothecary, but she "woried him out of the world with her wicked imperious usage." By Mr. Starkey, she had one child, and a fair estate. Upon his death, she married a lieutenant, Mr. Pigeon. She is also sister to Mrs. Jones and helps set up Mrs. Jones' relationship with Mr. Goodwin despite Mrs. Jones being already married, including setting up a marriage between the youngest Goodwin child and one of Mrs. Jones' daughters, making Mr. Goodwin's and Mrs. Jones' relationship incestuous in the eyes of God. Mrs. Pigeon is also allegedly involved with making an apprentice of Mr. Goodwin's "maillable," and takes a share of Mr. Goodwin's estate. Mrs. Pigeon is a woman "to whom no villainy is difficult," and allegedly drugs the servant Roger Cray, a young lady (Anonymous 307) to their own deaths. In her own marriage, Mrs. Pigeon is a wicked woman. Her constant "imperious carriage" by denying herself to her husband but bewitching him with amorous ways in order to gain his estate causes her husband at times to become ill and to fly into rages. She also becomes the mistress of a merchant while still married. She argues with Mr. Hansard Knowles, who leads her congregations, over the sickness of her husband, causing him to fly into a strange rage. She has the ability to change her appearance, making bruises on her face "by her art... yet more visible." She uses her charm and lies to separate from her husband. Mrs. Pigeon as a wicked woman engaged in unnatural practices is taken to the Justices by Mr. Goodwin's children, but she dismissed without punishment. Mr. Knowles eventually bans her from his Congregation, so that she must spend Sabbath at the Dye house. (1 - 26)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 1 - 26

Elizabeth Pigeon Mrs. Pigeon Witch
1674

A woman from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who used to be a schoolmistress before being wife to Mr. Jones. Mrs. Jones is compared to a siren, being not a woman but "charming with the musick of their fained speeches, a silly old man, and suddenly seising and devouring both him and all his family." She is sister of Mrs. Pigeon. She bewitches Mr. Goodwin upon the death of his wife so that he falls madly in love with her and acts strangely by dancing and violence, eventually leading to his family's ruin. She was disfavoured by the deceased Mrs. Goodwin. Mrs. Jones also engages in lewd behaviour, even while still married to Mr. Jones. She is falsely pious and bewitches Mr. Goodwin into think she is so and he can legally engage in relations with her. By a trick of words, she divorces her husband Mr. Jones, and steals his linens and more upon their separation. Mrs. Jones and her sister Mrs. Pigeon are involved in the sickness and death of Roger Crey, and a young woman (Anonymous 307). Her relationship with Mr. Goodwin becomes incestuous in the eyes of God when her daughter marries Mr. Goodwin's youngest son; she proceeds by this alliance to take Mr. Goodwin's estate. Mr. Goodwin's children take her to trial at St. Margarets' Hill, but she is dismissed by the justices there. She is eventually banned from Congregation, and must take Sabbath at the Dye house.(1 - 26)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 1 - 26

Mehetabell Jones Mrs. Jones Witch
1682

A woman from Strood in Kent who is accused of bewitching Mary Griffin so that she "languished until 7 Feb. and then died."(135-137)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 135-137

Anne Blundy Anne Blundy Witch
1688

A woman from Great Clacton in the county of Essex and daughter of accused witch Anne Cooper and perhaps the granddaughter of Joan Cooper. Sara Cooper allegedly was offered an "Impe in the likenes of a gray Kite (a hawk)" named Tom Boy and another familiar in the shape of a Cat. Accepting these imps would have made Sara into a witch; she does not, however, appear to have been tried as one. (23)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 23

Sara Cooper Sara Cooper Witch
1689

A woman from Thorpe-le-Soken in the county of Essex who is accused of sorcery and witchcraft. She does not appear to make it to trial and is found dead in jail, some time around July 17, 1645.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Elizabeth Gibson Elizabeth Gibson Witch
1690

A sixty year old widow from Langham in the county of Essex, an accused witch, and maybe a relative of two other women, Susan Cook/ Cocke, who was tried for witchcraft on 29 of July, 1645 at Chemlsford in Essex and her mother, Margery Stoakes. Mary Cooke dies in the goal at Chelmsford May 29th, 1645(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Mary Cooke Mary Cooke Witch
1692

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex who allegedly gives Rose Hallybread an imp which she later loses. (33-34)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 33-34

Hagtreee Goodwife Hagtree Witch
1730

A woman Thorpe-le-Soken in the county of Essex and daughter of accused witch Margaret Moone. Like her sister and mother, Judith is searched as a witch; Francis Miller testified that she "biggs in [her] privy parts as the said Margaret" had, described as "long teats or bigges in her secret parts." Moone testified she had fought with her mother that about two weeks before her apprehension; Margaret wanted her to go collect wood, Judith didn't feel like doing it. The next night, something crawled into bed with her, although she searched, she could not "could not finde any thing." Judith Moone appears to have died on the way to the gallows. (28-29)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, 28-29

Judith Moone Judith Moone Witch
1731

A woman form Thorpe-le-Soken in the county of Essex and daughter of accused witch Margaret Moone. Like her sister Judith and her mother, this woman is searched as a witch; Francis Miller testified that she "biggs in [her] privy parts as the said Margaret" had, described as "long teats or bigges in her secret parts." (28-29)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 28-29

Moone Moone (Daughter) Witch
1732

A woman from Ramsey in the county of Essex, wife of William Hatting and mother of John Hatting, and described as a "scolder." She is accused of bewitching Francis Stock's wife, daughter, and child with "extraordinary fits, pains and burnings all over" until then they died, and tormenting his servant, causing him to suffer from a "pining and languishing condition, crying out often of the said Sarah, that she had bewitched him, and was the cause of his death, which soon after ensued." Having been accused of entertaining, employing, and feeding two mice familiars, Hating is searched as a witch. She is found to have "foure Teats, or Bigges in those parts, almost an inch long, and as bigge as," according to Bridget Reynolds, her "little finger." Sara was legally indicted and found guilty bewitching Lionel Jefferson who died within a month, and Thomas Greene who died within two month. Hating denied all charges against her. She was hanged as a witch in 1645.(30-33)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 30-33

Sarah Hatting Sara Hatting Witch
1734

A woman from Harwich in the county of Essex, sister of Marian Hockett, Sarah Barton alledges that her sister gave her three familiars named Little-man, Pretty-man, and Dainty. Barton, herself accused of witchcraft, and held in the Harwich gaol, claims that her sister, Marion, has sliced off her witch's marks and healed herself pilasters, to conceal the open wounds. (32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 32

Sara Barton Sara Barton Witch
1749

A woman from Walton-in- Soken in the county of Essex, accused of "murder and raising spirits." She allegedly has "an evil spirit in the form of a bird called a jay" which she uses to bewitch Samuel Munt, who allegedly dies instantaneously. She is hanged as a witch in 1645.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341226)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341226

Margaret Grewe Margaret Grewe Witch
1751

A woman from Manningtree in the county of Essex, who allegedly bewitched Anne Wolvett, the daughter of Henry Woolvett, a mason in Manningtree. She appears to have been hanged for this crime. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341086)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341086

Sarah Bright Sarah Bright Witch
1756

A woman from Langham in the county of Essex, wife of John Sterling of Langham, Mary Sterling appears on December 19, 1642, along with her husband John, as being made "to answer the inhabitants of Langham." Sterling has only a short reprieve before she appears again, this time as a witch who allegedly entertains, employs, and feeds two familiars, in the form of moles. It is likely with one of these that she is believed to have bewitched Robert Potter Jr., a yeoman in Langham; these allegations were witnessed by John Sterne himself. Although Sterling was found guilty on both charges, she was "reprieved after judgement and to remain to gaol until the next Gaol Delivery." Indeed Sterling does appear in the roles for the Assizes held at Chelmsford 22 March 1648, where she appears on felony charges. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=8)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=8

Mary Stering Mary Stearling Witch
1758

A widow from Langham in the county of Essex, Susan Went is accused of entertaining, employing, and feeding black, mole-shaped familiars. Although this accusation was witnessed by Matthew Hopkins, and was compelling enough to warrant a death sentence, Went was "reprieved after judgement and to remain to gaol until the next Gaol Delivery." (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Susan Went Susan Went Witch
1759

A woman from Holland (now Great Holland) who allegedly had a familiar spirit in the form of a mouse named Prickeares. She is found guilt of this charge and condemned to die as a witch, at Chemlsford in 1645, but is "reprieved after judgement and to remain to gaol until the next Gaol Delivery." She appears again as one of the prisoners at the Colchester gaol, in August 11, 1647, having been committed for felony-to be kept in gaol until she can be "lawfully delivered." (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=12)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=12

Bridget Mayers Bridget Mayers Witch
1760

A woman from Great Holland in the county of Essex, the wife of Edward Thurston, a husbandman, Anne Thurston is accused of having two familiar spirits, "one in the from of a bird, the other of a mouse." She is committed for bewitching Aldurton's cow, and found not guilty. She was also committed for the crime of raising spirits, and found guilty, but reprieved and sentenced to remain to gaol until the next Gaol Delivery. Thurston appears to still be in the Colcheter gaol in August 11, 1647, where she is kept until she can be "thence lawfully delivered."(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Anne Thurston Anne Thurston Witch
1761

A woman from Kirby-le-Soken in the county of Essex and wife John Coppin. Coppin allegedly bewitched Alice Astin, who died instantly. She was found guilty of murder by witchcraft, but was "but was reprived after judgement uppon desire of Mr Gray the minister." As of August 11, 1647 she remained in the Colchester gaol, until she could be "lawfully delivered."(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Mary Coppin Mary Coppin Witch
1763

A woman from Clacton in the county of Essex and wife of Robert Waters. Dorothy Waters is accused of having, employing, and feeding "an evil spirit in the form of a dun coloured mouse. She is found guilty of this charge and condemned to die as a witch, at Chemlsford in 1645, but is "reprieved after judgement and to remain to gaol until the next Gaol Delivery." She appears again as one of the prisoners at the Colchester gaol, in August 11, 1647, having been committed for felony-to be kept in gaol until she can be "lawfully delivered." (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=3)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=3

Dorothy Waters Dorothy Waters Witch
1822

A woman from St. Nicholas' in Rochester in the county of Kent who is indicted at the Maidstone Assizes for allegedly bewitching Anne Huggins so that her body became "wasted and consumed."(58-65)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 58-65

James Watts James Watts Witch
1823

A sixteen year old girl from St Nicholas' in Rochester in the county of Kent who is allegedly bewitched by James Watts so that she became "wasted and consumed." (58-65)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 58-65

John Watts John Watts Witch
1895

A woman likely from Great-Holland in the county of Essex and mother of Anne Cate (Maidenhood). Sometime around 1623, this woman allegedly gives her daughter Cate the four familiars spirits, James, Prickeare, Robyn, and Sparrow, which she uses to torment and kill her neighbors. (38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38

Anonymous 345 Witch
1896

A widow from Hampstead in the county of Middlesex. Alice Bradley is indicted on four separate instances for witchcraft. Firstly, she is said to have used witchcraft on Robert Philpott so that he languished in his body for over twenty days. A few months later she is charged for having allegedly used witchcraft "against and upon two heafers worth five pounds, of the goods and chattels of Philip Barrett, so that she thereby killed and slew the same "juvencas vocat' heafers." She is charged again for she is said to have used witchcraft a few days later "against and upon four hogges worth fifty shillings, of the goods and chattels of Robert James, so that she killed and slew the same hogs." Then, she also allegedly use wicthcraft on Margaret James so that she "languished and wasted in her body for the space of three days, and so has continued and remained." Bradley pleads not guilty to all charges and is acquitted on all charges. (7-8)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 7-8

Anne Bradley Anne Bradley Witch
1900

A woman from Windsor in the county of Berkshire, known to be the daughter of Father Rosimond, whom Elizabeth Stile alleges is a witch and keeps a white cat for her familiar.(Image 5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579, Image 5

Rosimond Rosimond (Daughter) Witch
1908

A woman from Stisted in the county of Essex, daughter of Joan Cunny, and sister to Margaret Cunny, Avice Cunny is described as a "lewde Daughter," who was "no better then a naughty pack" and mother to a ten or twelve year old bastard son (who turns, as does his cousin, witness against his mother, aunt, and grandmother. Avice Cunny is found guilty "of murder by incantation," but pleads her belly and after being examined and found pregnant, is remanded. (A3, A4 )

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, A3, A4

Avice Cunny Avice Cunny Witch
1949

Two unknown women of Penzance in the county of Cornwall, who allegedly appeared to John Tonken in the company of Old Woman (Anonymous 6); as with Old Woman, Tonken is the only person who can see them. They accompanied Old Woman on her last visit to Tonken, in which she bid him farewell, saying she would trouble him no more. Two women were arrested on suspicion of witchcraft on Tonken's testimony: Jane Noal, and Betty Seeze.(5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Account of a Strange and Wonderful Relation of John Tonken, of Pensans in Cornwall. London: 1686, 5-6

Anonymous 373 Witch
1951

A woman of Penzance in the county of Cornwall, who was arrested on suspicion of witchcraft along with Betty Seeze following alleged demoniac John Tonken's testimony regarding the women who had appeared to him during his fits.(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Account of a Strange and Wonderful Relation of John Tonken, of Pensans in Cornwall. London: 1686, 6

Jane Noal Jane Noal Witch
1952

A woman of Penzance in the county of Cornwall, who was arrested on suspicion of witchcraft along with Jane Noal following alleged demoniac John Tonken's testimony regarding the women who had appeared to him during his fits.(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Account of a Strange and Wonderful Relation of John Tonken, of Pensans in Cornwall. London: 1686, 6

Elizabeth Seeze Betty Seeze Witch
1969

A spinster and wife of one Robert Mersam from Whitecross Street in the county of Middlesex (now the London borough of Islington) who, "at the instigation of the Devil," practiced many diabolical acts and acts of witchcraft upon James Thompson who languished and whose body wasted within the space of five days and continued so at the time of the indictment. (20)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 20

Rose Mersam Rose Mersam Witch
1982

A spinster from Enfield in the county of Middlesex (now the London borough of Enfield), Grodfrey was married to the town yeoman, John Godfrey. Agnes Godfrey is tried for various crimes of witchcraft between 1572 and 1588. She was first tried for allegedly harming a steere, a pig, a little pig and a mare, "of the goods and chattels" of William Durante. She was then tried for allegedly practicing witchcraft on Frances Baker, causing her to become " sick, weak and wasted in body." She, Frances Baker, remained so at the time of the deposition. She then was tried on two separate occasions for allegedly practicing witchcraft on Jasper Tappes and a one year old infant named Thomas Phillippes and an infant named William Harvye, causing their deaths. Agnes Godfrey plead not guilty to all the indictments. She is found guilty of killing William Durante's steere, pig, little pig and mare in accordance with the first indictment, and guilty of killing Thomas Phillippe. She was, however, found not guilty of the other charges. Her sentence for these crimes is unknown. She is also tried for allegedly practicing witchcraft on William Durant and William Coxe, causing them both to languish and their bodies to waste. Coxe eventually dies after languishing for a year. She is also indicted for practicing witchcraft on Robert Coxe and Henry Butterfield, causing them both to languish and then die. She pleads not guilty to all these accusations and is acquitted of all charges. (57-58, 79-80)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 57-58, 79-80

Agnes Godfrey Agnes Godfrey Witch
1991

A widow from Edmonton in the county of Middlesex (now the London borough of Enfield), who is indicted for allegedly practicing witchcraft on six people (Edward Boulton, John Baylie, Thomas Coleman, Josias Boswell, Richard Frisby, and Susan Mason) causing them to become ill and leading to their deaths. Beaver pleads not guilty to all the charges and is acquitted on all counts. (72-73)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 72-73

Anne Beaver Anne Beaver Witch
1998

A woman from Finchley in the county of Middlesex (now the London borough of Barnet) who allegedly practices witchcraft upon Priscella Fielde, William Lyon, Frances Fielde, and James Fielde. William Lyon becomes lame while Priscella, Frances and James Fielde all die. Rutter is indicted and pleads guilty. She is sentenced to be hung. (108)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 108

Elizabeth Rutter Elizabeth Rutter Witch
2003

A woman from Hampstead in the county of Middlesex who is married to William Hunt, a yeoman. Joan Hunt allegedly practices "certain detestable, impious and devilish arts, called witchcraftes inchauntmentes charmes and sorceries" on a thre year old infant named John Nuttinge. Nuttinge languishes for a few days and then dies. Joan Hunt is indicted for the crime and found guilty. She is sentenced to be hanged. (110, 218)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 110, 218

Joan Hunt Joan Hunt Witch
2004

A yeoman from Hampstead in the county of Middlesex who is married to Joan Hunt, an alleged witch. William Hunt is indicted (along with his wife, Joan) of bewitching Ales James and Richard Parrett, rendering both of them lame. The Hunts plead not guilty to the charges of bewitching James and Parrett and are acquitted on both counts. (110, 218)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 110, 218

William Hunt William Hunt Witch
2010

A woman from Stisted in the county of Essex. Joan Turner is accused of facilitating witchcraft by Elizabeth Bennett; Bennett accuses her of sending her two milk hungry familiar spirits, "Suckin, being blacke like a Dogge, the other called Lierd, beeing red like a Lion," because she had once denied Turner milk. According to Alice Manfield, her own four spirits, Robin, Jack, William, and Puppet (alias Mamet), abandoned her to hide out with Mother Turner (or Ursley Kempe, Margery Sammon, or Ales Hunt). She was indicted at Brentwood 13 March 1581 for bewitching Anne Feast, "so that her life was despaired of," George Sparrow, and the pregnant Ellen Sparrow to death, and found guilty on all charges. She is remanded to Colchester Castle prison as a felon and remains incarcerated for a year. (B6, Cv)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, B6, Cv

Joan Turner Joan Turner Witch
2023

A woman from the county of Middlesex who is indicted for allegedly practicing witchcraft upon Thomas Poole and Thomazine Heathe. Magicke pleads not guilty, but is found guilty. She is sentenced to a minimum of four years in prison and the pillory.(218)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 218

Dorothy Magicke Dorothy Magicke Witch
2024

A woman from an unknown area of Kent, who allegedly possesses Margaret Gurr as a witch on several instances throughout July and August of 1681. She enters Margaret Gurr and tempts "not to Pray, but Curse and Sware." She instructs Gurr to "Do as I say, and do as I would have you, and be as I am, for I am a Witch, a Witch. I am a Witch, do as I say and be as I am, and you shall be well," moreover, she emphasizes that "you shall be as well as ever you were in your Life." However, this wellness comes from possession and bewitchment alone; she counsels Margaret Gurr against seeking the help of Dr. Skinner, saying "take none of his Physick." Her possession of Margaret Gurr also causes Margaret Gurr "a most lamentable pain in my Limbs." The witch is cast out of Margaret Gurr by Dr. Skinner, along with two other devils (Anonymous 15 and Anonymous 16).(3-4)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 3-4

Anonymous 382 Witch
2062

A woman from Stratford in the County of Essex, who was brought before the Essex Assizes on charges of witchcraft for allegedly bewitching Joan Warlowe to death. Rogers was found not guilty.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=336932)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=336932

Margaret Rogers Margaret Rogers Witch
2068

A woman from Waltham in the county of Essex, Lowe is married to a yeoman named John. Elizabeth Lowe is indicted for allegedly bewitching Robert Wodley, John Wodley, and John Canell. Lowe pleads not guilty on all three counts, but is found guilty on all counts. She then pleads pregnancy. Lowe is supposedly the first person to ever be indicted by the 'Act agaynst conjuracions Inchantments and Witchcraftes.' Her case was brought forth less than a year after the act was passed by the Elizabethan government. While Lowe's contained a few unusual details for the time, her case was nevertheless not very rare. On one occasion, she allegedly bewitched her husband making him lame, which is not unheard of for the period. Elizabeth Lowe's case does provide something that others seem to be unable to, however. Lowe's case is recorded in detail and, on top of being the first one indicted under the 'Act agaynst conjuracions Inchantments and Witchcraftes,' her case can be clearly read as an example of how and why witches were persecuted to calm social anxieties. Alan R. Young's article forwards this view, arguing that Lowe's case provided villagers with an easily identifiable source of anxieties they could hardly articulate. An excerpt is included with this entry. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=331635)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=331635

Elizabeth Lowys Elizabeth Lowe Witch
2082

An old woman from Brighling in the county of Sussex, who is allegedly a witch. She comes to a servant girl of Joseph Cruttenden, and tells her, "sad Calamaties were coming upon her Master and Dame, their House should be Fired, and many other troubles befal them" and further explains to the girl that "if she spake of what she had told her, the Devil would tear her to pieces." After the woman's predictions come to pass, the girl "told her Dame the former story of the Womans Discourse," and so the old woman is "sent for, and Examined before Captain Collins, Mr. Busbridge," as well as searched and watched for a full twenty four hours. The servant girl (Anonymous 397) however, claims that while "she is like the Woman," she "will not swear it is the same." The old woman "was formerly suspected to be a Witch, had to Maidstone about it, but got away," and moved to Burwast, where she lived for some time. The old woman later sends "some meal" to her neighbours (Anonymous 401), to make into bread. However, they "could not make it into Loaves, but it was like Butter." When they put it in the oven, "it would not bake," but when it came out, it was "as it went in."(54)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 54

Anonymous 398 Witch
2096

A woman from Gilsborough in the county of Northampton, alleged to be a witch. It is said that, a fortnight before Agnes Brown's apprehension, Katherine Gardiner, Agnes Brown and Joan Lucas were seen to ride at night on a sow's back to Rauenstrop to visit Mother Rhoades. However, while they were en route, Mother Rhoades died; her last words were heard to be that there were "three of her old friends comming to se her, but they came too late, Howbeit shee would mete with them in another place within a month after."(B5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B5

Katherine Gardiner Katherine Gardiner Witch
2097

A woman from Gilsborough in the county of Northampton, alleged to be a witch. It is said that, a fortnight before Agnes Brown's apprehension, Joan Lucas, Agnes Brown and Katherine Gardiner were seen to ride at night on a sow's back to Rauenstrop to visit Mother Rhoades. However, while they were en route, Mother Rhoades died; her last words were heard to be that there were "three of her old friends comming to se her, but they came too late, Howbeit shee would mete with them in another place within a month after."(B5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B5

Joan Lucas Joan Lucas Witch
2098

A woman from Ravenstrop in the county of Northampton, alleged to be a witch. It is said that, a fortnight before Agnes Brown's apprehension, Katherine Gardiner, Agnes Brown and Joan Lucas were seen to ride at night on a sow's back to to visit Mother Rhoades. However, while they were en route, Mother Rhoades died; her last words were heard to be that there were "three of her old friends comming to se her, but they came too late, Howbeit shee would mete with them in another place within a month after."(B5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B5

Rhoades Mother Rhoades Witch
2102

A woman from Beckington in the county of Somerset, who is described as being "an old Woman." She is apprehended "by a Warrant from a Justice of Peace," after Mary Hill allegedly identifies her as appearing before her during one of Mary Hill's fits, characterized by the vomiting of crooked nails. Elizabeth Carrier is "Convicted by the Oaths of two Persons," and committed to "the County Goal," where she "dyed as soon as she came into Prison."(75)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 75

Elizabeth Carrier Elizabeth Carrier Witch
2152

A woman from Winchester in the county of Hampshire, who is allegedly of "evil fame" amongst her neighbours, and "suspected of divers ill practices." These are particularly associated with a schoolmistress in the area, whom she allegedly mutters against. After this incident, the schoolmistress (Anonymous 418) is menaced by several familiars attributed to this woman of "evil fame," including a "monstrous great Toad," and seven or nine cats. The cats come to visit the schoolmistress before she experiences a number of violent fits. It is believed that this woman is responsible for those fits, as well the fits experienced by the schoolmistress's young son (Anonymous 421). At one incident, the schoolmistress allegedly sees the suspected woman during one of her son's fits. John H., the schoolmistress's husband "cut the Witch," and "it was observed that that Party had a lame hand for a considerable time." Further, when the suspected witch (Anonymous 419) was in church, the schoolmistress (Anonymous 418) was not able to enter the church. The suspected witch eventually dies, "five years after the Afflicted," although by that time, the schoolmistress was "of opinion that others, beside the suspected Party, contributed to her misery."(189-190)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 189-190

Anonymous 419 Witch
2168

A woman from Redness in the county of Yorkshire who is indicted at the Castle of York for allegedly bewitching Rennerd's child, for allegedly killing foals belonging to Nicholas Baldwin of Redness, and for allegedly using witchcraft on Richard Brown, causing him to become sick and die. In 1648, Baldwin accuses Lambe of having murdered his three foals by use of witchcraft. Baldwin therefore beat her with his cane and had it not been for his wife who got down on her knees and asked for forgiveness, Baldwin claims he would have done much worse. In 1651, Thomas Rennerd, constable of Redness, claimed that his child was sick and that his wife suspected that Elizabeth Lambe had bewitching him. One day, Rennerd claims, his wife met Elizabeth Lambe at their doorstep and that Lambe fell down on her knees asking for forgiveness. The child recovered shortly thereafter. As for the case of Richard Brown Brown told Wreight that he was "cruelly handled at the heart with one Elizabeth Lambe." He added that she drew blood from his heart and wanted him to send for her to come to his house because he wanted to scratch her. He surmised that if he could scratch her and draw blood from her, his condition would improve. So, when Elizabeth Lambe is brought to him, Brown says to Lambe that she has wronged him and asks why he has done so. He concludes by saying that if she would do no more, he would forgive her. Lambe does not respond and so Wreight relates that Browne scratches her until she bled. He died within a week and complained all the while until he died that Elizabeth Lambe had caused his death. (58)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 58

Elizabeth Lambe Elizabeth Lambe Witch
2172

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, known to be minor gentry and the wife to old Robert Nutter, the mother of Christopher Nutter and the grandmother to young Robert Nutter and John Nutter. According to Anne Whittle, Elizabeth Nutter approached Whittle, Widow Lomeshaw and Jane Booth to request their assistance in killing her grandson Robert, so that the land would go to the women.(D4-D5)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, D4-D5

Elizabeth Nutter Elizabeth Nutter Witch
2173

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancaster. According to Anne Whittle, Boothman, Whittle and Widow Lomeshaw were approached by Elizabeth Nutter to assist her in killing her grandson Robert Nutter so that the land would go to the women. Boothman agreed to help, and is said to have done what she could to kill him. She died sometime between Robert Nutter's demise and the witch trials at Lancaster Assizes.(D4-D5)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, D4-D5

Jane Boothman Jane Boothman Witch
2178

A woman from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster. Grace Sowerbutts accused Old Doewife of bewitching her, along with Ellen Bierley, Jennet Bierley and Jane Southworth.(K4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K4v

Doewife Old Doewife Witch
2183

A woman from Thurniholme (Thurnham) in the County of Lancashire, known to be the wife of Chrisopher Hargraves, who allegedly attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. (G3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G3v

Elizabeth Hargraves Elizabeth Hargraves Witch
2184

A man from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, known to be the husband of Elizabeth Howgate, son of Elizabeth Southerns, brother of Elizabeth Device and uncle of James, Jennet and Alison Device, who allegedly attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. (G3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G3v

Christopher Howgate Christopher Howgate Witch
2185

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, known to be the wife of Christopher Howgate, who allegedly attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. (G3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G3v

Elizabeth Howgate Elizabeth Howgate Witch
2186

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, who allegedly attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. (Rv-R2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Rv-R2

Jennet Hargraves Jennet Hargraves Witch
2187

A man from Thurniholme (Thurnham) in the County of Lancashire, known to be the husband of Elizabeth Hargraves, who allegedly attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. (G3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, G3v

Christopher Hargraves Christopher Hargraves Witch
2188

A woman from Padiham in the County of Lancashire, who allegedly attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. (Rv-R2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Rv-R2

Grace Hay Grace Hay Witch
2189

A woman from Marchden in the County of Lancashire, who allegedly attended the Good Friday feast at Malking Tower. (Rv-R2)

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Mary Poole, Theft > grand larceny, 13th December 1699. . London: 1699, Rv-R2

Anne Crunckshey Anne Crunckshey Witch
2190

A woman from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, an apparition of whom John Law allegedly saw tormenting him with Alison Device. Law was lamed, rendered speechless and suffered a sensation of being pricked after refusing to sell Alison Device some pins. He did not recognize Anonymous 427, simply describing her to his son Abraham Law as an old woman.(S-Sv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, S-Sv

Anonymous 427 Witch
2201

A woman from Great Gadson in the County of Buckinghamshire, who allegedly had a falling out with Anonymous 429. She is said to have summoned two demons with Anonymous 431 and sent them to Anonymous 429; the spirits could not enter him because he was praying. They sent the spirits into his daughter Anonymous 28 instead.(2-3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire. London: 1677, 2-3

Anonymous 430 Witch
2202

A woman from Great Gadson in the County of Buckinghamshire, who assisted Anonymous 430 in summoning two spirits to possess Anonymous 429. The spirits could not enter him because he was praying, so Anonymous 430 and Anonymous 431 ordered them to possess his daughter Anonymous 28 instead.(2-3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire. London: 1677, 2-3

Anonymous 431 Witch
2215

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, alleged to be a Grand Witch. According to Margaret Muschamp, Grand Witch Meg appeared on St. John's Day (Midsummer Day) night to try and take George Muschamp Jr.'s life and Betty Muschamp's use of her legs. Margaret Muschamp had gathered a group of family and neighbours to pray for them, and they successfully repelled Grand Witch Meg's attempt. The only sign of her presence is a sudden stench of brimstone; no-one sees her but Margaret.(16-17)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 16-17

Meg Grand Witch Meg Witch
2219

A woman from Fevorsham in the County of Kent. Joan Carridan accused Goodwife Pantery of hosting a meeting of witches at which the "Divell sat at the upper end of the Table." Goodwife Dadson was said to have attended, and Goodwife Gardener was expected but did not come. Elizabeth Harris also accused her of meeting numerous times with Joan Williford and Jane Hott.(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott. London: 1645, 3

Pantery Goodwife Pantery Witch
2220

A woman from Fevorsham in the County of Kent. Joan Carridan accused Goodwife Dadson of attending a meeting of witches hosted by Goodwife Pantery at which the "Divell sat at the upper end of the Table." Elizabeth Harris also accused her of having a "very bad tongue."(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott. London: 1645, 3

Dadson Goodwife Dadson Witch
2221

A woman from Fevorsham in the County of Kent. Elizabeth Harris, when asked whether there were other witches in the town, accused Goodwife Cox of having a "very bad tongue."(5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott. London: 1645, 5

Cox Goodwife Cox Witch
2222

A woman from Fevorsham in the County of Kent. Joan Carridan alleged that Goodwife Gardner was expected at, but did not attend, a meeting of witches hosted by Goodwife Pantery at which the "Divell sat at the upper end of the Table." Elizabeth Harris also accused her of having a "very ill tongue."(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott. London: 1645, 3

Gardner Goodwife Gardner Witch
2224

An old man from Warboys in the county of Huntington, known to be the husband of Mother Alice Samuel, father of Agnes Samuel and a neighbour of Robert Throckmorton. When Mother Samuel refuses to go to the Throckmorton household after Robert Throckmorton arranges for her hire with John Samuel, he beats her with a cudgel until Robert Throckmorton convinces him to stop. Mother Samuel agrees to go with Throckmorton after the beating to escape John, and would not return home until he was out on an errand. When Robert Throckmorton came to question Agnes, he claimed to not know where she was while she hid above the parlour with sacks and tubs weighing down the trap door. After Mother Samuel was made to confess by the Throckmortons and Dr. Dorington convinced Robert Throckmorton to allow her to return home, John and Agnes convinced her to retract her confession. He called her a foul name the next day when he realized she had confessed all over again and had to be stopped from striking her; she fell into a faint when he tried. He later came to the Throckmorton house claiming to have heard Agnes was sick, and while there Elizabeth Throckmorton accused him of being a witch and demanded he speak a "charm" in which he confess to being a witch and that he had bewitched her; he refused. Hearing his wife deny involvement in Lady Cromwell's death in court, he said for all to hear "denie it not, but confesse the trueth: for thou didst it one way or other." Mother Samuel claimed he knew all about the death of Lady Cromwell, and that he had the skills of both a witch and an unwitcher himself. John Samuel was executed with Mother Samuel and Agnes Samuel following the trial.(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3

John Samuel John Samuel Witch
2225

A woman from Warboys in the county of Huntington, known to be the daughter of Mother Alice Samuel and John Samuel, and a neighbour of Robert Throckmorton. When Mother Samuel was taken to the Throckmorton home to be scratched by the afflicted children, Agnes was brought with her; Mother Samuel was overheard telling Agnes not to confess to anything. Later, Robert Throckmorton came to the Samuel home to question Agnes; she hid in a room above the parlour and blocked the trap door while John Samuel tried to convince Throckmorton she wasn't there. Agnes finally emerged when Throckmorton threatened to break into the room. She was imprisoned alongside Mother Samuel, but Throckmorton took pity, posted her bail and hired her to care for his children in their fits. The children began to claim to see spirits about the same time and accused Agnes of renewing their bewitchment on Mother Samuel's behalf with the old woman's familiars. Agnes denied having any familiars for some time. Throckmorton, at the urging of his kin, forced her to say "I charge thee thou diuell, as I loue thee, and haue authoritie ouer thee, and am a Witch, and guiltie of this matter, that thou suffer this childe to be well at this present;" it was observed that the children came out of their fits every time she did so. The Throckmorton children began to scratch her routinely as well. Agnes eventually confessed to having numerous familiars, each of which tormented a particular child, and to consenting to the death of Lady Cromwell. When urged to say the Lord's Prayer and the Creed, she could not, nor could she be taught to. Agnes was charged and stood trial for bewitching Lady Cromwell to death, joining her parents in court. She denied being a witch and refused to claim pregnancy to stay her execution. She was searched after her execution, but no witches' marks were found.(B)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, B

Agnes Samuel Agnes Samuel Witch
2236

A woman from Warboys in Hampshire. She was apprehended by Gilbert Pickering and brought to the Throckmorton house along with Mother Alice Samuel and Agnes Samuel. She was brought to one of the Throckmorton girls to be scratched. While Elizabeth Throckmorton was staying with Pickering, "at the naming of the devill, Mother Samuell, or any such black word, that keepeth the collour, as Sathan or Cicely (which is another womans name, that is suspected to be confederate in this wicked practise) she neuer feared nor would sticke at them, but alwayes shewed her selfe ready (though she very well knew that she should haue her fit for it) to cast her selfe upon the present danger."(7-11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 7-11

Cicely Burder Cicely Burder Witch
2245

A man from "no dwelling...he went on the last voiage beyond the seas." According to Mother Alice Samuel, Langlad is an upright man who "told her that M. Throgmorton was a hard man & would trouble her much, wherefore he would give her six spirits that should vex and torment his children, and so he did." He told her that if she called on these six spirits, they would come. He taught her to call three of them by the names of Pluck, Catch, White, and the rest with three smacks of her mouth; they appeared to her in the shape of dun chickens. Mother Samuel claimed initially to not know his name, but was bid during her confession to call on her spirits for that information. They allegedly told her his name was Langlad, that he had no set home, and that he had left on a sea voyage. During Mother Alice Samuel's trial, she is made to confess that his first name is William, and that she had carnal relations with him. Some of those present at the trial "are of opinion, that it was the Diuel in mans likenesse."(59-61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59-61

William Langlad William Langlad Witch
2319

A man from London, who excels in "juggling craft," which is according to Thomas Addy, author of _A Candle in the Dark_ (1655) one of the nine types of witchcraft. This man, who lived during King James' time called himself "The Kings Majesties most excellent Hocus Pocus," allegedly his name because after every trick, he would say "Hoc[...] pocus, tontus talontus, vade celeriter jubeo," which was "a dark composure of words," meant to distract observers, and "to make his Trick pass the more currantly without discovery." It is an abuse of "Natural Magick," and meant to trick innocent bystanders into believing things that are not true.(29)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 29

Anonymous 464 Witch
2320

A man from Leicester in the county of Leicestershire, who as a Master of Arts was condemned "only for using himself to the study and practise of the Jugling craft." He was formerly the Lord of Leicester, and according to the author Thomas Addy was unjustly condemned for simply studying witchcraft is not the same as being a Witch, for "the essence of a Witch is not in doing false Miracles, or any other Witchcraft by demonstration or discovery, but in seducing people from God, and his Truth." (41-42)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 41-42

Anonymous 465 Witch
2333

A number of men and women from London, who are slaughtered as witches "at the Assizes at -erry, and at Chelmsford." These "poor accused people," were exposed to much cruelty, until "they would confess what their inquisitors would have them, although it were a thing impossible."(104 - 105)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 104 - 105

Anonymous 474 Witch
2335

A woman from Suffolk, who is hanged as a witch at the Berry Assizes in the year 1645. She allegedly sends her imps (Anonymous 235) into the army in order to kill "Parliament Souldiers," and others to kill "King's Souldiers." She also allegedly sends her imps to a man's (Anonymous 477) crop of corn, causing it die. This woman allegedly confessed to these crimes.(114)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 114

Anonymous 476 Witch
2348

A woman from Southwold in the county of Suffolk, who is allegedly executed for bewitching a young man (Anonymous 479) for some time. He suffered from unknown symptoms.(7)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 7

Anonymous 480 Witch
2352

A woman from Burton upon Trent in the county of Staffordshire, who is believed might be responsible for a number of mysterious occurrences in a house occupied by a Tenant (Anonymous 2), including the moving of objects and food, the death of cattle, and the starting of a fire.(3 - 4)

Appears in:
A., J.. The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton. London: 1671, 3 - 4

Anonymous 485 Witch
2356

A man from Ware in the county of Hertfordshire, who is known as a "Cunning man, Wizard, or Fortune-teller." He is visited by his neighbour, Thomas Stretton, who has lost his Bible and wishes to consult the cunning man to find it. However, the two engage in an argument when Stretton accuses Anonymous 487 of being "a Witch or a Devil, seeing he could neither write nor read." These words anger Anonymous 487, and his wife, Anonymous 322. In turn, it is believed they cause Jane Stretton, Thomas Stretton's daughter, to be bewitched, and suffer from a number of violent fits. When it is discovered that Anonymous 487 and Thomas Stretton fought, he is brought forward to Jane Stretton with his wife, while the young girl is in the midst of a violent fit.(1 - 3)

Appears in:
Y., M.. The Hartford-shire Wonder. London: 1669, 1 - 3

Anonymous 487 Witch
2357

A woman from Southward in the city of London, who is allegedly responsible for the bewitchment of Hannah Crump, having provided her with an apple when the girl was sick, which brought on violent fits.(19)

Appears in:
Barrow, John. The Lord's Arm Stretched Out in an Answer of Prayer, or, A true Relation of the Wonderful Deliverance of James Barrow. London: 1664, 19

Anonymous 488 Witch
2369

A spinster from Great Leighs, Essex who allegedly bewitches livestock, and a woman to death. Elizabeth is indicted at the Chelmsford Assize on March 2, 1584, and confesses to bewitching livestock belonging to James Holmested, Anonymous 491, Thomas Cornyshe, and George Fy. Elizabeth is also indicted on the same day, for allegedly bewitching Margaret Cleveland to death, to which she pleads not guilty; she is found guilty regardless.()

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011,

Elizabeth Brooke Elizabeth Brooke Witch
2374

A servant maid, from somewhere in "the west" (presumably of England), who works in a gentleman's house circa 1670. When his daughter (Anonymous 494) reports on her thievery, causing the lady of the house to watch her diligently, she, with the help of some other 19 or 20 witches, she allegedly begins a campaign of bewitchment against the gentleman's daughter. What happens to her, or any of the other witches is uncertain. (1)

Appears in:
D, I. A Letter Concerning the Witches in the West. London: 1670, 1

Anonymous 493 Witch