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Assertions for a specific person.

Name Description Original Text
Anne ArmstrongA servant from birks-nooke, Yorkshire (presumably Birks Fell, Yorkshire) who is sent by her master, Mabel Fouler of Burtree House, to go buy eggs from Anne Forster. they could not agree on a price, however, and so Forster desired to look at Armstrong's head. Three days later as Armstrong is back at Burtree house and in the pasture shortly after day break, a man approaches her and asks her where she was the Friday previous. Armstrong relates that she was trying to get eggs from Ann Forster. He responds that the woman who looked at Armstrong's head "should be the first that made a horse of her spirrit, and who should be the next that would ride her ; and into what shape and liknesses she should be changed, if she would turne to there God." Then, Armstrong relates at the deposition that "And withall tould this informer how they would use all meanes they could to allure her: first, by there tricks, by rideing in the house in empty wood dishes that had never beene wett, and also in egg shells ; and how to obtaine whatever they desired by swinging in a rope; and with severall dishes of meate and drinke. But, if she eate not of their meate, they could not harme her. And, at last, tould her how it should be divulgd by eateing a piece of cheese, which should be laid by her when she laie downe in a field with her apron cast over her head, and so left her. As soon as the informant left her, she allegedly fell dead and remained so until six in the morning. She then allegedly starts suffering from these "fits" almost every day and sometimes a few times a day. She would sometimes fall into a fit from evening until dawn and on one such occasion, Anne Forster allegedly came to her and tried to put a bridle on her who was now "in the likeness of a horse." She alleges that after this incident, about a dozen people on horseback appear to her, asking her to sing for them as they danced around her, first in the shape of hares, then cats, then mice and several other shapes. They then returned home on their horses, led by their "protector." They then repeated the even for another six or seven nights. After dancing, they would go to the "Eideing house" where they all sat at a table. In the middle of a room, there was a rope hanging and everyone would touch it several times which made whatever they desired appear on the table, including meat and drink. When Armstrong tried to avoid joining them, they turned into their "own shape" and threatened her. They then never bothered her again. One day, while in the field, she found a piece of cheese and brought it home. After that, she divulged everything " hath disclosed all which she formerly kept secrett". (192-193)Feb. 5, 1672-3. Newcastle-on-Tyne, before Ralph Jenison. Anne Armstrong, of Birks-nooke, saith, that, being servant to one Mable Fouler, of Burtree house, in August last, her dame sent her to seeke eggs of one Anne Forster, of Socksfield ; but as they could not agree for the price, the said Anne desired her to sitt downc and looke her head, which, accordingly, she did. And then the said Anne lookt this informant's head. And, when they had done, she went home. And, about three dayes after, seekeing the cowes in the pasture, a little after day-breake, she mett, as she thought, an old man with ragg'd cloaths, who askt this informant where she was on the Friday last. She tould him she was seekeing eggs at Stocksfield. So he tould her that the same woman that lookt her head should be the first that made a horse of her spirrit, and who should be the next that would ride her ; and into what shape and liknesses she should be changed, if she would turne to there God. And withall tould this informer how they would use all meanes they could to allure her: first, by there tricks, by rideing in the house in empty wood dishes that had never beene wett, and also in egg shells ; and how to obtaine whatever they desired by swinging in a rope; and with severall dishes of meate and drinke. But, if she eate not of their meate, they could not harme her. And, at last, tould her how it should be divulgd by eateing a piece of cheese, which should be laid by her when she laie downe in a field with her apron cast over her head, and so left her. But after he was gone she fell suddainely downe dead and continued dead till towards six that morneing. And, when she arose, went home, but kept all these things secrett. And since that time, for the most parte every day, and sometimes two or three times in the day, she has taken of these fitts, and continued as dead often from evening till cockcrow. And whilst she was lying in that condition, which happend one night a little before Christmas, about the change of the moone, this informant see the said Anne Forster come with a bridle, and bridled her and ridd upon her crosse-leggd, till they came to (the) rest of her companions at Rideing millnc bridg-cnd, where they usually mett. And when she light of her back, pulld the bridle of this informer's head, now in the likcnesso of a horse; but, Avhen the bridle was taken of, she stood up in her owne shape, and then she see the said Anne Forster, Anne Drydcn, of Prudhoe, and Luce Thompson, of Mickley, and tenne more unknowne to her, and a long black man rideing on a bay galloway, as she thought, which tlaey calld there protector. And when they had haukt theire horses, they stood all upon a bare spott of ground, and bid this informer sing whilst they danced in severall shapes; first, of a haire, then in their owne, and then in a catt, sometimes in a mouse, and in severall other shapes. And when they had done, bridled this informer, and the rest of the horses, and rid home with their protector first. And for six or seaven nights together they did the same. And the last night this informer was with them they mett all at a house called the Rideinge house, where she saw Forster, Drydon, and Thompson, and the rest, and theire protector, which they call'd their god, sitting at the head of the table in a gold chaire, as she thought; and a rope hanging over the roome, which every one touched three several times, and what ever was desired was sett upon the table, of several kindes of meate and drinke; and when they had eaten, she that was last drew the table and kept the reversions. This was their custome which they usually did. But when this informer used meancs to avoyd theire company they came in theire owne shapes, and threatned her, if she would not turne to theire god, the last shift should be the worst. And from that time they have not troubled her. But further saith that, un St. John day last, being in the field, seeking sheep, she sitt downe, being weary, and cast her apron over her head. And when she gott upp she found a piece cheese lying at her head, which she tooke up and brought home, and did eate of it, and since that time hath disclosed all which she formerly kept secrett [...]()