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ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
63

Jane Stretton is a young woman of about twenty years old from Ware in the county of Hertfordshire, who is allegedly afflicted and tortured by witchcraft thought to be caused by a cunning man (Anonymous 487) and his wife (Anonymous 322). During her fits, Stretton is "forced to live like a chameleon, on air" and also endures vomiting of "flax and hair and thread-ends and crooked pins; while blue, whit, and red flames came in the intervals out of her mouth, and her body was continually slashed and cut with a knife, and imps in the shape of frogs, and toads, and mice forever haunted her." The worst pain of her fits come from her back, as it often feels she is being stabbed. Upon making Jane Stretton's bed, a knife is found, but no one knowns how it came to be there. Although medicine is applied to her, it only seems to aggravate her condition. Jane Stretton is often described as quite innocent and trusting. Her fits begin when she accepts drink from Anonymous 322, and when she provides a pin to the same woman, but neither time did she link her fits to Anonymous 322. These fits last some nine months, during which she cannot eat or pass stool, only being able to consume syrups. Her condition causes many people from other villages to come and visit her and observe "the wonder" of her condition, that she may survive on so little sustenance. (Image 5 - Image 6)

Appears in:
Y., M.. The Hartford-shire Wonder. London: 1669, Image 5 - Image 6

Jane Stretton Jane Stretton Victim
84

A poor woman from Deptford, in the county of Kent, who makes a living by selling cheese cakes and often swears and calls upon the devil. She becomes distracted and disorderly after allegedly meeting with an apparition upon coming home from working in London one evening. Arthur tells divers persons that as she was walking to her home in Deptford after a day of working, a "Human shape, in a dark habit" approached her. At first, she thought it was a man, but given his stern expression and consternation, she began doubting it was the Devil. The apparition followed her as she made her way home. In fear, she began running, but the apparition followed her asking where she was headed. Explaining that she was a poor woman, she was heading home to Deptford after selling cakes in the city. She claims that, in response, the apparition offers her a bag full of silver which she refuses out of fear. The apparition allegedly tried to persuade her to take his offering and even offered her gold. Anne Arthur claims to have then run away screaming until other villagers found her and brought her home. (1-2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange and Dreadful News from the Town of Deptford, in the County of Kent. London: 1685, 1-2

Anne Arthur Anne Arthur Victim
89

A man from Ringcroft of Stalking, Scotland whose house is infected with a devilish spirit for over four months(5-6)

Appears in:
Telfair, Alexander. A True Relation of an Apparition Expressions and Actings of a Spirit. Edinburgh: 1696, 5-6

Andrew Mackie Andrew Mackie Victim
90

Andrew Aewart is a man from Ringcroft of Stalking, Scotland whose head is hurt by the spirit allegedly haunting Andrew Mackie's house.(9-10)

Appears in:
Telfair, Alexander. A True Relation of an Apparition Expressions and Actings of a Spirit. Edinburgh: 1696, 9-10

Andrew Aewart Andrew Aewart Victim
93

Victoire Corbier is a woman from Marseille, France who is allegedly bewitched by the magician Lewis Gaufredy into lusting after him.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Life and Death of Lewis Gaufredy. London: 1612, 4

Victoire Corbier Victoire Corbier Victim
94

Mistris Magdalen of the Marish is a young woman from Marseille, France who is allegedly introduced to the Devil by the magician Lewis Gaufredy.(8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Life and Death of Lewis Gaufredy. London: 1612, 8

Magdalen of the Marish Magdalen of the Marish Victim
101

A man from Dunwich and Cookly in the county of Suffolk, described as Bailiff twice in Dunwich in the county of Suffolk. Thomas Spatchet allegedly suffered a variety of fits, a condition attributed to Aubrey Grinset. Born in January of 1614, he was the son of Mr. James Spatchet, and the grandson of Mr. Robert Spatchet, who conversed frequently with the late Lord Chief Justice Sir Edward Coke. Thomas Spatchet is said to have been watched over by the Providence of God from a young age. As an infant, he was dropped on his head against stone by a careless servant, leaving deep seam on the left side. As a young man, he went to draw water and fell down the well instead. He suffered no broken bones, but lost flesh from one hand, suffered a hole in his wrist, lost some skin, and was sick and bedridden for days after. Therafter, Spatchet began to have fits. At first, he would find himself abruptly unable to speak; this soon interfered with fulfilling his religious duties and prayer. His fits later took three forms: Benumbing, in which he could hear but would be unable to move; a shake that would end with his legs and feet moving with agility and harmony; finally, skipping and jumping until his strength ran out. Within a year and a half, he lost all ability to hear or partake in worship, and had difficulty eating. By the winter of 1693, he would shake throughout the day, so that he would be unable to eat until evening and be forced to do so while walking. He suffered kneading fits in 1665, which ended when he seemed to catch a thumb in his mouth and bite it. The witch Aubrey Grinset was searched and found to have an impression on her toe. A year later, the fits resumed. In 1665, Aubrey Grinset confessed to being a witch and sending an imp to cause his fits. However, she denied causing his roaring fits, which he suffered from 1665 to 1666. When he was urged to scratch her, he refused, being too tender-hearted. He attempted to visit Grinset shortly before her death, at the urging of a Mr. R., but was repelled and made to curtsey back from her. His fits remained until the death of the witch, leaving him the last two years entirely unable to pray or otherwise participate in worship. Taking physic made his fits worse, but when he stopped for two years, the fits became violent. The fits allegedly end eight weeks before Grinsets death. Before she died, she said others had him in hand as well, and that her death would not free him. He found himself unable to travel before her death, but discovered himself able again after. He continued to suffer fits to his death, though far less frequently, and he continues to have trouble praying.(2-21, 23, 27, 31, Postscript)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 2-21, 23, 27, 31, Postscript

Thomas Spatchet Thomas Spatchet Victim
107

A woman from Keyston in the County of Huntingdon, known to be a widow, who denied the witchcraft accusations leveled against her and claimed that she was a victim herself. She allegedly had a spirit appear to her over five weeks, making a roaring and puffing. She claimed that she found the bottom of her belly to be sore after the spirit came to her last, and that she had never willingly invoked or employed it. She was accused of striking or sending a spirit to harm Goodwife Darnell's child Katherine, and of spoiling Darnell's furmity; Chandler denied both. She claimed that Goodwife Darnell had turned Chandler into a duck for a time two years before, and that the roaring thing has started to torment her six month later. She was also accused of having two imps named Beelzebub and Truillibub, which she also denied, adding that Beelzebub was the name she had given her log and that Truillibub was a stick.(7-8)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 7-8

Elizabeth Chandler Elizabeth Chandler Victim
112

A woman from Romorantin-Lanthenay, France who is allegedly possessed by a wicked spirit(3)

Appears in:
Marescot, Michel. A True Discourse, Upon the Matter of Martha Brossier of Romorantin Pretended to be Possessed by a Devil. London: 1599, 3

Martha Brossier Martha Brossier Victim
117

A woman from Marseille who is allegedly possessed by three devils(208)

Appears in:
Machaelis, Sebastien. The Admirable History of the Posession and Conversion of a Penitent Woman. London: 1613, 208

Louise Cappeau Louise Cappeau Victim
124

A woman from Edmonton in the county of Middlesex, now part of the London Borough of Enfield, known to be married to Mr. Radcliffe, who was allegedly bewitched to death by their neighbour Elizabeth Sawyer. According to Mr. Radcliffe, Sawyer's sow ate some soap belonging to Agnes, and Agnes struck the animal; Sawyer was angered by this and threatened that Agnes would feel the blow as if it had struck her. That night, Agnes is said to have become sick and tormented, foaming at the mouth. She died of it four days later. He alleged that Agnes told him, on her deathbed, "that Elizabeth Sawyer her neighbour, whose Sowe with a washing-Beetle she had stricken, and so for that cause her malice being great, was the occasion of her death." Sawyer denied any involvement in Agnes' demise.(B2)

Appears in:
Goodcole, Henry. The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton. London: 1621, B2

Agnes Ratcleife Agnes Radcliffe Victim
125

A woman from the Carre (Carr Hall) in the County of Lancaster, known to be the wife of gentleman Henry Townley. Henry Townley accused James Device of bewitching Anne to death. James claimed in his examination that Townley accused him and his mother, Elizabeth Device, of stealing from her and had struck him. His familiar Dandy appeared to him a day or two later and bid him to make an image of Townley so that Dandy could kill or destroy her. James did so, dried the image by the fire, and crumbled slowly over the next week. Two days after the image had been crumbled entirely away, Townley is said to have died.(H2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, H2

Anne Townley Anne Townley Victim
129

A girl from Salmesbury in the County of Lancaster, known to be 14 years old and the granddaughter of Jennet Bierley and the niece of Henry Bierley and Ellen Bierley. She accused her grandmother, aunt and Jane Southworth of bewitching her so that her body wasted and was consumed. Grace eventually admitted to faking her afflictions and making false claims; she accused priest Master Thompson of having convinced her to make the claims. Grace accused all three women of haunting and vexing her, drawing her by her hair, and laying her on top of a hay-mow. Grace also claimed that Jennet had shapeshifted into a black dog in front of her and picked her off a sty. Another time, Jennet came to Grace in dog shape and allegedly tried to persuade her to drown herself, but a spirit in a white sheet carried her away. Jennet-as-dog also buried Grace in hay and lay on top, robbing her of her speech, senses, and an entire day; she claimed to be unable to speak in Jennet's presence thereafter. Grace also accused Jennet and Ellen of stealing Thomas Walshman's child, driving a nail through its navel and sucking from the hole through a pen, then returning the child to its bed; the child languished and died thereafter. Once the child died, Jennet and Ellen allegedly took it from the churchyard, boiled it, ate it and rendered the fat from its bones to anoint themselves so they could change shape. She also alleged that Jennet had brought her to attend a meeting of witches, at which Ellen and Jane were also present, where four things like men carried them all across the water to eat strange meat, which Grace refused, and dance; the black things pulled the women down to "abuse their bodies." Thomas Walshman gave deposition confirming that he had a child who became sick and died, but he did not know the cause. Jennet accused Grace, in turn, of conspiring with the priest Master Thompson when Grace's mother, brought her to him out of concern for Grace's fits. Grace retracted all her accusations before the court.(K3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, K3

Grace Sowerbutts Grace Sowerbutts Victim
136

A woman from Glamorgan, Wales who is the wife of the Earl of Essex and haunted by a apparition that takes the form of her husband.(24)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 24

Countess of Essex Countess of Essex Victim
138

A servant from Hointon in the county of Devon who is pained by a pin that mysteriously becomes stuck under the skin of her leg after she refuses to give an adequate pin to a woman who comes into Mrs. Heroin's shop, where she works. She lives with this pin invisibly buried in her leg for three weeks, before she is able to convince, Mr. Anthony Smith, a surgeon in Exeter to treat her. Smith makes an incision in her leg, digs out the pin, and treats her wound. Only after this trauma does Brooker recall the story of the woman in the shop, and attributes this wound to her refusal to give her a pin. (65-66)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 65-66

Elizabeth Brooker Elizabeth Brooker Victim
140

A fifteen year old girl who is allegedly bewitched and has fits, fevers, and vomits hair, bones, membrane, wood, stones, walnuts, and pieces of wall with lime on them (94-95)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 94-95

Catherine Gualter Catherine Gualter Victim
142

A man who is allegedly bewitched and tormented by great pains in his body and thus cut his own throat(13-14)

Appears in:
Covent of Eluthery, Pen neer the. A Pleasant Treatise of Witches . London: 1673, 13-14

Ulricus Neussesser Ulricus Neussesser Victim
147

A religious woman who is allegedly bewitched and suffers from fits, barking like a dog, and vomiting hair, pieces of flesh, bone, and chestnuts(6)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 6

Judith Unknown Judith Victim
148

A young girl from Huntington who is allegedly bewitched or possessed because she is said to have flown in the air and run up the walls and ceiling. Day is described as running "up the walls with her feet, laying no hand, and on the Seiling [ceiling] with her head downwards, which she could never do before nor since."(9)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 9

Elizabeth Day Elizabeth Day Victim
150

A man of Cookly in the county of Suffolk, who was allegedly bewitched to death by Aubrey Grinset. She confessed to calling his household out of the house to come see the greatest snake anyone had ever seen and used the opportunity to go to him; he died about two days later.(18)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 18

John Collet John Collet Victim
151

A man from Walpool in the county of Suffolk, described as a victim of Aubrey Grinset, who was allegedly bewitched to death by her.(18)

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 18

Henry Winson Henry Winson Victim
152

A man from Tidworth whose house is allegedly haunted by an unknown source that moves boards(93)

Appears in:
Glanvill, Joseph. Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts. London: 1681, 93

Mr. Mompesson Mr. Mompesson Victim
154

A young boy from Shepton Mallet who is allegedly bewitched by Jane Brooks(118-119)

Appears in:
Glanvill, Joseph. Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts. London: 1681, 118-119

Richard Jones Richard Jones Victim
159

A woman from Cork, Ireland who is bewitched by Florence Newton(168)

Appears in:
Glanvill, Joseph. Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts. London: 1681, 168

Mary Longdon Mary Longdon Victim
160

A man from Cork, Ireland who is bewitched to death by Florence Newton(185-186)

Appears in:
Glanvill, Joseph. Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts. London: 1681, 185-186

David Jones David Jones Victim
162

A man from Bradfield in the county of Berkshire, described as a doctor who is allegedly haunted by three spirits. They take the form of "a Spirit in the shape of Everard," a known conjurer who had worked or Pordage and been in his home, a dragon "which seemed to take up most part of a large Room, appearing with great Teeth and open Jaws, whence he often ejected fire" and a giant "with a great Sword in his Hand." He claims he received assistance against the evil spirits by the "Ministration of the Holy Angels." (11)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 11

Pordage Dr. Pordage Victim
163

A boy from Malmo, Sweden, who is allegedly bewitched and thus has fits and passes stones through his penis.(17-18)

Appears in:
Horneck, Anthony. An Account of What Happen'd in the Kingdom of Sweden in the Years 1669, and 1670. London: 1682, 17-18

Abraham Mechelburg Abraham Mechelburg Victim
165

A woman who allegedly accidentally learns witchcraft and who is allegedly bewitched by Blanche and who is allegedly possessed by the devil(11)

Appears in:
Machaelis, Sebastien. The Admirable History of the Posession and Conversion of a Penitent Woman. London: 1613, 11

Magdalene Magdalene Victim
176

A man who dies three days after being stroked by an invisible hand while walking in the streets in London.(12-13)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 12-13

Anonymous 16 Victim
177

A woman whose hand turns black after her husband allegedly dies three days after being hit on the thigh "with an invisible hand" that the black "Figure of a Mans hand, with the four Fingers, Thumb, and Palm" was "impressed deep in the Flesh."(12-13)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 12-13

Dark Mistress Dark Victim
178

A boy who is killed by a spectral woman and a man with trunk breeches that haunted him(13)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 13

Anonymous 17 Victim
183

A man from Chester who is allegedly haunted by the ghost of Anne Walker(19-20)

Appears in:
Sinclair, George. Satan's Invisible World Discovered. Edinburgh: 1685, 19-20

James Graham James Graham Victim
187

A man from Norfolk, described as a sailor who is generally regarded as having a strong constitution. Orkton is allegedly tormented by Mary Smith after he hit Mary Smith's son. She curses him and "wished in a most earnest and bitter manner, that his fingers might rotte off," which they duly did, as did his toes.(48-50)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 48-50

John Orkton John Orkton Victim
196

A young woman from Maidstone, Kent who becomes pregnant, and gives birth to a monstrous child that lives for twenty-three hours and then dies (1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Forme and Shape of a Monstrous Child, Borne at Maydstone in Kent. London: 1568, 1

Margaret Mere Margaret Mere Victim
197

An Anabaptist woman who lived on Old-Gravel lane in an unknown area of England, who was said to be possessed by the Devil and would speak in tongues, meow like a kitten and go suddenly blind. She becomes possessed after trying to convince her husband (Anonymous 482) to become baptized, and suffers from "strange and unusual Gestures, and involuntary Motions both of her Tongue and other Members." Ministers (Anonymous 483) visit her and converse with the spirit (Anonymous 240) possessing her, who admits to being sent from "a woman below." (Anonymous 238) These ministers believe the spirit is the Devil himself. The woman is unable to eat while possessed, as "the Vessels of her throat were stopped" whenever she attempted to eat. The spirit possessing her threatens in front of a number of Divines (Anonymous 484) to "throw her into the water, and so destroy her." It also tells the divines that it will make them sick for attempting to help the woman, and that "Prayers were not effectual, save only in [the] Pulpit." The woman remained possessed.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. News from Old-Gravel Lane. London: 1675, 2

Anonymous 19 Victim
198

A man from Horkesley in the county of Essex, whose wife gives birth to a monstrous male baby that has no limbs or tongue.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The True Reporte of the Forme and Shape of a Monstrous Childe, borne at Muche Horkesleye. London: 1562, 1

Anthony Smith Anthony Smith Victim
199

A Captain from Shropshire who is brutally murdered byt his servant and appears as an apparition before two Gentlewomen(1-2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. An Account of a Most Horrid and Barbarous Murder and Robbery Committed on the Body of Captain Brown. Edinburgh: 1694, 1-2

Captain Brown Captain Brown Victim
200

A young woman from Kirkham in the county of Lancashire, who curses individuals and gives birth to a monstrous baby that is born dead.(4-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration of a Strange and Wonderful Monster: Born in Kirkham parish in Lancashire. London: 1646, 4-6

Anonymous 20 Victim
203

A woman from Radcliffe who gives birth to a monstrous baby that is a hermaphrodite, has no hands, feet, or legs, and dies shortly after birth.(4-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Signs and Wonders from Heaven. With a True Relation of a Monster Born in Radcliffe Highway. London: 1645, 4-5

Anonymous 24 Victim
211

A man from Beckenton in Somersetshire, known to be 18 years old. He is said to have regularly taunted an old woman (Anonymous 8) living in the Alms-House by calling her witch and telling her of her buns. Enraged, she appealed to a Justice of the Peace and Spicer was "so frightened, that he humbled himself to her, and promised never to call her so again." A few days later, he began to have strange fits; this condition lasted a fortnight. During these fits, he claimed to see "this Old Woman against the Wall in the same Room of the House where he was, and that sometimes she did knock her Fist at him; sometimes grin her Teeth, and sometimes laugh at him." Three or four men would be needed to hold him while in the throes of a fit. Whenever he asked for a small beer, he would vomit 30 or more crooked pins.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Great News from the West of England being a True Account of Two Young Persons Lately Bewitched in the Town of Beckenton in Somerset-shire. London: 1689, 1

William Spicer William Spicer Victim
214

A woman from Stradbrook in the county of Suffolk, known to be the servant of Symon Fox. She allegedly had a falling out with Doll Bartham when she refused to give Bartham some of Symon Fox's goods. Bartham first sent three toads to torment Jorden and keep her from sleeping, but the first was thrown out the window, and the next two burnt in the fire. She then sent her cat, Gyles, to Jorden. He made strange noises in the night, would pin her down and kiss her, and talked often both to her and to anyone who would hear him. Gyles told the onlookers that he came for Jorden's life. Jorden suffered fits after Gyles began to visit her. In these fits, a lump arose and moved about her body, she struggled so hard she broke a chair and needed six men to restrain her, and was thrown violently against a wall and under the bed. Witnesses saw her eyes sink into her head, her head bend backwards almost to her hips, and her teeth close fast. She cried out " Barthram, thou hast killed mee" before numerous witnesses.(92-98)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 92-98

Joan Jorden Joan Jorden Victim
216

A boy from Thames Street near Broken Wharf in London, known to be the son of Master Nayler, and brother to Anne and Joan Nayler. Anne Kirk allegedly tormented George Nayler to death.(101)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 101

George Nayler George Nayler Victim
217

A girl from Thames Street near Broken Wharf in London, known to be the daughter of Master Nayler, and sister to George and Joan Nayler. Anne Kirk allegedly tormented Anne Nayler to death with an evil spirit, which caused her to have frenzied fits. Before she died, the spirit would talk to Master Nayler, and told him that "one would come after who should discouer the causer, and the truth of all."(101)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 101

Anne Nayler Anne Nayler Victim
218

A girl from Thames Street near Broken Wharf in London, known to be the daughter of Master Nayler, and sister to George and Joan Nayler. The spirit tormenting her sister Anne told their father Master Nayler "one would come after who should discouer the causer, and the truth of all" before she died. The day after Anne's burial, at which Anne Kirk was denied some of the alms the Nayler family gave to the poor, Joan began to be tormented by an evil spirit as well. The spirit possessing Joan spoke was heard to say "Giue me thy liuer, thy lights, thy heart, thy soule, &c; then thou shalt be released, then I will depart fro[m] thee" and to bid Joan to hang herself. Her body would be contorted in tormenting fits, during which she accused Anne Kirk of bewitching her. Master Nayler had Kirk apprehended, and thereafter Joan was witnessed to fall into fits whenever in Kirk's presence. She also had a fit when Kirk was bailed from prison, and while the jury was deliberating at Kirk's trial.(101-103)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 101-103

Jone Nayler Joan Nayler Victim
220

A man from Chipping Campden in the county of Gloucestershire, described as the original steward of Lady Powell who himself claims is a gardener and herb distiller. He is allegedly robbed and murdered by Widow Perry and her sons (Anonymous 92 and Anonymous 93). In truth, Harrison is not murdered, but spends years in Turkey and Portugal before finally returning home; the townspeople believe his absence is the product of witchcraft.(4-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Power of Witchcraft being a Most Strange but True Relation of the Most Miraculous and Wonderful Deliverance of One Mr. William Harrison. London: 1662, 4-5

William Harrison William Harrison Victim
222

The man from Canterbury in the county of Kent, described as the Archbishop of Canterbury whose life is foretold by chapters thirteen and fifteen of the Revelation of John.(Image 1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Prophecie of the Life, Reigne, and Death of William Laud. London: 1644, Image 1

William Laud William Laud Victim
230

A boy from Suffolk who disappeared and was presumed dead, but appeared at home after a month.(440)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Suffolk Miracle. London: 1693, 440

Anonymous 26 Victim
241

A girl of Cleworth in the county of Lancashire in the parish of Leigh, known to be the daughter of NIcholas Starchie and the sister of John Starchie, who at the age of nine allegedly began to suffer fits caused by Edmund Hartley. She was first taken with a dumpy and heavy countenance. Anne Starchy is alleged to have been given to scoffing and blasphemy during her fits, and to have caused a loud whupping noise by joining hands with other possessed persons. She described her possessor as being a foul ugly man with a white beard and a head-sized bulge on his chest. It is said that she developed supernatural strength and knowledge, able to foretell her fits.(Image 5, 9, 21)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 5, 9, 21

Anne Starchie Anne Starchie Victim
242

A boy from Cleworth in the County of Lancashire in the parish of Leigh, known to be the son of Nicholas Starchie and the brother of Anne Starchie, who at the age of ten allegedly began to suffer fits caused by Edmund Hartley. His fits started at school, where he could not keep himself from shouting, and progressing until they became more extreme. At various times, he would bleed abundantly, loudly blaspheme, cause a loud whupping noise, fall as if dead, gnash his teeth, or vomit. John Starchie described the possession as coming and going from him as a ill-favoured, hunchbacked man. He would also bite at people, snatch various things, and throw whatever came to hand. He developed supernatural strength, the ability to foretell his fits, and could tell what it was that someone was bringing him to drink ahead of time.(Image 5, 8, 9, 19, 21)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 5, 8, 9, 19, 21

John Starchie John Starchie Victim
244

A young girl of Cleworth in the County of Lancastershire in the parish of Leigh, known to be ten years of age and belong to the Starchie household, alleged to be afflicted with fits by Edmund Hartley. She is alleged to have been able to predict her fits and the details of them, and attributed this knowledge to a white dove. At one point, she and Elizabeth Hardman were unable to eat for three days and nights, nor speak to anyone but one another except " to ther lads. saue that their lads gaue them leaue (as the said) the one to eate a toast & drink, the other a sower milk posset." Hartley is said to have been angry that the ate, even with permission, and made them vomit it up. Holland was then made to spin with a distaff for an hour and a half, spinning faster and a finer thread than she ever had before. At a dinner, Holland and the Hardman sisters were thrown back, their bodies swelled, their faces disfigured, and strange motion was observed from within their bodies. Holland described her possessor as a great bear with an open mouth that turned into a white dove.(Image 6, 8, 10)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 6, 8, 10

Elinor Hollande Eleanor Holland Victim
246

A young woman of Cleworth in Lancashire in the parish of Leigh, known to be 30 years old and a member of the Starchie household, who is alleged to have been afflicted with fits by Edmund Hartley. When asked to bear witness against Hartley, she began to bark and howl. Later, she became sick after going into Hartley's chamber and looking in his chest. At another time, her belly swelled as if she were pregnant, but over the course of a day, before shrinking again. It is said that before her barking fit, Hartley had been seen kissing her, and was thought to have promised her marriage. She was not dispossessed with the rest, but instead suffered pains and vomited up foamy, bloody matter. She was thought to have been dispossessed, however, though it came out the next day that she was still tormented. The exorcism was performed again, this time successfully; the Devil was seen to leave her in a great breath, ugly like a toad. She confessed that the Devil had made her lie the day before.(Image 6, 8, 9)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 6, 8, 9

Jane Ashton Jane Ashton Victim
248

A woman from Cleworth in the county of Lancashire in the parish of Leigh, known to have been employed within the Starchie household, who allegedly suffered fits caused by Edmund Hartley. The first incident she suffered was to be flung toward the kitchen fire; throughout that day she was repeatedly flung about. During other fits, her belly would roil and feel like something was rising from it to her heart or her head and nose would feel as if full of nails. When her belly was swollen, she would be lifted up and bounced, and when the swelling subsided she would bark and howl while her body was numbed with cold. At one time, she accompanied Hartley to Salford, where he prayed over her and they met with two Justices of the Peace who tried to get Byrom to speak against him; she was struck speechless and was cast down backwards. She would be struck with visions of a large black dog or a black cat coming at her. Six times in a six-week period, she was left unable to eat or drink; when permitted to eat, she would eat greedily and cry for more, complaining that she was still hungry. At another time, she felt pulled to pieces and a stinking smoke and breath rose from her for a day and night. Shortly before Hartley's hanging, the Devil appeared to her in Hartley's likeness, promising silver and gold if she "took heed what she said."(Image 7)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 7

Margaret Byrom Margaret Byrom Victim
251

A girl from Great Gadson in the County of Buckinghamshire, known to have been sixteen or seventeen years old at the time of her possession. She is said to be "descended of honest Parents of good [repute], and by them carefully educated in the Principles of Christianity; nor was there a young maid of a more lovely innocent Beauty, sweet Carriage, or virtuous Disposition." Her father allegedly had a falling out with an unnamed woman with an "evil name" and not long after, she began to have strange fits. Two egg-sized bunches would rise in her throat and a strange voice, rough and guttural, would be heard within her speaking blasphemies; this voice would often converse with bystanders. Through these conversations, it was learned that there were two spirits possessing her, and that they had been sent into her by two women when the spirits found her father praying and were unable to enter him. Her father engaged five ministers to fast and pray to exorcise her (only four came, as predicted by the evil spirits), succeeding in removing one of the two. The spirit that remained inside her began tossing her about, taking the use of her legs, and contorting both her body and her face; it also caused her to ride home facing the rear of the horse. At other times, it would cause her to make a dog's barks, a bull's bellows or to roar. She is also said to have once attended a party, at which she lost the use of her legs to prevent her from drinking and tried to make her drown herself in the well in the yard. Her possession was still in effect at the time of the account's publication, about 13 years later.(2-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Wonderful News from Buckinghamshire. London: 1677, 2-4

Anonymous 28 Victim
252

A woman from Beckenton in Somersetshire, known to be 18 years old and to live with her brother and three younger sisters. Mary Hill allegedly demanded to borrow a ring from an old woman, Anonymous 8, and began threatening her for it. About a week before Mary's fits began, she met this same old woman in the street. Anonymous 8 took Mary by the hand and requested she escort her to Froom to look for work; Mary refused. The two met again four days later; Anonymous 8 begged an apple from Mary, and Mary again refused her. The following Sunday, Mary began to have prickings in her stomach, and on Monday something arose in her throat while she fell into a series of violent fits. Four or five people were needed to restrain her. While in the throes of a fit, Mary complained that she "saw this old Woman against the Wall, grinning at her, and being struck at, would step aside to avoid the blows." On Wednesday, she began to throw up crooked pins; this lasted a fortnight, and then threw up nails and pins. After an eight-day respite, she began throwing up "Nails again, and Handles of Spoons, both of Pewter and Brass; several pieces of Iron, Lead, and Tin, with several clusters of Crooked Pins; some tied with Yarn, and some with Thread, with abundance of Blood between." The townsfolk, concerned about Mary's condition, brought Anonymous 8 near her home. Though Mary allegedly did not know Anonymous 8 was approaching, she fell into a strong fit; Anonymous 8 was apprehended for witchcraft on this evidence. Mary's fits continued, however, as did her vomiting of nails and spoon-handles. Her vomiting is said to have been triggered by drinking small beer. Some accounts name the old woman as Elizabeth Carrier; Margery Combes and Anne More were also arrested in connection with Mary Hill's fits. Her vomiting was attested to in court by witnesses Susanna Belton, Ann Holland, Francis Jesse and Christopher Brewer. Belton and Holland brought numerous objects Mary was said to have vomited to court as evidence, while Jesse and Brewer gave deposition that they had searched Mary's mouth with their fingers before she vomited and were convinced she could not have faked it. John Humphreys observed that Mary vomited nails in the morning, sleep with her mouth open, groaned in her sleep while being impossible to wake, and to be much weakened by her vomiting. After the assizes, Humphreys reported that she vomited nails and glass; days later she swelled up and vomited bread and butter contaminated with white mercury.(1-2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Great News from the West of England being a True Account of Two Young Persons Lately Bewitched in the Town of Beckenton in Somerset-shire. London: 1689, 1-2

Mary Hill Mary Hill Victim
256

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, known to be an apprentice of Mr. Thomas Welling, who was allegedly bewitched by Sarah Morduck when asked to make a second key to fit her home's lock. He was convinced to take a drink from Morduck after much protesting, and is thereafter rendered unable to eat or drink, and and blind as well. His friends, concerned about him, brought Morduk to him, and convince him to scratch her. His vision returned, as did his ability to eat and drink, but when he finally had a bowel movement, the stool was full of pins. His friends then consulted a woman (Anonymous 370) known to have some skill who advised them to boil Hathaway's urine in a stone bottle, but the bottle burst into pieces when they did so, returning Hathaway to his former state even though none of the shards touched him. He remained in this state until some neighbors assisted him in scratching Morduck again, though he eventually relapsed once more.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 1

Richard Hathaway Richard Hathaway Victim
272

A woman from Yowell in the county of Surrey, known to be the maidservant of Mr. Tuers, who alleges that Joan Buts tormented her with witchcraft after she refused to give Buts a pair of old gloves, but would give her a pin for her neckcloth. She claims that fourteen days later, stones began to fly about the yard and hit no-one but her, and to suffer pains in her back that are discovered to be caused by lumps of clay filled with pins stuck fast to her back. Household goods such as linen and candlesticks are also alleged to fly around in Burgiss' presence.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. An Account of the Tryal and Examination of Joan Buts, for being a Common Witch and Inchantress. London: 1682, 2

Elizabeth Burgiss Elizabeth Burgiss Victim
301

An eighteen year old man from Whalley in the county of Lancashire, who is a gardener and servant to Thomas Lister, and an avid dancer. Dudgale starts having fits by some accounts when a schoolfellow denies his ability to perform various tricks, and by other accounts after a night of dancing at a rushbearing in Whalley. Richard Dugdale's fits consist of his ability to become clairvoyant, vomiting stones, brass rings, and buttons, making strange noises, dancing on his knees, exhibiting great strength, extreme changes in weight, strange lumps on his chest and belly, speaking in voices other than his own, his blasphemy of God, his ability to repeat Sermons he has never heard, and strange contortions of his body. Richard Dugdale is also pricked with a pin by John Hindle during a fit, to which he gives no reaction. Richard Dugdale and his family seek help from Dr. Chew, Dr. Crabtree, and the minister Mr. Jolly. Richard Dugdale allegedly admits that he feels Dr. Chew's medicines cured him of his Fits, but that these Fits were the work of the Devil. It is believed that Richard Dugdale made a contract with the Devil to dance better than all others, and upon confessing this in drink, Richard Dugdale experiences his last fit on March 24, 1690, a date he himself predicted. When the Devil speaks through Richard Dugdale's body, he often refers to Richard Dugdale as "Dicky." After he is cured, Richard Dugdale marries, and continues to pursue his profession as a gardener.(Image 5)

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, Image 5

Richard Dugdale Richard Dugdale Victim
303

A woman from Hockham in the county of Norfolk, who is allegedly bewitched by Elizabeth Frauncis.(145)

Appears in:
Ewen, L'Estrange C.. Witchcraft and Demonism. London: 1922, 145

Mary Cocke Mary Cocke Victim
304

An infant boy from Hockham in the county of Norfolk, who is allegedly bewitched by Elizabeth Francis.(145)

Appears in:
Ewen, L'Estrange C.. Witchcraft and Demonism. London: 1922, 145

William Auger William Auger Victim
306

A woman from Hockham in the county of Norwich who suffered suicidal tendencies diverse fits where she "sometimes seemed dead and senseles." Sometimes she "spoke strangely or barked like a dog" or had "strange visions and fearful sights of light and flashes of lightning in the evening," and of "two children, one white and the other red." She suffer tremendous physical and physiological complications: she foamed at the mouth, spat at the name of Jesus, and exhibited extraordinary strength. During these fits she "complained about Mother Frauncis" who was eventually imprisoned by Sir Bassingbourn Gawdy in the Norwich goal for causing Harvey's torments. It was there that Harvey scratched Frauncis to unwitch herself. Harvey was examined by Augustine Styward, sometime around December 20, 1600, and diagnosed as having "as physic calleth uteri suffoctio or strangulatio," or hysteria. Styward wrote to Goawdy, begging him to take mercy on Frauncis. Frauncis was released, but within three weeks she was dead. Beyond being diagnosed as a hysteric, Harvey was also accused of being a "counterfit."()

Appears in:
Unknown, . Brit. Mus., Add. MS. 28223, f.15. Unknown: 1600,

Joan Harvey Joan Harvey Victim
307

A man who was allegedly possessed. He would often lie as though dead and when they would prick him with needles, he would not bleed.()

Appears in:
Unknown, . Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 36,674, f.89. Unknown: ,

Edward Dynham Edward Dynham Victim
314

A ten or eleven year old girl, who allegedly suffered from fits for four years at the hands of Alice Huson. The accounts of suggest that she "did often Screech and Cry out vehemently, sometimes scratch and bite any she could lay hold on, and say, Ah, Alice, Old Witch, have I gotten thee? And sometimes lye down all drawn together, almost round; and lye still as in a Swoon, continuing thus the most part of a Week: And sometimes again all of a sudden, she became unusually Merry, and continued so for a considerable time together." The fits increased in nature and included convulsions. Faith was diagnosed as a hysteric, a melancholic, and possibly an epileptic. She could not be cured, Dr. Taylor postulated, because there was "fascination," or witchcraft causing her suffering.(50-55)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 50-55

Faith Corbet Faith Corbet Victim
326

A fourteen year old girl from the parish of Little All Hallows in Thames street, London, daughter of Timothy and Gawthren Glover, sister to Anne Glover, and granddaughter of the puritan martyr, Robert Glover. Mary Glover is allegedly bewitched after Elizabeth Jackson, to whom she had been sent on an errand by her mother, wished "an evil death will come upon her." Mary Glover becomes increasingly ill over a three month period. She weeps with pain and prays for relief. She suffers from physical torments, and suffers them in a social context. She seems pained and reverent, but also enraged and wrathful. Glovers fits cause her blindness, and dumbness. She becomes pale. Her belly, breast, and throat heave and swell. She waxes eloquently and devoutly. She desperately sounds out almost, almost and once more, once more through her nose and was seen rubbing hard, or stroking down with her hand, her left side and flanke. In her sharpest conflict she raged against the bewitchment, looking fierce and demonic herself: her tongue was black and rotated in a wide gaping mouth, her expression was fierce, scornful, terribly threatening. She tosses her head back and forth, and looks at the men that stood or kneled before her, as if she would devour them. According to John Swan, the minister who recorded her trials, Glover is not vexed by Satan, but the means of a witch. During moments of painfully contracted paralysis, Glover is able, through a clenched jaw and a body paralyzed, to sound out at least twice, hang her, hang her in reference to Mother Jackson. Mary Glovers experience was medically diagnosed as hysteria but legally defined as a bewitchment caused by Elizabeth Jackson. Edward Jorden was one of the experts called in to testify on Glovers case as he would be called on, three years later, to testify on the validity of Anne Gunters possession. Jorden concluded that Glovers suffering was grounded in her own body, not in witchcraft. Stephen Bradwell disagreed. Bradwell posited that a natural disease, like hysteria, was more likely found in a woman in (or at the end of) her reproductive years Glover was simply too young. Sir John Crook, Londons chief legal officer, performed a series of behavioral tests (he tried to trick Glover by dressing another woman as Elizabeth Jackson to see if she would react) and pseudo-medical tests (burning both Glover and Jackson to prove Glovers insensibility). The torments might have been natural, but Jorden could not definitively prove the cure or cause of it and so the presiding judge dismissed Jordens diagnosis for what it was: vague and unsubstantiated. Jackson was sentenced to the pillory for a year. Sir John Crook ordered an exorcism be performed on Mary Glover, however, which was done with the supervision of six ministers: Mr. Evans, Mr. Skelton, Mr. Bridger, Mr. Barber, Mr. Swan, and Mr. Lewis Hughes. Over the course of two days, these ministers and a number of witnesses (Anonymous 437) fast and pray with Mary Glover, until she is dispossessed. During the prayers Mary Glover utters, she asks God to forgive Elizabeth Jackson. When Mary Glover is finally dispossessed, some witnesses including John Swan, believe they see something leave her body. Mary Glover also cries out, "The comforter is come!", words that her grandfather also apparently cried at his death upon the stake. Mary Glover, although much weakened, seems fully recovered after this, and goes to stay with the preacher, Mr. Lewis Hughes for a year after her dispossession, in order to prevent being taken by her affliction again. Mary Glover's case is famous throughout London, most notably for dividing the opinions of the city and the College of Physicians into those that believe she was afflicted by supernatural causes, and those that believe she was not.(191)

Appears in:
Sharpe, James. Instruments of Darkness. Philidelphia: 1996, 191

Mary Glover Mary Glover Victim
327

A fourteen-year-old girl, daughter of the Lady Mallory, of Studley Hall, from near Ripon, North Yorkshire who suffered from fits for twelve weeks during which she could not move her limbs. When witnesses asked her who or what caused her to have fits, she replied she did not know. After suggestions names, however, Mallory reacted particularly violently to the name William Wayde. Mary Wayde allegedly confessed to the events and Mallory instantly stopped having fits. Mallory started having fits again, however, when Wayde retracted her answer. (75-78)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 75-78

Elizabeth Mallory Elizabeth Mallory Victim
343

A girl from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the daughter of Samuel Pacy and sister to Deborah Pacy, who was allegedly bewitched by Rose Cullender and Amy Denny at the age of eleven. Her father claimed in his deposition that Elizabeth was afflicted with a variety of fits, in which she would be unable to breathe, have a soreness in her entire body, be lame on one side, become deaf, dumb or blind, or cough pins and nails. During these fits, she is said to have seen apparitions of Cullender and Denny, to have been tormented by their imps, and to have been threatened by them with torments ten times worse if she told what she'd seen or heard. Denny allegedly made her able to speak the name of Satan or the Devil, but would not permit her to say Lord, Jesus or Christ. While in the care of her aunt Margaret Arnold, Arnold suspected her to be faking and removed all pins from her clothing, but she nevertheless continued vomiting pins; Elizabeth would claim that flies had brought them and put them in her mouth. Arnold also alleged in her deposition that Elizabeth would see things Arnold could not, catch them and throw them in the fire; once a thing Elizabeth said was a mouse made a flash like gunpowder. At the trial on the judge's order, Elizabeth was instructed to sit in a room with her eyes closed, and Amy Denny brought into the room; when their hands touched Elizabeth caught Denny's hand and attacked her with her fingernails.(15-17)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 15-17

Elizabeth Pacy Ellizabeth Pacy Victim
345

A young maid from Arpington in the county of Kent, who allegedly has two devils (Anonymous 18 and Anonymous 88) inside of her, causing her to have several fits. During fits, her face would be deformed so that she was unrecognizable. Her "Nerves, Joynts and Sinews, after so wonderful a manner, that they had almost drawn her out of human Shape," although generally, it was agreed she was a comely woman. Her face becomes so contorted that it is believed not her ever relatives would recognize her. She is further described as having a set jaw, and strained eyes, with "her Eye-balls an incredibly way into her Head." Doctor Boreman prays over her, which allegedly slightly improves her condition. Her condition attracts people (Anonymous 449) from far away who all say they have never seen anything like it. The spirits can be heard to groan inside of her belly, causing many spectators to run in fear and surprise. However, one witness, Mrs. Hopper and Doctor Boreman, hear one of the spirits within Anonymous 32 say "weaker and weaker, weaker and weaker" four times over before ceasing to speak. Both these two witness it when the spirits made the maid bark like a dog. At another occasion, when Doctor Boreman prayed over the maid during one of her fits, "a live and seeming substance forc'd its way out of her mouth in likeness of a large Serpent," (Anonymous 18) which then flew around Doctor Boreman's neck. It remains here until some witnesses take it off him, when it vanishes and is never seen again. However, despite being dispossessed by one spirit, Anonymous 32 is still under possession of a spirit (Anonymous 88) which causes her face to contort, and which makes noise whenever the maid moves, both answering questions and making "a hideous murmuring, as if it disliked its present habitation." It seems the maid is never completely dispossessed.(2-3)

Appears in:
Hopper, Mrs. Strange News from Arpington near Bexly in Kent being a True Narrative of a Young Maid who was Possest with Several Devils or Evil Spirits. London: 1679, 2-3

Anonymous 32 Victim
349

A twelve-year old girl who starts having violent fits and who is possessed by many evil spirits and devils; A young girl from Erskine, Renfrewshire who is allegedly bewitched by Catherine Campbell.(Image 6)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. A True Narrative of the Sufferings and Relief of a Young Girle; Strangely Molested, by Evil Spirits and their Instruments. Edinburgh: 1698, Image 6

Christian Shaw Christian Shaw Victim
366

A man betwitched by two women.()

Appears in:
Unknown, . British Museum Add. MS 32496 f. 42b. Unknown: 1604,

Marmaduke Jackson Marmaduke Jackson Victim
368

A man from Pollok in Glasgow, Scotland, who starts has great pains which keep him from sleeping and continuous sweating. His pain seemed like he was being continuously pricked with pins.(228)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 228

Maxwell Maxwell Victim
369

A young maid from Taunton in Somersetshire who suffer from strange fits. She lost her health and languished when bewitched by Julian Cox in 1663.()

Appears in:
Glanvill, Joseph. Saducismus Triumphatus, or, Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions in Two Parts. London: 1681,

Anonymous 33 Anonymous 33 Victim
371

A pious woman who gives birth to monsters ()

Appears in:
Anonymous. Signs and Wonders from Heaven. With a True Relation of a Monster Born in Radcliffe Highway. London: 1645,

Hart Mistress Hart Victim
372

A girl from Southwark in the county of Greater London, known to be the eleven year old daughter of Elizabeth Seager. On Whitson Eve, Dr. Lambe's serving-women were busy and he needed someone to deliver a basket of herbs to him. According to Joan, who told her tale to both her mother Elizabeth and to Mabel Swinnington, when she came with the basket, Dr. Lambe sent away his serving-man with a message and locked the door. He then led her into his closet, barred that door as well, put her on a joint-stool and stuck his tongue in her mouth. She was afraid and struggled, "but hee would not let her alone, but stroue with her." Joan was afraid to report this to her mother at first, thinking she would be beaten. When Elizabeth came to Mabel Swinton for help, Mabel took Joan into her home and got the rest of the story out of her. When Mabel examined Joan to dress her injuries, she found "the place did smoake like a pot that had seething liquor in it that were newly vncouered" and that Joan was very sore. Joan told her that "Lambs maid Becke had brought her a thing in a dish, and had drest her, but there was a little specke of the venimous substance of it, that stucke vpon the inside of her thigh." When Mabel pulled it away, "it had festerd the place where it stucke." Dr. Lambe was convicted of Joan's rape, sentenced to death, received a reprieve, and was struck down for it by an angry mob a year later.(15-16)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 15-16

Joan Joan Seager Joan Seager Victim
373

A woman who allegedly gives birth to two deformed bits of flesh after giving a known witch only half the bread she desired(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Signs and Wonders from Heaven. With a True Relation of a Monster Born in Radcliffe Highway. London: 1645, 4

Anonymous 34 Anonymous 34 Victim
374

A girl from London, known to be five years old, whom Jane Kent is alleged to have bewitched to death. According to her her father's testimony at the Old Bailey, she suffered from swelling all over her body and a strange skin discoloration before her death. (3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Proceedings at the Sessions of Oyer and Terminer. London: 1682, 3-4

Elizabeth Chamblet Elizabeth Chamblet Victim
380

A man from Munich, Germany, described as an innkeeper who was allegedly suffered so badly from his bewitchment by Anne Gamperle that he killed himself by smothering himself in a vat of pork.(9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Strange Report of Six Most Notorious Witches. London: 1601, 9

Anonymous 37 Anonymous 37 Victim
381

A woman from Munich, Germany, described as an innkeeper's wife who, when bewitched, runs into a hot oven and burns to death.(9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Strange Report of Six Most Notorious Witches. London: 1601, 9

Anonymous 38 Anonymous 38 Victim
382

A man from Bideford in the county of Devon, a husbandman (a tenant farmer) and father to William Herbert Jr. Herbert is "prick[ed] ... unto death" in approximately 1670 by Temperance Lloyd, allegedly at the behest of the blackman. She argued that he prompted her to kill Herbert by promising her that she should live well and do well should Herbert die. (16, 18)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 16, 18

William Herbert William Herbert Victim
384

A man from Green-head in Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be minor gentry the father of Robert Nutter, John Nutter and Margaret Crooke, father-in-law of Marie Nutter, and the son of Elizabeth and old Robert Nutter. Anne Redferne was charged with and convinced of bewitching him to death; he died around 1594. Elizabeth Southerns alleged that she saw Anne Whittle and Anne Redferne making clay images of Christopher, Robert and Marie Nutter at Thomas Redferne's home. Margaret Crooke claimed that Christopher died the year after his son Robert, and that he said numerous times in his illness that he was bewitched. (E-Ev)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E-Ev

Christopher Nutter Christopher Nutter Victim
389

A woman from Ipswich in the county of Suffolk, described as a maid who was allegedly killed by Mother Lakeland. Lakeland confessed the murder was based on annoyance; the maid had refused to give Lakeland a pin and was irate with Lakeland who had yet to pay her back a borrowed shilling.(8)

Appears in:
Lakeland, Mother. The Laws Against Witches and Conjuration. London: 1645, 8

Anonymous 42 Victim
390

A man from Hatfield in the county of Essex, known to be a servant to Goodman Some, who was allegedly made sick and died of a drink he accepted from Elizabeth Lord.(5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 5-6

John Fraunces John Fraunces Victim
393

A girl from York in the county of Yorkshire. She and Anonymous 10 suffered fits of convulsion in which they would vomit wool, crooked pins and the hafts of knives, one of which was marble. They demonstrated their afflictions before the Judges as evidence that Anonymous 43 and Anonymous 44 had bewitched them. The Jury was satisfied with their evidence, but the Judges "thought it requisite to give some respite of time for a more deliberate determination" to decide whether the girls' affliction was diabolical in origin or a deceit.(3-4)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 3-4

Anonymous 9 Victim
394

A girl from York in the county of Yorkshire. She and Anonymous 9 suffered fits of convulsion in which they would vomit wool, crooked pins and the hafts of knives, one of which was marble. They demonstrated their afflictions before the Judges as evidence that Anonymous 43 and Anonymous 44 had bewitched them. The Jury was satisfied with their evidence, but the Judges "thought it requisite to give some respite of time for a more deliberate determination" to decide whether the girls' affliction was diabolical in origin or a deceit.(3-4)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 3-4

Anonymous 10 Victim
397

A girl from Luyck in Brussels, known to be nine years of age. When Anonymous 12 came to the door to beg, this girl gave her bread and beer, and received a sorrel leaf in return, which she ate. Not long after, this girl began to suffer convulsive fits and "did fall down as dead." She was examined by physicians of both genders and many remedies were tried to no effect. A priest prayed over her, but this only caused her to contort violently and begin to vomit horse dung, pins, hair, feathers, knots of thread, nails, pieces of broken glass, eggshells and more. Her family noticed that when Anonymous 12 came near or looked toward their home, Anonymous 11 became all the more tormented and had her apprehended; Anonymous 12 confessed and was hanged for it. This did not end Anonymous 11's fits, however - Anonymous 12 claimed at her hanging that two other witches were also practicing their art on her. The girl's parents brought her to famous physician Henri de Heer, who witnessed her vomit a variety of strange things, be unable to eat for 15 days at a time, swell and suffer convulsions. de Heer claimed to pull the strange objects directly from her throat with his hand, disproving claims that she faked her bewitchment. He gives her a decoction of various herbs and makes an ointment, both of which he credits for her cure.(5-13)

Appears in:
Heer, Henri de. The Most True and Wonderful Narration of two Women Bewitched in Yorkshire. S.I.: 1658, 5-13

Anonymous 11 Victim
399

A man who allegedly publicly identifies Joan Upney as a witch. Upney confesses to sending her familiar to plague his wife soon after()

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589,

John Harrolde John Harrolde / Harwood Victim
400

A woman from Dagenham in the County of Essex and wife of John Harrolde. Joan is allegedly pinched and sucked by one of Joan Upney's familiar toads. She dies on August 14, 1588. (Sig. Aiiiv, B)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, Sig. Aiiiv, B

Joan Harrolde Joan Harrolde / Harwood Victim
401

A widow from the town of Thorpe and possibly the wife of Robert Cheston or a relation of Robert Cheston and his wife. Joan Cheston appears to have earned the ire of two accused witches, Ales Manfield and Margaret Grevell. According to Joan Cheston, she noted that in the summer of 1581, having refused to give Ales Manfield some curds she had not yet made, a number of her cows went lame for eight days. When Manfield returned to demand curds, Cheston yelled at her accusing her of bewitching her cattel and suggesting that her own health depended on theirs; Cheston would burn Mansfield [herself?] if the cows didn't recover. Margaret Grevell could not recall any falling out between herself and Joan Cheston, save that she had approached "Joan Ceston to buye a penniworth of Rie meale, but shee woulde let her haue none."(D6-D6v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, D6-D6v

Joan Cheston Joan Cheston Victim
402

A man from Thorpe in the county of Essex, husband to Mrs. Cheston (who may be Joan Cheston), and likely a farmer. According to Alice Manfield, following a fight she had with Mrs. Cheston circa 1575, Margaret Grevell had her spirit Robbin (a familiar shared with Manfield) bewitch Robert Cheston's bull at while it was at still harnessed to the plow making it "pine & die." In around 1577, Grevell, again according to Manfield, sent "her spirite Iacke to goe to plague Cheston, vpon the great Toe vnto the death," rewarding him hansomly for his efforts with "blood of the saide Margrettes bodie, and that besides it had of her Beere and Breade for the labour" and "Beare and Breed" for reporting its efforts to Manfield. Manfield is indicted, tried, and found not guilty for causing the death of Robert Cheston. (D5, D6)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, D5, D6

Robert Cheston Robert Cheston Victim
403

The maid servant of a pork farmer (Anonymous 45) from Swaffham in the county of Norfolk, who is frightened and bewitched after refusing to give a woman, who appears dressed and mounted like a gentlewoman (Anonymous 22), beer and bacon. She makes the woman vanish with a pious invocation, but quakes and tremble and can not speak for two hours after the incident()

Appears in:
Anonymous. Signs and Wonders from Heaven. With a True Relation of a Monster Born in Radcliffe Highway. London: 1645,

Anonymous 45 Victim
408

A man from Windsor in the county of Berkshire, who is allegedly killed by Elizabeth Stile. He had promised an old cloak to Stile, and broke the promise; she clapped him on the shoulder, after which he went home and died.(14)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579, 14

Saddock M. Saddock Victim
411

A girl from Yowel in Surrey, who was allegedly bewitched by Joan Buts; she became ill and died. Witnesses at Buts' trial swore that they had to remove pins from Farmer's arms and other parts of her bodies many times, also attributed to Buts' bewitchment of the child.(1, 2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. An Account of the Tryal and Examination of Joan Buts, for being a Common Witch and Inchantress. London: 1682, 1, 2

Mary Farmer Mary Farmer Victim
413

A man from Ipswich in the county of Suffolk, who is bewitched to death by his wife, Mother Lakeland. He allegedly "lay in great misery for a time, and at last dyed." it was his death that ultimately caused Lakeland's own. She convicted of petty treason and was "burned to death, because she was the death of her husband." (7-8)

Appears in:
Lakeland, Mother. The Laws Against Witches and Conjuration. London: 1645, 7-8

Anonymous 46 Victim
414

A man from Ipswich in the county of Suffolk, described as living in such intolerable pain and misery that he is "forced to go with his head and his knees together." Beale is allegedly tormented by an imp sent by Mother Lakeland when he would not marry her granddaughter. His ship is burnt and he is body is made to consume and putrefy. He lives to suffer this punishment, with "halfe of his body is rotten upon him" for over a year and a half. After Mother Lakeland is executed, "a bunch of flesh, something after the form of a Dog, that grew upon the thigh" broke off, and another sore, that "rose upon the side of his belly, in the form of a Fistula," began to heal. There was hope, at the time of publication, that he would recover. (8)

Appears in:
Lakeland, Mother. The Laws Against Witches and Conjuration. London: 1645, 8

Beale Mr. Beale Victim
425

A man from St. Osyth in the county of Essex and husband of Mrs. Johnson, Johnson is both a cloth-maker and is responsible for collecting and distributing alms in St. Osyth. He appears to be widely known in his community. He also appears to have fallen afoul with at least three women who were accused of witchcraft; Ales Newman, Elizabeth Bennet, and Joan Pechey all of them were questioned in terms of what is read as his suspicious death. Johnson is first mentioned by Thomas Rabbet, Ursely Kempe's eight year old son. He claims to have overheard Ales Newman, a woman he describes as his godmother, tell his mother that And this examinat saith, that within a fewe daies after the said Newmans wife came vnto his mother, and "she had sent a spirit to plague Iohnson to ye death, and an other to plague his wife." This accusation, however vague, was in supported by Kempe herself, who claimed that Johnson denied Newman's request for money to help her sick husband, claiming that "had disbursed more money then hee had collected, saying, therefore hee coulde not then helpe her with any," enraging Newman, and according to Kempe's familioar spirit Tyffin, "sent one of the spirites that shee had from this examinate to plague the saide Iohnson and his wife vnto the death." Elizabeth Bennet, although denying she had made any claim about Newman sending spirits to plague Johnson or his wife, did testify that she had witnessed Ales Newman use "some harde speeches vnto him, and seemed to be much angrie" when he denied to provide he with money for her husband. Bennet also denies that she had ever sent a familiar to plague Johnson or his wife, although it is unclear where this accusation may have come from. Finally, Joan Pechy is inculcated in the death of Johnson. Ales Hunt claims that as Pechy was "going homewardes," having received bread which was too hard to eat, she "murmured & found great fault at Iohnson, saying, he might haue giuen that to a gyrle or another, and not to her, saying, the bread was to hard baked for her, and that shee then seemed to bee in a great anger therewithall. " Whereas this anger might have been interpreted as normal annoyance, Johnson's death, coupled with the fact that Hunt claimed that Pechy "was skilfull and cunning in witcherie," made her a suspect in his untimely demise. The index at the end of _A True and Just Relation_ records Ales Newman as the witch who bewitched John Johnson and his wife to death (as confessed by Ursley Kempe and Elizabeth Bennet; Newman does not appear to have responded to these charges, or to have been indicted on them. (A3v-A4)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A3v-A4

John Johnson John Johnson (2) Victim
426

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex and wife of John Johnson, a local cloth-maker and alms collector. Mrs. Johnson is allegedly bewitched to death, as is her husband, by either Ales Newman, Joan Pechey, or Elizabeth Bennet. Mrs. Johnson's death appears to have been read as an act of vengeance against her husband (she appears to have committed no crimes) and his own death caused by what was seen as indifference by Joan Pechy and miserliness by Ales Newman. In the end, both their deaths are Ales Newman, although she is not charged on this matter. (A3v-A4)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A3v-A4

Johnson Mrs. Johnson Victim
430

A man whose child was nipped by Joan Prentice's familiar bid, and whose logs were knocked over by John Cunny's familiars, Jack and Jyll(8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, 8

John Glascock John Glascock Victim
431

A woman, the wife of John Sparrow (the elder), who was bewitched by Joan Cunny's familiars, Jack and Jyll()

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589,

Sparrow Mrs. Sparrow Victim
433

A man from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be wealthy. Elizabeth Francis allegedly desired Andrew Byles as a husband, and was advised by her familiar Sathan to allow him to "abuse" her first. She does so, but Byles refuses to marry her. Francis, desiring revenge, had Sathan "waste his goodes" and later kill him with a touch. After Byles death, Francis finds herself pregnant with his child and ends the pregnancy with a decoction of a herb Sathan recommends to her.(13)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 13

Andrew Byles Andrew Byles Victim
434

A man from Chelmsford in the county of Essex, known to be the husband of Mrs. Saunder; when Mrs. Saunder refused to give Mother Staunton yeast, Mother Staunton allegedly left offended and murmuring, after which Saunder's infant child became violently sick. The cradle continued to rock of its own accord when Mrs. Saunder picked up the child to comfort it, and would not stop until a guest of the home, one of the Earl of Surrey's gentlemen (Anonymous 50), stabbed it with his dagger.(11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 11

Richard Saunder Richard Saunder Victim
435

A woman from Chelmsford in the county of Essex, known to be the wife of Richard Saunder, who refused to give Mother Staunton yeast; Mother Staunton allegedly left offended and murmuring, after which Saunder's infant child became violently sick. The cradle continued to rock of its own accord when Mrs. Saunder picked up the child to comfort it, and would not stop until a guest of the home, one of the Earl of Surrey's gentlemen (Anonymous 50), stabbed it with his dagger.(11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 11

Saunder Mrs. Saunder Victim
438

Grace Thurlowe is a woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, wife of John Thurlow and mother of Davie Thurlowe and an infant daughter. Her son Davie is allegedly saved from a strange body twisting torment by Ursula Kempe, but who later blames a series of her own problems on Kempe. Grace had a falling out with Kempe; she refused to allow Grace to wet nurse her baby daughter. Thurlowe laid her three month old daughter to sleep in her cradle after nursing her shortly thereafter the infant fell out of its cradle, breaking its neck and dying, a loss Thurlowe blamed on Kempe. They began to fight viciously, and when "about halfe a yeere past she began to haue a lamenesse in her bones, & specially in her legges" Kempe suggested she could cure her for "xii. pence," curing her, only to lame her again when she didn't pay up. Kempe later fell on her knees and begged Thurlowe to forgive her, presumably for the murder of her daughter, rather than removing her cunning cure. (A-A2)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A-A2

Grace Thurlowe Grace Thurlowe Victim
441

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, the wife of John Glascocke and the sister of Edward Wood. Accusations against Glascocke appear to come from a few sources; one of her former tenants or roommates, according to Michael the shoemaker, reported that Glascocke was "a naughtie woman, and a dealer in witchcrafte," and another person named Sparrow also living with Glascocke complained of "a straunge noise or rumbling since Christmas." However, most of the accusations against her come courtesy of Ursley Kempe. Kempe notes that the same shoemaker said Glascocke "had bewitched his Chylde, whereof it dyed," an accusation confirmed by Kempe's familiar Tyffin. Tyffin also evidently claimed that Glascock had killed Charity Page, described as "the Base childe that Page and his wife haue in keeping." And Kempe herself accused Glacocke of bewitching Fortune's child. Glascocke represents herself as a victim of paranormal events and witchcraft, as opposed to a perpetrator of them. She suggests that when she was twenty years old, that she had been "haunted by" (bewitched or forspoken by) Mrs. Arnold, who "was accompted a witch' and who she suspected of causing "certain ledde~ weights and great stones were cast into the house, and diuers straunge noyses of rumblinges hearde" as a way to scare Glascocke's husband away. Glascocke suggests that she was also "consumed by the space of two or three yeares," by "straung aches in her bones, and otherwise." She saught the help of man named Herring (named to bee a Cawker [or a person who water proofs a ship]) who gave her a poultice, in the form of a "lynnen bagge of the breadth of a groate, full of small thinges like seedes, and willed her to put the same where her payne was most, the which shee proued by sewing it vppon her garmente, neare the place where her greefe was." She is searched by Annis Letherdall and Margaret Sympson did "affyrme vppon their credites, that vpon the left side of the thighe of this Examinate, there be some spots, and vpon the left shoulder likewise one or two Which spottes bee like the sucked spots, that Ursley Kempe hath vppon her bodie." Glascocke is actually charged with bewitching Charity Page, Abraham Hedg, and Martha Stevens. She is condemned but remanded. She is found guilty and remanded to prison. As of August 2, 1582, she is still imprisoned, along with Ales Newman, Ellen Southern, and Cecily Sellis at Colchester Goal. (Cv-C3)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, Cv-C3

Annis Glascocke Annis Glascocke Victim
443

A man from Thorpe in the county of Essex and an acting Constable at the time of the March 1582 assize. John Sayer testifies against Ales Mansfield, suggesting that one of his carts become mysteriously stuck when it passed by Manfield's home. He traces this act of "witcherie" to an incident which occurred earlier, when Manfield asked a man thatching his roof to also thatch the roof of her oven. The man was happy enough to do it, he replied, if he was able to secure permission to do so from Sayer. Manfield, impatient and irritated, suggested that "hee had beene as good as to have willed you to doe it. For I will bee even with him." Manfield tells a different version of this story or indeed of another reason she might have sought retribution. She suggests that Sayer's chart had taken a big gauge out of her lawn as he passed by on his way home from collecting dung. In an act of convenient revenge, she sent her familiar Puppet (alias Mamet) to lodge the cart in place, paying the imp with beer for the labor.(C6v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C6v

Iohn Sayer John Sayer Victim
444

A girl from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be 12 years old and to work in her family's milkhouse. Agnes Brown allegedly refused her Joan Waterhouse bread and cheese one day, for which Joan allegedly summoned her mother's familiar Sathan to frighten the girl. Brown claimed in court that one day, while she was churning butter, a large black dog with an ape's face, a short tail, a chain and a silver whistle appeared with the milkhouse key in its mouth; this creature demanded butter and unlocked the milkhouse. She claimed the dog went in and emerged a while later claiming to have made butter for her. Brown reporting this to her aunt, who fetched a priest; they found the imprint of butter on some of the cheese in the milkhouse. The dog returned twice more over the next week for more butter. The last time, it carried a dagger and threatened to kill her, identifying Mother Waterhouse as its "sweet dame" and the owner of the knife. Mother Waterhouse called Brown a liar for this last, saying she only owned a great knife, not a dagger. Joan was acquitted of bewitching Brown, though the girl allegedly became disabled in her right leg and arm.(18-20)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 18-20

Agnes Browne Agnes Browne Victim
445

A man from Chelmsford in the county of Essex, who refused alms to Ellen Smith's son; Smith is alleged to have bewitched him later that day, sending a being that came first as a rat and then as a toad to his home. John Eastwood, assisted by a visiting neighbor (Anonymous 51), seized the creature in tongs and thrust it in the fire, where it made the fire burn blue and go almost out. Ellen Smith came to Eastwood's home in great pain, making the excuse that she had come to ensure all was well with him, and leaving again when he replied that it was.(8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 8

John Eastwood John Eastwood Victim
448

A man from Chelmsford in the county of Essex, known to have feuded with Mother Staunton and signed as a witness on a document detailing her alleged misdeeds; one time he allegedly scratched her face with a needle after they argued, to which she responded by telling him he had a flea on him, causing him to be tormented in his limbs. At another occasion, they allegedly fought over some grain and he snatched it from her hands saying he would feed them to his chickens; all three or four dozen chickens fed with the grain died with only one surviving.(10, 11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 10, 11

Thomas Prat Thomas Prat Victim
449

A child from Chelmsford in the county of Essex, known as the child of William and Mrs. Corner, who was then allegedly taken with sweat and chills, and started shrieking and staring, and wringing and writhing, after Mrs. Corner refused to provide Mother Staunton with items she had demanded. The child's affliction was so extreme that those who saw it were uncertain it would live.(12)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 12

Corner Corner (child) Victim
450

A woman from Chelmsford in the county of Essex, known to be the wife of William Corner and the mother of one child, who refused to give Mother Staunton various items she had demanded; Staunton then demanded to know how many children Mrs. Corner had. The Corner child was then allegedly taken with sweat and chills, and started shrieking and staring, and wringing and writhing, until those who saw it were uncertain it would live.(12)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 12

Corner Mrs. Corner Victim
452

A woman from Chelmsford in the county of Essex, known to be the wife of Robert Cornell, who allegedly denied Mother Staunton milk on two occasions, and barred the door against her, for she suspected Staunton to be a witch. The second time she was sent away, Mother Staunton is said to have made a circle on the ground with her knife in front of the door, marking it with the points of the compass in full view of both Cornells and their maid; when they asked what she was doing, she answered that she was making an outhouse and left. The next day, Mrs. Cornell was taken sick after leaving the house through that door, her body swelling from time to time as if with child until she feared she would burst. Her health never recovered.(12-13)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 12-13

Cornell Mrs. Cornell Victim
454

A man from Wimbish in the county of Essex, who allegedly refused charity to Mother Staunton; she took offence, and immediately after his cows began to give stinking bloody gore instead of milk, one becoming sick beyond recovery.(14)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 14

John Cornell John Cornell, Jr. Victim
455

A man from Wimbish in the county of Essex, who allegedly sent Mother Staunton away empty-handed when she came calling for alms; shortly after her departure, twenty of Lathburie's hogs are said to have fallen sick and died, and a cow of his was afflicted such that it was three times more likely to become lost. Lathburie burned one of the dead hogs in the hope of saving the rest.(14-15)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 14-15

Rohart Lathburie Robert Lathburie Victim
457

A woman from Burton upon Trent in the county of Staffordshire, whose house is haunted by an unknown force that moves her bread, kills the cattle, sets hay and a house on fire, and moves meat and cheese from one room to another. Eventually, these incidents force her to move from her house.(2 - 6)

Appears in:
A., J.. The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton. London: 1671, 2 - 6

Anonymous Anonymous Anonymous 2 Victim
458

A woman from Shoelane in London who gives birth on September 16, 1645, to a monstrous baby that has nails coming out of its thighs, no head, and stumps for legs.(7-8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Wounderfull Apperation of Blood in a Pool at Garraton in Leicester-shire. London: 1645, 7-8

Anonymous 21 Victim
461

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex and wife of Mr. Bonner. Mrs. Bonner and Elizabeth Bennet, according to her husband, "were lovers and familiar friendes, and did accompanie much together." Bennet, supposedly sympathizing with Bonner about an ongoing lameness in her knee, "vsed speeches vnto her, saying, a good woman how thou art loden, & then clasped her in her armes, and kissed her." Within ten days, Mrs. Bonner's "vpper Lippe swelled & was very bigge, and her eyes much sunked into her head," a condition which continued almost two months, and continued still while her husband testified at the March 29, 1582. The knee condition which plagued Mrs. Bonner was caused, according to Ursely Kempe, by Elizabeth Bennet's familiar spirit, Lyerd. The facial swelling and sinking presumably by Bennet herself. Although Bennet admits to having a familiar named Lyerd, she does not mention this incident in her confession, nor does it appear in the counts against her at the Assize. (B5v-B6)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, B5v-B6

Bonner Mrs. Bonner Victim
462

A man from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, husband of Joan Byet, and a dairy farmer. Although the Bytes lived in peace with their neighbor for the first year of their residence, things soon grew strained, and then violent between the families. Byet would sometime call Bennett an "olde trot and olde witche, and did banne and curse" her cattle. In return, Bennett would call Byett a "knave saying, winde it vp Byet, for it wil light vpon your selfe." Although Bennett mentioned the three of Byett's cow shortly after this incident, and more to do with poor animal husbandry; Byet beat the fallen cow until it died. Joan Byet also "did beate her swine seuerall times with greate Gybets." Moreover, she also" thrust a pitchforke through the side of one of [Elizabeth Bennet's] swine, the which Durrant a Butcher did buie, and for that when hee had dressed it, it prooued A messell," (a leprous animal, which presumably could not be eaten?). Of course, this version of the story is not the only one. According to Ursely Kempe, although Elizabeth Bennet's three familiars "plagued three of his Beastes whereof two of them dyed, and the third leyer fire or drooping, & not likly to liue: Byette caused his folkes to make a fire about her" presumably as an act of countermagic and cremation. Kempe suggested that "the Cowe feeling the heate of the fire, starte vp and ranne her way, and by that occasion was saued"; Byett himself seems to hint that the cow was certainly saved by jumping up, but also by "byting of stickes, bigger then any mans finger" from a local wood stack. Joan Byett was not so lucky. She appears to have died on Febraury 10, 1581, a crime attributed Kempe to Bennet's other familiar, Suckin who "did plague Byettes wife vnto death." The court blames the bewitchment on Bennet. Bennet acknowledges the felony, and is deemed guilty and charged to be hanged. (A2v-A3)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A2v-A3

William Byet William Byet Victim
463

Martha Stevens is a girl from St. Osyth in the county of Essex and daughter of Michael Stevens, a local cobbler. Martha Stevens is allegedly bewitched by Annis Glascocke via one of her familiar spirits, as related by Ursley Kempe. She died on February 1, 1581. (Cv)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, Cv

Martha Stevens Martha Stevens Victim
464

The Base Childe at Page's is a child from St. Osyth in the county of Essex. The legitimacy of this child is in question; it may be the child of William Page and Mrs. Page and sibling to Charity Page, who was allegedly bewitched by Annis Glascock. Or it may be Charity Page herself. Since there is so much concern about the legitimacy of the child, it would appear, however, that this is a different sibling, or a ward cared for by the Pages. According to Ursley Kempe (who provides information given to her courtesy of her familiar Tyffin, Annis Glascock bewitched this "base child" to death. (Cv, C2v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, Cv, C2v

Page Page (Child) Victim
465

A girl from St. Osyth in the county of Essex and the (possibly illegitimate) daughter of William Page. According to Ursley Kempe, Annis Glascock bewitched Charity Page. Page grew ill at the beginning of March, 1580 and died May 8, 1580. Her mother later visited Ursley Kempe to seek a cure for her own bewitchment. This may or may not be the "base child" which purportedly lived with the Pages. (Appendix)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, Appendix

Charity Page Charity Page Victim
467

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, wife to local dairy farmer, William Byet, and the neighbor of Elizabeth Bennett. Although the Bytes lived in peace with their neighbor for the first year of their residence, things soon grew strained, and then violent between the families. Byet would sometime call Bennett an "olde trot and olde witche, and did banne and curse" her cattle. In return, Bennett would call Byett a "knave saying, winde it vp Byet, for it wil light vpon your selfe." Although Bennett mentioned the three of Byett's cow shortly after this incident, and more to do with poor animal husbandry; Byet beat the fallen cow until it died. Joan Byet also "did beate her swine seuerall times with greate Gybets." Moreover, she also" thrust a pitchforke through the side of one of [Elizabeth Bennet's] swine, the which Durrant a Butcher did buie, and for that when hee had dressed it, it prooued A messell," (a leprous animal, which presumably could not be eaten?). Of course, this version of the story is not the only one. According to Ursely Kempe, although Elizabeth Bennet's three familiars "plagued three of his Beastes whereof two of them dyed, and the third leyer fire or drooping, & not likly to liue: Byette caused his folkes to make a fire about her" presumably as an act of countermagic and cremation. Kempe suggested that "the Cowe feeling the heate of the fire, starte vp and ranne her way, and by that occasion was saued"; Byett himself seems to hint that the cow was certainly saved by jumping up, but also by "byting of stickes, bigger then any mans finger" from a local wood stack. Joan Byett was not so lucky. She appears to have died on Febraury 10, 1581, a crime attributed Kempe to Bennet's other familiar, Suckin who "did plague Byettes wife vnto death." The court blames the bewitchment on Bennet. Bennet acknowledges the felony, and is deemed guilty and charged to be hanged. (A2v-A3)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A2v-A3

Joan Byet Joan Byet Victim
472

A man from Thorpe (now Thorpe-le-Soken) in the county of Essex, a father, husband, and brother of Mr. Crosse. Sannuet was a farmer (he had dairy cows and hogs) and employer to Margaret Eustace (circa 1567). After he "vsed some threatning speeches vnto her," he found his "mouth was drawne awrye, well neere vppe to the vpper parte of his cheek," an afflication he blamed on her mother. Years later, his brother Thomas Crosse (Felice Okey's husband) becomes "verye sickly, and at tymes was without any remembrance," some time around 1579. He calls Sanneuet to his side and claims that "Margaret Ewstace had bewitched him, and brought him into that weak state hee then was at." Sannuet, in a rage, claimed, that if that was true, he "wished a spyt red hotte [be put] in her buttocks." These angry words were carried to Elizabeth Eustace, Margaret's mother, who warned a neighbor not to enter Sanneuet's house, claiming "aye goe not thyther, for he saith I am a witch: And sayed, his wife is with Childe and lustie, but it will bee otherwise with her then hee looketh for: Whereuppon this Examinate saith, that his wife had a most straunge sicknes, and was deliuered of childe, which within short time after dyed." This was not Sanneuet's only loss, however. The same summer (circa 1579 or 1582) his dairy cows produced blood in lieu of milk and his hogs "did skippe and leape aboute the parde in a straunge sorte: And some of them dyed."()

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582,

Robert Sanneuet Robert Sanneuet Victim
474

A man from Little Clacton in the county of Essex. According to Rosse, who serves as one of the chief witness against the Sellis (their sons serve as the others), one day as Henry Sellis is plowing Rosse's his field, having only "gone twise or thrise aboute the lande, two of [Rosses] lykest horses fell downe in moste straunge wise, and dyed." Since these horsed were healthy and died so quickly, Rosse begins to think that Sellis had bewitched them. He has two reasons to think this, both involving Henry's wife Cecily. A negotiation over the price of malt between Rosse and Cecily Sellis had gone bad; Sellis wanted to pay about a third the cost Rosse was willing to part with his malt for. They fell out; and she left without malt and "vsing many harde speaches." The next verbal altercation happened between Rosse's wife and Cecily. Upon discovering Sellis' cows in her pasture, Mrs. Rosse dud "hunt the~ out therof." In a rage and great anger, Cecily gave Mrs. Rosse "lewd speeches." Shortly thereafter, "many of his beaste were in a most straung taking: the which he doth say, to be wrought by some witchcraft, or sorcery by ye said He~ry or Cisly his wife." Finally, and as almost an aside, Rosse mentions that before his barn burned, that John Sellis noted that the "youngest sonne of the saide Henrie and Cisley, should say heere is a goodly deale of corne, and a man vnknowen shoulde answere there was the diuell store."(C8-D)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C8-D

Rychard Rosse Richard Rosse Victim
483

A woman from Ipswich in the county of Suffolk who allegedly attempts to call in a one shilling loan from and will not give a needle to Mother Lakeland. Mother Lakeland allegedly sends her familiar moles "to torment her and take away her life."(8)

Appears in:
Lakeland, Mother. The Laws Against Witches and Conjuration. London: 1645, 8

Anonymous 337 Victim
487

A man from Windsor in the county of Berkshire, known to be a butcher, who was allegedly killed by Elizabeth Stile (alias Rockingham) Mother Deuell, Mother Margaret and Mother Dutton through image magic.(Image 7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579, Image 7

Mr. Switcher Switcher Victim
488

A man from Windsor in the county of Berkshire, known to have been the mayor of Windsor, and allegedly killed by Elizabeth Stile (alias Rockingham), Mother Deuell, Mother Margaret, and by Mother Dutton by means of image magic. Maister Gallis is the father of Richard and James Galis.()

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579,

RIchard Galis RIchard Galis Sr. Victim
489

A woman from Windsor in the county of Berkshire, who is employed by Lanckforde and was allegedly killed at the same time as her employer, by Elizabeth Stile (alias Rockingham), Mother Deuell, Mother Margaret and Mother Dutton through image magic.()

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579,

Anonymous 53 Victim
490

A man from Windsor in the county of Berkshire, known to be a farmer, who was allegedly killed along with a maidservant by Elizabeth Stile (alias Rockingham), Mother Deuell, Mother Margaret and Mother Dutton through image magic.()

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579,

Lanckforde Mr. Lanckforde Victim
491

A man from Windsor in the county of Berkshire, known to be a butcher, who was allegedly bewitched by Elizabeth Stile (alias Rockingham) Mother Dutten, Mother Deuell, Mother Margaret, through image magic. Dutton confirmed that Mastyln was bewitched, but denied causing it.(7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579, 7

Mastlyn Mastlyn Victim
494

A man from Windsor in the county of Berkshire, who was bewitched by Elizabeth Stile (alias Rockingham), Mother Dutton, Mother Deuell, and Mother Margaret, after he had a falling out with George Whittyng. The bewitchment was done on an image of Foster that Whyttyng provided, into which hawthorn spikes were thrust. He was later healed by Mother Dutton.(Image 7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579, Image 7

William Foster William Foster Victim
496

A man who is physically hurt by Joan Cunny's imps Jack and Jill(8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, 8

Barnaby Griffen Barnaby Griffen Victim
497

A boy from Windsor in the county of Berkshire, who threw a stone at Elizabeth Stile's home when he came to collect water from a nearby well; Stile bewitched him so that his hand turned clear around. Mother Dutton later reversed the bewitchment.(B2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579, B2

Anonymous 54 Victim
499

A wealthy yeoman from the Hundred of Devonshey in the county of Essex. Antony James is robbed and murdered by a group of eight men and one woman. The group had initially planned to simply ransack the house, but were disappointed with what they found. They killed Anthony James by stabbing him and proceeded to stab his wife and kidnap his children (one of whom they later murdered and the other, mutilated). (Image 3 - 4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, Image 3 - 4

Anthony James Anthony James Victim
502

A man from the Petticoat Lane area of London in the county of Greater London, described as a brewer, who is respected in his community, whose maidservant is thought to have bewitched his property when he attempted to dismiss her.(3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Shee-devil of Petticoat-Lane, or, A True and Perfect Relation of a Sad Accident which Befel Mr. Freeland. London: 1666, 3-4

Freeland Mr. Freeland Victim
503

A man from the Petticoat Lane area of London in the county of Greater London, whose head is badly gashed by a magically flying pitcher while he sits in Mr. Freeland's drinking room.(5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Shee-devil of Petticoat-Lane, or, A True and Perfect Relation of a Sad Accident which Befel Mr. Freeland. London: 1666, 5

Rowland Bennet Rowland Bennet Victim
504

A woman from the Petticoat Lane area of London in the county of Greater London, described as the wife of Mr. Freeland, a brewer, who went after a looking glass which had mysteriously flown out the window into the yard, put it on the dresser, with a dish on it to hold it down. The dish trembled and took flight.(5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Shee-devil of Petticoat-Lane, or, A True and Perfect Relation of a Sad Accident which Befel Mr. Freeland. London: 1666, 5

Freeland Mrs. Freeland Victim
506

William Adams is a man whose brew was destroyed after his wife had a falling out with Joan Prentice.(B2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, B2

William Adams William Adams Victim
507

A woman whose brew was destoyed after she had a falling out with Joan Prentice(B2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, B2

Adams Mrs. Adams Victim
509

A man from Maldon in the county of Essex, known to be the husband of Alice Chaundler and the stepfather of Ellen Smith, who had a falling out with Smith over money Alice had given her after Alice's execution for witchcraft; Smith bewitched him to be unable to eat meat without bringing it up again, with the result that he wasted to death.(7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 7

Jhon Chaundeler John Chaundeler Victim
513

A man from Lamberd End (now Lambourne) in the County of Essex, described as the servant of Thomas Spycer, who snatched gloves from Mother Noke's daughter and was allegedly robbed of the use of his limbs for the offense. Unable to move, he sent another servant, Anonymous 366, to return the gloves, for which Mother Nokes also afflicted Anonymous 366.(15-16)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 15-16

Anonymous 58 Victim
528

A person from the Petticoat Lane area of London in the county of Greater London, described as a laborer who is hit in the back with pieces of tile and brick while working in Mr. Freeland's yard; the objects were thrown by an unknown force.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Shee-devil of Petticoat-Lane, or, A True and Perfect Relation of a Sad Accident which Befel Mr. Freeland. London: 1666, 4

Anonymous 59 Victim
529

A person from the Petticoat Lane area of London in the county of Greater London, described as a labourer who is hit in the back with peices of tile and brick while working in Mr. Freeland's yard; the objects were thrown by an unknown force.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Shee-devil of Petticoat-Lane, or, A True and Perfect Relation of a Sad Accident which Befel Mr. Freeland. London: 1666, 4

Anonymous 60 Victim
530

An honest gentleman, of forty pounds a year, who was allegedly bewitched by Old Alice, by means of her familiars Partner and Little Devil. He languished and died(72)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 72

Richard Anger Richard Anger Victim
531

The son of a gentleman landowner who, like his father, was allegedly killed by Old Alice's familiars, Partner and Little Devil()

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651,

Edward Anger Edward Anger Victim
532

A woman from West Wall, who was allegedly killed by Old Alice's familiars Partner and Little Devil()

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651,

Wolton Mrs. Wolton Victim
541

A man from Thorpe in the county of Essex, the father to Carter Jr., a "tall and lustie man, of the age of xxxvi. yeeres," and a local brewer. John Carter testifies, along with others, against Margaret Grevell. He suspects that she was involved in attempting to destroy his brewing through bewitchment.(C2v-C3)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C2v-C3

John Carter John Carter Victim
542

A man likely from Thorpe in the county of Essex, a butcher, and the husband of Mrs. Strickland. Strickland testifies against Margaret Grevell. He suggests that his family experienced at least two bits of property damaged brought about by Grevell. Strickland refused to give Grevell's son a rack of newly butchered lamb on demand, and rather suggested the son come back after noon (it is unclear on whether or not he does. However, soon after, his wife is unable to churn butter. Strickland attempted a number of counter magic and pasteurizing techniques. He heated the milk over a great fire; he poured half out, and attempted to heat it again, but could neither make it seeth, nor later churn. The whole batch was ruined and pour out for the pigs. Soon after his main breeding cow "cast her calf" Strickland, fearing it would die painfully, euthanized the calf. (E3-E3v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, E3-E3v

Nicholas Stricklande Nicholas Stricklande Victim
543

A woman from Thorpe (now Thorpe-le-Soken) in the county of Essex, the widow of Thomas Crosse and the sister (in law?) or Robert Sannuet. Felice Okey testifies that she had a falling out with Elizabeth Eustace after finding Eustance's geese in her yard, and driving them out, causing one of them to be injured. Eustace cursed her family and her livelihood, claiming "thy husbande shall not haue his health, nor that whiche hee hath shall not prosper so well as it hath done, and that shee also sayde, thou haste not had so good lucke with thy gooslings." Okey could never keep geese thereafter, her cows gave blood for eight days, in lieu of milk, and worse yet, her husband, Thomas Crosse began to suffer. Having fallen one day onto the ground, he was thereafter taken "in a stra~ge sort" of illness, where he "coulde neyther see, heare, nor speake, and his face all to bee scratched." He would sometime regain lucidity and would "woulde alwayes crye out vpon the sayde Elizabeth euen vnto his dying day, and woulde say that sithence shee the sayd Elizabeth had threatned him he was consumed, and that shee had bewitched him."()

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582,

Felice Okey Felice Okey Victim
546

A child, the daughter of John Glascock, who was allegedly killed by Joan Prentice's familiar Bidd, the day after Joan was turned away empty handed from Glascock's door()

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589,

Sara Glascock Sara Glascock Victim
547

A woman from Hatfield in the county of Essex, known to be a servant of old Higham, who became sick and died after accepting a piece of apple cake from Elizabeth Francis.(A5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, A5

Jone Roberts Jone Roberts Victim
548

A man from Chelmsford in the county of Essex, from whom Mother Staunton allegedly requested a leather thong, which he denied her; that night, his horse died suddenly though it had been in good heath previously.(13)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 13

John Hopwood John Hopwood Victim
549

A Minister who is successfully able to ward off a physical attack from Joan Cunny's familiars by means of a strong religious faith.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, 2

Master Kitchin Master Kitchin Victim
550

A town shoe maker who is successfully able to ward off a physical attack from Joan Cunny's familiars because of his strong religious faith.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, 2

George Coe George Coe Victim
556

Sir Francis Manners is Justice of the peace for the County of Lincoln, the Earle of Rutland, owner of Belvoir (Beaver) Castle and father of Henry Lord Rosse, Francis Lord Rosse, and Lady Katherine. He is from Belvoir in the county of Leicestershire. All three of his children are allegedly bewitched after his wife, Countess Manners, dismisses Joan and Margaret Flower from their employment at Belvoir Castle. Margaret Flower alleged in her examination that Sir Francis Manners and Countess Manners were also bewitched to make them unable to have more children. He participated in the examinations of Anne Baker and Phillip Flower. Countess Cecily Manners is his second wife, his first wife, Frances, died shortly after Lady Katherine's birth. Both of his sons died young, leaving Lady Katherine his sole heir.(C2-C2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C2v

Francis Manners Sir Francis Manners Victim
557

Countess Cecily Manners, the second wife of Sir Francis Manners and the wealthy widow of Sir Edward Hungerford, she was from Belvoir in the county of Leicestershire. Identified as Lady Rosse, the Countess of Rutland, she was the mother of Henry Lord Rosse and Francis Lord Rosse, and stepmother to Lady Katherine. All three of her children allegedly become bewitched after Lady Rosse dismisses the Joan and Margaret Flower from their employment at Belvoir (Beaver) Castle. Margaret Flower alleged in her examination that Sir Francis Manners and Lady Rosse were also bewitched to make them unable to have more children. Countess Manners (C2-C2v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, C2-C2v

Cecily Manners Countess Cecily Manners Victim
559

A young woman from from Belvoir in the county of Leicestershire, known to be the the daughter of Sir Francis Manners and Frances, (d. 1605), daughter of Henry Knyvet of Charlton, Wiltshire, and widow of Sir William Bevill, and the subsequent stepdaughter of Countess Cecily Manners. She was through this marriage the half-sister of Henry Lord Rosse and Francis Lord Rosse. This child of Sir Francis' first marriage, she would have been about 15 years old at the time of Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower's apprehension. She allegedly became afflicted with "extreame maladies and vnusuall fits" after Joan and Margaret Flower were dismissed from their employment at Belvoir (Beaver) Castle. Margaret Flower claimed that she stole a handkerchief from Lady Katherine at her mother, Joan Flower's, command. Joan is said to have put the handkerchief in hot water, rubbed it on her familiar Rutterkin, and bid Rutterkin to go to Lady Katherine, but the familiar only mewed, having no power to harm her. She would later marry George Villiers, becoming the Duchess of Buckingham, and bore three children to him (3 of whom survived infancy). Katherine was purportedly one of Jone of Charles I's favorites, he called her "poor fond Kate," and held a position of honor in Queen Henrietta Maria's chamber, and upon Villiers' death, she would become enormously wealthy. She would next marry Randal MacDonnell, a man with a lesser estate and a few years her junior, but who stood as the heir to the first earl of Antrim. She was described later in life as a woman of "great extraction and fortune, [...] very great wit and spirit."(Dv-D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Dv-D2

Katherine Manners Lady Katherine Manners Victim
564

A boy from Bottesford in the county of Leicestershire, known to be the son of William Fairebarne. Anne Baker alleged during her examination that she had a vision of Thomas being hit by a blue planet, which corresponded with some unknown affliction besetting him. His father, William, beat Baker and broke her head; Thomas is said to have recovered thereafter. However, Baker claimed that she did not send the planet. (D4-D4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D4-D4v

Thomas Fairebarne Thomas Fairebarne Victim
567

A young girl from Bottesford in the county of Leicestershire, known to be the daughter of Anne Stannidge, whom Anne Baker allegedly of bewitched to death. According to Anne Baker's confession, Stannidge brought her daughter to Baker, and Baker laid her on her skirt, but did the child no harm. Stannidge claimed that in order to get Baker to let her daughter go, she had to burn some hair and nail parings from the child, which made Baker come in and set the child down. Baker said that she remembered coming into Stannidge's house in great pain, but knew nothing of the burnt hair and nails, and was so sick at the time that she doesn't recall why she went in the first place. (D4v-E)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, D4v-E

Stannidge Stannidge (Daughter) Victim
568

A man who Margaret Cunny curses after the two have a falling out.(2-3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, 2-3

Father Hurrill Father Hurrill Victim
570

A woman Joan Cunny is suspected of physically hurting with her familiars.(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, 3

Deuenishe Mrs. Deuenishe Victim
571

A man Joan Cunny is suspected of physically hurting with her familiars.(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, 3

Renold Ferror Renold Ferror Victim
572

A woman from Bottesford in the county of Leicestershire, known to be the wife of William Hough, who was allegedly bewitched to death by Anne Baker. Baker would not admit to killing her, but she did say in her confession that she had been angry with Elizabeth for giving her "second bread" as alms when Elizabeth might haue giuen her of her better bread, for she had gone too often on her errands."(E)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E

Elizabeth Hough Elizabeth Hough Victim
575

A child from from Bottesford in the County of Leicester, known to be the child of Joane Gylles, who became sick. Her mother asked Anne Baker to diagnose the child's illness, and Baker told her that the child was forspoken. The child died some time later.(E-Ev)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E-Ev

Gylles Gylles (child) Victim
576

A man from Bottesford in the county of Leicestershire, who accused Anne Baker of bewitching him so that he "had two or three ill nights." She replied "you should haue let me alone then," implying that he had been harassing her.(Ev)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Ev

Henry Milles Henry Milles Victim
583

A woman from Stathorne in the county of Leicestershire, known to be the wife of John Patchett. Both she and her child died, allegedly bewitched to death. Joan Willimott claimed that the child would have lived had John Patchett sought help for it in time, and Mrs. Patchett "had an euill thing within her, which should make an end of her, and that she knew by her Girdle." Ellen Green claimed that she had sent spirits to bewitch the child and Mrs. Patchett to death at Willimott's direction. According to Green, Mrs. Patchett languished "by the space of a moneth and more, for then shee dyed; the childe dyed the next day after she touched it."(E4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E4v

Pathchett Mrs. Patchett Victim
586

A woman from Stisted (or Braintree) in the county of Essex and the wife of Harry Finch. Mrs. Finch who denies Joan Cunny drink because she is too busy brewing to give her any. Displeased by this, Cunny sends her familiars to seek revenge, causing her pain in the head and side of the body for a week, after which she dies.(3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, 3

Finch Mrs. Finch Victim
589

A young boy from Sisted in the county of Essex whose foot is pricked by one of Joan Cunny's familiars after he steals wood from Cunny's grandson.()

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589,

Anonymous 64 Victim
590

A man from Stisted in the county of Essex and the High Sheriff of that Shire. Huddlestone's tree is seemingly ripped out of the land as though it came down in a storm, although there was no wind. This property damage is blamed on the work of Joan Cunny's familiar Jack.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Apprehension and Confession of Three Notorious Witches. London: 1589, 4

Edward Huddlestone Sir Edward Huddlestone Victim
596

A woman from Goadby in the county of Leicestershire, who allegedly called Ellen Greene a witch, a whore and a jade. In retribution, Greene sent her familiar HIsse HIsse to bewitch Anne Dawse to death. Dawse died within a fortnight.(Fv-F2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv-F2

Anne Dawse Anne Dawse Victim
597

A man from Goadby in the county of Leicestershire, known to be the town baker, who Ellen Greene claims had "called her Witch & stricken her." For this act, Greene sent her familiar Pusse to bewitch him to death; he died within a fortnight.(Fv-F2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Fv-F2

Anonymous 65 Victim
598

A man from Stonesby in the county of Leicestershire, known to be a husbandman's son; Ellen Greene allegedly sent her familiar Hisse HIsse to bewitch Robert Williman to death. He died within ten days.(F2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F2

Robert Williman Robert Williman Victim
599

A man from Stonesby in the county of Leicestershire, known to be a husbandman; Ellen Greene allegedly sent her familiar Pusse to bewitch him to death. He died within ten days.(F2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F2

Willison Willison Victim
600

A seven year old boy from the county of Essex and the son of Anthony James who is murdered by George and Annis Dell. After his parents are murdered by the Dells, the children are kidnapped by the Dells and taken to Bishops Hatfield in Hartforshire. It is here that the Dells, after having cut out this sister's tongue (Elizabeth James), throw Anthony James Jr. into a pond to die. Three weeks later, his body is found by men whose dogs had sniffed James' body from under some weeds in the pond. After taking the boy out and laying him down on the ground and telling the town about the strange ordeal, a group of people came to see the body and many recognized the boy, having seen him with the Dells a few weeks earlier. When Annis Dell is called to come see the boy, she denies ever having seen him. She is suspected of lying, however, and upon this discovery is asked to appear at the next Assizes.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 4

Anthony James Anthony James (Jr.) Victim
601

An eight year old girl, and the daughter of Anthony James, from the hundred of Devonshey in the county of Essex who is kidnapped and has her tongue cut out by George and Annis Dell. After watching her parents be brutally murdered, Elizabeth James is taken to Bishops Hatfield in Hartfordshire. One night, Elizabeth James and her brother are awakened and taken by men to Annis and George Dell. Then, Annis Dell cuts out Elizabeth James' tongue and threatens to slit her throat if she laments. Then the Dells force her to watch as they throw her brother into a pond, causing him to drown and force her to throw her tongue into the pond as well. The next day, the Dells take her to woods about two miles outside of Hatfield and sell her to a beggar. Elizabeth James escapes from the beggar, however, and makes her way to London where she meets a barber who takes her in out of poity. Over the next four years, he helped her mouth heal. Five years later she is miraculously able to tell others of her family's murder.(3-5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 3-5

Elizabeth James Elizabeth James Victim
602

A woman from the Devonshey hundred in the county of Essex and the wife of Antony James. One evening, eight anonymous men and an anonymous woman decide to ransack the James family home. Displeased with the amount the bounty found in the house, the robbers decide to first murder Anthony James by stabbing him with daggers. They then turn to his wife who is calling out to her husband as he dying and the anonymous woman, described as being in a state of rage, stabs the woman in the stomach, thus killing her as well as her unborn baby.(3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 3-4

Anonymous 66 Victim
608

A woman from Hartford in the county of Huntingdonshire, whose baby was allegedly murdered by Johane Harrison after she sprinkled dirty laundry water on Harrison while she was walking by; evidently the sprinkled water was done by accident.(20-21)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 20-21

Anonymous 72 Victim
609

A man from Hartford in the county of Huntingdonshire, described as a Yeoman whose cattle are allegedly bewitched to death by Johane Harrison after he tries to help his bewitched sister by riding to Cambridge to seek out a scholar.(21)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 21

Anonymous 73 Victim
610

A man from Ware in the county of Hertfordshire, who loses his bible and swears revenge on the thief. He goes to see his neighbour (Anonymous 487), a reputted cunningman, to find out who stole the bible. However, Thomas Stretton accuses the cunning man of being a Witch or a Devil, causing deep anger in the cunning man and his wife, who in turn cause Thomas Stretton's daughter, Jane Stretton, to become afflicted with violent fits. Thomas Stretton eventually moves his daughter to a quieter house, as her condition causes many people from far and wide to visit. She is never dispossessed.(2)

Appears in:
Y., M.. The Hartford-shire Wonder. London: 1669, 2

Thomas Stretton Thomas Stretton Victim
613

A young boy, and the son of John Ferrall, who is allegedly bewitched by Margaret Simons after attacking her dog with a knife. He becomes very ill five days after the incident occurs, but recovers with the help of another witch.(3-4)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 3-4

Anonymous 74 Victim
618

An archer, of the town Malling in Kent, who is accused of playing with a fly devil or familiar that enhances his skill in archery. The archer won two or three shillings as a result of his advanced abilities, and was then severely punished by authority figures to appease the other angered archers and to overthrow witchcraft.(52)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 52

Anonymous 75 Victim
619

A man from the county of Kent, described as an "honest yeoman," who is approached by a con-man (Anonymous 77) who, believing that the Yeoman's "estate and humour to be convenient in this purpose" finally "came a wooing (as they say) to his daughter, to whom he made love cunningly in words." However, seeing that cheating the Yeoman would be a faster way of making money than marrying his daughter, Anoymous claimed he could multiply him money chemically, taking "one angell [to] make two or three." In truth, after a great deal of pomp and ceremony which looked like magic, the Alchemist takes the Yeoman's money, leaving him with a lump of lead.(252-253)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 252-253

Anonymous 76 Victim
626

A man from somewhere in between the London parishes of Shadwell and Wapping, himself a thief and a murder, who is later transported to the Barbados, and hanged for breaking and entering and killing his wife, who accuses his mother, Alice Flower, of bewitching him and several others for years on end. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange News from Shadwell being a True and Just Relation of the Death of Alice Fowler. London: 1684, 2

Walter Fowler Walter Fowler Victim
627

A woman who presumably lived somewhere between the London parishes of Wapping and Shadwell who as a girl was nursed by Alice Flower (circa 1664). As the girl grew into a woman, she "was still fearful and apprehensive of her, until the time of her Death." The narrator suggest that Anonymous 79, who had "been affrighted by some of [Alice Fowler's] Tricks when she was Young," had a terrible life thereafter, living always in the "greatest Dread and Terror imaginable." She appears to have died by the time of publication. (2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange News from Shadwell being a True and Just Relation of the Death of Alice Fowler. London: 1684, 2

Anonymous 79 Victim
630

An infant from Edmonton in the county of Middlesex, now part of the London Borough of Enfield. Elizabeth Sawyer alleged in her confession that the Devil, called Tom, killed this child and one other, Anonymous 82, on her behalf. (C2)

Appears in:
Goodcole, Henry. The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton. London: 1621, C2

Anonymous 81 Victim
631

An infant from Edmonton in the county of Middlesex, now part of the London Borough of Enfield. Elizabeth Sawyer alleged in her confession that the Devil, called Tom, killed this child and one other, Anonymous 81, on her behalf. (C2)

Appears in:
Goodcole, Henry. The Wonderful Discovery of Elizabeth Sawyer a Witch Late of Edmonton. London: 1621, C2

Anonymous 82 Victim
640

A man from Faulkborne in the County of Essex, known to be a Justice of the Peace and, as of 1564, Sherrif of Essex. Master Henry Fortescue and Reverend Dr. Thomas Cole heard the confessions of Elizabeth Francis, Mother Agnes Waterhouse, Joan Waterhouse and Agnes Brown.()

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566,

Henry Fortescue Henry Fortescue Victim
642

A man from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex. He allegedly offended Mother Agnes Waterhouse, for which she bid her familiar Sathan kill three of his hogs. Mother Waterhouse rewarded Sathan with a chicken and a drop of her blood.(14-15 (B-Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 14-15 (B-Bv)

Kersye Father Kersye Victim
643

A woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex. She allegedly had a falling out with Mother Agnes Waterhouse, for which Mother Waterhouse bid her familiar Sathan to drown Widow Gooday's cow.(15 (Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 15 (Bv)

Gooday Widow Gooday Victim
644

A woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse. She allegedly had a falling out with Mother Waterhouse, after which Mother Waterhouse bid her familiar Sathan to drown three of Anonymous 67's geese.(15 (Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 15 (Bv)

Anonymous 67 Victim
645

A woman from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse who refused to give Mother Waterhouse butter. In revenge, Mother Waterhouse caused her to "lose the curdes" two or three days later.(15 (Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 15 (Bv)

Anonymous 68 Victim
646

A man from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse and the husband of Anonymous 86. He and his wife allegedly had a falling out with Mother Waterhouse, after which Mother Waterhouse bid her familiar Sathan to kill him with a "bluddye flux." (15 (Bv))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 15 (Bv)

Anonymous 85 Victim
651

A woman from London, known to be the mother of Elizabeth Chamblet and the wife of Mr. Chamblet, who was allegedly bewitched by Jane Kent. According to her husband's testimony at the Old Bailey, Mr. Chamblet went to see a Dr. Ha[...]ks in Spittle-Fields after the death of their daughter for advice on un-witching, who advised him to boil a quart of Mrs. Chamblet's urine with hair clippings and nail parings, which he did.(3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Proceedings at the Sessions of Oyer and Terminer. London: 1682, 3-4

Mrs. Chamblet Victim
652

A man from London, known to be the father of Elizabeth Chamblet and the husband of Mrs. Chamblet, who alleged in proceedings at the Old Bailey that Jane Kent had bewitched his swine, wife and daughter, and that his daughter had died of it. Mr. Chamblet claimed that the bewitchments started when he bargained with Kent for two of his pigs, and refused to deliver them to her without first having been paid. After his daughter's death, Mr. Chamblet consulted a Dr. Ha[...]ks in Spittle-Field, who advised boiling his wife's urine with clippings from her hair and parings from her nails; when he did so, he claims he heard Kent's voice at his door, screaming as if being murdered, and that the next day she appeared swollen and bloated.(3-4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Proceedings at the Sessions of Oyer and Terminer. London: 1682, 3-4

Mr. Chamblet Victim
653

A man from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, whom Elizabeth Weed allegedly attempted to kill by setting her familiar Lilly on him. Lilly went to him, but returned saying that he did not have the power to do so. Three days later, Weed succeeded in having Lilly kill Bedell's child instead.(2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 2

Henry Bedell Henry Bedell Victim
654

A child from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon of unknown gender, known to be the child of Henry Bedell. Elizabeth Weed alleged that she had her familiar Lilly kill this child three days after Lilly was unable to kill Henry Bedell.(2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 2

Bedell Bedell (Child) Victim
655

A man from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, whom Elizabeth Weed allegedly tried to kill by setting her familiar Lilly on him. Lilly claimed he was unable to harm Musgrave: he lacked the power to do so. Weed sent her familiar Priscill to kill his two horses instead.(2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 2

Edward Musgrave Edward Musgrave Victim
656

A man from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, whose horse was allegedly killed by Elizabeth Weed's familiar Priscill.(2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 2

John Musgrave John Musgrave Victim
657

A man from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, whose cow was allegedly killed by Elizabeth Weed's familiar Priscill.(2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 2

William Musgrave William Musgrave Victim
658

A man from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, whose cow was allegedly killed by Elizabeth Weed's familiar Priscill.(2)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 2

Thomas Thorpe Thomas Thorpe Victim
659

A woman from Molesworth in the county of Huntingdon, known to be a maidservant in the employ of Mr. Say, whom John Winnick allegedly set his bear spirit on in order to intimidate her into stealing food from her Master for him.(4)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 4

Anonymous 88 Victim
660

A man from Molesworth in the county of Huntingdon, whose maid (Anonymous 88) allegedly stole food from him at the behest of John Winnick's bear-spirit.(4)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 4

Say Mr. Say Victim
662

A man from Catworth in County of Huntingdon, who was allegedly bewitched to death by France Moore's familiar Tiffy after he threatened to hang Moore's children for trying to stead some bread. He fell sick and lay in great pain for seven or eight days before dying. Moore claimed she could not remember what precisely she had asked Tiffy to do to him.(5)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 5

William Foster William Foster (2) Victim
663

A man from Catworth in County of Huntingdon, whose cow was allegedly killed by Frances Moore's familiar Pretty two or three days after it got into Moore's field and ate her corn.(5-6)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 5-6

Peter Browne Peter Browne Victim
664

A man from Catworth in County of Huntingdon, whose cow was allegedly caused to swell and die by Frances Moore's familiar Pretty after it got into Moore's field and ate her grain.(5)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 5

Edward Hull Edward Hull Victim
669

A man from Catworth in the County of Huntingdon, known to be a Yeoman, who alleged that he heard Frances Moore confess to being a witch and causing much harm. Searle claimed that Moore had sent her familiar Pretty to kill his chickens after he refused to give her bread, and that she had killed one of his hogs in revenge after his servants set a dog on one of hers.(7)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 7

William Searle William Searle Victim
670

A girl from Keyston in the County of Huntingdon, known to be nine years old and the daughter of Mary Darnell and William Darnell, who was allegedly bewitched to death by Elizabeth Chandler. Katherine's mother claimed that Chandler had boxed Katherine's ear after their children had a falling out, and that the Katherine became sick soon thereafter. Katherine lay ill for three weeks before dying, complaining of pain in her ear and shrieking that Chandler had appeared to her and would kill her. Chandler denied striking Katherine, or having set a spirit on her.(8)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 8

Katherine Darnell Katherine Darnell Victim
671

A woman from Keyston in the County of Huntingdon, known to be the wife of blacksmith William Darnell and the mother of Katherine Darnell, who alleged that Elizabeth Chandler had bewitched Katherine to death after their children had a falling out. Darnell claims that Katherine told her Chandler had boxed her ear, which troubled her until her death three weeks later. Furthermore, Katherine was said to have shrieked often that Chandler had come to her and would kill her. Darnell also alleged that, a year later, she had pulled a pot of furmity off the fire only to have it continue boiling for an hour and run over the side no matter what she did, and that Lewis Carmell had told her that Chandler confessed to causing her familiar Beelzebub to spoil it. Chandler alleged that she had no part in Katherine's death or the furmity, and that, on the contrary, Darnell had bewitched Chandler by turning her into a duck for a time and causing a roaring spirit to come to her in the night.(8)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 8

Mary Darnell Mary Darnell Victim
673

A young boy from St. Osyth in county of Essex, the son of Grace Thurlowe and John Thurlowe, and the brother of an infant sister. Davie is "strangely taken and greatly tormented" around February, 1581. His "handes were turned where the backes shoulde bee, and the backe in the place of the palmes." According to his mother, Davie was cured by word magic, or counter-magic administered by Ursley Kempe. Kempe took Davie by the hand tooke "saying, A good childe howe art thou loden and so went thrise out of the doores, and euery time when shee came in shee tooke the childe by the hands, and saide A good childe howe art thou loden." Kempe reassured Thurlow that night that her some would do "well enough," a statement she reiterated the next day, "I warrant thee it shall doe well" when Thurlowe went out of her way to report on Davie's condition. Davie appears to have been successfully healed. (A-Av)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A-Av

Dauye Thurlowe Davie Thurlowe Victim
677

A man from Milton in the county of Bedford, known to be a gentleman landowner and the father of a seven year old son. Mother Sutton and Mary Sutton began a vendetta against him and his for some unknown slight, beginning with the destruction of his horses in their stables and of his swine in their pens. After his stricken servant, Anonymous 89, reported that Mary had tried to coerce him into having sex with her in exchange for the return of his health, Master Enger took matters into his own hands and began a campaign of harassment in return. He approached Mary as she was tending hogs. When he could not persuade her to come with him, he snatched her by force and took her to Anonymous 89's bedside, where Anonymous 89 scratched her; the servant improved but became worse than before when she left. Master Enger's son died, for which he blamed Mary and Mother Sutton; he was visited in his grief by a gentleman friend (Anonymous 90), who advised him to swim both women to see if they floated. The next day, Master Enger seized Mary again, beat her senseless, bound her to his horse and dragged her to the water. She was observed to float like a plank, searched for teats, and a confession of her spirits forced out of her son. Master Enger had her swum a second time, this time bound toe to thumb and with a rope around her middle held on either end by servants; she floated again, and spun about as if caught in a whirlpool. He forced a confession out of her and used it to apprehend Mother Sutton as well, ultimately succeeding in having both tried and executed for witchcraft.(A4-A4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, A4-A4v

Enger Master Enger Victim
678

A man from Milton in the county of Bedford, known to be an old servant of Master Enger. He caught Henry Sutton throwing stones and filth at other children while playing at the Mill dam, and struck him the ears when he would not desist. Henry went crying home to his mother Mary Sutton; in revenge, she caused a black sow to madden Anonymous 89's carthorses on the way to the market the next day. Anonymous 89 observed the sow go into Mother Sutton's home later that day. This same servant later repeated stories he had heard of Mary and Mother Sutton's misdeeds and was stroked by a beetle (Anonymous 155), causing him to fall into a trance. Afflicted and bedridden thereafter, he reported that Mary habitually came in through a window to knit at the foot of his bed or stare at him; she allegedly told him that he would be restored to health if he consented to bed her. He berated her for her behaviour and bastard children instead, and she left the way she came. The next day, Master Enger found her tending her hogs and tried to persuade her to come with him; when she refused he took her by force to Anonymous 89. Anonymous 89 drew blood from her and became well again for a short time, but was afflicted all the worse once she left. (B-B2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, B-B2

Anonymous 89 Victim
680

A man from Keyston in the county of Cambridgeshire, whom John Browne claims confessed to being a witch when they met on the road to Keyston. According to Browne, Clarke was in a hurry, and said that he and his parents had been accused of being witches. Browne said that he, too, had been accused, and that the searchers had claimed to find marks on his body. Clarke berated him for lacking the wits to cut off his marks, as he had done three days before he was searched. Browne alleged that after some further conversation, Clarke said that Browne couldn't be a witch because he had not seen him at any meetings; Brown responded that he met in different places, and they parted. Clarke denied the confession; in his account, he says that while he did overtake a man and three women on the road, he never said anything about being a witch, cutting off any marks, attending any meetings, or making any kind of compact with the Devil.(13)

Appears in:
Davenport, John. The Witches of Huntingdon. London: 1646, 13

John Clarke John Clarke Jr. Victim
683

A child from Milton in the county of Bedford, known to be the seven year old son of Master Enger. He heard reports of Mary Sutton and Mother Sutton's wicked behaviour, and, seeing Mother Sutton go to the mill to grind corn, threw stones at her and called her a witch. In revenge, Mother Sutton and Mary Sutton set their familiars Dicke and Jude on the boy and had him tormented to death.(C-Cv)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Witches Apprehended, Examined, and Executed. London : 1613, C-Cv

Enger Enger (son) Victim
687

A family on whom Catherine Campbell allegedly places a curse.(10)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 10

Bargarren Bargarren (Plural) Victim
689

A girl from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the daughter of Samuel Pacy and sister to Elizabeth Pacy, who was allegedly bewitched by Rose Cullender and Amy Denny at the age of nine; she was too sick to attend their trial. Her father claimed in his deposition that her fits started with lameness, and progressed to extreme pain in her stomach and shrieking at the very moment Samuel Pacy refused to sell Amy Denny herring for the third time. After that time, Deborah was afflicted with a variety of fits, in which she would be unable to breathe, have a soreness in her entire body, be lame on one side, become deaf, dumb or blind, or cough pins and nails. During these fits, she is said to have seen apparitions of Cullender and Denny, to have been tormented by their imps, and to have been threatened by them with torments ten times worse if she told what she'd seen or heard. Denny allegedly made her able to speak the name of Satan or the Devil, but would not permit her to say Lord, Jesus or Christ. While in the care of her aunt Margaret Arnold, Arnold suspected her to be faking and removed all pins from her clothing, but she nevertheless continued vomiting pins; Deborah would claim that bees had forced the pins into her mouth. Arnold also alleged in her deposition that Deborah would see things Arnold could not, catch them and throw them in the fire.(15, 17)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 15, 17

Deborah Pacy Deborah Pacy Victim
693

A young woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the daughter of Edmund Durent, who was allegedly bewitched by Rose Cullender after her mother refused to sell Cullender herrings. According to Edmund Durent's deposition, Durent was afflicted with great pain in her stomach like the pricking of pins, fell into swooning fits, and upon recovery claimed that she had seen an apparition of Cullender which threatening to torment her. She was also said to have vomited pins, was rendered speechless in court, and was observed to fall into violent fits when brought before Cullender during the trial.(33-35)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 33-35

Ann Durent Ann Durent Victim
695

A young woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the daughter of Diana Bocking, who allegedly suffered fits at the hands of Rose Cullender and Amy Denny. She did not appear in court. Diana Bocking gave deposition instead, claiming that Jane had been afflicted with swooning fits, but recovered from them, only to have stomach pains some months later that progressed to further swooning and the daily vomiting of crooked pins. During her fits, she would spread her arms with her hands open, then make as if she had caught something; when her hands were forced open, they would be found to hold more crooked pins, or, once, a lath-nail. At other times, Jane would talk as if conversing to someone, but take no notice of anyone in the room with her. She would also complain that Cullender and Denny were standing at the head or foot of her bed, or elsewhere in the room. At one time, she suffered no fits but was stricken dumb for several days. When Jane regained her speech and asked for meat, her mother asked why she had been unable to speak, to which Jane answered "Amy Duny would not suffer her to speak." The lath-nail and pins were presented as evidence in court.(35-38)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 35-38

Jane Bocking Jane Bocking Victim
697

A young woman from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be eighteen years old and the daughter of Mary and Robert Chandler. According to Mary Chandler's deposition in court, Susan began to have fits after her mother was hired to search Rose Cullender for witches' marks. Rose Cullender allegedly appeared to Susan the morning after Cullender was searched, and took Susan by the hand, frightening her. Susan went immediately to her mother to report what she had seen, and became extremely sick to her stomach. The next day, she was afflicted with fits of extreme distraction, in which she cried out against Cullender, claiming Cullender came to her in her bed. In the intervals between fits, Susan alleged that she had seen an apparition of Cullender with a large dog. She also vomited crooked pins, and was at times struck blind or dumb. When brought into court, Susan allegedly fell into fits that prevented her from giving evidence; the only words she could get out were "burn her." After Cullender was pronounced guilty and sentenced to hang, Susan was the only person still afflicted, remaining thin and wan with a pain like the pricking of pins in her stomach.(38-42)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 38-42

Susan Chandler Susan Chandler Victim
700

A young, pregnant woman seen traveling in the count of Kent, described as "handsome, and decently apparelled," who is given lodging by Mother Watts. Anonymous 94 feels possessed by an evil energy and, with the help of a midwife, Goodwife Hatch, gives birth to a baby described as an "abbortiue and prodigious fruit." It resembles a lump of flesh with deformed facial features, arms growing out of its shoulder with no joints, and fourteen toes on its feet. (Aiii - Biii)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Strange News out of Kent of a Monstrous and Misshapen Child. London: 1609, Aiii - Biii

Anonymous 94 Victim
701

A boy from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the infant son of Dorothy Durent, whom Dorothy alleged in her deposition was bewitched by Amy Denny. Dorothy claimed that William was afflicted by fits of swooning after Denny looked after the child for her; Dorothy said that she had requested Denny not give William suck, but discovered on her return that Denny had done so anyway. She had been angry and Denny angry in return, saying "she had as good to have done otherwise than to have found fault with her." William fell sick that night. Dorothy reported that she consulted a Doctor Jacob in Yarmouth, who had a reputation for helping bewitched children, and that he had advised her to "hang up the Childs Blanket in the Chimney corner all day, and at night when she put the Child to Bed, to put it into the said blanket, and if she found any thing in it, she should not be afraid, but to throw it into the Fire." When she did so, a great toad fell out of William's blanket, which made a horrible noise and flashed like gunpowder when held in the fire before disappearing. The next day, Durent visited Denny and found her burnt. William recovered, and was well at the time of the assizes.(5-11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 5-11

William Durent William Durent Victim
707

A man from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be a yeoman, who gave deposition alleging that his cart was bewitched after it hit Rose Cullender's window and she, irate at the damage, threatened Soam. This cart overturned two or three times that day and stuck in the town gate despite having more than enough clearance, forcing Soam to have a gatepost cut down to free it. Once he managed to get the cart into the yard, he could not get it near the place where he needed to unload his corn. When he and others tried to unload it well away from the place, it proved to be a great and tiring labour. They were forced to stop when people who came to help all developed sudden nosebleeds. The next morning, Soam returned to the cart and was able to unload it without any trouble at all.(51-54)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 51-54

John Soam John Soam Victim
708

A man from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to have given deposition against Rose Cullender. In his deposition, he alleges that his cart smashed into Rose Cullender's home, breaking part of the house; she threatened him and said his horses would suffer for it. Sure enough, all four died a short time later. Sherringham claims that he also lost all his piglets, was taken with a lameness in his limbs, and was persistently plagued with "a great Number of Lice of an extraordinary bigness."(54-55)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 54-55

Robert Sherringham Robert Sherringham Victim
719

A woman called Margaret, one of three women, or "a crew of women" called Margaret or Maggi. In Shaw's representation these women are represented as a conflation of harpies, familiars, and witches. This Margaret shrieks like a woman possessed, and, as such, seems to be represented as bewitching as she is bewitched. According to Shaw, these women are poised to "carry her out of the House that they might drown her in the Well, where there were eighteen more waiting for her."(14)

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 14

Margaret Margaret Victim
732

A woman from East Basham in the county of Norfolk, who was allegedly bewitched. Her tongue is found tied "in her Head with a Hempenstring." As well, she is "run full of Pins." She sometimes suffered from around twenty fits a day and it was thought that the cause was a toad (Anonymous 236) believed the be Teechle's wife's familiar, which would creep into her lap on several occasions. When it was offered to burn the toad, the familiar disappeared.(7)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 7

Jane Walter Jane Walter Victim
734

A girl from Bungay in the county of Norfolk, known as John Ballard's daughter, who is allegedly bewitched for two years. During this time, she voids stones, crooked pins, glass, a buckle, buttons, and other things from her mouth, while having "many strange Fits in a day." All of these are presented as evidence before the Mayor of Norwich (Anonymous 101) by John Ballard.(7-8 )

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 7-8

Ballard Ballard (Daughter) Victim
735

A woman from Norwich in the county of Norfolk, who is allegedly bewitched for several years. She suffers from over twenty fits in one day, during which she voids "Pins, Nails, Quills, Tabacco pipes, and a bended Farthing, with several other things." These items were shown to the Mayor of Norwich (Anonymous 101) as proof of her possession.(8)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 8

Agnes Burgess Agnes Burgess Victim
736

A woman from Norwich in the county of Norfolk, the daughter of John Brown, who is allegedly bewitched for years. She "voided" many things from her body including pins. These were taken as evidence of her bewitchment before the Mayor of Norwich (Anonymous 101).(8)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 8

Grace Brown Grace Brown Victim
749

A man from Maidstone in the county of Kent, described as a Groom (Anonymous 104) who mockingly invokes Ann Ashby's spirit Rug to enter him. He later dies close to London.(4)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 4

Anonymous 104 Victim
757

A twenty one year old woman, daughter of Edward Fairfax. Fairfax describes her as home schooled, 'slow of speach,' 'patient of reproof,' and free of melancholy(32)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 32

Helen Fairfax Helen Fairfax Victim
758

A seven year old girl, daughter of Edward Fairfax. Fairfax describes her as lively, and quick witted, and 'able to receive any instruction and willing to undergo pains'(32)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 32

Elizabeth Fairfax Elizabeth Fairfax Victim
759

A woman from Bideford in the county of Devon, sister of Elizabeth Eastchurch and sister-in-law to Thomas Eastchurch, who is horribly tormented by pricking and stabbing sensations (like a demoniac) over a period of two years, which she attributes to being bewitched by Temperance Lloyd. She begins to recover when Lloyd is detained.(7-9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 7-9

Grace Thomas Grace Thomas Victim
761

A woman from Salisbury in the county of Wilshire, described as a servant who visits Anne Bodenham numerous times acting a a go-between for Richard Goddard's family and Anne Bodenham. However, after Styles' purchase of arsenic (purportedly to be used as countermagic, but read as the poison to be used by Sara and Anne Goodard against their mother) is discovered, Styles is considered a criminal, an attempted murderer, who flees to London. Before she goes, she allegedly becomes Anne Bodenham's apprentice when she is seduced by the old witch into giving the Devil her soul "seald with her blood," in exchange for "wisdome and true grace" and "wealth and ease," found by using a looking glass. After having signed over her soul, Anne Styles is repentant "as she understood That she must loose the joyes of heaven." In one account, with Mistress Bodenham's understanding, Anne Styles flees to London, only to be taken at Stockbridge by the Devil and "cast to and froe," in front of a great number of witnesses. A Gentleman prays for Anne Stiles for four days, during which she is tormented by the Devil in the shape of a snake. She confesses to her contract with the Devil, and to the nature of Mistress Rodnam. When Mistress Rodnam comes to Stockbridge, Anne Stiles can finally sleep and when "she walkt againe, She praised God she felt no paine." Another account explains that all of this confession comes out when Mr. Chandler (son in law to Mris. Goddard) caught up with the Styles and who, in "a great trembling and shaking," was carried "between Sutton and Stockbridge," where she "did confesse and acknowledge all the transactions and passages between the Witch and her." The next night, at an Inn in Stockbridge, Styles had her first fit. These fits, fits which made her into a penitent victim of witchcraft, rather than an attempted murder, would continue for the three weeks Styles was in prison in Salisbury. She had "such strange fits that drew both pity and admiration from the beholders" they came "as frequent as violent," lasting thirty to sixty minutes, with only a fifteen minute respite, and while she was in them, she exhibited such strength that "six men, sometimes more could not keep her." While in her fits, she would be "miserably groaning and skrieking, being deprived of her speech and sight, and many times she grinded her teeth, and sweat in her fits continually, constantly in motion, seeking to tear her self." She could hear but not speak, and might sit "in a very senselesse idle manner" or be found "lying foaming, raving, groaning, skrieking, trembling in an unheard of manner." Styles represented herself as a ever penitent sinner who cried out "Oh very damnable, very wretched; this hand of mine writ my name in the Devils book, this finger of mine was pricked, here is yet the hole that was made, and with my blood I wrote my own Damnation, and have cut my self off from Heaven and Eternall life," who is more than willing to be saved. She participates in the normal tests demoniacs do, reacting to Bodenham, with out knowing she was there. Styles temporarily recovers from her fits, "but began to relapse into her former fits, and was tormented as formerly" the night before Bodenham's execution, as if to once more protest her innocence. After Bodenham's execution, Style's made a final assertion of her new godly self: "I am this day to go away home, I hope now to begin a holy life."(7-8, 15-16)

Appears in:
Bower, Edmond. Doctor Lamb Revived, or, Witchcraft Condemned in Anne Bodenham. London: 1653, 7-8, 15-16

Anne Styles Anne Styles Victim
778

The three year old son of Henry Moulton who was allegedly bewitched by Elizabeth Bradwell by means of image magic. John Moulton languished for eighteen months, but spontaneously began to recover, despite no one ever locating the wax image of him.(47-48)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 47-48

John Moulton John Moulton Victim
781

A young boy (Anonymous 108) who, when tending his mother's cow, was allegedly bewitched. He lost his voice, ran from his home, threw pottage in the witch's face, and allegedly beat her apparition away. His accusation appears to have single handedly caused the woman's arrest and trial.(50)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 50

Anonymous 108 Victim
798

A man who is allegedly murdered by Alice Huson by means of the evil eye and ill intent.(59)

Appears in:
Hale, Matthew. A Collection of Modern Relations of Matter of Fact Concerning Witches & Witchcraft. London: 1693, 59

Dick Warren Dick Warren Victim
813

A woman from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be the Lady of an estate and both the aunt and godmother of Mrs. Anne Levingston, who is allegedly bewitched to death by Joan Peterson and Anne Levingston. Levingston was the beneficiary of Lady Powel's estate until the murder charges saw it stripped from her. It is conclusively determined by several examining physicians and surgeons that Lady Powel died of several compounding chronic illnesses, their professional opinion being that she not only died of natural causes but that it is extraordinary that she lived as long as she did. Lady Powel is said to have been about 80 years of age at the time of her death.(4, 6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 4, 6-7

Powel Lady Powel Victim
818

A man from Wapping in the county of Greater London, who is alleged in Margaret Austin's indictment against Joan Peterson to have first been cured of an illness by Peterson and then made ill again through witchcraft when he is unable to pay for her services. According to Austin, Peterson warned Wilson that if he didn't pay his illness will return. Wilson was then afflicted with "very strange fits, and for twelve hours together would rage and wave like a mad man." The fits continue for another twelve hours and last for days, leaving him ill and "languishing." Contrary to Austin's testimony, Wilson does not complain of any such treatment.(7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Declaration in Answer to Several Lying Pamphlets Concerning the Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 7

Christopher Wilson Christopher Wilson Victim
821

An unknown number of men or boys from an unknown part of the county of York, known to be the sons of the Earl of Moultgrave and brothers to the Lady Fairfax. Dr. Lamb told Lady Fairfax "within this few dayes your heart will ake, by occasion and accident of water," and three days later, her brothers all drowned.(5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Briefe Description of the Notorious Life of John Lambe. Amsterdam: 1628, 5

Anonymous 118 Victim
825

A young man from Lawford in the county of Essex, son of Prudence Hart and Thomas Hart, John Hart is allegedly bewitched Rebecca West as an act of vengeance against his father.(15, 15-16)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 15, 15-16

John Start John Hart Victim
828

A man allegedly murdered by Rose Hallybread and Susan Cock.()

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches. London: 1690,

John Peak John Peak Victim
829

A woman who is allegedly murdered by Rose Hallybread and Susan Cock.(5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches. London: 1690, 5

Mary Peak Mary Peak Victim
835

A man from Hartford in the county of Huntingdonshire, described as a Yeoman who is allegedly bewitched by Johane Harrison after he calls her an old hag. He suffers from hot sweats, cold chills, and twitching limbs and becomes well again after he scratches Johane Harrison's face.(19-29)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Cruel and Bloody Murder Committed by an Inkeepers wife, called Annis Dell, and her Son George Dell. London: 1606, 19-29

Anonymous 122 Victim
842

A woman from St Albans in the county of Hertfordshire, who is allegedly bewitched and murdered by John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott. She is murdered when Elizabeth Knott and her kinsman, John Palmer, create a figure of Goodwife Pearls in clay, which they laid in fire. While "it was consuming and mouldring away, the woman lay in miserable torments." As soon as the figure was consumed entirely by the flames, Goodwife Pearls died. This deed was accomplished out of revenge, "for hanging a lock upon his doore, and for the not paying of his rent."(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott. London: 1649, 4

Goodwife Pearls Victim
843

A man from the county of Hertfordshire, whose horse is allegedly killed by one of John Palmer's familiars. (4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott. London: 1649, 4

Mr. Cleavers Victim
844

A man from Hertfordshire, whose cow is allegedly bewitched by a familiar (Anonymous 241) in the form of a cat that was sent by Elizabeth Knott. The reason Elizabeth Knott does this is because "she demanded money which was due to her, from the said Lamans wife, and it was denied her."(4 - 5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott. London: 1649, 4 - 5

John Lamans John Lamans Victim
845

A woman from Guilsborough in the county of Northampton, known to be the sister of Master Avery, who is allegedly bewitched by Agnes Brown and Joan Vaughan after striking Vaughan for unseemly behavior and sending her away. Not long after, Belcher is said to have been taken with a sudden intolerable pain in her body and to have suffered disfigurement. She was heard to cry out "Heere comes Ioane Uaughan, away with Ioane Uaughan," and to have cried out against Brown as well. When Brown and Vaughan were apprehended and gaoled in Northampton, Belcher was brought to them and allowed to scratch them, which ended her pain for a time. On the road back home from the gaol, she and Avery suffered the loss of their horses after encountering a strangely gesturing man and woman.(B2-B3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B2-B3

Belcher Mistress Belcher Victim
849

A young man from Hartford in the county of Hertfordshire who is allegedly turned into a toad by John Palmer after he kicked Palmer in the shin. The young man was bewitched for many years, "to his great woe and torment."(5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott. London: 1649, 5

Anonymous 124 Victim
863

A woman from Raunds in the county of Northampton, known to be the daughter of Edward Aspine, who was allegedly bewitched to death by Arthur Bill. The suspicion of Bill's involvement in her death led to his arrest, and ultimately to his conviction of her murder; he was sentenced to death.(C2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, C2

Martha Aspine Martha Aspine Victim
872

A woman who is allegedly 'secretly' pricked in the eye and murdered by Temperance Lloyd.(19)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 19

Jane Dallyn Jane Dallyn Victim
873

A woman from Bideford in the county of Devon and wife of a local mariner named John Coleman. Coleman allegedly begins suffering from tormenting Pains, "by pricking in her Arms, Stomach, and Heart," in August 1680, and sees the form of Susanna Edwards in her room "at the time of her tormenting Pains." Coleman had her neighbor, Thomas Bremincom, request a local physician, Doctor Beare, to come examine her, to try to get some remedy for her chronic pain. However, "upon view of her Body he did say, that it was past his skill to ease her of her said Pains; for he told her that she was Bewitch'd." Coleman also allegedly hears Edwards confess that she had bewitched [Grace Barnes], and done her some bodily harm by bewitching of her," a crime for which she fell on her knees a begged that Coleman pray for her. (1-2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 1-2

Dorcas Coleman Dorcas Coleman Victim
884

A man from Feversham in the County of Kent. According to Joan Williford, Elizabeth Harris cursed his boat six or seven years before. Harris, during her examination, admitted to wanting revenge on his "High" for the drowning of her son. She "wished that God might be her revenger, which was her watchword to the Divell, and this High was cast away."(1, 2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott. London: 1645, 1, 2

John Woodcott John Woodcott Victim
886

A young man who is allegedly attacked by a clowder of cats in the Forest of Knaresborough, close to Margaret Wait's home.(91)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 91

Thomas Forrest Thomas Forrest Victim
887

The infant daughter of Edward Fairfax who dies under mysterious circumstances; she begins bleeding all over her body. (106)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 106

Anne Fairfax Anne Fairfax Victim
902

A young woman from Bideford in the county of Devon, daughter of local gentleman Edward Fellow who is allegedly murdered by Temperance Lloyd. Lloyd confessed that "the said black Man or Devil, (or some other black Man or Devil) with her this said Examinant did do some bodily hurt to the said Anne Fellow, and that thereupon the said Anne Fellow did shortly die and depart this life." (19)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 19

Anne Fellow Anne Fellow Victim
903

A woman from Bideford in the county of Devon, wife of John Barnes, Yeoman, who as of May 18, 1682 suffered "very great pains of sticking and pricking in her Arms, Stomach, and Breast, as though she had been stabbed with Awls." Her pain was so severe, that her husband John "thought that she would have died immediately," yet she suffered still at the time of the trial. Grace Barns identified Mary Trembles as "one of them that did torment her" and likewise suspected "one Susanna Edwards of Biddiford aforesaid Widow, because that she the said Susanna would oftentimes repair unto this Informants Husband's house upon frivolous or no occasions at all."(26-28)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 26-28

Grace Barns Grace Barns Victim
905

A spinster from Bideford in the county of Devon, who is allegedly bewitched to death by Temperance Lloyd after seeing Lloyd appear in the shape of a red pig. Burnman had testified against Lloyd May 15, 1679, on the charge of bewitching Anne Fellows. Lloyd was acquitted of this crime, and evidently decided to seek revenge against Burnman for her role in the trial. (22, 27)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True and Impartial Relation of the Informations Against Three Witches. London: 1682, 22, 27

Lydia Burman Lydia Burman Victim
907

A man from Halifax in the County of York, known to be travelling pedlar and the father of Abraham Law, who was allegedly bewitched to be lamed, wasted and consumed by Alison Device. He was seen in court to be "deformed by her Witch-craft, and transformed beyond the course of Nature." Device confessed to bewitching him, alleging that she set her familiar on him when he refused to sell her pins; her familiar caused Law to fall down lame in the road. Law gave deposition against Device, alleging that she became angry with him when he refused to give, not sell, her pins, and he fell when he walked away from her. He made it into a nearby alehouse, and lay there in great pain and unable to stir. While lying stricken he "saw a great Black-Dogge stand by him, with very fearefull firie eyes, great teeth, and a terrible countenance, looking him in the face; whereat he was very sore afraid: and immediately after came in the said Alizon Deuice, who staid not long there, but looked on him, and went away." He was tormented continually by her thereafter, rendering him unable to continue his travels. His son, Abraham Law, also gave deposition, claiming that he went to his father in Coine and found Law speechless and lamed on his left side with the exception of his eye. Abraham said that once Law recovered his speech, he complained of being pricked, and that it had started when Alison Device offered to buy pins from him but had no money to pay; Law gave her the pins anyway. Law also complained to him that Device lay upon him and troubled him along with an old woman Law did not know. Device confessed and begged forgiveness, which Law gave readily.(R2v-R3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, R2v-R3

John Law John Law Victim
910

A woman from Maidstone in the county of Kent, who disappears mysteriously after giving an unknown woman a pin. The woman had threatened that Katherine would disappear when the latter offered her victuals and thread to go along with her pin.(7)

Appears in:
E.G., Gent.. A Prodigious & Tragic History of the Arraignment, Trial, Confession, and Condemnation of Six Witches at Maidston Kent. London: 1652, 7

Katherine Atkins Katherine Atkins Victim
916

A young maid allegedly bewitched by her neighbour.(146)

Appears in:
Scot, Reginald. Scot's Discovery of Witchcraft Proving the Common Opinions of Witches Contracting with Devils, Spirits, or Familiars. London: 1651, 146

Stuppeny Stuppeny daughter Victim
918

A twelve year old girl who is allegedly bewitched. She accuses four women of bewitching her.()

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings. British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Foster, Donald W., ed. "The Bewitchment of Elizabeth Jennings." Normalized text, ed. D. Foster (1999), from British Library MS Add. 36674, fols. 134-7. Poughkeepsie, NY: Vassar College, 1999.: 1622,

Elizabeth Jennings Elizabeth Jennings Victim
928

A man whose sheep were allegdely killed by Joyce Boanes' imp(31)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31

John Spell John Spell Victim
959

A woman who is tried twice. At first, she is determined to be a witch, but during a second trial, it is determined that she is not a witch.(115)

Appears in:
Gardiner, Ralph . England's Grievance Discovered. Unknown: 1796, 115

Anonymous 143 Victim
964

A man from Downeham in the County of Lancaster, known to be the son of Richard Ashton, Esquire. According to Anne Whittle's confession, Richard Ashton the younger was bewitched to death by Elizabeth Southerns.(B5-B5v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B5-B5v

Richard Ashton Richard Ashton Victim
965

A young girl from Weethead within the Forest of Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be the daughter of Richard Baldwin, who was allegedly betwitched to death by Elizabeth Southerns. According to Alison Device's deposition, Southerns had a falling-out with Richard Baldwin, and once had Device take her to Baldwin's home late at night. The next morning, Device heard that Baldwin's daughter was sick. The child was said to "languish afterwards by the space of a yeare, or thereaboutes, and dyed." Device was convinced that Southerns had caused the girl's death.(C-Cv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C-Cv

Baldwin Baldwin (Daughter) Victim
969

A man from the Bull-Hole in Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be minor gentry and the son of Christopher Nutter, brother to Robert Nutter and Margaret Crooke, grandson of Elizabeth Nutter and Robert Nutter the older, and father to a son. He is also the neighbour of Anne Whittle, alias Chattox. According to Alison Device, John Nutter once asked her grandmother Elizabeth Southerns to cure a sick cow, which Southerns agreed to do. Device also told of an encounter Nutter had with Anne Whittle's daughter Elizabeth. Whittle's daughter went to Nutter to beg a dish of milk and brought the milk to Whittle. While Whittle was churning it, Nutter's son came up to her and, disliking what she was doing, knocked over the can with the milk. The next day, Nutter's cow was found to be sick; it languished three or four days before dying.(C-Cv)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C-Cv

John Nutter John Nutter Victim
971

A child from Pendle in the County of Lancaster, known to be the child of Henry Bullocke, who was allegedly bewitched by Alison Device. According to James Device's deposition, when Bullocke accused Alison of the bewitchment, Device confessed and begged forgiveness. (C2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2

Bullocke Bullocke (child) Victim
980

A man from Pendle in the County of Lancaster, whom Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, allegedly bewitched to death. According to Alison Device, Whittle had a falling-out with Hugh Moore when he accused her of bewitching his cattle, for which she "did curse and worry the said Moore, and said she would be Reuenged." Moore became sick not long after. He languished for half a year before dying.(E4-E4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E4-E4v

Hugh Moore Hugh Moore Victim
982

A man from Rough-Lee in the County of Lancaster, who was allegedly bewitched to death by Elizabeth Device, Alice Nutter and Elizabeth Southerns. According to James Device, Mytton had refused to give Southerns a penny, for which she sought his death.(F3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, F3v

Henry Mytton Henry Mytton Victim
983

A man from Westby in the County of Lancaster, known to be a neighbour of Jennet Preston, who was allegedly bewitched to death; Preston was executed for her involvement in his death. According to Elizabeth Device and James Device, the attendees of Elizabeth's dinner at Malking Tower discussed Lister and agreed to assist Preston in killing him. James claimed that Preston said that Lister had "borne malice vnto her, and had thought to haue put her away at the last Assises at Yorke, but could not and this Examinate heard the said woman say, That her power was not strong ynough to doe it her selfe, being now lesse then before time it had beene." Elizabeth confessed to involvement in Lister's death. Anne Robinson gave deposition claiming that, on his deathbed, Lister "cried out vnto them that stood about him; that Iennet Preston was in the house, looke where shee is, take hold of her: for Gods sake shut the doores, and take her, shee cannot escape away. Looke about for her, and lay hold on her, for shee is in the house: and so cryed very often in his great paines, to them that came to visit him during his sicknesse." His body is said to have bled fresh blood in Preston's presence.(C2v-C3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, C2v-C3

Thomas Lister Master Thomas Lister Victim
991

A woman from Paddiham in the county of Lancashire, known to be a mother, who was allegedly bewitched to death along with her daughter by Margaret Pearson. Anne Whittle gave the deposition accusing Pearson of causing the Childers' deaths.(S4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, S4v

Childer Mrs. Childer Victim
992

A girl from Paddiham in the county of Lancashire, who was allegedly bewitched to death along with her mother Mrs. Childer by Margaret Pearson. Anne Whittle gave the deposition accusing Pearson of causing the Childers' deaths.(S4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, S4v

Childer Childer (Daughter) Victim
993

A man from Windle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the husband of Mrs. Chaddock, who claimed to be bewitched by Isabel Robey. According to Chaddock, he had a falling out with Robey as she "was not pleased that hee should marrie his now wife: whereupon this Examinate called the said Isabel Witch, and said that hee did not care for her." He alleged that two days later, he was afflicted with a pain in his bones, but mended not long after. Four years after that, his wife argued with Isabelle, and he was afflicted with a pain in his neck for five days, was intensely thirsty, and felt hot throughout his body. He claimed that he only mended when James the Glover brought him a drink and prayed for him. The pain in his bones reoccured the year before the trial, and he was convinced Robey was behind it. (T3-T3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, T3-T3v

Peter Chaddock Peter Chaddock Victim
995

A woman from Windle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the wife of Francis Wilkinson, who accused Isabel Robey of bewitching her. According to Wilkinson, Robey asked her milk and she refused to give any; Wilkinson became afraid of Robey and was sick shortly thereafter, accompanied by such pain that she could not stand. The next day, Wilkinson travelled to Warrington, and on the road felt a sudden pinch on her thigh, after which she was so sick she had to return home on horseback. She soon mended, however. According to Margaret Parre, Robey confessed to her that she had bewitched Wilkinson.(T4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, T4

Jane Wilkinson Jane Wilkinson Victim
1008

A girl from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the eldest daughter of Mary Moore and her first husband George Muschamp, the sister to Margaret Muschamp and George Muschamp Jr., and the half-sister to Sibilla Moore. After Margaret had been afflicted with her fits for about a year and her brother George Muschamp Jr. had also become afflicted with illness and pain, Margaret predicted that if there was no justice against Dorothy Swinow (the woman accused of being behind the afflictions), Betty too would became afflicted. This proved prophetic and Betty became the worst afflicted of the three. Margaret also claimed that if Swinow was brought to justice, all the afflictions would end, and if there were no justice, they would become sicker than ever before. Margaret White, in her confession, alleged that Swinow and Jane Martin were responsible for the afflictions of the Muschamp children. (14)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 14

Betty Muschamp Betty Muschamp Victim
1009

A boy from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the eldest son of Mary Moore and her first husband George Muschamp, the brother to Margaret Muschamp and Betty Muschamp, and the half-brother to Sibilla Moore. After his sister Margaret had been afflicted with her fits for about a year, George Muschamp Jr. allegedly also became afflicted with illness and pain while "both his stomack and the use of his legs taken from him." He subsisted on milk, water and sour milk, consuming away; he nevertheless retained his spirits and would talk and laugh with friends. The doctors predicted he had a month to live. According to Margaret, John Hutton and Dorothy Swinow were responsible for his wasting, and that two drops of blood from either of them would save his life. Mary Moore got blood from Hutton for George Jr., and Hutton used the opportunity to cast sole blame on Swinow. Margaret also claimed that if Swinow was brought to justice, her brother's illness would end and if there were no justice, he would become sicker than ever before. Margaret White, in her confession, alleged that Swinow and Jane Martin were responsible for the afflictions of the Muschamp children. (4-5)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 4-5

George Muschamp George Muschamp Jr. Victim
1010

An infant girl from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the daughter of Mary Moore and her second husband Edward Moore, and the half sister to Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr. and Betty Muschamp. Margaret told her mother Mary Moore, pregnant with Sibillia Moore, that Dorothy Swinow was "consuming the child within her." It was later alleged that Swinow "would have consumed the childe that Mrs. Moore had last in her wombe, but the Lord would not permit her; and that after the childe was borne Mrs. Swinow was the occasion of its death" along with Swinow's sister Jane. Swinow was finally apprehended and gaoled awaiting trial on charges of bewitching Sibilla to death.(16)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 16

Sibilla Moore Sibilla Moore Victim
1011

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the wife of Lord Robert Hambleton, the sister of Mary Moore and the aunt of Margaret Muschamp, George Muschamp Jr., Betty Muschamp and Sibilla Moore. According to Mary Moore, Margery Hambleton "dyed in a restlesse sicknesse;" John Hutton claimed that Dorothy Swinow was responsible. Margaret Muschamp also blamed Swinow for Hambleton's death. Robert Hambleton is said to have died from a broken heart not long after, the estate falling to their son thereafter.(8)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 8

Margery Hambleton Margery Hambleton Victim
1012

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a Lord and knight, the husband and widower of Lady Margery Hambleton, and the brother-in-law of Mary Moore. Robert Hambleton is said to have died from a broken heart not long after Margery's death, the estate falling to their son thereafter.(15)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 15

Robert Hambleton Sir Robert Hambleton Victim
1039

A woman from Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the daughter of Anthony Nutter, whom Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, allegedly bewitched to death. Alison Device claimed that, while visiting Anthony Nutter's home, she and Anne Nutter laughed at Anne Whittle, who was also visiting. Whittle told the two of them "I will be meet with the one of you," and the next day Anne Nutter fell sick. She died three weeks later.(E3v-E4)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E3v-E4

Anne Nutter Anne Nutter Victim
1043

A man from Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the father of Anne Nutter. Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, confessed to using her familiar Fancie to bewitch his cow to death for preferring Elizabeth Southerns to her. Alison Device claimed that Whittle also bewitched his daughter Anne do death for laughing at her.(E2v-E3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2v-E3

Anthony Nutter Anthony Nutter Victim
1044

A young girl from Lowestoft in the county of Suffolk, known to be the ten year old daughter of Dorothy Durent and sister of William Durent; she was allegedly bewitched to death by Amy Denny. Dorothy Durent gave deposition in court that, after Denny gave suck to baby William against Dorothy's wishes and caused William to have fits when Dorothy became angry, Elizabeth also began to suffer fits. According to Dorothy, Elizabeth complained of Denny during her fits. Dorothy also claimed that she had returned from the apothecary one day to find Denny at her home; Denny said she was there to give Elizabeth some water, and, when Dorothy ejected her from the house, prophesied that Elizabeth would not live long. Two days later, Elizabeth died.(11-13)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Tryal of Witches. London: 1682, 11-13

Elizabeth Durent Elizabeth Durent Victim
1047

A child from Belvoir in the county of Leicester, the son of Sir Francis Manners and Countess Manners, brother to Henry Manners and half brother to Katherine Manners. Francis would be poised to inherit the title of Lord Rosse and the Earl of Rutland following the death of his brother Henry; he is half-brother to Lady Katherine. Child of Sir Francis' second marriage, he would have been no more than 7 or 8 years old at the time of Joan, Margaret and Phillip Flower's apprehension. He allegedly became bewitched, suffering a strange sickness, after Phillip and Margaret Flowers were dismissed from service by his mother, Lady Rosse. His glove was stolen from a dung-heap by Margaret Flower, who gave it to her mother Joan Flower; Joan is said to have used the glove to bewitch him by boiling it in water, rubbing it on her familiar Rutterkin and burying it in the yard. He eventually recovered from his affliction. Francis would not be the only member of his family would would allegedly suffer from the malefic ministrations brought down by the Flowers women. Both his parents would likewise become extraordinarily ill with "sicknesse and extraordinary conuulsions," his sister, Katherine was at "many times in great danger of life, through extreame maladies and vnusuall fits," and his elder brother, Henry, sickened and died. (Dv-D2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, Dv-D2

Francis Manners Francis Lord Rosse Victim
1048

A man from Nuenham in the County of Kent. Elizabeth Harris claimed that he accused her of stealing a pig. Once Harris acquired her familiar Imp, "she desired that God would revenge her of him." Chilman pined away and died not long after.(5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott. London: 1645, 5

Goodman Chilman Goodman Chilman Victim
1051

A child from Belvoir in the county of Leicester, known to be the son of Sir Francis Manners. He would become himself, for a short while, Lord Rosse and the Earl of Rutland. He is brother to Francis Manners Jr. and half-brother to Lady Katherine Manner. Child of Sir Francis' second marriage, he would have been no more than 7 years old at the time of his death. Henry was allegedly bewitched by Margaret, Phillip and Joan Flowers, so that "he sickened verty strangely and after a while dyed."Lord Henry's glove was stolen by Margaret Flower for her mother Joan Flower; Joan rubbed the glove on the back of her familiar Rutterkin, boiled it it water, stuck it with pins, and buried it in her yard. Lord Henry died not long after. According to Anne Baker's confession, Mrs. Peake and Mrs. Dennis told her that Lord Henry had died because as the glove rotted and wasted, so did Lord Henry's liver. Henry would not be the only member of the family tormented by witchcraft; his parents would be "subiect to sicknesse and extraordinary conuulsions," and made barren, and his brother would likewise be "inhumanely tortured by a strange sicknesse," and his sister was "many times in great danger of life, through extreame maladies and vnusuall fits." However, Henry appears to be the only one who died as a direct cause of presumed bewitchment. (F3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, F3

Henry Rosse Henry Lord Rosse Victim
1056

A man from Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the husband of Mrs. Robinson and brother of John Robinson, who accused Anne Whittle and Anne Redferne of witchcraft, and was allegedly bewitched to death by Elizabeth Device. According to Robinson, his wife had hired Whittle to card wool six years before, and that the drink from which Whittle drew during the carding not only spoiled, but that any drink he brought into the house spoiled for eight or nine weeks after. He claimed that "the said Anne Whittle, alias Chattox, and Anne Redferne her said Daughter, are commonly reputed and reported to bee Witches," and that Robert Nutter the younger said that Whittle and Redferne had bewitched him, causing his sickness. Device confessed to bewitching Robinson to death; Jennet Device claimed to have heard her mother Elizabeth Device call for her familiar Ball to kill Robinson.(Ev-E2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Ev-E2v

James Robinson James Robinson Victim
1061

A man from Higham in the county of Lancashire, known to a gentleman, the husband of Mrs. Moore and father of John Moore. Anne Whittle confessed to having amended some drink belonging to Moore which had been forespoken; she claimed that Mrs. Moore had sent for her to do it. Alison Device alleged that Whittle was suspected of having bewitched the drink herself, and that Whittle had also caused Moore's son to become sick for half a year and finally die. Device claimed to have seen Whittle sitting in her garden with a clay image of Moore's child.(E2v-E3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2v-E3

John Moore John Moore Victim
1062

A child from Higham in the county of Lancashire, known to be the son of John Moore and Mrs. Moore. Alison Device alleged that Whittle caused John Moore Jr. to become sick for half a year and finally die. Device claimed to have seen Whittle sitting in her garden with a clay image of him.(E4-E4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E4-E4v

John Moore John Moore Jr. Victim
1063

A man from Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the brother of James Robinson, who was allegedly bewitched to death by Elizabeth Device. Device confessed to having made a clay image of Robinson at her familiar Ball's direction; she said she dried it by the fire and crumbled it over the course of the next week, and that he died not long after. She claimed that Robinson had "chidden and becalled this Examinate, for hauing a Bastard child with one Seller." Elizabeth's daughter, Jennet Device, claimed that Elizabeth asked Ball to help her kill Robinson. Elizabeth's son, James Device, also claimed that she had made a clay image of Robinson. James also claimed to have stolen a wether (a castrated goat or sheep) from Robinson.(F3v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, F3v

John Robinson John Robinson Victim
1065

A boy from Penzance in the county of Cornwall, known to be fifteen or sixteen years old, who allegedly suffers from strange and violent fits after seeing an unfamiliar woman (Anonymous 6) in a "blue Jerkin and Red Petticoat, with Yellow and Green patches" who told him he would not get better until he vomits "Nutshels Pins and nails." Soon after, Tonken is said to have vomited pins, nails, walnut shells and straw. The fits of vomiting strange objects continue, as do the apparitions of the woman, and sometimes that of a cat, whom Tonken identifies as the woman in another shape. The last time, three women appeared to him, and Anonymous 6 bid him farewell, saying she would trouble him no more; two days later he was well and able to go about on crutches. Two women were arrested on suspicion of witchcraft following his testimony, Jane Noal (alias Nickless) and Betty Seeze.(2-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Account of a Strange and Wonderful Relation of John Tonken, of Pensans in Cornwall. London: 1686, 2-6

John Tonken John Tonken Victim
1088

A woman from Green-head in Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be the wife of Robert Nutter the younger. According to Elizabeth Southerns, she saw Anne Whittle and Anne Redfearne making clay images, including ones of Marie Nutter and of her husband Robert.(E-Ev)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E-Ev

Marie Nutter Marie Nutter Victim
1097

A man from Guilsborough in the county of Northampton, known to be the brother of Mistress Belcher, who allegedly witnessed his sister's torments and heard her cry out that Joan Vaughan and Agnes Brown were the cause. He tried to lure Vaughan and Brown from their home to scratch them, but encountered an invisible barrier and was unable to approach the house. Unable to help his sister, he returned to his home, but began to be tormented in the same way. This continued until Brown and Vaughan were apprehended and gaoled in Northampton. Avery was brought to them and allowed to scratch them, which ended his pain for a time. On the road back home from the gaol, Avery and Belcher suffered the loss of their horses after encountering a strangely gesturing man and woman; Avery praised God that it was their horses and not them that died.(B3-B4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witches of Northampton-shire. Agnes Browne. Joane Vaughan. Arthur Bill. Hellen Jenkenson. Mary Barber. London: 1612, B3-B4

Avery Master Avery Victim
1103

A man from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a tailor and a neighbour of Mother Agnes Waterhouse. According to Mother Waterhouse's final confession, he offended her and she tried to set her familiar Sathan on him to "hurte and destroy him & his goodes." Sathan failed in his task and returns to tell Mother Waterhouse that "Wardol was so strong in fayth that he hadde no power to hurt hym." Sathan tries again numerous times to cause Wardol mischief, but it proves in vain.(38-40)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 38-40

Wardol Mr. Wardol Victim
1104

A man from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be the husband of Mother Agnes Waterhouse and the father of Joan Waterhouse. According to Mother Waterhouse's confession, the two lived "somwhat vnquietly," and for that reason she had her familiar Sathan kill him about nine years before.(14-16 (B-Bii))

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 14-16 (B-Bii)

Waterhouse Mr. Waterhouse Victim
1107

A woman from Higham in the county of Lancashire, known to be the wife of John Moore and mother of John Moore Jr. Anne Whittle claimed that Mrs. Moore sent for her to amended some drink which had been forespoken. Alison Device alleged that Whittle was suspected of having bewitched the drink herself, and that Whittle had also caused Moore's son to become sick for half a year and finally die. Device claimed to have seen Whittle sitting in her garden with a clay image of Moore's child.(E2v-E3)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E2v-E3

Moore Mrs. Moore Victim
1108

A woman from Hatfield in the county of Hertfordshire, known to be the wife of Richard Poole; Alice Poole is allegedly cursed by Elizabeth Francis as punishment for not lending yeast. She languishes and then dies. Francis is charged for killing Alice "by malice aforethought" at the Chelmsford assizes, and found guilty.(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 6

Alice Poole Alice Poole Victim
1111

A child from Stathorne in the county of Leicestershire, known to be the child of John Patchett and Mrs. Patchett, and was allegedly bewitched to death along with its mother. Joan Willimott claimed that the child would have lived had John Patchett sought help for it in time. Ellen Green claimed that she had sent spirits to bewitch the child and Mrs. Patchett to death at Willimott's direction. According to Green, "the childe dyed the next day after she touched it."(E4v)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Wonderful Discovery of the Witchcrafts of Margaret and Phillip Flower. London: 1619, E4v

Patchett (Child) Victim
1112

A man from Green-head in Pendle in the county of Lancashire, known to be minor gentry and the husband of Marie Nutter, son of Christopher Nutter, grandson of Robert Nutter the older and Elizabeth Nutter, brother of John Nutter and half-brother to Margaret Crooke; he is said to have been bewitched to death by Anne Whittle and Anne Redferne. Whittle alleged in her confession that Nutter had desired her daughter, Anne Redferne, but that Redferne had refused his advances. He left in a rage, saying that "if euer the Ground came to him, shee should neuer dwell vpon his Land." When Whittle heard this, she called her familiar Fancie to her, and bid Fancie to revenge her of Nutter; three months later, he died. Whittle added that Nutter's grandmother Elizabeth had gathered together Whittle, Widow Loomshaw and Jane Boothman to request their help in killing Nutter so that the land would go to the women instead. Whittle was persuaded not to participate at that time by her son-in-law Thomas Redferne, but she thought that "the sayd Loomeshaws wife, and lane Boothman, did what they could to kill the sayd Robert Nutter, as well as this Examinate did." Elizabeth Southerns claimed to have seen Whittle and Anne Redferne making clay images of Nutter, his wife Marie and father Christopher. James Robinson gave deposition that Nutter had often complained that Whittle and Redferne were the cause of his illness and had threatened Thomas Redferne with eviction. Margaret Crooke claimed that Nutter was sick within two weeks of falling out with Anne Redferne and blamed her for his illness. John Nutter claimed that Nutter insisted he would have Whittle and Redferne imprisoned for bewitching him, but that their father Christopher told him "Thou art a foolish Ladde, it is not so, it is thy miscarriage. "(B4-B4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, B4-B4v

Robert Nutter Robert Nutter Victim
1118

A four year old boy from Warmfield in west Yorkshire who is allegedly bewitched by Margaret Morton. According to his mother, Joane, he was in good health until he ate a piece of bread which was offered to him by Margaret Morton. After eating the bread, he became ill, his body began to swell and his flesh became "wasted." When Morton, who was suspected of bewitching the child, came to ask forgiveness and his mother drew blood from him, the child instantly began to get better. (38)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 38

Anonymous 157 Victim
1127

A servant to Hester Spivey from Hothersfielde in the county of Yorkshire (possible Huddersfield, Yorkshire) who is allegedly bewitched by Hester France. Spivey recounts that one evening, upon coming home, Johnson tells her that France had been at the house. While she (Johnson) was tending to the fire, France allegedly told her "itt was a good deede to scare her lipps with it" and then left, but then came again and curse her (Elizabeth Johnson), praying she would never bake again. Johnson starts then believing that she has been bewitched. When going to bed, she begins to suffer from fits. She laid down in bed, but could neither speak nor stand and continued to be unable to speak from six until eight or nine in the evening--except for speaking once to her brother to whom she asked that Hester France be sent for. When France came, Johnson spoke to her and "catched country people near Bradford." Elizabeth Johnson allegedly began to get better after being scratched. She was still ill, but became somewhat better. (51-52)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 51-52

Elizabeth Johnson Elizabeth Johnson Victim
1132

A man who, according to John Johnson, accused Hester France of bewitching him. According to Johnson, Cliff had been sick for about half a year but now (at the time of the trial) had become very weak and ill. One day, Cliff asked Johnson to send for Hester France. When France arrived in Cliff's chamber, he scratched her and accused her of having caused him to become ill to which France replied that she had never hurt. (52)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 52

Kobert Cliff Robert Cliff Victim
1133

A child from Redness in the county of York who was allegedly bewitched and healed by Elizabeth Lambe according to his father Thomas Rennerd. Rennerd testifies that his wife said " I feare this wife (meaninge Eliz. Lambe) hath wronged my child." Shortly after, Rennerd's wife met Elizabeth Lambe at her (Rennerd's) doorstep where Lambe fell down on her knees and begged forgiveness. Soon after, the child recovered. (58)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 58

Rennerd Rennerd (Child) Victim
1136

A man from Redness in the county of Yorkshire who accuses Elizabeth Lambe of having drowned his foals. Baldwin was said to be sick "in bodye" testified that because Elizabeth Lambe had allegedly murdered his foals by witchcraft, he beat her with his cane and that were it not for his wife who got on her knees and begged him for forgiveness, he would have done much worse.(58)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 58

Nicholas Baldwin Nicholas Baldwin Victim
1137

A man from Redness in the county of Yorkshire who accuses Elizabeth Lambe of having caused Richard Brown of Redness to become ill and die. While sick, Brown told Wreight that he was "cruelly handled at the heart with one Elizabeth Lambe." He added that she drew blood from his heart and wanted him to send for her to come to his house because he wanted to scratch her. He surmised that if he could scratch her and draw blood from her, his condition would improve. So, when Elizabeth Lambe is brought to him, Brown says to Lambe that she has wronged him and asks why he has done so. He concludes by saying that if she would do no more, he would forgive her. Lambe does not respond and so Wreight relates that Browne scratches her until she bled. He died within a week and complained all the while until he died that Elizabeth Lambe had caused his death.(58)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 58

John Wreight John Wright Victim
1138

A man from redness in the county of Yorkshire who is allegedly murdered by Elizabeth Lambe by use of witchcraft. While sick, Brown told Wreight that he was "cruelly handled at the heart with one Elizabeth Lambe." He added that she drew blood from his heart and wanted him to send for her to come to his house because he wanted to scratch her. He surmised that if he could scratch her and draw blood from her, his condition would improve. So, when Elizabeth Lambe is brought to him, Brown says to Lambe that she has wronged him and asks why he has done so. He concludes by saying that if she would do no more, he would forgive her. Lambe does not respond and so Wreight relates that Browne scratches her until she bled. He died within a week and complained all the while until he died that Elizabeth Lambe had caused his death.(58)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 58

Kichard Browne Richard Brown Victim
1142

A man from Gargreave in the county of Yorkshire who testifies against Anne Greene before John Ashton and Edgar Coats. He claims that two weeks after Christmas, he became "disabled in body" and that one night he was troubled by spirits who advised him to worship the enemy, all of which were visible except Anne Greene. The spirits appeared to him at least four times (possibly on different dates). As a result, Tatterson approached Anne Greene, telling her that he wanted to sanctify and purify her heart as well as "worketh out the carnal part" thus leading to her salvation. (64)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 64

John Tatterson John Tatterson Victim
1147

A man from Beverley in the county of Yorkshire who claims he witnessed Elizabeth Roberts change into the likeness of a cat. He claims that a week before the trial, on a Saturday evening, Elizabeth Roberts appeared to him wearing her usual clothes but with a ruff around her neck. She then vanished, turning herself into the semblance of a cat which clung near his legs and, after "much struggling," vanished, whereupon Greendife had pain in his heart. He then relates that on the Wednesday, a cat struck him in the head causing him to fall into a sort of trance. When he recovered slightly, he saw Elizabeth Roberts escaping in her regular attire. The next day, he claims that Elizabeth Roberts appeared to him in the shape of a bee, sending him in such a state that five or six people could barely hold him down.(67)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 67

John Greendife John Greendife Victim
1150

A man from Rhodes in the county of Yorkshire who claims Katherine Earle struck him in the neck as well as his mare. Hatfield testifies that about August last Katherine Earle struck him in the neck and his mare with a "docken stalke." The mare immediately became sick and died and he became troubled by pain in his neck. (69)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 69

Henry Hatefeild John Hatfield Victim
1155

A man who testifies against Jennet and George Benton. He claims that after throwing stones at them for trespassing, he and his wife and child began suffering from a myriad of fits. The Bentons and Jackson had been arguing about the Benton's alleged trespassing. An angry Jackson procured an action against the Bentons, prohibiting them from passing. The Bentons then threaten him and his family. Richard Jackson starts to suffer from pains in the shoulders, heart and back. he also began to hear strange noises like bells ringing accompanied by singing and dancing. (74)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 74

Richard Jackson Richard Jackson Victim
1156

A child from Wakefield in the county of Yorkshire (the son of Mrs. Jackson and Richard Jackson) who starts suffering from fits in the night, according to his father Richard Jackson, after Richard was threatened by Jennet and George Benton. (74-65)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 74-65

Jackson Jackson (Child) Victim
1158

A woman from Wakefield in the county of Yorkshire who allegedly loses her hearing after her husband has an altercation with Jenet and George Benton. The Bentons had allegedly been trespassing on the land of the farm on which Richard Jackson worked. When Jackson passed an action against the Bentons, prohibiting them from passing, Jennet Benton threatened him and his family. Shortly thereafter is when Mrs. Jackson lost her hearing.(74-75)

Appears in:
Raine, James. Depositions from the Castle of York. Unknown: 1861, 74-75

Jackson Mrs. Jackson Victim
1164

A man from Leicester in the county of Leicestershire, who claims to have been bewitched by Phillip Flower, because he had no power to leave her, and was marvelously altered both in mind and body since he met her. (7)

Appears in:
Flower, Margaret. Witchcrafts, strange and wonderfull: discovering the damnable practices of seven witches. London: 1635, 7

Thomas Simpson Thomas Simpson Victim
1169

A man from Estoat near Fosters-Booth in Northhamptonshire, known to be a well-respected farmer and the neighbour of Mary/Ann Foster. When Foster tried to buy mutton from Weedon, who had slaughtered several sick sheep, and offered less than Weedon was asking for the meat, Weedon refused. At this, Mary/Ann was heard to mutter "You had been better let me have it, for you shall have more Mutton shortly lye upon your hands then you know what to do with." The next day, Weedon found seven of his soundest sheep had shattered legs, and this repeated night after night until over 30 had been destroyed. When he burned the bodies, Mary/Ann "came up to the fire, and asked them what they were doing," though she had no business in the area. Weedon tried to scratch her with his fingernails, and when they proved too blunt, cut the back of her hand with his knife. Mary/Ann threatened to sue him for the damage to her person, and Weedon gave her 20 shillings in reparation. She boasted thereafter that "it was the devil in her shape that received it of VVeedon, and that now she had thereby power to do him further mischief." Days later, Weedon's hay barn, corn barn and house burnt down, causing over 300 pounds in damages. Mary/Ann Foster later confessed to lighting the barns on fire and claimed responsibility for the destruction of Weedon's sheep. Weedon visited her in prison, and she told him it was all in revenge for him refusing to sell her mutton. (3-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Relation of the Most Remarkable Proceedings at the late Assizes at Northampton. London: 1674, 3-7

Joseph Weedon Joseph Weedon Victim
1202

A young girl of Cleworth in the County of Lancastershire in the parish of Leigh, known to be the sister of Margaret Hardmen and belong to the Starchie household, alleged to be afflicted with fits by Edmund Hartlay. Hardman is found under a bed making a hole in the wall, saying that she will be drawn through it to Heaven. She is alleged to have been able to predict her fits and the details of them, and attributed this knowledge to a white dove. At one point, she and Eleanor Holland were unable to eat for three days and nights, nor speak to anyone but one another except " to ther lads. saue that their lads gaue them leaue (as the said) the one to eate a toast & drink, the other a sower milk posset." Hartley is said to have been angry that the ate, even with permission, and made them vomit it up. At a dinner, Holland and the Hardman sisters were thrown back, their bodies swelled, their faces disfigured, and strange motion was observed from within their bodies. At one time, Harman describes her possessor as being like an urchin, who went through a tiny hole in the parlor and returned in a foul shape promising her gold if he gave her leave to possess her again; he threatened to throw her into the fire and break her neck when she resisted. At another time, he came to her in the shape of a bear with fire in its mouth, which terrified her into running away; she was caught and showed two bags, one of silver and one of gold, and promised nine times as much but she resisted. He came next in the shape of an ape, again promising gold, threatening to cast her out the window or into the fire, and departed with a shriek.(Image 5, 6, 8, 10)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 5, 6, 8, 10

Elizabeth Hardman Elizabeth Hardman Victim
1203

A man from Windsor in the county of Berkshire, known to be the son of the Mayor of Windsor Master Galis, brother to James Galis, and the author of "A brief treatise containing the most strange and horrible cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her confederates, executed at Abingdon, upon R. Galis." This pamphlet contains a full account of his alleged bewitchment at the hands of Elizabeth Stile (alias Rockingam), his meeting with Mother Dutton, his life at sea, and his return home.(2-3)

Appears in:
Galis, Richard. A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates. London: 1572, 2-3

Richard Galis Richard Galis Victim
1210

A man from Windsor in the county of Berkshire, known to be the brother of Richard Galis and the son of Mayor of Windsor Master Gallis, allegedly bewitched by Mother Dutton sometime in 1564. According to Richard Galis' account, James is still forespoken and "bereft of his wits" in 1579. (Image 4)

Appears in:
Galis, Richard. A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates. London: 1572, Image 4

James Galis James Galis Victim
1213

An infant girl, aged a years and a half, from St. Osyth in the county of Essex and the daughter of Annis Letherdall and Richard Letherdall. Elizabeth is allegedly bewitched by Ursula Kempe who muttered at Elizabeth and she developed a "great swelling in the bottome of the belly, and other priuie partes." Her mother took her to see Mother Ratcliffe for medical or unwitching treatment, on to way to and from Ratcliffe's home, Elizabeth cried "to the mother, wo, wo, and poynted with the finger to the wyndowe wardes." Although Ratcliffe claimed she could likely do little, she attempted to minister to the child. Soon after, perumably because the child did not get better, Letherdall visited a cunning woman who diagnosed the girl as having been bewitched by Kempe. Kempe scoffed at Lethedall claiming that she "would lay her life that she the said Annis had not been with any [cunning folk]," so certain was she, that Kempe "requested a woman being in the house a spinning with the said Ursley, to beare witnesse what shee had said." Elizabeth's conditioned worsened, becoming a "most piteous case to beholde." Kemp, believing that she would be afforded some lenience if she confessed, answered the specific questions Brian Darcey demanded of her, confessing to sending her familiar "Pigen [to torment] Letherdalls Childe" and begging "forgiuenesse of the sayde Letherdalls wife." Ursula Kempe and Alice Newman are indicted and found guilty for this crime, but remanded. (A2V-A3)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A2V-A3

Elizabeth Letherdall Elizabeth Letherdall Victim
1217

A man from Windsor in the county of Berkshire, who is allegedly bewitched in his limbs by Elizabeth Stile after being unable to provide her with sufficient alms when she arrives late at his master's house.(Image 10)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Rehearsal both Strange and True. London: 1579, Image 10

Ostler of Windsor Victim
1224

A child from Manningtree in the county of Essex who is allegedly murdered by the imps kept by Mother Benefield, Mother Goodwin, Anne West, and Rebecca West.(2)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex. London: 1645, 2

Anonymous 193 Victim
1231

A man who is nearly hurt by a spirit in the form of a red dog. The spirit was sent by Goodwife Clarke, who had intended for it to kill Mr. Long by making him fall off his horse and break his neck.(5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Arraignment of Thirty Witches at Chensford in Essex. London: 1645, 5

Long Mr. Long Victim
1232

A man from Windsor in the county of Berkshire, who suffered an ailment of his limbs while at his country house and alleged that he had been bewitched; he sent for his friend Richard Galis and requested Galis find witches to help break the bewitchment. Galis brings Mistress Audrey, Elizabeth Stile, Mother Dutten, and Mother Devell, and caused the four to kneel before Handley, but they could not ease his grief or tell the cause of it. Handley recovers shortly after nevertheless. (Image 5-6)

Appears in:
Galis, Richard. A Brief Treatise Containing the Most Strange and Horrible Cruelty of Elizabeth Stile alias Rockingham and her Confederates. London: 1572, Image 5-6

Robert Handley Robert Handley Victim
1236

A woman from Maningtree in the county of Essex, and wife of John Rivet, in late December, 1645, Mrs. Rivet became "sicke, and lame, with such violent fits, that this Informant verily conceived her sicknesse was something more then meerly naturall." He husband sought the counsel of a cunning woman, one the wife of one Hovye at Hadleigh in Suffolke, who told him his wife was bewitched by two neighboring witches. Rivet deduced that Elizabeth Clarke was one the witches, based on the proximity of her home and the common knowledge that "Elizabeths mother and some other of her kinsfolke did suffer death for Witchcraft and murther."(5)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 5

Rivet Mrs. Rivet Victim
1245

A man from Norfolk who is a shoe maker and a seller of Holland cheese. When his trade in dairy products threatens Mary Smith's, he finds himself the victim of supernatural torments, manifest as a "madnesse or phrensie," a body "benummed," and "pains and greifes from which hee is not yet freed." He twice attempts countermagic against Smith, once burning her familiar to burn her, and once trying to scratch her, but finding himself unable to. (57-59)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 57-59

Edmund Newton Edmund Newton Victim
1246

A woman from Norfolk who curses at Mary Smith after Smith wrongfully accuses her of stealing a chicken. Hancocke is plagued by a lingering illness which manifests like possession (she suffers extreme pains, loses her senses, is tossed about the bed, tears at her hair etc.). She recovers from her illness after he father makes a witch cake, but continues to be plagued by supernatural occurences, and haunted by a great cat, and the apparition (or the person) of Mary Smith. (50-55)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 50-55

Elizabeth Hancocke Elizabeth Hancocke Victim
1248

A man from London, described as a fishmonger who falls ill after attempting to collect a debt (owed to his wife) from Henry Smith. Younges is plagued by this strange disease for over thirteen months, during which he can not walk without crutches or feed himself. He seeks medical treatment from "sundry learned and experienced Physitians in Norwich." Although he eventually recovers somewhat when Mary Smith was imprisoned for witchcraft, he was still weak at suffering from a lame hand at time of publication. (58-59)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 58-59

Thomas Yonges Thomas Younges Victim
1251

A woman from Norfolk, described as a servant who has a disagreement with Mary Smith. Smith calls Bayles "a great fattail'd sow," and promises her that she would not be fat for long. Bayles is soon struck with a wasting illness which lasts six months and does not end until Bayles quits her employment (and by implication moves far away from Smith).(55-57)

Appears in:
Roberts, Alexander. A Treatise of Witchcraft. London: 1616, 55-57

Cecily Bayle Cecily Bayle Victim
1254

A man from Chester in the county of Cheshire, who identifies Mary Poole as a witch and claims the she allegedly bewitched him and his horse when they crossed paths in Sutors-Hill about seven years earlier. (2)

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Proceedings of the Old Bailey: Mary Poole, Theft > grand larceny, 13th December 1699. . London: 1699, 2

Anonymous 203 Victim
1258

A girl from Maldon in the county of Essex, known to be 4 years old and the daughter of Widow Webbe, who has a falling out with Ellen Smith's daughter; Smith allegedly came her home the next day and struck her on the face, causing her to becomes ill, and die two days later. During the days of her illness, Susan Webbe is said to have cried continually "awaie with the Witche, awaie with the Witch." Immediately after she died, her mother saw a thing like a black dog leave the house, which upset Widow Webbe out of her wits. Smith was tried at the Chelmsford assizes for Susan's death and found guilty.(9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 9

Susan Webbe Susan Webbe Victim
1260

A four year old boy, likely from Great Clacton in the county of Essex, the brother of Marie Death and the son of Thomas Death. There had been a verbal altercation between his mother and Cyciey Sellis after Sellis was fired as wet nurse to George Battell's child and Mrs. Death was hired. Sellis threated that Mrs. Death would "loose more by the hauing of it, then thou shalt haue for the keeping of it," suggesting that getting this child would cost her one of her own. This boy, having been healthy, "presently fell downe dead, and after by helpe being brought to life, the saide childe was in a pitious case, and so died presently."(D8v-E)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, D8v-E

John Death John Death Victim
1261

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex and the wife of John Stratton. Two incidents appear to have lead to her sickness and death allegedly at the will of Ursula Kempe and Ales Newman. Bad blood began to boil after a verbal altercation between her husband, John, and Kempe, where John called Kempe a "whore & gaue her other euill speeches." Shortly thereafter, Kempe sent her son to ask Edna Stratton for some spices. Stratton refused the request. Kempe allegedly requested that said Ales Newmans wife "sende Iacke the spirite vnto Strattons wife to plague her," which she did and which did. According to Kempe "it had plagued her in the backe euen vnto death."(B, B2-B2v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, B, B2-B2v

Edna Stratton Edna Statton Victim
1269

A man from Exeter in the county of Devon, who is ill and whose wife (Grace Matthew) believes him to have been bewitched.(150-151)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 150-151

Anonymous 209 Victim
1274

A woman from Exeter in the county of Devon, described as a servant-maid who is allegedly bewitched by Joan Baker. She suffered from a wasting illness for over nine months, in grievous pain, until she was consumed "away in her body and soe dyed." During this time, she "often cried out in her sickness that she was bewitched."(151)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 151

Anonymous 212 Victim
1278

A boy from Exeter in the county of Devon, who works for Ezekiel Trible, the tobacco pipe maker, and who is allegedly rendered ill by Diana Crosse.(150-151)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 150-151

Anonymous 213 Victim
1280

A child from Exeter in the county of Devon described as one of Mrs. Dicker's who becomes ill shortly after Mrs. Dicker refuses to help Diana Crosse.(151)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 151

Anonymous 214 Victim
1282

A child from Exeter in the county of Devon, who allegedly falls ill because his mother (Anonymous 215) refused Diana Crosse some milk.(151)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 151

Anonymous 216 Victim
1283

A child from Exeter in the county of Devon, who becomes ill allegedly because his mother (Anonymous 215) refused Diana Crosse some milk.(151)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 151

Anonymous 217 Victim
1284

A man from Exeter in the county of Devon, described as the husband of Anonymous 215 and a wool-comber by trade, who allegedly is ill. At the time of examination, (Anonymous 218) has been ill for two years.(151)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 151

Anonymous 218 Victim
1289

A woman from Exeter who allegedly falls ill, suffering from pain in her limbs, as a magical consequence of her husband's (Anonymous 220) refusal to bring a petition to the Mayor on behalf of Diana Crosse. Her son (Anonymous 222) also falls and breaks his arm after this event. (151)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 151

Anonymous 221 Victim
1291

A boy, the son of (Father: Anonymous 220 and Mother: Anonymous 221), from Exeter who allegedly falls and breaks his arm, an accident read as the magical consequence of his father's refusal to bring a petition to the Mayor on behalf of Diana Crosse. His mother also grows ill with limb pain.(151)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 151

Anonymous 222 Victim
1294

An infant girl from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be the daughter of Elizabeth Francis and Christopher Frances, and a year and a half old at the time of her death. Elizabeth used her pregnancy with this child to convince Christopher Frances to marry her; their daughter was born within three months after the wedding. When the marriage proved prone to " much vnquietnes and moued to swearing and cursinge," Elizabeth asked her familiar Sathan to kill the child in the hope that their relationship would improve if it were just the two of them again.(9, 11-12)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 9, 11-12

Francis Francis (Child) Victim
1295

A man from Hatfield Peverel in the County of Essex, known to be a yeoman, the husband of Elizabeth Francis and father of an infant girl. When Elizabeth desired Christopher as her husband, her familiar Sathan advised her to fornicate with him first; Elizabeth then used the resulting pregnancy to convince Christopher to marry her. Their daughter was born within three months after the wedding. When the marriage proved prone to "much vnquietnes and moued to swearing and cursinge," Elizabeth asked Sathan to kill the child in the hope that their relationship would improve if it were just the two of them again. The marriage continued unquiet after the child's death and Elizabeth had Sathan lie in wait in Christopher's shoe in the form of a toad. When Christopher found the toad with his toe, she had him kill it, giving Sathan the opportunity to inflict Christopher with "a lamenes wherof he can not healed"(9, 11-12)

Appears in:
Phillips, John. The Examination and Confession of Certain Witches. London: 1566, 9, 11-12

Christopher Francis Christopher Francis Victim
1297

A woman who testifies against Diana Crosse. She claims that Crosse is responsible for the death of her husband and child as well as for Goodwife Woodman.(152)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 152

Southcott Mrs. Southcott Victim
1298

A child who allegedly falls ill after leaving Diana Crosse's school. She is ill for five years and then dies.(152)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 152

Southcott Southcott (Child) Victim
1299

A tailor who allegedly becomes ill and dies a few weeks after his daughter who allegedly died as a result of leaving Diana Crosse's school.(152)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 152

Southcott Mr. Southcott Victim
1300

A woman who allegedly dies not long after Mrs. Southcott's daughter. Mrs. Southcott's daughter had come to goodwife Woodman's school not long after leaving Diana Crosse's.(152)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 152

Goodwife Woodman Victim
1310

A man who is allegedly bewitched by Johan Furnace. He has "fits in his head and distempers in his body" and seems to be unable to speak normally except in the presence of Johan Furnace.(152)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 152

Greene Greene Victim
1311

A child of Greene's who is allegedly "creemed" by Johan Furnace and would have allegedly been again had the witch not been fed small pieces of silver.(152)

Appears in:
Woollcombe, William Cotton, Henry . Gleanings from the Municipal and Cathedral Records Relative to the History of the City of Exeter. Unknown: 1877, 152

Greene Greene (Child) Victim
1314

A man from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, whose wife Alice Newman is an accused witch and allegedly the "cause of her husbands great miserie and wretcher state." According to their neighbor, William Hooke, she allowed her familiars to torment him and possibly kill him.(A6-A6v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A6-A6v

William Newman William Newman Victim
1321

A man from Well-Close in London, described as Mr. John ---'s Apprentice who takes ill after Mother Griffith believes he is ridiculing her in Mr. John's shop. Later, after having swum Mother Griffith, Mr. John ---'s Apprentice is marked with her handprint in black on his arm, and "he had unaccountable fits, vomited up old nails, pins and such like, his body being turned into strange postures, and all the while nothing but crying out of Mother Griffith that she was come to torment him, his Arm rotted almost off Gangreend and killd him." He was then buried in St. Pulcher's Churchyard.(1)

Appears in:
Greenwel, Thomas. A Full and True Account of the Discovery, Apprehending and taking of a notorious witch,. London: 1704, 1

Mr. John --- 's Apprentice Victim
1331

A woman from Stepney, in the county of Middlesex (now part of the London Borough of Tower Hamlets) who is allegedly bewitched by Barbara Bartle. She languishes, is lame, and is left speechless from June 17th to July 12th of 1653.()

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 3: 1625-67. Middlesex: 1888,

Elizabeth Gyan Elizabeth Gyan Victim
1333

A nine-year-old boy who is allegedly bewitched by Elizabeth Newman. His body begins to waste away and he soon becomes deaf and dumb.()

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 3: 1625-67. Middlesex: 1888,

John Gale John Gale Victim
1334

A seven-year-old girl who is allegedly bewitched by Elizabeth Newman. Her body begins to waste away and she soon becomes deaf and dumb.()

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 3: 1625-67. Middlesex: 1888,

Elizabeth Gale Elizabeth Gale Victim
1335

A five-year-old boy who is allegedly bewitched by Elizabeth Newman. His body begins to waste away and soon he becomes deaf and dumb.()

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 3: 1625-67. Middlesex: 1888,

James Gale James Gale Victim
1336

A woman from Whitechapel, in the country of Middlesex (now part of London) who is allegedly bewitched by Elizabeth Newman. From August to January, she "was wasted consumed and pyned in her body." ()

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 3: 1625-67. Middlesex: 1888,

Joan Holland Joan Holland Victim
1337

A man, likely Israel Amyce, a surveyor and former employee of Edward de Vere, the Seventeenth Earl of Oxford, and commissioned by Roger Harlackenden to do large map of the Earldom and Priory Manors and agent to Sir Robert Cecil at Theobalds. At the time of his alleged bewitchment, he may have been in Flamstead in the county of Hertfordshire. Aymce believes he is made terribly ill by an alleged witch (Anonymous 225) and has her committed to the goal in Hertford. At the time his narrative appears in the Cecil Papers, there is some hope Amyce will recover from an illness which has "almost consumed to the bone." Amyce visited numerous doctors, and finally consulted a cunning woman, unwitcher, or female physician, "a woman that dwelt 12 miles from Waltham," who had "skill in those matters." He took her prescriptions before bed, began to recover somewhat in the morning, and was able to eat "more meat than he had done all the time of his sickness."()

Appears in:
Roberts, R. A.. Calendar of the Cecil Papers in Hatfield House, Volume 10: 1600. Unknown: 1904,

Iseal Amyce Mr. Amyce Victim
1340

A woman from Enfield (now the London Borough of Enfield), who is allegedly bewitched by Agnes Berry. Hasley "became lame, and languished from 25 August until 3 September then next following and wasted away in her whole body".()

Appears in:
Le Hardy, William. County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16. Middlesex: 1937,

Grace Hasley Grace Hasley Victim
1343

An infant, described as aged "three-quarters of a year," who is allegedly bewitched by Emma/Anne Branch. He becomes ill and lame for the space of a few days or weeks, and then dies.()

Appears in:
Le Hardy, William. County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16. Middlesex: 1937,

Edward Wheeler Edward Wheeler Victim
1344

A girl who is allegedly bewitched by Emma Branch. While bewitched, "her whole body and became lame and still so lives."()

Appears in:
Le Hardy, William. County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16. Middlesex: 1937,

Anne Howell Anne Howell Victim
1346

A girl allegedly bewitched by Emma Branch. She "has become wasted away and lame and still so lives."()

Appears in:
Le Hardy, William. County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 3: 1615-16. Middlesex: 1937,

Joan Aldrdige Joan Aldridge Victim
1355

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be a witness to Margaret Muschamp's discourse with her angels. He was present when she claimed receiving two drops of blood from John Hutton had averted seven years of torment. He also heard her accuse Dorothy Swinow of causing her Aunt Hambleton's death, George Muschamp Jr.'s consumption, her torments and James Faucet's unnatural fits, in addition to her claim that George Jr. needed two drops of blood as well to live. When en route to Spital, George Lee was "almost cast away comming into Barwick Harbour in a Ship by that fearfull tempest which HUTTON raised."(9)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9

George Lee George Lee Victim
1361

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the son of Mr. Fauset, to have one sister, and through that sister to be the brother-in-law of Lady Margery Hambleton's son. Margaret Muschamp accused Dorothy Swinow of causing James Fauset to suffer unnatural fits in an attempt to kill him so that Mr. Fauset's estate would go to Hambleton's son by virtue of his marriage to Faucet's sister. Muschamp also claimed that Swinow left Faucet alone, allowing him to recover, to focus on her and her family instead.(9)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9

James Fauset James Fauset Victim
1364

One of a group of messengers who claim to have been cursed by Anonymous 229 as they were passing by her house in a boat.(150)

Appears in:
Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, . Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, Reign of Charles 1: 1637. H. M. Stationery Office: 1868, 150

Anonymous 231 Victim
1365

A waterman who is allegedly "stricken with such a lamentable crick in his back that he was constrained to get help" soon after the group of messengers (Anonymous 231) are allegedly cursed by Anonymous 229.(150)

Appears in:
Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, . Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, Reign of Charles 1: 1637. H. M. Stationery Office: 1868, 150

Anonymous 232 Victim
1373

A woman from Witham In the county of Essex who is allegedly bewitched by Joan Haddon. However, Joan Haddon is acquitted on the count of witchcraft, but found guilty of fraudulently getting money from Bowltell.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=331225)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=331225

Joan Bowltell Joan Bowltell Victim
1374

A man from Witham in the county of Essex who is allegedly bewitched by Joan Haddon. Haddon, however, is acquitted from the charge of witchcraft but found guilty of allegedly fraudulently acquiring money from Emmerye and others.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=331225)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=331225

Thomas Emmerye Thomas Emmerye Victim
1375

One of a group of unidentified people from county of Essex who are allegedly bewitched by Joan Haddon. Haddon, however, is acquitted of the charge of witchcraft, but found guilty of getting money from them through fraudulent means. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=331225)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=331225

Anonymous 233 Victim
1378

A man from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the husband of Mrs. Custerd, who was allegedly killed by Dorothy Swinow, Anonymous 234 and Anonymous 236.(9-10)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9-10

John Custerd John Custerd Victim
1379

A woman from Spital in the County of Northumberland, known to be the wife of John Custerd, who was allegedly killed by Dorothy Swinow, Anonymous 234 and Anonymous 236.(9-10)

Appears in:
Moore, Mary. Wonderfull Newes from the North. London: 1650, 9-10

Custerd Mrs. Custerd Victim
1385

A man from the county of Essex who is allegedly bewitched by John Samond. Samond allegedly had the intention of killing him.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1

John Grant John Grant Victim
1386

A woman from the county of Essex who is allegedly bewitched by John Samond. Samond allegedly bewitched her with the intention of killing her. She languishes from the 28th of May until the 29th of August (1659 or 1560) and dies.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1

Bridget Pecocke Bridget Peacock Victim
1387

A man from the county of Essex who is allegedly bewitched by accused wizard, John Samond. Anthony languishes from May 8th to May 29th (1560) and then dies.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1

Anthony Anthony Victim
1393

A spinster from Stebbing, Essex who is allegedly bewitched (or rather murdered) by Margaret Hodgin. She languishes and then dies.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Margaret Hull Margaret Hull Victim
1395

A boy, the son of William Auger, of Hatfield Peverel who is allegedly bewitched by Elizabeth Francis so that he became decrepit. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

John John (Auger) Victim
1405

A woman from Little Baddow in the county of Essex, who is the wife of William Basticke. She is allegedly bewitched by Alice Swallow so that she languishes and dies.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Alice Basticke Alice Basticke Victim
1416

A man from Coven-Garden in London and the county of Greater London, described as a plain Country Yeoman that discovers seven witches residing at Queen-Street in Coven-Garden who are falsely giving confession for monetary prices and after swearing confessors under several articles. John Stockden refuses to swear to these articles, although he "was willing to have a wench," and he thus discovers them to be witches.(5)

Appears in:
Unknown, . The Seven Women Confessors or a Discovery of the Seven White Divels which Lived at Queen-Street in Coven-Garden. London: 1641, 5

John Stockden John Stockden Victim
1419

A man who is allegedly bewitched by Joan Norfolk and Margaret Ganne so that he languishes for months and then dies.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1

John Furmyn John Furmyn Victim
1423

A man from Hatfield in the county of Essex whose animals (a cow, six sheep and four pigs) are thought to have been bewitched by Lora Wynchester.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

William Higham William Higham Victim
1426

A one-year-old infant from Kelvedon in the county of Essex, who was thought to have been bewitched by Joan Cocke. The infant "was lame, enfeebled and maimed." (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=332210)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=332210

Agnes Cryspe Agnes Cryspe Victim
1428

A man from Pinner in the county of Middlesex, described as the servant of Master Edling who believes he is bewitched by Mother Atkins after running into two of her familiars: the hare and a monstrous black cat. The bewitchment caused him to be carried in the air to unknown location where he is kept imprisoned and burned, as well as rendered mute. Upon release some four days later, he is cured of his lack of speech by the parson of the town, and scratches Mother Atkins, which seems to have remedied him, "for since that he hath mended reasonablie, and nowe goeth to Churche."()

Appears in:
B., G.. A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England) . London: 1592,

Richard Burt Richard Burt Victim
1431

A man from Pinner in the county of Middlesex, described as a neighbour of Master Edling who present when the servant of Master Edling, Richard Burt, is cured of his inability to speak by the parson of the town, P. Smith. He goes with the parson to fetch the witch Mother Atkins at the bequest of the victim. He himself is also a victim of Mother Atkins, as she comes to his house some time later asking for milk. When she is refused, almost immediately upon her departure, his kitchens are made a mess, the cream the dairymaids have gathered is lost down the sink-hole, and no chores are accomplished for the rest of the day.()

Appears in:
B., G.. A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England) . London: 1592,

Master Burbridge Victim
1432

A man from Pinner in the county of Middlesex, described as a victim of Mother Atkins, who comes to his house begging for charity. He is busy with his lambs, and is slow to answer her, and in a fury, she leaves. Shortly thereafter, two of his lambs "began so nimbly to skip and frilke to and fro, that they never ceased after til they died." (6)

Appears in:
B., G.. A Most Wicked Worke of a Wretched Witch, (the Like Whereof None Can Record these Manie Yeeres in England) . London: 1592, 6

Gregorie Coulson Gregory Coulson Victim
1434

A woman from Kelvedon in the county of Essex who suspects Joan Cocke of Kelvedon's daughter (Anonymous 243) of being a witch because she (Noble's Wife) could no longer get butter. She also claims Cocke (daughter) bewitched Belfild wife's cows so that one died and two others gave milk of all colours. ()

Appears in:
Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, . Report of the Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, Part 4. H.M. Stationery Office: 1885,

Noble's Wife Victim
1435

A woman from Liford in the county of Essex who has a cow that died and two "miche neate" (dairy cows) that gave milk of "all colours." Joan Cocke's daughter (Anonymous 243) is suspected of having used "witcherie" to bewitch these cows. ()

Appears in:
Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, . Report of the Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, Part 4. H.M. Stationery Office: 1885,

Belfild's Wife Victim
1437

A man from the county of Essex who is allegedly lamed after Joan Cocke of Kelvedon initially put her hands on his knees while in his house and then clapped her hands on his knees. ()

Appears in:
Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, . Report of the Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, Part 4. H.M. Stationery Office: 1885,

Richard Sherman Richard Sherman Victim
1438

A girl from Purleigh in the county of Essex, described as the daughter of one Richard Willson who is thought to have been bewitched by Joan Cocke of Hatfield.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=332210)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=332210

Anne Willson Anne Willson Victim
1444

A man from Stock in the county of Essex, the son of Roger Veele, who is allegedly bewitched by Agnes Sawen so that his feet are lamed and curved so that he suffers great pains and can barely walk.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1

Christopher Veele Christopher Veele Victim
1446

A man from the county of Essex, described as a Butcher (Anonymous 245) who, having lost a cow, went to visit a cunning-man (Anonymous 247). The cunning-man fooled the butcher by asking him to look at the reflections cast in a glass as his "confederate of his covered over with a Bulls Hide, and a pair of horns on his head" attempted to trick him. The butcher figured out the ruse and returned with his boy and his dog, a large mastiff, which the boy released on the confederate (Anonymous 248).(62-63)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 62-63

Anonymous 245 Victim
1453

A one and a half year old infant who is allegedly enchanted by Agnes Berden. He languishes for three days and then is body becomes so "vexed and troubled" that it was determined "that his life was greatly despaired of."(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=3)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=3

Thomas Barlee Thomas Barlee Victim
1458

A girl, the daughter of Thomas Egles of Braintree in the county of Essex, Margery Egles is allegedly enchanted by Alice Aylett in August of 1589, so that she "gravely languished" until the month of November. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1

Margery Egles Margery Egles Victim
1472

A maid (Anonymous 253) from Bedford in the county of Bedfordshire who, upon refusing to share her pease porridge with Goodwife Rose, found it had gone mealy. This maid turned accuser against Rose and went so far as to offer to be swum next to her, to prove an honest woman would sink while a witch floated. This is indeed what happened, but as much to the Maid's detriment as to Rose's. While Rose floated sinisterly on the water, the Maid almost drowned, and could hardly be recovered. (41)

Appears in:
Fairfax, Edward . Daemonologia: a Discourse on Witchcraft as it was Acted in the Family of Mr. Edward Fairfax. Unknown: 1621, 41

Anonymous 253 Victim
1491

A man and apprentice bodice maker from Great Gaddesden who is allegedly possessed. Thomas Burridge is described as having been "seized with temptations of Satan."(16)

Appears in:
Gerish, W. B.. The Folk-lore of Hertfordshire. Dunstable: 1911, 16

Thomas Burridge Thomas Burridge Victim
1492

A girl from the county of Essex and the daughter of William Skynner who is thought to have been bewitched by Alice Aylett. Skynner allegedly languished from August until November of 1589. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1

Rachel Skynner Rachel Skynner Victim
1493

A man or boy from the county of Essex who is believed to have been bewitched by Alice Aylett on November 5, 1589, so that he gravely languished until the first of December, 1589.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1

Henry Joye Henry Joye Victim
1494

A six year old girl from the county of Essex who is thought to have been bewitched by Alice Aylett. Parman allegedly languished from March 6, 1579-80, until April 26,1583.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1

Susan Parman Susan Parman Victim
1495

A boy from the county of Essex (possibly named Simon) who is believed to have been bewitched by Alice Aylett. The boy is said to have languished and then died and Alice Aylett is found guilty of having bewitched and murdered Susan Parman and Simon. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1

Anonymous 259 Victim
1498

A child from Lutterworth in the county of Leicestershire who is allegedly bewitched by Margaret Bell. Anonymous 260 appears to be cured when Bell is scratched. (21)

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 21

Anonymous 260 Victim
1505

A maid and servant from Great Bentley in the county of Essex who is called a witch and an old whore by Edward Munt. The woman told Munt who had come to see Anonymous 261 masters, John Harris or his wife, that neither were available at the moment which sent Munt into a fit. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=5)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=5

Anonymous 261 Victim
1535

A man from Suffolk who was allegedly bewitched to death along with the rest of his family: his wife and five children, by an old woman (Anonymous 271), who was later tried, convicted, and condemned to death at a session in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk in 1645. (Cover, 3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover, 3

Anonymous 284 Victim
1536

A woman from Suffolk, married to a man (Anonymous 284) and having five children (Anonymous 286, Anonymous 287, Anonymous 288, Anonymous 289, Anonymous 290) who was allegedly bewitched to death along with the rest of her family by an old woman (Anonymous 271). The old woman was later tried, convicted, and condemned to death at a session in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk in 1645. (Cover, 3)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover, 3

Anonymous 285 Victim
1537

A child from Suffolk, who is allegedly bewitched to death along with the rest of his or her family: a man (Anonymous 284), his wife (Anonymous 285), and four siblings (Anonymous 287, Anonymous 288, Anonymous 289, Anonymous 290). The family was bewitched by "one old woman" (Anonymous 271) who was later tried, convicted, and condemned to death at a session in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk in 1645. (Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Anonymous 286 Victim
1538

A child from Suffolk, who is allegedly bewitched to death along with the rest of his or her family: a man (Anonymous 284), his wife (Anonymous 285), and four siblings (Anonymous 286, Anonymous 288, Anonymous 289, Anonymous 290). The family was bewitched by "one old woman" (Anonymous 271) who was later tried, convicted, and condemned to death at a session in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk in 1645. (Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Anonymous 287 Victim
1539

A child from Suffolk, who is allegedly bewitched to death along with the rest of his or her family: a man (Anonymous 284), his wife (Anonymous 285), and four siblings (Anonymous 286, Anonymous 287, Anonymous 289, Anonymous 290). The family was bewitched by "one old woman" (Anonymous 271) who was later tried, convicted, and condemned to death at a session in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk in 1645. (Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Anonymous 288 Victim
1540

A child from Suffolk, who is allegedly bewitched to death along with the rest of his or her family: a man (Anonymous 284), his wife (Anonymous 285), and four siblings (Anonymous 286, Anonymous 287, Anonymous 288, Anonymous 290). The family was bewitched by "one old woman" (Anonymous 271) who was later tried, convicted, and condemned to death at a session in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk in 1645. (Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Anonymous 289 Victim
1541

A child from Suffolk, who is allegedly bewitched to death along with the rest of his or her family: a man (Anonymous 284), his wife (Anonymous 285), and four siblings (Anonymous 286, Anonymous 287, Anonymous 288, Anonymous 289). The family was bewitched by "one old woman" (Anonymous 271) who was later tried, convicted, and condemned to death at a session in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk in 1645. (Cover)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover

Anonymous 290 Victim
1543

A child who is allegedly bewitched to death by "another of the women Witches" (Anonymous 272). The woman is later tried, convicted, and condemned to death at a session in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk in 1645. (Cover, 4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, Cover, 4

Anonymous 283 Victim
1551

A man from Suffolk, who along with his wife (Anonymous 282) offended a woman (Anonymous 274) by expressing discontent at her frequent visits, causing her to send her imp in the form "of a little black smoth Dog" to play with their young and only son. The imp brings the son to water and drowns him, " to the great grief of the parents." The woman is imprisoned at Bury St. Edmunds in 1645.(5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 281 Victim
1553

A woman from Suffolk, who along with her husband (Anonymous 281) offended a woman (Anonymous 274) by expressing discontent at her frequent visits, causing her to send her imp in the form "of a little black smoth Dog" to play with their young and only son. The imp brings the son to water and drowns him, " to the great grief of the parents." The woman is imprisoned at Bury St. Edmunds in 1645.(5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 282 Victim
1554

A young boy and the only child of a gentleman and his wife in Suffolk. He plays with an imp "in the likenesse of a little black smoth dog" sent by a woman (Anonymous 274) who was offended when the family expressed displeasure at her frequent visits. At first, the boy "refused to play with it," but it persisted until "the Child made much of it" and the imp brought the child to water, "and there drowned the said child to the great grief of the parents." The woman is imprisoned at Bury St. Edmunds in 1645.(5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 5

Anonymous 275 Victim
1560

A man from Barling in the county of Essex who is allegedly bewitched by William and Margery Skelton of neighbouring Little Wakering so the he died instantly. ()

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011,

John Churcheman John Churcheman Victim
1561

A one year old infant from presumably either Little Wakering or Barling in the county of Essex and the daughter of William Collen, who is allegedly bewitched by WIlliam Skelton and his wife, Margery. She allegedly languished for a long time.()

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011,

Agnes Collen Agnes Collen Victim
1564

A man from Mistley, Suffolk whose horses are allegedly killed by two imps sent by Anne Leech, after his wife accused Anne Leech of being "a naughty woman."(7-8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 7-8

Bragge Mr. Bragge Victim
1565

A woman from Mistley, Suffolk, who offends Anne Leech by suspecting her to be "a naughty woman." This causes Anne Leech to send her imps to kill Mr. Bragge, her husband's horses. (7-8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 7-8

Bragge Mrs. Bragge Victim
1566

A child of a local member of the gentry, Richard Edwards, from Manningtree in the county of Essex. John Edwards is "taken sick, and had very strange fire, extending the limbs, and rowling the eyes, and within two dayes after dyed. The child is allegedly bewitched by a white imp and a black imp sent by Anne Leech and Elizabeth Gooding, respectively. Elizabeth Gooding is hanged as a witch on the charge of having bewitched John Edwards to death.(7-8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 7-8

John Edwards John Edwards Victim
1568

A woman from Manningtree, Suffolk, who "lanhished by the space of one whole year, untill she dyed," after Anne Leech allegedgly sent a gray imp to destroy her. Elizabeth Kirk refused to share a comb with Anne Leech.(7-8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 7-8

Elizabeth Kirk Elizabeth Kirk Victim
1569

The daughter of Widow Rawlyns from Mistley, Suffolk, who was allegedly killed by a gray imp sent by Anne Leech, after Anne Leech was removed in her farm so that Widow Rawlyns could live there.(8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 8

Rawlyns Rawlyns (Daughter) Victim
1570

A woman from Mistley, Suffolk who allegedly offends Anne Leech when she moves in to Anne Leech's old house, forcing Anne Leech to leave. Her daughter is killed by one of Anne Leech's imps.(8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 8

Rawlyns Widow Rawlyns Victim
1571

A woman from Manningtree, Suffolk, who is allegedly tormented by the imp of Elizabeth Gooding, after she refused Elizabeth Gooding some beer.(8)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 8

Mary Tayler Mary Tayler Victim
1574

A boy, and apprentice worsted comber by trade, who lives outside the west gate of the city of Exeter in the county of Devonshire (now commemorated on the site St Mary's Steps Church in Exeter), who allegedly suffers from falling-fits and foaming at the mouth for over nine years. Nathan is the son of Zacheus Crab and Mrs. Crab, and the brother of Daughter Crab, family members who attempt to find a cure for his unexplained ailments. Nathan is introduced to Mr. Gibs, Mr. Elson, and Mr. Pridham, people who attempt to cure him. Their cures include a Bag to hang about the Youth's Neck, and Powder to take in White wine, as well as pills, induced vomiting, and urine collecting. These cures work, but only temporarily as the fits always return, leaving Nathan generally so deprived of Reason, that he is clad, and otherwise used as a meer Idiot.(47-52)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 47-52

Nathan Crab Nathan Crab Victim
1582

A man, described as "one of Cromwell's Soldiers being on his Watch" stationed on his watch near the Queen's Chapel of St. James' Palace, who has an encounter with an unknown apparition (Apparition 1) that throws him to the ground. The soldier apparently told the apparition (Apparition 1) to stop and stand or else he would shoot it, at which point the apparition (Apparition 1) "ran upon him, and threw him over the way far off."(57-58)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 57-58

Anonymous 291 Victim
1585

A woman from Halstead in the county of Essex and wife of a yeoman named Thomas Bentall, Sibyl Bentall is allegedly bewitched by Agnes Steadman. As a result, Bentall suffers from violent pains for twelve days during which she feared for her life. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=2)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=2

Sibel Bentall Sibyl Bentall Victim
1586

A man from Halstead in the county of Essex whose cow (worth thirty shillings) is allegedly bewitched by Agnes Steadman causing it to become violently ill. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Owin Norman Owen Norman Victim
1587

A man from Halstead in the county of Essex whose three cows are allegedly bewitched by Agnes Steadman causing them to languish violently for three days. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1

John Rome John Rome Victim
1590

A young baby from Gravesend, in the county of Kent, who was the child of Roger and Jane Morgan. Elizabeth Morgan died at the age of six weeks. Anne Neale was indicted for allegedly bewitching and murdering her. Ultimately, there was not enough evidence to prosecute Neale. (3-16)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 3-16

Elizabeth Morgan Elizabeth Morgan Victim
1591

A boy from Gravesend in the county of Kent who is allegedly bewitched by Anne Neale so that he languished for a week and then died. There was, however, not enough evidence to prosecute Neale for this crime. (3-16)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 3-16

William Eason William Eason Victim
1592

A boy from Gravesend in the county of Kent who was allegedly bewitched by Anne Neale so that he languished for three months and then died. Neale was never prosecuted for this crime, however, due to lack of evidence. (3-16)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 3-16

Walter Warren Walter Warren Victim
1631

A man from Ramsgate in the county of Kent who is allegedly bewitched by Mary Foster. Jordan's body allegedly became wasted and consumed. He, along with Isabel Jordan, Parnel Bourn, Elizabeth Sheerman, Jane Moverley, Anne Joad, Elizabeth West, Henry Rigden, accuses Mary Foster.(87-91)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 87-91

Michael Jordan Michael Jordan Victim
1646

A woman from Hoo in the county of Kent who is allegedly bewitched by Thomas Whiteing. as a result her body became "greatly wasted, pined, and consumed." She, along with 18 others, accuse Whiteing and make him appear at the assizes in Maidstone. (150-157)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 150-157

Sarah Curtis Sarah Curtis Victim
1665

A man from Cranbrook in the county of Kent. Colman is allegedly murdered by Elizabeth Scott who used witchcraft on him so that he languished for a week and then died. (141-147)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 141-147

John Colman John Colman Victim
1672

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who was married at age 26 to a most goodly woman, Mrs. Eleanor Armstrong, with whom he had at least four children: three sons and a daughter. Mr. Wessell Goodwin is much given to music of all sorts, often choosing music above his family, even on his wife's deathbed. This is allegedly thought to be the faults of Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. James. Upon his wife's death (when he is already aged), he is seduced and bewitched by Mrs. James, still a married woman, causing him to engage in publicly lewd acts, and to act strangely himself including dancing, and violence. Mr. Goodwin is convinced to grant Mrs. Jones his estate and to estrange his children. Through his relationship with Mrs. Jones, which becomes incestuous in the eyes of God upon the marriage of his youngest son to one of Mrs. Jones' daughters, his family and himself are ruined. (1 - 26)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 1 - 26

Wessell Goodwin Mr. Goodwin Victim
1676

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the eldest son of Mr. Goodwin. He cares for the Goodwin family accounts, and is married to a most virtuous woman. He suspects Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones of unnatural proceedings, both with his father and Roger Crey. He is also taken away by two bailiffs at the request of Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon, from his own home. His siblings and he file a petition with the Justices of Southwark against the two women, and he is witness to all their trickery. He does not come to the trial, for fear of "these Litigious women."(3)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 3

Andrew Goodwin Andrew Goodwin Victim
1677

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who marries the only daughter of Mr. Goodwin. He is witness along with his wife to the ruin of the Goodwin family.(2)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 2

Vernon Vernon (Son-in-Law) Victim
1678

A woman from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the only daughter of Mr. Goodwin and his first wife. She is witness to the ruin of the Goodwin family, along with her husband. She implores her father to leave Mrs. Jones, and helps to file a petition against Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pigeon, although she does not come to the trial for fear of "the Litigious women."(2)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 2

Vernon Vernon (Daughter) Victim
1679

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the first husband of Mrs. Pigeon. He was an apothecary. Mrs. Pigeon allegedly "woried him out of the world with her wicked imperious usage." He left his wife with one child and an estate.(4-5)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 4-5

Starkey Mr. Starkey Victim
1684

A girl, the daughter of Anne and John Griffin from Strood in the county of Kent, who is allegedly bewitched by Anne Blundy. She languished for two days and then died. (135-137)

Appears in:
Cockburn, J.S.. Calendar of Assize records: Kent indictments, Charles II, 1676-1688. Great Britain: 1997, 135-137

Mary Griffin Mary Griffin Victim
1693

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is married to the alleged wicked woman, Mrs. Pigeon. He is a lieutenant in Mr. General Cromwell's regiment. Mrs. Pigeon convinces Mr. Pigeon by "this carriage of hers" to give her all his estate. She eventually has an affair with a merchant in Clapham. Mr. Pigeon is also witness to the wicked deeds of Mrs. Jones and Mr. Goodwin. Mr. Pigeon and Mr. Knowles are also strangely provoked into fighting, when Mr. Knowles suggests Mr. Pigeon leave his wife during a sickness. Through these violent acts, Mrs. Pigeon eventually leaves Mr. Pigeon. (4)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 4

Pigeon Mr. Pigeon Victim
1696

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the eldest apprentice of Mr. Goodwin's family. He speaks out often against the practices of Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, "professing that these women would ruine the family." When he falls sick, the two women care for him, and he grows worse. When his water is secretly taken by Andrew Goodwin, Mr. Goodwin's son, to Dr. Burnet and Mr. Clarke, men of medicine, they both agree if help had been sought in time, he might have been cured. However, these women still "plye him with their druggs," despite Roger Crey's objections to having them treat him. He eventually dies of their administrations.(13-14)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 13-14

Roger Crey Roger Crey Victim
1699

A woman from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is visited in her sickness by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, two allegedly wicked women. After the death of Roger Crey, widely believed to have been caused by the administrations of these two women, the parents of the virtuous young woman (Anonymous 307) refuse that their daughter should take anything from them. Anonymous 207 dies of grief, "having her heart broke by the occasion of the practices of these women."(14-15)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14-15

Anonymous 307 Victim
1700

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the father of a virtuous young woman (Anonymous 307), being treated in her sickness by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, two alleged wicked women believed to be responsible for the death of Roger Crey. His wife and him "wat'cht diligently that she [their daughter] should take nothing from them [Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones]." Their daughter passes away from grief.(14-15)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14-15

Anonymous 308 Victim
1701

A woman from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the mother of a virtuous young woman (Anonymous 307), being treated in her sickness by Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones, two alleged wicked women believed to be responsible for the death of Roger Crey. Her husband and her "wat'cht diligently that she [their daughter] should take nothing from them [Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones]." Their daughter passes away from grief.(14-15)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 14-15

Anonymous 309 Victim
1703

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is Lord General. Mrs. Pigeon "applyes her self" to him, and "with her smooth tongue, that she procured to have her said husband dismist the Army," allowing her to live in separation from Mr. Pigeon. (18)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 18

Anonymous 310 Victim
1704

A man from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the youngest son of Mr. Goodwin. At seventeen years of age, Mrs. Pigeon and Mrs. Jones arrange for him to marry Mrs. Jones' daughter by first making him "maillable." The marriage between these two cause Mrs. Jones and Mr. Goodwin's relationship to appear incestuous in the eyes of God.(18 - 19)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 18 - 19

James Goodwin James Goodwin Victim
1705

A woman from the Borough of Southwark in the county of Greater London, who is the daughter of the alleged wicked woman, Mrs. Jones. At fifteen years of age, she is married to Mr. Goodwin's youngest son, James Goodwin. This causes her mother's relationship with Mr. Goodwin to become incestuous in the eyes of God. (18 - 19)

Appears in:
Vernon, Samuel . A Brief Relation of the Strange and Unnatural Practices of Wessel Goodwin. London: 1654, 18 - 19

Jones Jones (Daughter) Victim
1711

An boy from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, the son of Thomas Toakley, who is allegedly bewitched by Rose Hallybread. Hallybread pushed her familiar "into a cranny of the doore of the said Toakely's house, after which time the son of the said Thomas languished, and dyed, crying out of this Examinant, that shee was his death."(33, 34)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 33, 34

Toakley Toakley (Son) Victim
1714

A two year old child of Elizabeth Otley from Wivenhoe in the county of Essex who is allegedly killed (according to Alice Dixon), by Mary Johnson. Johnson allegedly took her familiar (an imp in the shape of a rat with no ears) from out of her pocket, shoved it through a hole in Otley's door, and told it to "go rock the Cradle, and do the businesse she sent it about, and return to her again." Johnson also took a hands on approach to this attack, arriving at Otely's door, presumably unseen by her, and giving this child an apple and a kiss the day after, the "child was taken with very violent fits, and in the fits (although the Child was but two yeers old) yet this Informant could very hardly with all her strength hold it down in the Cradle, and so continued untill it died."(21-22)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 21-22

Otley Otley (Child) Victim
1715

A woman from Wivenhoe in the county of Essex whose child is allegedly killed by Mary Johnson and who finds herself "taken with extreme pains in her body." According to Alice Dixon, herself an accused witch, Johnson, allegedly took her familiar (an imp in the shape of a rat with no ears) from out of her pocket, shoved it through a hole in Otley's door, and told it to "go rock the Cradle, and do the businesse she sent it about, and return to her again." Johnson also took a hands on approach to this attack, arriving at Otely's door, presumably unseen by her, and giving this child an apple and a kiss the day after, the "child was taken with very violent fits, and in the fits (although the Child was but two yeers old) yet this Informant could very hardly with all her strength hold it down in the Cradle, and so continued untill it died." Soon after Otley began to experience extreme pain, loss of appetite, and insomnia; Johnson visited her numerous times during this period, pleading her innocence. However, Otley would not rest until she had made Johnson bleed an act of countermagic which seems to have been adminiters by punching Johnson in the mouth Otley's health returned. (21-22)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 21-22

Elizabeth Otley Elizabeth Otley Victim
1716

A woman from Wivenhoe in the county of Essex and the wife of George Durrant. Durrant encountered Johnson one day while traveling Wivenhoe to Fingerhoe. Johnson approached Durrant and her daughter, told her it "was a pretty child; and stroaked it upon the face, and gave it a peece of bread and butter." Having eaten the snack, the child strangely "shricked and cried out." Mr. Dawber, a local surgeon, could "find no naturall cause of its lamenesse," and her daughter "continued for the space of eight dayes shricking and tearing it self, and then died." Annaball is herself is "taken with extreme pains in her body," torments which come every day of every few days and last seven or eight months. She describes the pain as "if she had been to be delivered of a child, but was not with child." She is also temporarily, but severely lamed; she recovers just in time to testify against Johnson, an act encouraged by her husband, when her too begins to suffer sweating and paninting "in great extremity," having cried out "It comes, it comes, Now goodwife Johnsons Impe is come, Now she hath my life. Durrant believes that Mary Johnson was the "cause of her childs death: And that she is now the cause of her husbands extremity." (24-25)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 24-25

Annaball Durrant Annaball Durrant Victim
1717

A two year old child from Wivenhoe in the county of Essex, daughter of Annaball and Goerge Durrant. This child was the unwitting victim of an act of instrumental magic (one of malefic contamination and poisoning) allegedly administered by Mary Johnson. The child had been walking with her mother from Wivenhoe to Fingerhoe when she was stopped by Johnson, who called her a pretty child, stroked her cheek, and gave her a piece of bread and butter to eat. and gave it a peece of bread and butter." Shortly after she ate the food, she "shricked and cried out." Her mother sought medical advice from a local surgeon named Mr. Dawber a Chirurgeon, but there appeared to be "no naturall cause [for her] lamenesse." The Durrant child would not survive for much longer: the last eight days of her life were spent in torment, described as "eight dayes shricking and tearing it self, and then died. Her mother and father were also allegedly bewitched, but appear to survive their ordeals. (24-25)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 24-25

Durrant Durrant (Child) Victim
1718

A man from Wivenhoe in the county of Essex and the husband of Annaball Durrant. Durrant is allegedly bewitched by Mary Johnson, as is his two year old daughter and his wife. Durrant's daughter becomes ill after she accepts a compliment (she was called a "pretty child") and a "peece of bread and butter" from Johnson. The illness is extreme and lasts about eight days before the child dies. Annaball is herself bewitched, suffering from labour-like pains for around eight months, and a strange bout of lameness and stiffness. Durrant's bewitchment begins after she shrieks and cries out that Mary Johnson would be at his death; he claims "It comes, it comes, Now goodwife Johnsons Impe is come, Now she hath my life." He appears in this extremity while his wife testifies against Johnson, an act he encouraged, and an act which allegedly cost him his health. (24-25)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, 24-25

George Durrant George Durrant Victim
1726

A girl from Thorpe-le-Saxon in the county of Essex, and daughter of Henry Cornwall, a man who testified against Margaret Moone. Joan Cornwall, like her parent, falls sick the day after he had been Margaret Moone's house and returned home with half a peck of Moone's apples. She was "taken sick with strange fits, and shrickings out." Although her father made a full recovery, and her mother partially recovered, Joan Cornwall "continued languishing for a moneth, and died." Moone is found guilty of the murder and hanged as a witch.(26)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 26

Joan Cornwall Joan Cornwall Victim
1727

A man from Thorpe-le-Soken in the county of Essex, a husband and the father of Joan Cornwall, Henry Cornwall acts as witness against Margaret Moone and, along with his wife and daughter, was her victim. Corwall had allegedly done some work for Margaret Moone, afterwards, she decided to buy a hook off of him, an item paid for with a half a peck of apples. Cornwall brought the apples home, ate one, and was sick "with an extreme shaking and pain in all parts of his body" for twelve weeks. Although his wife threw the apples away, sensing that they might be a contaminate from a known witch, she too became ill, as does their daughter. Although Henry appears to make a full recovery, his wife, who suffered as he did, only partially recovers, and his daughter, "languishing for a moneth, and died."(26)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 26

Henry Cornwall Henry Cornwall Victim
1728

A woman from Thorpe-le-Soken in the county of Essex, wife of Henry and mother of Joan, Mrs. Cornwall and her family fall victim to a malefic contamination which enters her home and her body by way of a peck of apples her Henry traded Margaret Moone for a hook. Although Mrs. Cornwall recognized Moone as a "woman of a very bad fame and suspected for a Witch, and had formerly been questioned at an Assize for the same," and threw the apples away, she soon fell sick to a mysterious disease which consumed her and her husband for twelve weeks and which kills their daughter. Mrs. Cornwall never fully recovers. Moone is found guilty and executed for the death of her daughter. (26)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 26

Cornwall Mrs. Cornwall Victim
1729

A Man from Thorpe-le-Saxon in the county of Essex who, along with his wife, is bewitched after the move into a house from which Margaret Moone was evicted. Rawbood appears to have offered his landlord, Thomas Turners, ten shillings more than Moone was able to pay. Moone was not amused and warned that they should not have "medled with the house," a statement read as a curse. The couple began to sicken from the moment they moved into the house, and from that point on, they "did never thrive after." As with his wife, Rawbood was "alwayes lame of sick untill they died"(27)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 27

Rawbood Mr. Rawbood Victim
1736

A man from St. Osyth in the county of Essex and husband of Katherine. Thomas Bumstead is allegedly killed by Rebecca Jones, by virtue of her imp Margaret (and in conjunction with one of Joyce Boane's imps). Thomas Bumstead had beaten Jone's son after he had stolen and consumed some of his honey; this was Jone's retribution. Jones is hanged as a witch at Chemlsford in 1645 for this crime.(37-38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 37-38

Thomas Bumstead Thomas Bumstead Victim
1737

A man woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex and wife of Thomas Bumstead. Katherine Bumstead is allegedly killed by Rebecca Jones by virtue of her imp Aime shortly after Thomas died. He husband had allegedly beaten Jones' son after he had stolen and consumed some of his honey; this was Jone's retribution. Jones is indicted on this charge, but hanged for the murder of her husband. (37)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 37

Katherine Bumstead Katherine Bumstead Victim
1738

A child from Much-Holland (now Great Holland) in the county of Essex, and a child of Thomas Woodward who is allegedly killed by Joan Cooper, by virtue of her imp. (38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38

Woodward Woodward (Child) Victim
1739

A child from Much Holland (now Great Holland) in the county of Essex and one of John Cartwrights' child, this person, along with their sibling, is allegedly killed by Joan Cooper, by virtue of one of her imps. (38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38

Cartwright Cartwright (Child) Victim
1740

A child from Much-Holland (now Great Holland) in the county of Essex, and a child of Thomas Woodward who is allegedly killed by Joan Cooper, by virtue of her imp. (38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38

Cartwright Cartwright (Child 2) Victim
1741

A woman from Much Holland (now Great Holland) in the county of Essex whose refusal to give Anne Cate milk allegedly cost her child's life. Mrs. Parby is herself allegedly killed by Joan Cooper, by virtue of her imp. (38, 39)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38, 39

Parby Mrs. Parby Victim
1742

A man from Much Holland (now Great Holland) in the county of Essex whose wife is allegedly killed Anne Cooper by virtue of her imp, and whose child is allegedly killed by Anne Cate by hers.(38-39)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38-39

George Parby George Parby Victim
1743

A child from Much Holland (now Great Holland) in the county of Essex, the child of George Parby and his wife, who is whose child is allegedly killed by Anne Cate by virtue of her familiar. This child's mother is also killed by Joan Cooper, a murder allegedly to spurred by Mrs. Parby's refusal to give Cooper milk. (38-39)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38-39

Parby Parby (Child) Victim
1744

A man from Little Clacton in the county of Essex and the first victim of Anne Cate's supposed familiar magic. Cate allegedly sent one of her three mice shaped imps to "nip the knee of one Robert Freeman" laming him, and causing him die, presumably from a kind of malefic metastasis, within the year. (38-39)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38-39

Robert Freeman Robert Freeman Victim
1745

A girl from Much Holland (now Great Holland) in the county of Essex and the daughter of a local butcher John Rawlins. This child is allegedly bewitched killed by one of Anne Cate's mouse shaped familiars, Prickeare, and dies a short time later. Anne Cate is found guilty of this crime. (38-39)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38-39

Susan Rawlins Susan Rawlins Victim
1746

A man from Much Holland (now Great Holland) in the county of Essex, John Tillet is allegedly killed by Anne Cate's mouse shaped familiar, Prickeare.(38, 39)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38, 39

John Tillet John Tillet Victim
1748

A child from Much Holland (now Great Holland) in the county of Essex and daughter of Samuel Ray and his wife. This person is allegedly killed by Anne Cate's familiar Sparrow. Her death may have come about because her mother had fought with Anne Cate over a contested loan of two shillings. (38, 39)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 38, 39

Ray Ray (Daughter) Victim
1750

A woman from Manningtree in the county of Essex, daughter of Mary and Edward Parsely, and quite possibly referred to as Anne. Mary Parsley very suddenly sickens and dies. Her death is blamed on a falling out between her mother Mary and Hellen Clarke, after which Hellen, passing by the Parsley's door, allegedly muttered "that Mary the daughter of the said Edward and Mary Parsley should rue for all, whereupon, presently the said Mary the daughter, fell sick, and died within six weeks after." It appears that Hellen Clarke was executed for this crime; she was hanged in Manningtree in 1645 on charges of murder.(14)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 14

Mary Parsely Mary Parsely Victim
1754

A boy from Great Clacton in the county of Essex and Edward Blowers, Anthony Blowers is allegedly bewitched by Mary Wiles and suffers an instantaneous death. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=1

Anthony Blowers Anothony Blowers Victim
1755

A woman from Great Clacton in the county of Essex and wife of Michael de Greate, Anne de Great is allegedly bewitched by Mary Wiles and suffers an instantaneous death. Wiles was found guilty of this crime and hanged as a witch in 1645. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=2http://seax.essexcc.)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=2http://seax.essexcc.

Anne de Greate Anne de Greate Victim
1757

A man from Langham in the county of Essex and a yeoman, Robert Potter Jr. is allegedly bewitched to death by Mary Sterling. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=8)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=8

Robert Potter Robert Potter Jr. Victim
1762

A young woman from Kirby-le-Soken in the county of Essex and daughter of a bricklayer, William Astin. Alice Astin is allegedly bewitched by Mary Coppin and dies instantly. Coppin is convicted of this crime, but not killed. She is held over in jail until at least August 11, 1647.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?intOffSet=0&intThisRecordsOffSet=0

Alice Astin Alice Astin Victim
1764

A man from Manningtree in the county of Essex, whose horse is allegedly killed by Elizabeth Clarke or by Elizabeth Gooding. (6,7, 10-11)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 6,7, 10-11

Robert Tayler Robert Tayler Victim
1765

A man from Lawford in the county of Essex, who is allegedly killed by Elizabeth Clarke; he appears to have died within a week of being bewitched (or circe March 18, 1645).(8-9)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 8-9

Robert Okes Robert Okes Victim
1766

A child from Dedham in the county of Essex, described as the child of a clothier who is allegedly bewitched by Elizabeth Clarke. The child dies within a week of being bewitched (or March 18, 1645). (8-9)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 8-9

Anonymous 332 Victim
1767

A woman from Manningtree in the county of Essex, described as the wife of William Cole. Mrs. Cole is allegedly bewitched to death by Elizabeth Clarke, presumably through an act of familiar magic. Cole died of a "pining and languishing disease" shortly before March 26, 1645. (8-9)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 8-9

Cole Mrs. Cole Victim
1768

A man from Manningtree in the county of Essex, whose Hoy (a small sloop-rigged coasting ship) capsized in a storm, killing Turner and sinking the vessel; his death is blamed on Elizabeth Clarke. (9)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 9

Thomas Turner Thomas Turner Victim
1769

A father from Manningtree in the county of Essex, described as a beef or dairy farmer who turns state informant against Anne Leech. Edwards accuses Anne Leech of bewitching two of his cattle to death after they die suddenly and no natural cause can be found. One of Edward's children, one who is nursed by Goodwife Wyles, "was taken sick, and had very strange fire, extending the limbs, and rowling the eyes, and within two dayes after dyed. Edward's blames Anne Leech and the Elizabeth Gooding, for this child's death.(11-13)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 11-13

Richard Edwards Richard Edwards Victim
1770

A woman from Lawford in the county of Essex, described as the wife of Thomas Hart and Mother to John Hart. Prudence Hart suffers from two tragedies which are blamed on Rebecca West and Anne West. Prudence suffers a sudden miscarriage on a Sunday as she walks home; Prudence later finds herself lamed by a mysterious thing which touches her in bed. Her son son John is also allegedly killed by Rebecca West as an act of vengeance against her husband Thomas Hart. It appears that the Hart family saw themselves as bitter enemies of Rebecca West and Anne West.(15, 15-16, 17, 18, 19)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 15, 15-16, 17, 18, 19

Prudence Hart Purdence Hart Victim
1771

A thirteen or fourteen year old young woman from Alresford in the county of Essex, described as the daughter of Susan Sparrow. The night after Mary Greenliefe's daughter cries out that she is under attack by one of her mother's familars, this adolescent is also allegedly attacked by one Mary Greenliefe's familiar spirits. She awoke much "affrighted, sweating, and shrieking in a terrible manner, complaining that shee was nipped and pinched on her thigh." Although this looked like a nightmare, the next morning, she had "a black and blew spot, as broad and long as her hand" on her thigh and complained on pain in her leg for the next month. (19)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 19

Sparrow Sparrow (Daughter) Victim
1772

A thirteen or fourteen year old young woman from Alresford in the county of Essex, described as the daughter of Mary Greenliefe. This adolescent is allegedly attacked by one of her mother Mary's familiar spirits, an attack which causes considerable fear for Greenlief and in the household where she lives with her mother Mary, Susan Sparrow, and Sparrow's daughter. (19)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 19

Greenliefe Greenliefe (Daughter) Victim
1773

A man from Clacton in the county of Essex, whose horse is allegedly cursed to death by Anne Cooper.(22-23)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 22-23

William Cottingam William Cottingam Victim
1794

A man from St. Paul's Cross in London who is the father of Agnes Brigges, who was allegedly possessed and exorcised, although she later confessed her possession was false. He is a clothworker by trade.(12)

Appears in:
Chrysostom, John. The Disclosing of a Late Counterfeyted Possession by the Deuyl in Two Maydens within the Citie of London. London: 1574, 12

William Brigges William Brigges Victim
1798

A woman from an area of London who is accused by Agnes Brigges of bewitching her and causing Satan to possess Agnes Brigges. Agnes Brigges later confesses to have made up this accusation and asks forgiveness, which Joan Thornton grants.(15-16)

Appears in:
Chrysostom, John. The Disclosing of a Late Counterfeyted Possession by the Deuyl in Two Maydens within the Citie of London. London: 1574, 15-16

Joane Thorneton Joan Thornton Victim
1802

A man from Thorpe-le-Soken in the county of Essex, whose three cows are allegedly killed by Margaret Moone.(26)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 26

Stephen Cooker Stephen Cooker Victim
1803

A man from Thorpe-le-Soken in the county of Essex, whose cow and sow are allegedly bewitched to death by Margaret Moone.(27)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 27

Henry Robinson Henry Robinson Victim
1805

A man from Thorpe-le-Soken in the county of Essex, whose batch of bread is bewitched by Margaret Moone. (26)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 26

Phillip Berriman Philip Berriman Victim
1806

A man from Thorpe-le-Soken in the county of Essex, whose horse is allegedly bewitched by Margaret Moone; it falls down and breaks its neck while pulling his wagon down hill. (26)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 26

Philip Daniels Philip Daniels Victim
1807

A woman from Manningtree in the county of Essex, described as one of the "Manningtree Rouges" Mary Philips act as a witch-searcher, testifying that she saw witches marks on Margaret Moone, her daughter Judith and her other daughter, Sarah Hating, Elizabeth Harvie, and Marian Hocket. Philips is also allegedly hit my a mysterious blow as she crosses a foot bridge; she lands in the water up to her neck, persumably the strike was meant to drown her (perhaps to keep her from searching women). (28-28, 30)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 28-28, 30

Mary Philips Mary Philips Victim
1808

A man from Great Clacton in the county of Essex, recorded as a Yeoman, George Fossett is allegedly bewitched by May Wiles so that "his body was consumed."(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341122)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341122

George Fossett George Fossett Victim
1809

A five year old girl from Great Clacton in the county of Essex and daughter of John Knights. She is allegedly bewitched by Anne Cooper and dies within a month.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341134)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341134

Mary Knights Mary Knights Victim
1810

A boy from Great Clacton in the county of Essex and son of John Curstissurre, a yeoman. James Curstissurre is allegedly bewitched by Anne Cooper on April 10 and dies April 11, presumably of the same year. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341130)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341130

James Curstissurre James Curstissurre Victim
1811

A man from Great Holland in the county of Essex whose cow is allegedly bewitched by Anne Thurston.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341154)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341154

John Aldurton John Aldurton Victim
1812

A young woman from Wivenhoe in the county of Essex and daughter of Daniel Occlam, Elizabeth is allegedly bewitched by Mary Johnson and dies within three days. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341162)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341162

Elizabeth Occlam Elizabeth Occlam Victim
1813

A man from Fingeringhoe in the county of Essex, described as a seaman, George Durrell is bewitched to death by Mary Johnson. He dies within five days or his bewitchment. Johnson is indicted and tried for this crime, but found not guilty. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341158)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341158

George Durrell George Durrell Victim
1831

A man from Ramsey in the county of Essex who is allegedly bewitched by Sara Hatting. He dies twenty eight days later. (http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341182)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341182

Lionel Jefferson Lionel Jefferson Victim
1832

A man from Ramsey in the county of Essex who is allegedly bewitched by Sara Hatting; he dies within two months.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341190)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=341190

Thomas Greene Thomas Greene Victim
1835

A woman from Ramsey in the county of Essex, described as the wife of Francis Stock, former Constable of Ramsey and witness for the state in the Essex Assize at Chelsmford, July 1645. Mrs. Stock (and two of her children) allegedly become victims in a vendetta between their family and the Hatting family after her husband, Francis Stock insults William Hatting's wife Sara Hatting. Mrs. Stock is haunted by a mysterious (apparition?) of a snake which she attempts to kill. She attempts to smash it with a spade, but the snake, is no where to be seen. Mrs. Stock soon becomes ill "with extraordinary fits, pains and burnings all over her body, and within one week dyed." The condition which took her life would also take the lives of two of her children. Mrs. Stock, before her death and Francis Stock, after it, blamed Sara Hatting for this malefic sickness and murder. (31-32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31-32

Stock Mrs. Stock Victim
1837

A girl or young woman from Ramsey in the county of Essex, described as the child of Francis Stock and Mrs. Stock. This person is allegedly bewitched the death by Sara Hatting. Like her mother and sibling, this child "was taken sick with extraordinary fits, pains and burnings all over her body" and dies within ten days of a verbal altercation between her father and William Hatting, Sara Hatting's husband. (31-32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31-32

Stock Stock (Daughter) Victim
1838

A child from Ramsey in the county of Essex, described as the child of Francis Stock and Mrs. Stock. This person is allegedly bewitched the death by Sara Hatting. Like her/his mother and sibling, this child "was taken sick with extraordinary fits, pains and burnings all over her body" and dies within ten days of a verbal altercation between her father and William Hatting, Sara Hatting's husband. (31-32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31-32

Stock Stock (Child) Victim
1839

A man from Ramsey in the county of Essex, described as a servant to Francis Stock. This man allegedly gets into fisticuffs with John Hatting, son of accused witch, Sara Hatting. The day after this altercation "hee was taken sick, and so continued in a pining and languishing condition, crying out often of the said Sarah, that she had bewitched him, and was the cause of his death, which soon after ensued."(31-32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31-32

Anonymous 336 Victim
1841

A boy or young man from Ramsey in the county of Essex, described as one of the sons of accused witch Sara Hatting and her husband William Hatting. John Hatting allegedly uses "ill language" at Francis Stock's servant, Anonymous 336. The man servant, in returns, administers a beating to John Hatting, but finds himself sick the next day, and "in a pining and languishing condition," often accused John's mother, Sara, or being the cause of his plight and bringing on his imminent death. (31, 32)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 31, 32

John Hatting John Hatting Victim
1842

A young girl of Cleworth in the County of Lancastershire in the parish of Leigh, known to be fourteen years of age and the sister of Elizabeth Hardmen and belong to the Starchie household, alleged to be afflicted with fits by Edmund Hartlay. She is alleged to have been able to predict her fits and the details of them, and attributed this knowledge to a white dove. At a dinner, Holland and the Hardman sisters were thrown back, their bodies swelled, their faces disfigured, and strange motion was observed from within their bodies. She is heard to say " I must goe I must away: I cannot tarrie, whither shall I goe? I am hot, I am too hot. I will not dye" when a Mr. More was praying over her. She describes her possessor the same way as John Starchie, as like an ill-favoured man with a bulge on his back; at one time he offers gold and threatens to break her neck, cast her into a pit and drown her for refusing him.(Image 8, 10)

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, Image 8, 10

Margaret Hardman Margaret Hardman Victim
1849

A man from St. Osyth in the county of Essex who owns or works on a farm called Cocket-wick whose lambs, numbering almost a dozen, are allegedly killed by Joyvce Boane's familiars. (34)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 34

Richard Welch Richard Welch Victim
1850

A man from St. Osyth in the county of Essex whose calf, a sheep and a lamb are allegedly killed by Joyce Boane's familiars, at her behest.(34)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 34

Thomas Clynch Thomas Clynch Victim
1887

A man from Little-Clacton in the county of Essex whose sow is allegedly killed by one of Rebecca Jones' familiars (circa 1620).(36, 37)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 36, 37

Benjamin Howes Benjamin Howes Victim
1888

A young person from St. Osyth in the county of Essex and a child of Mistress Darcy. This person is allegedly tormented by Rebecca Jones' familiar, Margaret. The torment presumably ended when Jones recalled Margaret. (36, 37-38)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 36, 37-38

Darcy Darcy (Child) Victim
1890

A woman from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be a cow keeper, who approached Jane Peterson for help in un-witching her cow; Peterson used divination to discover who had bewitched the animal and advised her on how to undo the bewitchment.(4)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 4

Anonymous 342 Victim
1891

An unknown number of persons from Wapping in the county of Greater London, known to be neighbors of Joan Peterson, who allegedly witnessed strange things attributed to her. In one instance, a black cat repeatedly come to rock the cradle of a young child; the parents engaged various neighbors to help them watch the child, and two women agreed to watch the child one night. One of them managed to kick the cat, suffering a swollen leg for her actions. In another instance, a man living by Peterson was talking with her by the fireside when they both saw a black dog go directly to Peterson and put its head under her armpit; he was so unnerved by this he ran out of the house.(5-6, 7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 5-6, 7

Anonymous 341 Victim
1893

A woman from Wapping in the county of greater London, known to be a maidservant to Joan Peterson, who alleged that Joan Peterson was visited by a squirrel in the night; the squirrel is thought to be Joan Peterson's familiar, and they were heard talking into the night but the maidservant was bewitched so that she could not recall a word of it.(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Witch of Wapping. London: 1652, 6

Anonymous 344 Victim
1897

A man from Manningtree in the county of Essex, described as "very honest" and unwilling to "speake an untruth," and maybe a glover. This man, whose testimony is presented at court second hand by Sir Thomas Bowes, Knight, claims to have encountered four of Anne West's familiar spirits one morning at four AM, outside her home. He launches off on a prolonged and intensive attempt to kill them; braining one, strangling one, attempting to drown one, only to discover it had disappeared. This man accuses West of sending these spirit to torment him, a crime she denies, by allegedly suggesting that they were scouts, sent out on another mission. This anecdotal evidence is the last narrative in _A True and Exact Relation of the Severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, Arraigned and Executed in the County of Essex_, suggesting its importance in the whole narrative. (39-40)

Appears in:
H., F.. A True and Exact Relation of the severall Informations, Examinations, and Confessions of the late Witches, arraigned and executed in the County of Essex. . London: 1645, 39-40

Anonymous 346 Victim
1907

A woman from Dagenham in the County of Essex and wife of Richard Foster. Alice Foster is allegedly bewitched to death by Joan Upney by virtue of one of her familiar toads. Foster's death was represented as retribution for her husband's claim that Upney was a witch.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=331153)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=331153

Alice Foster Alice Foster Victim
1910

A woman of Maldon in the county of Essex, known to be a widow and the mother of a daughter; her daughter had a falling out with the daughter of Ellen Smith, for which Smith struck Webbe's daughter on the face causing her to sicken and die. The morning after her daughter's death, Widow Webbe saw a black thing like a dog leave through her door, the sight upsetting her out of her wits.(9)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 9

Webbe Widow Webbe Victim
1916

A woman of Brookewalden in Essex (likely the environs of the Manor of Brooke Walden in Saffron Walden) known to be the wife of Robert Petie and the mother of a small child, who was allegedly visited by Mother Staunton; Staunton demanded a variety of things from her, which Mrs. Petie refused to give, and accused Mrs. Petie of stealing a knife, leaving in anger. Shortly after Staunton's departure, the Petie child became so sick it nearly died, the illness lasting a week.(11)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 11

Petie Mrs. Petie Victim
1920

A child from Wimbish in Essex, known to be the VIcar's son, whose mother was allegedly asked for alms by Mother Staunton while his father was away and denied the request; Staunton is said to have touched the little boy causing him to become violently sick nearly unto death while Staunton sat by. Within an hour of his father's return, the child recovered perfectly and resumed playing.(14)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 14

Anonymous 363 Victim
1923

A boy from Lambert End (now Lambourne) in the county of Essex, known to be a servant of Thomas Spycer, who was asked to return a pair of gloves another servant (Anonymous 58) had snatched from Mother Nokes' daughter; Nokes allegedly robbed him of the use of his limbs, causing him to be bedridden for eight days. His master, Thomas Spycer, had to have him transported home in a wheelbarrow.(15-16)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 15-16

Anonymous 366 Victim
1924

A man from Lamberd End (now Lambourne) in the county of Essex, known to be a servant in the service of Thomas Spycer, who allegedly refused to answer a question put to him by Mother Nokes, for which she caused the horse he was plowing with to develop a swollen head.(17)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Detection of Damnable Driftes Practised by Three Witches Arranged at Chelmifforde in Essex. London: 1579, 17

Anonymous 367 Victim
1932

A child from the London Borough of Southwark, known to belong to Mr. Swan, a neighbor of Richard Hathaway, who became sick in "as bad a manner, tho' not altogether so strange;" this child's illness helped convince the neighborhood of the truth of Hathaway's claim that he had been bewitched by Mrs. Sarah Morduck.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 1

Swan Swan (Child) Victim
1933

A man from the London Borough of Southwark, known to be a boat-builder and a neighbor of Richard Hathaway, who became sick in "as bad a manner, tho' not altogether so strange;" his illness helped convince the neighborhood of the truth of Hathaway's claim that he had been bewitched by Mrs. Sarah Morduck.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Full and True Account of the Apprehending and Taking of Mrs. Sarah Moordike. Unknown: 1701, 1

Parrot Mr. Parrot Victim
1938

A six year old boy from Hampstead in the county of Middlesex who is allegedly bewitched by Alice Bradley. He languished for twenty days and still languished at the time when the text was written.(7-8)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 7-8

Robert Phillpot Robert Phillpot Victim
1939

A man from Hampstead in the county of Middlesex who owned two young cows worth 5. Alice Bradley allegedly used witchcraft on these cows, thereby killing them.(7-8)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 7-8

Phillip Barrett Phillip Barrett Victim
1940

A man from Hampstead in the county of Middlesex who owned four hogs worth fifty shillings. His hogs are allegedly killed by Alice Bradley using witchcraft.()

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887,

Robert James Robert James Victim
1941

A woman from Hampstead in the county of Middlesex who is allegedly made ill and languished for three days. Alice Bradley is indicted for witchcraft for allegedly causing James to become ill.(7-8)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 7-8

Margaret James Margaret James Victim
1970

A man from Whitecross Street in Middlesex (now the London borough of Islington) who is allegedly a victim of Rose Mersam's acts of witchcraft (which were instigated by the Devil). Thompson languishes and his body wasted for five days and continued so at the time of Rose Mersam's indictment.(20)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 20

James Thompson James Thompson Victim
1981

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, wife of Lawrence Kempe and sister in law of Ursely Kempe. Mrs. Kempe is allegedly forespoken by Ursley Kempe so that she was "taken in her backe, and in the priuie partes of her bodye, in a very extreame and most straunge sorte, and so continued about three quarters of a year. This origin of this bewitchment occurred circa 1580 when Ursley and Mrs. Kempe has a physical altercation when Ursley "tooke vp her clothes and did heat her vpon the hippes, and otherwise in wordes did misuse her greatly." Mrs. Kempe allegedly told her husband "seuerall times that Ursley kempe his sister, had forspoke her, and that shee was the onely cause of that her sicknesse." Mrs. Kempe's body grew cold before she died, and she lay in a kind of half life, "like a dead creature," until Ursley came one day, unannounced and again "lifted vp the clothes and tooke her by the arme, the which shee had not so soone doone, but presently after she gasped, and neuer after drew her breath and so dyed."(C4v-C5)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, C4v-C5

Kempe Mrs. Kempe Victim
1983

A man from Enfield in the county of Middlesex (now the London Borough of Enfield) whose steere, pig, little pig and mare, are allegedly killed by Agnes Godfrey who used witchcraft to harm them. A few years later, Agnes Godfrey is indicted for allegedly having practiced witchcraft on him causing him to "langui[sh] and wast[e] away and [become] greatly injured in his body."(57-58, 79-80\)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 57-58, 79-80\

William Durante William Durante Victim
1984

A woman from Enfield in the county of Middlesex (now the London borough of Enfield) who is allegedly made ill by Agnes Godfrey who used witchcraft on her. Baker became sick, weak, and wasted in body. She remained is that same condition at the time the text was written. (57-58)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 57-58

Frances Baker Frances Baker Victim
1986

An one year old infant from Enfield in the county of Middlesex (now the London borough of Enfield) who allegedly dies because Agnes Godfrey performed witchcraft on him. He allegedly languished for three days before his death.(57-58)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 57-58

William Harvye William Harvye Victim
1987

A man from Enfield in the county of Middlessex (now the London borough of Enfield) who becomes ill after Agnes Godfre allegedly practices witchcraft upon him. He remains ill for a year at which point he dies. (57-58, 79-80)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 57-58, 79-80

William Coxe William Coxe Victim
1988

A man from Enfield in the county of Middlesex (now the London borough of Enfield), who is made ill and dies after Agnes Godfrey allegedly practices witchcraft upon him. He was ill for a month before he died. (57-58, 79-80)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 57-58, 79-80

Robert Coxe Robert Coxe Victim
1989

An one year old infant from Enfield in the county of Middlesex (now the London borough of Enfield) who dies after Anne Godfrey allegedly practices magic upon him. (57-58)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 57-58

Thomas Phillippes Thomas Phillippes Victim
1990

A man from Enfield in the county of Middlesex (now the London borough of Enfield) who is made ill for a month (March 7 - April 7, 1575) and dies after Agnes Godfrey allegedly practices witchcraft upon him.(79-80)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 79-80

Anonymous 378 Victim
1992

A man from Edmonton in the county of Middlesex (now the London borough of Enfield) who languishes for the space of nearly three weeks and then dies after Anne Beaver allegedly practices witchcraft upon him.(72-73)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 72-73

Edward Boulton Edward Boulton Victim
1993

A man from Edmonton in the county of Middlesex (now the London borough of Enfield), who languishes and then dies after Anne Beaver allegedly practices witchcraft upon him.(72-73)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 72-73

John Baylie John Baylie Victim
1994

A man from Edmonton in the county of Middlesex (now the London borough of Enfield) who languished for a month and then dies after Anne Beaver allegedly practices witchcraft upon him.(72-73)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 72-73

Thomas Coleman Thomas Coleman Victim
1995

A man from Edmonton in the county of Middlesex (now the London borough of Enfield) who languishes for nearly three weeks and then dies after Anne Beaver allegedly practices witchcraft upon him. (72-73)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 72-73

Josias Boswell Josias Boswell Victim
1996

A man from Edmonton in the county of Middlesex (now the London borough of Enfield) who languishes for nearly three weeks and then dies after Anne Beaver allegedly practices witchcraft upon him.(72-73)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 72-73

Richard Frisby Richard Frisby Victim
1997

A woman from Edmonton in the county of Middlesex (now the London borough of Enfield) who languishes for eleven days and then dies after Anne Beaver allegedly practices witchcraft upon her. (72-73)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 72-73

Susan Mason Susan Mason Victim
1999

A girl from Finchley in the county of Middlesex (now the London borough of Barnet) who is allegedly a victim of Elizabeth Rutter's acts of witchcraft. Priscella Fielde languishes for two days and then dies. She is the daughter of James Fielde.(108)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 108

Priscella Fielde Priscella Fielde Victim
2000

A boy from Finchley in the county of Middlesex (now the London borough of Barnet) who is a victim of Elizabeth Rutter's alleged acts of witchcraft. Fielde languishes for two days and then dies. He is the son of James Fielde. (108, 218)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 108, 218

John FIelde John Fielde Victim
2001

A girl from Finchley in the county of Middlesex (now the London borough of Barnet) who is a victim of Elizabeth Rutter's alleged acts of witchcraft. Fielde languishes for two days and then dies. She is the daughter of James Fielde. (108, 218)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 108, 218

Frances Fielde Frances Fielde Victim
2002

A boy from Finchley in the county of Middlesex (now the London borough of Barnet) who is a victim of Elizabeth Rutter's alleged acts of witchcraft. Lyon, the son of John Lyon, becomes lame and remains in that state at the time of the indictment. (108, 218)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 108, 218

William Lyon William Lyon Victim
2005

A woman from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, mother to Charity Page, and wife of William Page. Mrs. Page appears in the narrative on three points. The legitimacy of one of her children is in question. She is referred to as the "base childe that Page and his wife haue in keepin" by Ursely Kempe. Kempe also accuses Annis Glascocke of bewitching this child to death and indeed Glascocke is tried for the crime. Mrs. Page also visits Kempe in prison, to inquiry if she was also bewitched. Kempe confirmed the diagnosis "did minister vnto [her] the foresaid medicine," which was bit of countermagic taught to Kempe by Mrs. Cocke's (circa 1571). It involved pricking dung and charnel three times, pricking a table three times, and drinking beer and taking three leaves of St. John's Wart. This cure provided Mrs. Page, as it had for Kempe a decade before, a "speedie amendement."(B2, B3v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, B2, B3v

Page Mrs. Page Victim
2006

A three year old infant from Hampstead in the county of Middlesex upon whom Joan Hunt allegedly "practised certain detestable, impious and devilish arts, called witchcraftes inchauntmentes charmes and sorceries" causing him to sicken and languish for a few days and then die. (110, 218)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 110, 218

John Nutting John Nutting Victim
2007

A man from Hampstead in the county of Middlesex who is allegedly bewitched by Joan and William Hunt. As a result she is lamed. The Hunts are indicted and acquitted of the charge. (218)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 218

Richard Parrett Richard Parrett Victim
2009

A woman from Walton in the county of Essex and wife of Mr. Carter. Margarey Carter testifies against Joan Robinson, recounting three grizzly accounts of animal damage. Around 1572 Robinson's husband asked if he could graze his cow in their pasture. Carter's husband denied the request, suggesting there would not be enough grass to feed his own cattle if he shared the pasture. This, however, would not be an apt excuse for long for"presently after two of his best & likliest beasts in a stra~ge sort [looked as if they would?] brake their neckes," and on cue, Mr. Robinson arrived and "said, God restore you your losse, nowe you may pastor me a cowe, the which then he did, and then his beasts left breaking of their necks." Around 1580, after her husband refused to sell the Robinson's property next to theirs, a "faire ambling mare," suddenly "came in to ye stable, & prese~tly was in a great sweat, & did hold her tongue out of her head, & shooke & quaked in a stra~ge sort, & prese~tly died, the wt whe~ it was fleed, a neighbors dog came & fed of it, and thereof presently died." The reign of terror continued right up until two weeks before the assize, when on March 14, 1582, one of Margary Carter's "best beasts drowned in a ditche where there was but a litle water," three days after refusing to loan Robinson a hayer. (F5, F6-F6v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, F5, F6-F6v

Margery Carter Margery Carter Victim
2021

A man from the county of Middlesex upon whom Dorothy Magicke allegedly practices witchcraft.(218)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 218

Thomas Poole Thomas Poole Victim
2022

A man from the county of Middlesex upon whom Dorothy Magicke allegedly practices witchcraft.(218)

Appears in:
Jeaffreson (editor), John Cordy . Middlesex County Records: Volume 2: 1603-25. Unknown: 1887, 218

Thomazine Heathe Thomazine Heathe Victim
2025

A woman from Sevenoak in the county of Kent who was seemingly miraculously cured by Dr. Skinner from "the most lamentable pain in her head," a mysterious illness which was so severe, she could not sleep. She took "much Physick" of many other doctors, but "ere no good." Immediately upon encountering Dr. Skinner, she was at ease and cured, and "now remains in vivide and perfect health." (12)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 12

Goody Halle Goody Halle Victim
2026

A woman from West Grinstead in Sussex, who seeks out a cure of a mysterious "Evil in her Throat" from Dr. Skinner. She encounters him at a fair, and promises to call upon him. When she fails to show, Dr. Skinner sends inquiry as to why she did not come, and "the Woman said she had no need, for she found her self begin to mend from that same time," and is miraculously cured thereafter, having only needed to encounter Dr. Skinner in person.(12)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 12

Anonymous 388 Victim
2029

A woman from West Chiltington in the county of Kent, who suffers from a mysterious illness where she "had the Evil in her Eyes, and a great Rheum and inflammation." Many doctors try to help her, but cannot. Eventually, her father seeks the help of Dr. Skinner, who advises that her father simply "go home." After doing so, "his Daughter was in extream mistery with swelling and raging pain in her Eyes," but miraculously, "on a sudden, it began to mend." In a short time, she was made perfectly well, by Dr. Skinner.(14-12)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 14-12

Susan Woldredge Susan Woldredge Victim
2032

A young man from Hadlaw in the county of Kent, who is the seventeen year old servant of Henry Chowning. The young man allegedly encounters a spirit in the form of a greyhound, who instructs him to go to Virginia before disappearing. Following this encounter, the boy returns home to master, "in a great fright," and "amazed." He falls ill, and his condition continues to deteriorate, so that observers "fear'd the Boy would make away with himself," because he was "under an evil Tongue or bewitcht." His master seeks the help of Dr. Skinner to treat him. Dr. Skinner sees that the boy is "melancholy," and likely possessed by the Devil in the shape of a greyhound, "for, it was as it were in amaze, and his eyes were always fixed in his head," and it was difficult to get him to speak. Once the boy did speak, he confessed to being tempted by strange things, such "as to go to Sea, and matters that he was not able to mention." As well, "he spoke through the Nose (as we call it) for it was not his own speech, but the Spirit or Devil within him." After assessing the pain he was under, Dr. Skinner "understood what the means must be that must relieve him." The boy is administered medicines, which "he was very willing to take." The boy's mother finds him "much ammended" within a week. The boy complains of a "pain in his belly," so that Dr. Skinner sent him more medicine, and he was cured within "18 days time." After this, the boy is dispossessed and cured of his illness, and "neither hath any thing attempted to trouble him since in the least." decides that the boy is "possest with a Devil in the shape of a Greay-hound," as Anonymous 384 confesses to being tempted by strange things, such "as to go to Sea," to great pain, and can speak in a voice "not his own speech." The young servant boy seems to be better when around Dr. Skinner, who then gives him medicine, leading to him being "made perfectly well in 18 days time."(8-9)

Appears in:
Skinner, John. A Strange and Wonderful Relation of Margaret Gurr of Tunbridge, in Kent. Unknown: 1681-1684, 8-9

Anonymous 384 Victim
2041

A fifteen year old boy from Bow in the county of Devon, who was "stubborne and untowardly." His father would like him to apprentice himself to Simon Culsver, a weaver in Crediton. Opposed to this, Joseph Buxford "secretly departed away to the Kings Army," but was forced to return home to his father when "the Cavaliers received at Langport-Moore," were defeated. His father "would have him returne to the Weaver again," but the boy refused. The old man, John Buxford, was "so incensed" that he "would bind him Apprentice to the Devill, which rash and in considerate threatenings, he often times used and repeated." On November 5, 1645, Joseph Buxford's father beats him into going on the road to Crediton, although Joseph Buxford still exclaims "he would rather go to the Devill." They encounter a carrier and four horses on the road to Crediton, who asks after their strange behaviour. Once John Buxford explains "the circumstances of his Sonnes refractory behaviour in running from his Master, and his unwillingnes to take any good course of life, or honest vocation for his future maintainance," the carrier offers to find a master for the boy, if the boy and the father agrees to it. The carrier offers to find employment for the boy that "would put him in the way so gaine a compleat estate to maintaine himself and helpe his friends." John Buxford agrees to these conditions, as long as the carrier "send backe the Boy in eight daies time at the furthest, if he should not take likeing of the promised service." Joseph Buxford agrees to these conditions as well, "being more inclined to any service then to live with his old Master the Weaver." Once his father leaves, however, the carrier transforms into "a flying Hourse in a black and ugly shape and colour." The flying horse takes Joseph Buxford onto his back, "with violence and motion swifter then imagination," and they fly through the air. Through this flight, Joseph Buxford begins a most "stupendious Miracle." Joseph Buxford and the horse see Earth so that it is "of a very small proportion, London and other magnificent Cities on greater than small cottages." They also pass the moon, and are plunged into "watrie dominions," where the boy "observed the most strange and unutterable wonders of the deepe diversified." These sights are beyond what astrologers and "the wisest Phoylosophers," are capable of understanding. The horse and Joseph Buxford eventually land in "a profound Cell or Cave, (the earth seeming to open it selfe.)" Here, the Joseph Buxford descends the horse, which turns into "a more terrible shape," and reveals itself to be the Devill. Joseph Buxford has landed in Hell. The Devil explains to him, "Bee not dismayed, thy employment here shall be onely to take a view of divers men, who thou hast formerly seene or knowne in the Malignant Army, whose base course of life have occasioned their suddaine and unexpected deaths, and now are sent to me to receive their due recompence for the same." Joseph Buxford witnesses the torment of a number of apparitions, who are familiar to him from his time in the "Malignant Army," as they wail, "Woe, Woe unto us that ever we undertooke the devence of such an unjust Cause." Joseph Buxford is further witness to the torment of Sir Peter Ball, "one of the Commissioners of Excester lately deceased," which "made the greatest impression" on him. Joseph Buxford also witnesses the torments of Greenvile, Goring, Lady Scot, and Lady Dolkeat. Their "waylings were too tedious here to relate but were in fine so full of dread and horrour to this wretched Boy, that he earnestly wished himselfe out of this place," and agreed to undergo any service that would not lead to something "so miserable and deplorable." At the end of eight days in Hell, the Devil releases Joseph Buxford to Cannon Lee in Devon, "where he was found by two honest Labourers," under a Hedge. The circumstances in which Joseph Buxford was found were strange, as he "was speechlesse, and his hands and legs strangely distorted, his haire of his head singyd, his cloathes all be smeared with pitch and rosin, and other sulfurous matter." Joseph Buxford is taken to Justice Cullum's household, where being provided with a bed and food, Joseph Buxford confesses "his name, birth-place, and his strange journey with the Devill." At first, this story is not believed, but upon reflection of the strange manner of the finding of Joseph Buxford, and the verification of his father in the manner which he left, it thought the story is true. Mr. Jonathan Gainwell, a minister, takes interest in the stor, and "gave the Boy very pious admonitions of obedience," which take such effect that Joseph Buxford is "truely penitent of his former lewd courses and there reconciled himselfe to his father, with whom he now liveth and is almost cured of that distortion of his members."(2)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 2

Joseph Buxford Joseph Buxford Victim
2043

A man from Exeter in the county of Devon, who is allegedly tortured in Hell upon his death, as he was once a commissioner of a "Malignant Army." His torture makes "the greatest impression" on young Joseph Buxford who is shown Hell by the Devil, and was once part of the same army. Sir Peter Ball is described as "lying all along after a strange manner, his Legs and Feet schorching in furious flames, his Buttockes upon a Crediton, his Backe and Shoulders in a frying pan, his Head in a boyling kettle of pitch, bellowing and roaring out in grievous sort, and cursing the hour of activity, with his extorting, coveteousnesse, and cheating of the Country."(4)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 4

Peter Ball Sir Peter Ball Victim
2044

A man from an unknown area of the county of Devon, who is allegedly tortured in Hell upon his death, as witnessed by the young apprentice, Joseph Buxford. Greenvile is tortured with his companion Goring, for both were in the "Malignant Army" that Joseph Buxford was once part of. These two are located in Hell, close to Sir Peter Ball. They are attended by "three furies" also known as the "Ladies of Scalding," who pour "Acomite downe their belching throats." (4)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 4

Caytiffe Greenvile Caytiffe Greenvile Victim
2045

A man from an unknown area of the county of Devon, who is allegedly tortured in Hell upon his death, as witnessed by the young apprentice, Joseph Buxford. Goring is tortured with his companion Castiffe Greenvile, for both were in the "Malignant Army" that Joseph Buxford was once part of. These two are located in Hell, close to Sir Peter Ball. They are attended by "three furies" also known as the "Ladies of Scalding," who pour "Acomite downe their belching throats." The sister of Goring is also in Hell, Lady Scot.(4)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 4

Goring Goring Victim
2046

A woman from some unknown area of the county of Devon, who is allegedly tortured in Hell upon her death, as witnessed by the young apprentice, Joseph Buxford. Lady Scot is the sister of Goring, and is ushered by Caytiffe Greenvile. She is "to behung up by the tongue upon hot burning tender hooks."(4)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 4

Scot Lady Scot Victim
2047

A woman from Exeter in the county of Devon, who is allegedly tortured in Hell upon her death, as witnessed by the young apprentice, Joseph Buxford. She was once the nurse to "the young Princesse lying at Bedford House in Excester." The form of her torture is unknown.(4)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 4

Dolkeat Lady Dolkeat Victim
2053

A number of men from an unknown area of Devon, who are "stragling Troopers of the Malignant Party." They encounter the Devil disguised as a carrier with four horses, which were so "faire" they "made themselves sure of rich purchase, and presently addressed themselves to plunder." But as they made to attack the carrier, he and his horses "suddainely vanished away in the flames of fire," killing three of them, and leaving the rest "so shaken and almost stifled with the noisome sent of Brimstone," they barely escaped to retell the news.(6)

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 6

Anonymous 393 (Plural) Victim
2059

A woman, wife of Richard Harrison (and presumably the daughter of a judge) who acts like a demoniac or a hysteric, and who is, at the origin of her torments, living in her family home in Little Oakley in the county of Essex. When Mrs. Harrison's hatched ducklings go missing, she "did suspect one Annis Herd a light woma~, and a common harlot to haue stolen her duckelins." An enraged Harrison went to accuse Heard in person; returning home "very angry against the said Annis." Within a few hours she "did crie out: Oh Lord Lorde, helpe me & keepe me, [...] that yonder wicked harlot Annis Herd doth bewitch me." Richard Harrison provided little comfort to his wife; interpreting her fear as a kind of disbelief inappropriate to a preacher's wife; saying "but trust in God and put your trust in him onely, and he will defend you from her, and from the Diuell himselfe also: and said moreouer, what will the people say, that I beeing a Preacher shoulde haue my wife so weake in faith." Despite his stern warning, Mrs. Harrison's illness continued for over two months; in desperation she cried out: "pray you as euer there was loue betweene vs, (as I hope there hath been for I haue v. pretie children by you I thanke God) seeke some remedie for me against yonder wicked beast (meaning the saide Annis Herd)," and promising to call on her father for assistance, promising that "if I haue no remedie, she will vtterly consume me." Harrison promised to ensure that Heard would hang if she had indeed bewitched his wife, and told Heard as much, when they saw one another as he gathered plums. However, the threat has no effect, and Harrison grew worse, "taken sore sick, & was at many times afraid both sleeping and waking," claiming all the while that Heard had bewitched her. She predicted her own, death, taking leave of her husband, and two days before she died, crying out, as she had "divers times in her sicknesse and before, repeating these wordes. Oh Annis Hersd, Annis Herd she hath consumed me." According to Bret's wife, these were her dying words. Both John Pollin and Bret's wife, as well as her own husband, born witness to this claim. _A True and Just Record_ records Mrs. Harrison's death as one crimes attributed to Heard; however, she was not indicted for Mrs. Harrison's death. (F2-F3v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, F2-F3v

Harrison Mrs. Harrison Victim
2066

A woman from Stratford in the County of Essex, who was allegedly bewitched to death by Margaret Rogers at the age of 31. Rogers was found not guilty in Warlowe's death by the Essex Assizes.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=336932)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=336932

Joan Warlowe Joan Warlowe Victim
2069

A three year old infant from Waltham in the county of Essex that is allegedly bewitched by Elizabeth Lowe. Canell languishes and dies.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=331645)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=331645

John Canell John Canell Victim
2070

A hussbandman from Chelmsford from the county of Essex who is allegedly bewitched by Elizabeth Lowe. Wodley languished and dies.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=331640)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=331640

Robert Wodley Robert Wodley Victim
2071

A three month old infant from Chlemsford in the county of Essex who is allegedly bewitched by Elizabeth Lowe. Wodley languishes for two days and the dies.(http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=331635)

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011, http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/result_details.asp?DocID=331635

John Wodley John Wodley Victim
2072

A three month old infant girl from St. Osyth in the county of Essex, the daughter of Grace and John Thurlowe and the sister of Davie Thurlowe. Joan Thurlowe falls from her cradle and dies, neck broken (circa October 6, 1582); Ursely Kempe remarks to Grace that the death of her daughter would save her the trouble of "the keeping and nursing of it." Kempe later confesses to the malefic murder of the child, claiming "shee sent Tyffin, the spirite vnto her childe, which lay in the Cradle, and willed the same to [knock] the Cradle ouer, so as the childe might fall out thereof, and breake the necke of it." Kempe later "examinate burst out in teares and fell vpon her knees, and asked forgiuenesse of [...] Thorlows wife," presumably for this crime. Both Ursley Kempe and Ales Newman are indicted and tried for this malefic murder. Both plead not guilty and both are found guilty; Newman is remanded, and Kempe is presumably hanged for it.(A, Av-A2)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, A, Av-A2

Joan Thurlowe Joan Thurlowe Victim
2073

A young girl from Evesham in the county of Worcester, who is the alleged victim of the with Catherine Huxley. Mary Ellins, who is believed to be around nine or ten, joins in a group of children in throwing stones at Catherine Huxley, calling her a "Witch." Mary Ellins, however, took up a stone but was "so affrighted, that she could not throw it at her." When the children ran from Cathering Huxley, Mary Ellins lags behind, and Huxley yells after her, "Ellins, you shall have stones enough in you ---" Mary Ellins falls ill that same day, and is "so weak and Languishing that her Friends feared she would not. recover." After a month of being ill, Mary Ellins begins to "void stones by the urinary passages." These tones often "drop into the Pot or Bason," and are accompanied by the "most grievous pains in her Back and Reins, like the pricking of Pins." In total, Mary Ellins voids close to eighty stones, "some plain pebbles, some plain flints, some very small, and some about an ounce weight," over the course of one or two months. However, when Catherine Huxley is suspected of witchcraft, apprended, condemned and executed, "Mary ceased to void any more stones." For awhile, instead, Mary Ellins "voided much blackish and muddy Sand," before becoming "perfectly recovered." She eventually marries and has seven children, and "never voided any stones since, nor been troubled with the pain forementioned." (44)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 44

Mary Ellins Mary Ellins Victim
2075

A man from Evershot in the county of Dorset-shire, who is "a poor Labouring Man," neighbour to two ministers. This man finds "a Shilling under his Door," every morning, which for a long time he tells no one about. This money allows him to buy "some Sheep or Swine, and seeming Rich," his neighbours "marvelled" and wondered how he had this money. When he confesses to the methods, he "was suddenly struck Lame and Bed-rid," as witnessed by his neighbours.(46)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 46

Anonymous 395 Victim
2077

William Harward is a man and likely a cattle farmer from Frowick house, St. Osyth in the county of Essex. When six of William Hayward's cows die in mysterious circumstances, he may begin to suspect foul play. It is unclear on why Ales Hunt is originally suspected of this crime; they is no textual record of her falling out with Hayward. However, it is clear that Hunt's daughter Feby and Ursley Kempe (via information provided by her familiar Tyffin) both accuse Hunt of having sent her familiars, Jacke and Robbin, to Hayward. Feby claims to only know that her mother sent the familiars, but to not know what their mission was; Kempe claims one of Hunt's familiars "had killed Heywarde of Frowicke sixe beastes which were lately dressed of the gargette. And sayeth, that her sayde spirite tolde her, that Huntes wiues spirite had a droppe of her blood for a rewarde: but shee sayeth, that shee asked not her spirite vpon what place of her body it was." These accusations were presumably compelling enough to cause Ales Hunt to be indicted and tried for bewitching six of Hayward's cattle; but she is found not guilty on these charges. (B2v, B3v)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, B2v, B3v

William Hayward William Hayward Victim
2078

A man likely from St.Osyth in the county of Essex. According to Ursley Kempe, who quotes her familiar Tyffin when making a number of these assertions, Willingall is allegedly bewitched by Elizabeth Bennett who sent her black canine familiar, Suckin, to "plague one Willingall, whereof hee languished and died: beeyng sicke of an impostume" (the archaic term for an abscess).(B2v, B4)

Appears in:
W., W. . A True and Just Record, of the Information, Examination and Confession of all the Witches, taken at S. Osyth in the county of Essex. London: 1582, B2v, B4

Willingall Mr. Willingall Victim
2083

A man from Brightling in the county of Sussex, who is, along with his wife, the victim of witchcraft. An old woman predicts that Joseph Cruttenden and his wife will have many "sad Calamaties," including that "their House should be Fired, and many other troubles befal them." Their troubles begin one night, when lying in bed with his wife, "Dirt, and Dust, &c. was thrown at them, but they could not tell whence it came." Joseph Cruttenden and his wife rise to pray, which abates the "trouble," but when they went to bed again, they found "the same trouble." At night, "a part of one end of their House Fired," and "flashed somewhat like Gunpowder." This fire was seemingly unnatural: as soon as it stopped in one place, "it began in another place, and thence to another," until the entire house was burned down, although the fire itself "flamed not." Some of the household of Joseph Cruttenden claimed to see a black bull in association with the fire. When Joseph Cruttenden and his wife relocate to a house offered to them by Colonel Busbridge, and their goods are transferred into it, the same misfortune before the house, and it was "fireth." Nothing could put out the fire, until the Goods were taken out, which made the fire "cease with little or no help." After this, no one would let Joseph Cruttenden and his wife into their houses, and the couple "abide under a Hut," wherein their goods are seemingly bewitched and "thrown upside down," including "Peuter-dishes, Knives, Brickbrats," which also strike their owners and two ministers who come to pray, although not during the length of prayers. One of these goods rises up and hits a passing thief as well. Once four ministers, Mr. Bennett, Mr. Weller, Mr. Bradshaw, and Mr. Gold "kept a Fast," Joseph Cruttenden experiences "not of any trouble."(55)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 55

Joseph Cruttenden Joseph Cruttenden Victim
2085

A woman from Brightling in the county of Sussex, who is, along with her husband, the victim of witchcraft. An old woman predicts that Joseph Cruttenden and his wife will have many "sad Calamaties," including that "their House should be Fired, and many other troubles befal them." Their troubles begin one night, when lying in bed with her husband, "Dirt, and Dust, &c. was thrown at them, but they could not tell whence it came." Joseph Cruttenden's wife and himself rise to pray, which abates the "trouble," but when they went to bed again, they found "the same trouble." At night, "a part of one end of their House Fired," and "flashed somewhat like Gunpowder." This fire was seemingly unnatural: as soon as it stopped in one place, "it began in another place, and thence to another," until the entire house was burned down, although the fire itself "flamed not." Some of the household of Joseph Cruttenden claimed to see a black bull in association with the fire. When Joseph Cruttenden and his wife relocate to a house offered to them by Colonel Busbridge, and their goods are transferred into it, the same misfortune before the house, and it was "fireth." Nothing could put out the fire, until the Goods were taken out, which made the fire "cease with little or no help." After this, no one would let Joseph Cruttenden and his wife into their houses, and the couple "abide under a Hut," wherein their goods are seemingly bewitched and "thrown upside down," including "Peuter-dishes, Knives, Brickbrats," which also strike their owners and two ministers who come to pray, although not during the length of prayers. One of these goods rises up and hits a passing thief as well. After these events, one of Joseph Cruttenden's servant girls comes to his wife, and tells her "the former story of the Womans Discourse," leading to the apprehension, examination, and searching of the old Woman (Anonymous 398), who was "formerly suspected to be a Witch." Once four ministers, Mr. Bennett, Mr. Weller, Mr. Bradshaw, and Mr. Gold "kept a Fast," Joseph Cruttenden's wife experiences "not of any trouble."(55)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 55

Cruttenden Cruttenden (Wife) Victim
2089

A man from Brightling in the county of Sussex, who passes by the hut that Joseph Cruttenden and his wife must abide in, full of bewitched goods. The hut is "without Doors," and a "Wooden Tut came flying out of the Air," which struck the man. After, a horseshoe, "which was by some laid away," rose of its own accord, flew to the man, "and strook him in the midst of a hundred People." The man later confesses that "he had be a Theif," and that he was hiding "under the colour of Religion."(56)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 56

Anonymous 399 Victim
2095

A man from St. James's in the city of London, who was once a servant to a man who "carried Stockins and such ware about to sell." Anonymous 403 murders his master "for his money," and buried him near St. James's. After, he runs away to Ireland to become a soldier under Colonel Hill, which takes him back to London. Yet, "when ever he lay alone," his master appeared to me in the form of a "headless Man," and stood by his bed, asking "Wilt thou yet confess?" Eventually, the spirit appears to Anonymous 403 in the form of a "bed-fellow," still asking "Wilt thou yet confess?" The soldier, during this time, looks "pale and sad, and pined." He confesses the murder to Colonel Hill. (57)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 57

Anonymous 403 Victim
2099

A man from Bewdley in the county of Worcestershire, who is the Chief Magistrate there, as well as a member of Parliament. Mr. Hopkins suffers from pain "he thought with the Spleen," but he displays no signs of "Melancholy." Mr. Hopkins believes he is "possest (meaning, I think Bewitcht)," but these claims are dismissed as "Fanciful and Melancholy." Mr. Hopkins maintains that these claims are true, and never seemed to "shew of Melancholy." He continues in pain for some time, "and before he dyed, a piece of Wood came down into the rectum intestinum," which had to be pulled out by use of fingers. His wife thought the piece of wood was close to "the length of ones finger," and both Mr. Hopkins and his wife believed that "he never swallowed any such thing." It is concluded he was likely afflicted by Satan.(59-60)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 59-60

Hopkins Mr. Hopkins Victim
2120

A man from an unknown area of London, who encounters the conjurer Dr. Lamb one morning with his companion, Sir Miles Sands. Dr. Lamb invites them back to his house, to "drink their Mornings Draught." There, they "discourse about his Art," and Dr. Lamb tells them "if they would hold their Tongues, and their Hands from medling with any thing, he would shew them some Sport." Dr. Lamb then "falls to his Practice," and conjures up a tree, which springs up in the middle of the room. Following that "appeared three little Fellows, with Axes on their Shoulders, and Baskets in their Hands, who presently fell to work, cut down the Tree, and carried all away." During this magical apparition, a wood chip fell on Mr. Barbor's velvet coat, and "he flips it into his Pocket," to carry home with him. That evening, when he and his family were sleeping, "all the Doors and VVindows in the House opened and clattered, so as to awaken and affright them all." His wife asked if he had "medled with something" at Dr. Lamb's earlier that day, to which he replied, "I put a Chip in my Pocket." His wife asks him to "fling it out," for fear that "we shall have no Quiet." After Mr. Barbor disposes of the wood chip, "and all the VVindows and Doors were presently shut, and all quiet," the family is able to sleep again.(155-156)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 155-156

Barbor Mr. Barbor Victim
2121

A woman from an unknown area of London, whose husband returned home from a visit to a conjurer with a chip "into his Pocket." The same day, at night, when the family is sleeping, "all the Doors and VVindows in the House opened and clattered, as to awaken and affright them all." Mr. Barbor's wife turned to him then, and said, "you told me you was at Dr. Lamb's this Day, and I fear you medled with something." Her husband tells her that he took a wood chip from Dr. Lamb's, and she asks him to "fling it out," for fear, "we shall have no Quiet." After her husband does as she says, the "VVindows and Doors were presently shut, and all quiet," so the family was able to sleep again.(156)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 156

Barbor Barbor (Wife) Victim
2135

A man from Stondon Hall, Stondon Massey in the county of Essex, who came to lives with Colonel Nathaniel Rich and his wife after he was "exercised," and fell ill. Mr. Tyro confesses during his stay to Lady Rich that one evening, when he was returning home, he heard a voice say, "You shall die, and not pass your five and thirtieth Year of Age." Mr. Tyro was so astonished by this, he looked around him for the source of the voice, but "seeing no body, put [him] into great Consternation and Sweat," in a way he had never felt and compared to "drops of Blood," and that he "cannot express how dreadful it was." Mr. Tyro was certain that it was "an auricular Voice," and no "Melancholaly Fancy." Although Mr. Tyro prayed to God to discover if this was "a Delusion of Satan," the "Impression remained. This event came to pass, for Mr. Tyro passed away in January 1630, a full seven months before his thirty-fifth birthday. Mr. Tyro is a great admirer of Richard Baxter, and reads his works frequently and listened to him preach, making him feel "such a Presence of God [...] that he felt both Fear, and Trembling, and Joy possess him at once."(197)

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 197

Tyro Mr. Tyro Victim
2138

A man from Mary Poel Street in the City of Bristol, in the county of Bristol, who was a shoemaker. He was "extreamly disturbed with most surprizing, and unaccountable noises for some time." However, one night, around midnight, these noises were accompanied by "so great a light through the whole House, as if every Room had been full of burning Tapers, or Torches." After this happening, Peter Pain "applied" himself to Mr. Toogood, a minister, who agreed to visit the house. At the house, Mr. Toogood and the Pain family gathered in a Chamber, where at one end was "a large bulky Trunk," which was "so heavy, that four or five men were not able to lift it." They closed the door, and began praying, when "on a sudden something was flung against the Chamber door, with extraordinary violence." Immediately after this, the noises within the house ceased. When Peter Pain and the minister attempted to open the door, they could not do so, but had to call for neighbours to help. They found "the door barr'd close with the great Trunk aforesaid." It was concluded that it was cast there when they heard "that mighty shock against the door."(164-165)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 164-165

Peter Pain Peter Pain Victim
2140

A man from Spreyton, in the county of Devon, who is visited by at least two specters in his service to Mr. Philip Furze. The first of these is "a resemblance of an Aged Gentleman, like his masters Father," who approaches him "with a Pole or Staff in his hand, resembling that he was wont to carry when living, to kill the moles withal." At first Francis Fey is "not a little surprized," to see the ghost, but his directed by the specter to fulfill "several Legacies which by his Testament he had bequeathed were unpaid," including paying two persons ten shillings, and the dead man's sister, a Gentlewoman, twenty shillings. Francis Fey points out that one of the former two persons is also deceased, which prompts the specter to tell him to pay "the next Relation." It is promised that if Francis Fey does these things, the ghost would "trouble him no further." Francis Fey fulfills these wishes, save that when he goes to Totnes to visit the Gentlewoman, (Anonymous 412), she refuses the twenty shillings, fearing it is "sent her from the Devil." Francis Fey spends the night at her house, and the specter appears to him again. Francis Fey challenges the ghost's promise not to trouble him any more, saying he had done all but could not provide the sister. The ghost tells him to into Totnes and buy her a ring worth twenty shillings, and that she should accept this. Francis Fey does as he was advised, and she received the ring. After this, the "Apparition of the old Gentleman, hath seemed to be at rest, having never given the young man any further trouble." The following day, traveling with a servant of the gentlewoman (Anonymous 413), Francis Fey is attacked by the ghost of the old Gentleman's second wife (Anonymous 169), and flung off of his horse "with such violence," that there was a "resounding great noise." The young man is continually tormented by this second ghost, who thrusts his head in small places, causing him injury and requiring "the strength of divers men" to release him. She also attempts to strangle him using the girding of his injuries, and various "Cravats and Handkerchiefs, that he hath worn about his Neck." When Francis Fey wears a perriwig, the ghost tears these up after tearing them off his head, and when Francis Fey attempts to protect the perriwig "he esteemed above the rest," by putting it in several boxes, and putting weights on these boxes, the ghost still breaks all the boxes, and "rended into many small parts and tatters." The ghost also tears his shoestrings from his shoes, and tears his gloves in his pocket, and the clothes on his back, unless they belonged to another. Finally, the daemon also entangles "the feet and legs of the young man [...] about his Neck, that he hath been loosed with great difficulty." This is repeated at times with "the frames of Chairs, and Stools." Near Easter, Francis Fey is "taken up by the skirt of his doublet, by this Female Daemon, and carried a heighth into the Air." His master, Mr. Philip Furze misses him, and goes to look for him. Francis Fey is found near half an hour later, and "he was heard singing, and whistling in a bog, or quagmire," and was in fact "in a king of Trance, or extatick fit," which he sometimes suffers from, although it is unclear if these fits are caused by the spirit. When Francis Fey is asked where he was, he tells his master that he had been carried so high into the air, that "his Masters house seemed to him to be but as a Hay-cock." This story is verified when a workman finds a shoe outside of Mr. Philip Furze's house, and a perriwig in a tree. After this incident, where the young man's body had bee "on the mud in the Quagmire," was "somewhat benummed, and seemingly deader than the other." Francis Fey is then taken to Crediton, "to be bleeded," which after accomplished, he was left alone. When "the Company" (Anonymous 417) which accompanied him to Crediton found him again, he was "in one of his Fits, with his fore-head much bruised, and swoln to a great bigness." When Francis Fey comes out of his fit, he explains that "a Bird had with great swiftness, and force flown in at the Window," and thrown a stone at his forehead. When searched, it was found that under where Francis Fey sat lay "a weight of Brass or Copper," which it seems the Daemon used to harm the boy. The Spirit continued to "molest the young man in a very severe and rugged manner," indefinitely.(178 - 179)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 178 - 179

Francis Fey Francis Fey Victim
2143

A woman from Spreyton in the county of Devon, who is able to see "the She-spectre" haunting the young servant, Francis Fey. She is "by reason of the troublesomenes of the Spirit," forced to leave the household of Mr. Philip Furze, with Ann Langdon and a little Child (Anonymous 414), where they all live in together.(180-181)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 180-181

Thomasin Gidly Thomasine Gidly Victim
2144

A woman from Spreyton in the county of Devon, who is able to see "the She-spectre" haunting the young servant, Francis Fey. She is "by reason of the troublesomenes of the Spirit," forced to leave the household of Mr. Philip Furze, with mistress Thomasin Gidly, and a little Child (Anonymous 414), where they all live in together.(180-181)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 180-181

Ann Langdon Ann Langdon Victim
2145

A small child from Spreyton in the county of Devon, who is able to see "the She-spectre" haunting the young servant, Francis Fey. The child is "by reason of the troublesomenes of the Spirit," forced to leave the household of Mr. Philip Furze, with Mistress Thomasine Gidly, and Ann Langdon, where they all live in together.(180-181)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 180-181

Anonymous 414 Victim
2146

A woman from Spreyton in the county of Devon, who is a maid in the household of Mr. Philip Furze, alongside Francis Fey, a servant who is haunted by the spirit of Philip Furze's deceased father's deceased second wife. One day, Francis Fey's "shoe-strings was observed (without the assistance of any hand) to come of its own accord" and fly across the room. The second shoe-string "was crawling after it," and the maid, seeing this, "with her hand drew it out." Upon doing so, "it strangely clasp'd and curl'd about her hand like a living Eel, or Serpent."(182)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 182

Anonymous 414 Victim
2155

A man from Sherborne, in the county of Dorset, who as a falconer was "of a Temper more Considerate, and very fond of a Book by night." After a day of discoursing with a huntsman (Anonymous 423), the falconer was told that "Falconers used to look upwards, and blaspheme." That night, while the huntsman slept, the falconer "betook himself to a certain Book he had got out of Chaplains Chamber." While he read the book, and "had not read much in it," suddenly, "he saw something come to the side of the Bed." This was in fact a "frightful Goblin" (Anonymous 172), which made him remember what the Huntsman had said to him about "looking upwards, and Blaspheming." The falconer awoke the huntsman (Anonymous 423) on this, but could only get him to say "Good Devil do not mistake, for that is the Falconer," before sleeping again. Upon seeking the Chaplain, the falconer is put at ease, when the troublesome huntsman is discharged. The falconer is further counseled by the Chaplain (Anonymous 424) to "peruse no Books."(196-198)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 196-198

Anonymous 422 Victim
2159

A man from Combe St. Nicholas in the county of Somerset, who riding home one day saw before him "on the side of the hill, a great company of People, that seemed to him like Country Folks, Assembled, as at a Fair." This fair, as far as he could tell, held ordinary fairs "with all kind of Trinkets, Fruit, and drinking Booths." At first, he thought this fair might be one at Chestonford, but then upon realizing it was the wrong season for it, "he was under very great surprize, and admired the meaning of what he saw should be." It occurred to him that this might be a Fair for the Fairies of Blackhill Downs (Anonymous 174). The man decides to "ride in amongst them, and see what they were," and although he could see them perfectly while he approached them, once there, "he could discern nothing at all," and instead was "thrust, as when one passes through a throng of people." After he had gone a little distance, he could again see the fair. After this incident, the man found himself in pain, and "a Lameness seized him all on one side," which continued with him "as long as he lived," which was for "more than twenty years afterward." However, he would give an "account to any that inquired of this Accicident." (208-209)

Appears in:
Bovet, Richard. Pandaemonium. London: 1684, 208-209

Anonymous 425 Victim
2166

A child from Salmsbury in the county of Lancashire, known to be the infant child of Thomas Welshman and grandchild of Hugh Walshman. Grace Sowerbutts accused her grandmother Jennet Bierley and aunt Ellen Bierley of taking this child from its parents' bed in the night to drive a nail into its navel and suck from the hole through a pen. They then returned the infant to the bed. It became sick and died not long after. Grace also accused her grandmother and aunt of stealing the child's body from the church-yard; she claimed they cannibalized the child's body and rendering the fat from its bones to rub on themselves so the could change shape. Thomas Walshman gave deposition saying that he did have a child who had become sick and died at about one year of age, but that he did not know the cause. Grace later retracted her accusations.(Lv-L2v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Lv-L2v

Walshman Walshman (child) Victim
2174

A man from the Forest of Pendle, known to be the husband of Elizabeth Device, the father of James, Jennet and Alison Device, and the son-in-law of Elizabeth Southerns. According to his daughter Alison, John Device was afraid of Anne Whittle, and made a deal to pay her a measure of meal every year in exchange for the safety of his family. John allegedly said on his deathbed that Whittle bewitched him to death for missing a payment.(E4-E4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, E4-E4v

John Device John Device Victim
2175

A man from Pendle in the County of Lancashire, who was allegedly bewitched to death by James Device. Device was charged with and tried for Duckworth's murder. During his examination, Device claimed that John Duckworth had promised him an old shirt, but when Device came to get it two weeks later, Duckworth denied it to him. As Device had touched Duckworth during this encounter, his familiar Dandy said he had power over him, and Device urged Dandy to kill Duckworth. Within a week, Duckworth died.(Hv-H2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, Hv-H2

John Duckworth John Duckworth Victim
2176

A man from Gould-Shey-Booth (Goodshaw) in the County of Lancaster, whom James Device is accused of bewitching to death. Jennet Device claimed that she heard James, her brother, call his familiar Dandy and tell him to kill John Hargraves. James pleaded not guilty.(H4v)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, H4v

John Hargraves John Hargraves Victim
2191

A man from Paddiham in the County of Lancashire, known to be the owner of a stable. Margaret Pearson stood trial for bewitching his horse and goods.(S2)

Appears in:
Potts, Thomas. The Wonderfull Discovery of Witches in the County of Lancaster. London: 1613, S2

Dodgeson Dodgeson Victim
2223

A man from Fevorsham in the County of Kent. Joan Williford claimed that her familiar Bunne carried Thomas Gardler out of a window, causing him to fall on his backside.(1)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Examination, Confession, Trial, and Execution, of Joane Williford, Joan Cariden, and Jane Hott. London: 1645, 1

Thomas Gardler Thomas Gardler Victim
2226

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntington, known to be about ten years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, niece to Gilbert Pickering and sister to Joan, Elizabeth, Grace, Mary and Robert Throckmorton. Jane was the first of the Throckmorton children to become sick, be afflicted with fits and to accuse Mother Alice Samuel of being the cause. Her parents consulted Dr. Barrow on her initial illness; Dr. Barrow thought she had worms and sent medicine, but she did not improve. When consulted again a few days later, Dr. Barrow declared her to be clean of disease, and finally admitted that she might be bewitched. A consultation with Master Butler gave the same answer. Jane's four sisters all fell sick with the same illness within weeks of her affliction. It was said that they "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." When Gilbert Pickering brought Mother Samuel to the Throckmorton house, she fell into a severe fit and had to be carried to her bed, where her belly swelled massively and deflated again numerous times. She lay there scratching at the covers. Pickering covered her eyes and first touched her hand himself and then made Mother Samuel do so; Jane scratched Mother Samuel violently but would not scratch him. After Mother Samuel and Agnes Samuel were apprehended and imprisoned at Huntingdon, Jane and her sisters fell into fits in which their brother, Robert Throckmorton Jr., was the only person who could make himself understood to Jane, and Jane would relay the questions he asked to the other girls. By this means, the Jane and her sisters predicted Agnes Samuel's bail from gaol and arrival in the Throckmorton household. At this time, Jane also began to claim to talk to the spirit tormenting her. Once Agnes had lived with the Throckmortons for a few months, Jane and her sisters began to come out of their fits whenever Agnes said a "charm" stating that she was a witch, had killed Lady Cromwell and bewitched the girls. According to the spirit Smack, via Joan Throckmorton, Jane was tormented by the spirit Blew. Jane is also said to have been urged to suicide by Blew, and to have cast away knives while claiming he was urging her to kill herself, or to strain toward the fire and require restraint. She would have fits in which her mouth sealed shut repeatedly at meals, requiring Agnes to hold a knife at her lips to open it again, and other times would claim to see clothing and jewelry walking about of its own volition. Jane was among the girls who scratched Agnes severely. At his trial, John Samuel was made to say the same self-accusing charm as Agnes over Jane, which brought her out of her fits and was used as evidence that he had a part in the bewitchment of the Throckmorton girls. (3-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 3-6

Jane Throckmorton Jane Throckmorton Victim
2228

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 12 or 13 years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, and sister to Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. She became afflicted by fits about a month after her younger sister, Jane, and all three "cryed out upon Mother Samuell: saying, take her away, looke where shee standeth here before us in a blacke thrumbd Cap, (which kind of Cap indeed shee did usually weare, but shee was not then present) it is shee (saide they) that hath bewitched us, and shee will kill us if you doe not take her away." It was said that once all five sisters were afflicted, they "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." She was thereafter afflicted by fits of "lamenesse, blindnesse, deafnesse, and want of feeling." While Agnes Samuel was living in the Throckmorton household, Mary had a fit in which she insisted it was the day she was to scratch Agnes and went after her eagerly and fiercely, then wept and claimed she didn't want to, but her spirit said she must. The next day, she claimed to speak to the spirit Smack, which had previously only conversed with Joan, and it told her she would have no more fits because she had scratched Agnes. Smack later told Joan that Mary had been assigned his cousin Smack (3).(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6

Mary Throckmorton Mary Throckmorton Victim
2229

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 12 or 13 years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, niece to Gilbert Pickering and sister to Joan, Jane, Mary, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. She became afflicted by fits about a month after her younger sister, Jane, at the same time as Mary, and all three "cryed out upon Mother Samuell: saying, take her away, looke where shee standeth here before us in a blacke thrumbd Cap, (which kind of Cap indeed shee did usually weare, but shee was not then present) it is shee (saide they) that hath bewitched us, and shee will kill us if you doe not take her away." It was said that once all five sisters were afflicted, they "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." When Elizabeth traveled to her uncle Gilbert Pickering's home in Tichmarch, Pickering noted that her fits ceased during the journey and resumed as soon as she entered the house. At dinner, she was prevented from eating, and she scratched, cried and sneezed during the evening prayers; the same happened when Pickering read from the Bible or she tried to pray herself. Pickering discovered that taking her out of the house ended her fits, but they resumed as soon as she reentered. Elizabeth remained with Pickering for months, as when she tried to return back to Warboys, her fits prevented her. Once Elizabeth had returned to Warboys and Mother Samuel was living in the Throckmorton household, Elizabeth had a fit in which she was unable to eat, drink or speak, and could not until her father, Robert Throckmorton, forbid Mother Samuel to eat until Elizabeth was able. While Agnes Samuel was living in the Throckmorton household, Elizabeth and her sisters had fits in which their mouths shut at meals, and would not reopen until Agnes Samuel ordered the spirits tormenting them to stop. Later, she had fit at dinner in which she declared she would scratch Agnes and did so viciously, then exhorted Agnes and faulted her for not confessing her bewitchments, for parting with her soul and for not praying in her heart, and demanded she make her confessions lest she go to hell. According to the spirit Smack, speaking through Joan, Elizabeth was tormented by his cousin Smack (2). After Joan had scratched Agnes's face bloody and burnt her blood-stained fingernail clippings, Joan assisted Elizabeth in scratching Agnes' right hand.(6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6

Elizabeth Throckmorton Elizabeth Throckmorton Victim
2230

A child from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 9 years of age, the daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, and sister to Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. She became afflicted by fits a few weeks after her older sisters Jane, Elizabeth and Mary did. It was said that the sisters "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." She was thereafter afflicted by fits of "lamenesse, blindnesse, deafnesse, and want of feeling." When her sister Elizabeth first scratched Agnes Samuel, Agnes was comforting Grace, who was in the throes of a fit, in her arms; Grace was caught in Agnes' embrace for the duration while Agnes was viciously scratched. Grace tried to scratch Agnes herself some time later, but her nails were too short and her strength insufficient to cause Agnes any harm. According to the spirit Smack, speaking through Joan, Grace was tormented by the spirit White.(5-6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 5-6

Grace Throckmorton Grace Throckmorton Victim
2232

A girl from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be about 15 years of age, the eldest daughter of Robert Throckmorton and Mistress Throckmorton, niece to Gilbert Pickering and Henry Pickering, and sister to Jane, Elizabeth, Grace, Mary and Robert Throckmorton. She was the last of the sisters to be afflicted by fits, and hers are said to have been worst of them. The fits "forced her to neese, screetch & grone verie fearefullie, sometime it would heaue up her bellie, and bounce up her bodie with such violence, that had she not bin kept upon her bed, it could not but haue greatly brused her body." It was said that the sisters "all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." After Joan had been afflicted for some time, she began to claim that spirits would give her predictions; she foretold that 12 people in total would become afflicted within the household. A year later, when her uncle Henry Pickering came to visit, she reported the details of his surveillance of and conversation with Mother Samuel, which no-one in the household had known he was doing. Thereafter, she was able to report on whatever Mother Samuel said and did, claiming that her spirit told her. She claimed to converse extensively with various spirits, first one named Blew, and then primarily with Smack. Joan accused Agnes Samuel of renewing Mother Samuel's bewitchment of the Throckmorton girls, saying that the spirits told her so. Joan also said the spirits told her that she would have her worst fits when strangers visited the Throckmorton home, in order to prove that Agnes was bewitching her, for they promised she would not come out of her fits until Agnes said a "charm" over her stating that she was a witch, had killed Lady Cromwell, and had bewitched the Throckmorton girls. Robert Throckmorton would thereafter order Agnes to say those words over his daughters whenever they had a visitor, and they would miraculously recover. Through Joan, Smack also began to predict her fits, report on Mother Throckmorton, who was imprisoned at that time, accused John Samuel of being a witch and listed off which spirits were assigned to torment which girls, with Smack being hers. Smack also told her she should scratch Agnes, and gave Joan the words to have Agnes say to bring her and her sisters out of their fits. When she scratched Agnes, Smack bid her attack one side of Agnes' face for herself, and the other for her aunt Pickering, who Agnes allegedly also bewitched. He also instructed her to clip her bloody fingernails after, throw them on the fire, and throw the wash water on as well after cleaning blood from her hands. While at Huntingdon to prove that Agnes Samuel was a witch to the assembled judges, Joan was seen repeatedly to have shaking and groaning fits whenever Agnes said God or Jesus Christ, and Agnes was made to say the self-accusing "charm" repeatedly over Joan before the judges. Joan is said to have never suffered another fit after these demonstrations.(6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6-7

Joan Throckmorton Joan Throckmorton Victim
2235

Seven women from Warboys in the county of Hampshire, known to be employed as servants by Robert and Mistress Throckmorton. They begin experiencing fits after Joan Throckmorton predicts that there will be a total of twelve people afflicted in the Throckmorton household, including the five Throckmorton girls. During their fits, "they all cried out of Mother Samuell, as the Children did, saying take her away Mistris, for Gods sake take her away and burne her, for shee will kill us all if you let her alone, hauing the same miseries and extremities that the children had, and when they were out of their fittes they knew no more than the children did." This lasted about two years, and when servants left the Throckmortons' employ, their fits ceased.(6-7)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 6-7

Anonymous 440 (plural) Victim
2240

A woman from Ramsey in the county of Huntingdon, known to be the wife of Sir Henry Cromwell and the mother-in-law of Mistress Cromwell. Lady Cromwell comes to the Throckmorton home to comfort Robert and Mistress Throckmorton and visit the children. While there, she confronts Mother Alice Samuel, accusing her of witchcraft and taking a lock of hair and a hairlace from her. Lady Cromwell gives these objects to Mistress Throckmorton to burn. When she returns to Ramsey that night, she has a nightmare in which Mother Samuel sends a cat to her to pluck off all of her skin and flesh from her arms and body. She becomes sick thereafter, suffering fits similar to those of the Throckmorton children, and dies of it 15 months later.(30-32)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 30-32

Cromwell Lady Cromwell Victim
2249

A woman from Ellington in the county of Huntingdon, known to be the aunt of Joan, Jane, Elizabeth, Mary, Grace and Robert Throckmorton. According to Joan Throckmorton, Agnes Samuel bewitched Mistress Pickering after Mother Alice Samuel was imprisoned. Joan claims the spirit Smack told her Agnes did so, and manipulated Agnes into saying she had.(90-96)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 90-96

Pickering MIstress Pickering Victim
2250

A man from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be married to Mistress Chappel and to be the next-door neighbour of John Samuel. According to the spirit Smack, John Samuel bewitched both Chappel and Mistress Chappel so that "woman not able to stirre her selfe, and then man was for a fitte or two in the same case that these children were in." Smack also claimed that John Samuel asked him to break Chappel's neck in a fall, so he "caused on the suddaine both his Pattins to be broken, and if he had fallen on the stones as he fell in the myre, he had beene maymed." Chappel, when asked, confessed that "confessed that he had once such a fall, as he met with old Samuell in the streetes, and both his Pattins were broken at one instant, and because he would not fall upn the causie (for it was but narrow) into the myre, wherin he was marveilously foyled, and if an other neighbor had not beene with him, he had beene in greater danger."(94-95)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 94-95

Chappel Victim
2251

A woman from Warboys in the county of Huntingdon, known to be married to Chappel and to be the next-door neighbour of John Samuel. According to the spirit Smack, John Samuel bewitched both Chappel and Mistress Chappel so that "woman not able to stirre her selfe, and then man was for a fitte or two in the same case that these children were in."(94-95)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 94-95

Chappel Mistress Chappel Victim
2253

A man from Brampton in the county of Huntingdon. Robert Poulter, vicar of Brampton, a deposition before the Huntingdon Assizes on behalf John Langley, who was too sick to come to court himself. Langley claimed to Mother Alice Samuel bewitched various of his livestock to death, and caused him to become sick, after she overheard him order that she was to have no meat. He is said to have died during the Assizes.(110)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 110

John Langley John Langley Victim
2255

A man from the vicinity of Huntingdon Gaol in the county of Huntingdon, known to be a the Jailor/Gaoler's servant. According to the Jailor of Huntingdon, Anonymous 445 chained Mother Alice Samuel to her bedpost for unruly behavior, and soon after became sick with tormenting fits. He is said to have cried out against Mother Samuel during his fits, and to have displayed the strength of two men. He died of it five or six days later.(111)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 111

Anonymous 445 Victim
2256

A child from the vicinity of Huntingdon Gaol in the county of Huntingdon, known to be the son of the Jailor of Huntingdon. According to his father, Anonymous 446 became sick with tormenting fits while Mother Alice Samuel was imprisoned awaiting trial. This child did not improve until has father brought him into Mother Samuel's cell and held her down so the boy could scratch her.(59, 61)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Most Strange and Admirable Discouerie of the Three Witches of Warboys . Unknown: 1593, 59, 61

Anonymous 446 Victim
2264

A woman from Nottingham in the county of Nottinghamshire, known to be the sister of William Sommers. She is said to have had fits and to have been possessed, much as Sommers was, and to have started her fits when his ended. John Darrell faced charges for allegedly instructing Mary Cooper, William Sommers and others to counterfeit their possessions and dispossessions. Darrell alleged in his defense that Cooper's belly was heard to make a whooping noise like the purr of a cat and swelled as if in pregnancy. (13-17)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 13-17

Mary Cooper Mary Cooper Victim
2269

A woman from Stradbrook in the county of Suffolk. According to the spirit Gyles, Doll Bartham sent him and two other spirits named Tom and J. to kill her. Gyles initially tried to drown her by leading her into a ditch filled with water, but it only went up to her chin. Tom them "brought a rope and put it vnder her chaps" so Gyles could hang her. The noose is said to have been so big that three men's heads could have slipped through at once.(95-96)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 95-96

Caver Mrs. Caver Victim
2273

A girl from the vicinity of Castle Alley near Broken Wharf in London, known to be the daughter of Anonymous 457 and to have a sister. Her mother had a falling out with Anne Kirk, which resulted in her sister being bewitched to death. Not long after the child died, Anonymous 458 met Kirk in the street, and was "stricken downe in a very strange maner; her mouth beeing drawne aside like a purse, her teeth gnashing togeather, her mouth foming, and her eyes staring the rest of her body being strangely disfigured." When Kirk left, she recovered, but often had similar fits thereafter. She gave deposition against Kirk, but claimed that she could not show how she was tormented until she had a fit.(99-100)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 99-100

Anonymous 458 Victim
2275

A man from the vicinity of Castle Alley near Broken Wharf in London, known to be an innkeeper and to be the father of a child. He had a falling out with Anne Kirk, and in revenge she bewitched his child so that it became strangely tormented. He tried to use physick to heal his child, but it did not work, so he consulted a cunning-man (Anonymous 461), who revealed that Anne Kirk was responsible but could not save the child. After his child died, Anonymous 459 saw Kirk coming out of a neighbour's house, and told that neighbour that Kirk had bewitched his child to death after she was gone. When he went home, he too fell sick, and died not long after.(100-101)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Trial of Maist. Dorrell. Unknown: 1599, 100-101

Anonymous 459 Victim
2281

A man from London, who is allegedly cursed by Elizabeth Jackson, an old woman believed to be responsible for bewitching the young girl, Mary Glover. Anonymous 455 words for Lady Bond, and at one time asked Elizabeth Jackson to wash his clothes. When Elizabeth Jackson came "to his lodging for money," she found that he was out of town, and cried, "Is he gone? I pray god he may breake his necke, or his legge, before he com again." Accordingly, during his journey, Anonymous 455 broke his leg. This account is given at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, as proof that her cursing "had ben observed to have a mischevous consequent."(Fol. 35r - Fol. 35v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 35r - Fol. 35v

Anonymous 455 Victim
2290

A woman from London, who is allegedly breathed upon by the fourteen year old girl, Mary Glover during the early days of her fits. Mary Glover is described as having "exceeding wyde gapings, with her mouth, during the which, there did flie out of her mouth a great venemous and stinking blast." When she breathes upon people in this state, they are usually injured; in the case of Mistress Lumas, Mary Glover breathed upon her face, "and caused it to be very sore." This leaves Mistress Lumas quite sick, and "held a noysome impression in her a great while after."(Fol. 7r - Fol. 7v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 7r - Fol. 7v

Lumas Mistress Lumas Victim
2291

A girl from the parish of Little All Hallows in Thames street, London, daughter of Tim and Gawthren Glover, and the who sister of Mary Glover, a fourteen year demoniac. Her sister Mary was allegedly bewitched by the Elizabeth Jackson, a local charwoman. Although Anne was not herself a demoniac, at one time, Mary breathes on her during one of her fits. Mary Glover is described as having "exceeding wyde gapings, with her mouth, during the which, there did flie out of her mouth a great venemous and stinking blast." When she "did smyte her sister Anne upon the face," with this breath, it caused Anne's face to "blister and swell." When Mary is dispossessed, Anne accompanies her sister and the rest of her family to live at the house of the preacher, Mr. Lewis Hughes in St. Helen's Bishopsgate in London, for a year, a move made to protect Mary from further possession and bewitchment. (Fol. 7v - Fol. 8r)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 7v - Fol. 8r

Anne Glover Anne Glover Victim
2309

A woman from London, who is a neighbor of the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson. Elizabeth Jackson is believed to have cursed the young girl Mary Glover, so that she experiences violent fits. On the first day that Elizabeth Jackson threatens Mary Glover, the young girl stops at Elizabeth Burges' house, as she felt ill. Elizabeth Burges immediately notices that something is wrong with Mary Glover, as her "contenance and colour had much altered." After Mary Glover leaves the house of Elizabeth Burges, Elizabeth Jackson who had apparently overheard the conversation, comes running over to Elizabeth Burges' house, and exclaims, "I have ratled up one of the Gossips that medled with my daughters apparrell, and I hope an evill death will come unto her." This is the first threat Elizabeth Jackson utters against Mary Glover in front of a witness. Similar threats are uttered in the house of Alderman Glover, the uncle of Mary Glover. At the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, Elizabeth Burges also comes forward as a witness to testify against the old woman. She confesses to having seen Elizabeth Jackson threaten Mary Glover, but also tells how she "had ben therefore threatned by her," so that one day while eating prunes, the old woman visits her and Elizabeth Burges is "not able to swallow one downe, but also fell on vomiting." This continues for some three weeks after being visited by Elizabeth Jackson, "upon all sustenance of meat receaved." At another visit of Elizabeth Jackson while Elizabeth Burges was vomiting, Elizabeth Jackson allegedly wishes "that she might cast up her heart, gutts and all," adding "Thou shortly, shalt have in thee an evill spirit too." The following night, Elizabeth Burges is visited by a vision in the shape of a fox; the night after that a vision in the shape of "an ougly black man, with a bounch of keyes in his hand, intysing her to go with him, and those keyes would bring her to gould enough"; and a final third night, Elizabeth Burges is visited by the vision in the "likenes of a mouse." However, by "faithfull praier," aided by her Master and Mistress, Elizabeth Burges was delivered from these visions. While recounting this tale at the trial, Elizabeth Jackson interrupts Elizabeth Burges, saying "thow wilt be sicke, and cast againe anon," causing Elizabeth Burges to lose her power of speech. She was led into a chamber after, where she fell ill as Elizabeth Jackson had predicted, "and after that, was led home weake, faynte and Casting, benummed in all her body, hardly able to stand, and never yet to this day recovered her perfect libertie againe."(Fol. 3v)

Appears in:
Bradwell, Stephen. Mary Glover's Late Woeful Case. Unknown: 1603, Fol. 3v

Elizabeth Burges Elizabeth Burges Victim
2315

A man from London, who was keenly involved in the Mary Glover case on many levels, as both a minister and a witness. Mr. Lewis Hughes was witness to the testing the Recorder of London of the young girl, including a series of tests such as bringing Elizabeth Jackson to Mary Glover in disguise, and burning the young girl when she is in a fit. Mr. Lewis Hughes further advises the Recorder, Sir John Crook, to test Elizabeth Jackson by bidding her saying the Lord's Prayer. Sir John Crook takes this advice, and has Elizabeth Jackson recite the prayer, and she is unable to utter the line, "Deliver us from evil." Mr. Lewis Hughes confirms that when he had frequented Elizabeth Jackson before, he had found it to be the case that she could never utter that line. Some months later, on December 1, 1602, Mr. Lewis Hughes testifies at the trial of Elizabeth Glover, against the old woman. Mr. Lewis Hughes admits in court that he was "willing to admonish the said Elizabeth Jackson of her lewde tongue," and so went to visit the old woman at her house. As soon as he entered her abode, she "very intentively fixt her eyes upon him," facing him. As the Preacher prepared to speak with her, he "had suddenly his speech taken from him, his necke became stiffe, and his Chin borne inwards into his bosome, his knees (withall) yeelding under him, as though he should fall." Calling upon God, the Preacher finds the strength to prevail, and is able to depart from Elizabeth Jackson's house. However, he is not able to speak for two hours afterward. He further confesses in court to visiting Elizabeth Jackson while she was in Newgate Prison, but he could "by no meanes cause her, to rehearse the beliefe," of God and Jesus Christ. Further, she refused of her own accord to say, "Deliver us from evil," once again. This evidence is heavily weighed in court. After Elizabeth Jackson is found guilty of witchcraft, Mr. Lewis Hughes is ordered by Sir John Crook to perform an exorcism on Mary Glover, as she still experiences fits. Leading a group of witnesses (Anonymous 437) in fasting and prayer with five other preachers: Mr. Swan, Mr. Bridger, Mr. Evans, Mr. Barber and Mr. Skelton; Mr. Lewis Hughes aids in the dispossession of Mary Glover, and takes the girl and her family includings Gawthren Glover, and Anne Glover, into his house at St. Helen's Bishopsgate in London for a year in order to watch over her and prevent the girl from being possessed again. It is also during this time that Mr. Lewis Hughes visits Bishop Bancroft on the advice of Sir John Crook, in order to report the success of Mary Glover's dispossession. Bishop Bancroft, however, is not pleased to hear this news, having been the first to accuse Mary Glover of counterfeit. He grants no audience to Mr. Lewis Hughes, and calls the man "Rascall and varlot," for his stories. Mr. Lewis Hughes is imprisoned for four months, and named along with the five other preachers present during Mary Glover's dispossession "Devil finders, Devil puffers, and Devill prayers." Some forty years after all these events, Mr. Lewis Hughes records them in a text he authors, named, "Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open." The text for the most part is dialogue between ministers. Often, Mr. Lewis Hughes is referenced as a very divine minister.(12-13)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 12-13

Lewis Hughes M. Lewis Hughes Victim
2320

A man from Leicester in the county of Leicestershire, who as a Master of Arts was condemned "only for using himself to the study and practise of the Jugling craft." He was formerly the Lord of Leicester, and according to the author Thomas Addy was unjustly condemned for simply studying witchcraft is not the same as being a Witch, for "the essence of a Witch is not in doing false Miracles, or any other Witchcraft by demonstration or discovery, but in seducing people from God, and his Truth." (41-42)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 41-42

Anonymous 465 Victim
2329

A man from London, who serves in King James' I court. At the encouragement of the King, the imposture (Anonymous 471) would call out Sir John's name, without revealing himself, in order to get Sir John "to stamp with madness," and find himself unable to ever begin discourse with the King due to constant interruption.(81 - 82)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 81 - 82

John Sir John Victim
2331

A man from Framingham in the county of Suffolk, who is executed for witchcraft alongside a hundred innocent people at the Berry Assizes by a "wicked inquisitor" (Anonymous 472). He is allegedly innocent, and a minister.(101 - 102)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 101 - 102

Anonymous 473 Victim
2333

A number of men and women from London, who are slaughtered as witches "at the Assizes at -erry, and at Chelmsford." These "poor accused people," were exposed to much cruelty, until "they would confess what their inquisitors would have them, although it were a thing impossible."(104 - 105)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 104 - 105

Anonymous 474 Victim
2336

A man from London, whose crops of corn are allegedly attacked by imps (Anonymous 235). These imps are associated with a woman, hanged for a witch (Anonymous 476). The corn is "blasted, and tipt, or crockt," causing it to die. (114)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 114

Anonymous 477 Victim
2337

A man from London, who is executed at Barry in Wales, in the year 1645, as a minister accused of witchcraft. Allegedly, however, he suffers from a disease "called Hemorroids or Piles," which results in swelling and the pouring of blood, which was mistaken for witchcraft.(128)

Appears in:
Ady, Thomas. A Candle in the Dark . London: 1655, 128

Lewis Master Lewis Victim
2347

A young man from the town of Southwold in the county of Suffolk, who suffers from bewitchment for some time. The witch (Anonymous 480) responsible for his circumstance was allegedly executed for it.(7)

Appears in:
Dirby, Richard . Dreadful News from Wapping. Unknown: 1693, 7

Anonymous 479 Victim
2354

A man from Burton upon Trent in the county of Staffordshire, who takes up residence in a house after a Tenant (Anonymous 2) decides to leave it because of many strange occurrences, including the moving of food, the death of cattle, and mysterious fires, in order to confront the "Hagg" who is responsible for this witchcraft. John Jones is described as "a valiant Welchman of the neighborhood." He brings with him "a large Baskethilted Sword, a Mastive Dog and a Lanthorn and Candle." However, having not lain long with his dog and sword ready, he heard a great knocking at the door of his chamber, upon which as "many Cats as he conceived" came into his rooms, broke the windows, and made a "hideous noise." This causes the dog to howl and quake with fear, and creep closer to John Jones when the candle goes out. John Jones falls "into a cold sweat," and leaving his sword unused, exits the house running "half a Mile without ever looking behind him." The following day, he claims that "he would not ley another night in the House for a hundred pounds."(4 - 5)

Appears in:
A., J.. The Daemon of Burton, or, A True Relation of Strange Witchcrafts or Incantations Lately Practised at Burton. London: 1671, 4 - 5

John Jones John Jones Victim
2355

A woman from Hertfordshire, whose husband's cow is bewitched by a familiar (Anonymous 241) in the shape of a cat, sent by Elizabeth Knott. She allegedly refused to pay Elizabeth Knott money to which she was due, prompting Elizabeth Knott to bewitch the cow as an act of revenge.(4 - 5)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott. London: 1649, 4 - 5

Lamans Lamans (Wife) Victim
2364

A woman from Edmundbyres in the county of Durham, who allegedly possessed, and the wife of Stephen Hooper. Together, Stephen Hooper and Margaret Hooper have a young son. Margaret Hooper begins to act strange upon returning home from the village Hanstonueth, causing concern in her household, noticeably in her husband. She begins to talk to herself, and "continued as if she had beene one bewitched, or haunted by an evill Spirit."(Anonymous 248) Stephen Hooper becomes desperate to cure her, and tries to convince his wife to focus on God, and to pray with him. However, over time, Margaret Hooper becomes more troubled until one day, she experiences a fit, which causes such a fright for Stephen Hooper that he sends for her sister. Together, Stephen Hooper and Margaret Hooper's sister confine Margaret Hooper to her bed, where she foams at the mouth, and shakes so badly, that the chamber and the bed shook with her. Stephen Hooper begins to pray for his wife again, and within a half-hour, she is much recovered, although still complains that she followed by a beast without a head or tail that no one else can see. Stephen Hooper still implores his wife to pray with him, which she did, and seemed fine for a week. However, after this time, Margaret Hooper begins to rage again, and has little memory of her fits, "to the great griefe of her husband." One night, Margaret Hooper wakes from a violent fit, and calls out for Stephen Hooper, claiming to "see a strange thing like unto a snale."(Anonymous 247) Stephen Hooper tries to comfort his wife, but she remains fearful, asking him "doe not you see the Devill?" When Stephen Hooper counsels her to think of God, she tells him, "if you see nothing now, you shall see something by and by." Shortly after this, a great noise is heard in the street "as if it had beene the comming of foure or five carts." Looking up, Stephen Hooper sees a monster (Anonymous 245) coming towards their bed, "much like a beare, but it had no head nor taile," and was significantly taller. Stephen Hooper attempts to attack the beast with a stool, but it simply bounces off the monster as if it were a feather bed. The beast turns its attention to Margaret Hooper, stroking her on the feet three times. It then takes her out of the bed and rolled her around the chamber and under the bed. Finally, the apparition causes Margaret Hooper to put her head between her legs, and rolled her around like a hoop through the house, and down the stairs. Her husband does not dare go after at her, but instead weeps to see her carried away. The hall was filled with "an horrible stinke [...] and such fiery flames." Eventually, Margaret Hooper calls out to her husband, claiming the spirit is gone, and she comes up the stairs back to him. Together, with the rest of the household, Stephen and Margaret Hooper pray. During these prayers, the window is mysteriously opened, and suddenly, Margaret Hooper's leg's are thrust out the window, "so that they were clasped about the post in the middle of the Window betweene her leggs." As well, a great fire appears at her feet "the stink whereof was horrible." Her husband, and his brother decide to "charge the Devill in the name of the Father, the Sonne, and the holy Ghost to depart from her, and to trouble her no more," pulling her off the window. Margaret Hooper then cries out that she sees "a little child," (Anonymous 246) and upon looking out the window, a little child is seen, "with a very bright shinning countenance," that he outsides the candle. All present "fall flat to the ground," and pray. The child vanishes, and Margaret Hooper believes she is freed from her possession.(2 - 6)

Appears in:
Anonymous. Most Fearful and Strange News from Durham being a True Relation of one Margaret Hooper of Edenbyres. London: 1641, 2 - 6

Margret Hooper Margaret Hooper Victim
2365

A man from Ipswich in the county of Suffolk upon whom Mother Lakeland sent her imp in the shape of a dog to torment and kill. He has a child which Mother Lakeland's imp also torments and kills. (9)

Appears in:
Lakeland, Mother. The Laws Against Witches and Conjuration. London: 1645, 9

Lawrence Mr. Lawrence Victim
2366

A child from Ipswich in the county of Suffolk who is allegedly killed by Mother Lakeland's imp (in the shape of a dog). The imp torment the child before killing it.(9)

Appears in:
Lakeland, Mother. The Laws Against Witches and Conjuration. London: 1645, 9

Lawrence Mr. Lawrence's Child Victim
2367

A man from Hertfordshire, known to be a farmer and a landowner with at least three half acres. At harvest-time, he disagreed with Anon 490, a poor mower, on the matter of Anon 490's wage to mow his field of oats. When Anon 490 tried to bargain the price of his labor, Anon 489 declared that "the Devil himself should Mow his Oats before [Anon 490] should have anything to do with them." That night, his field burned, and in the morning, the oats were found to be unburnt, mowed in circular pattern. Anon 489 "is as yet afraid to remove them."(Title page)

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Mowing-Devil. Unknown: 1678, Title page

Anonymous 489 Anonymous 489 Victim
2370

A woman from Great Leighs, Essex, and the wife of John Cleveland. Margaret is allegedly bewitched to death by Elizabeth Brooke.()

Appears in:
Essex Record Office, . Calendar of Essex Assize Records. Online. http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk: 2011,

Margaret Cleveland Margaret Cleveland Victim
2373

The daughter of Gentleman who lives in "the west" (presumably of England), who is bewitched by a maidservant (Anonymous 493) who worked for her family who would allegedly steal small objects and give them to her friends. After the gentleman's daughter reported the maidservant (who swore vengeance on her), she began to experience torments; her mouth would twist and her tongue would extend if she attempted to speak. She would vomit burning coals, hair, hay, and rags, she would be pinched, beaten, and bitten (the indents of toothmarks could be seen). In the end the gentleman's daughter's allegation supposedly caused the examination of some 20 witches.()

Appears in:
D, I. A Letter Concerning the Witches in the West. London: 1670,

Anonymous 494 Victim