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Assertions for a specific person.

Name Description Original Text
Thomas CrosseA man from Thorpe (now Thorpe-le-Soken) in the county of Essex and brother to Robert Sanneuet and husband of Felice Okey. Thomas Crosse becomes "verye sickly, and at tymes was without any remembrance," some time around 1579. He calls Sanneuet to his side and claims that "Margaret Ewstace had bewitched him, and brought him into that weak state hee then was at." Sannuet, in a rage, claimed, that if that was true, he "wished a spyt red hotte [be put] in her buttocks." His wife claims that Thomas Crosse fell to the ground one day, and thereafter "hee coulde neyther see, heare, nor speake, and his face all to bee scratched." He often lost his sence, but when regained his wits, "woulde alwayes crye out vpon the sayde Elizabeth euen vnto his dying day, and woulde say that sithence shee the sayd Elizabeth had threatned him he was consumed, and that shee had bewitched him."()The Information of Robert Sanneuet, taken before me Brian Darcey Esquire, one of her M. Iustices the xiiii. of March. *** This Examinat saith, that iii. yeres sithence his brother Crosse was taken verye sickly, and at tymes was without any remembrance, & that he sent for this Examinat, & when he came vnto him, hee tolde him that Margaret Ewstace had bewitched him, and brought him into that weak state hee then was at: Wherto this Examinate saith, that if that bee so, hee then wished a spyt red hotte and in her buttocks, which speaches of his, hee sayth was carryed by one then in the house vnto the saide Mother Ewstace, and this Examinate saith, that shee seeing a neighbour of his going towardes this Examinates house, asked her whether shee was going, and she answered vnto this Examinates house: Wherevnto she the sayd Mother Ewstace should say, naye goe not thyther, for he saith I am a witch: And sayed, his wife is with Childe and lustie, but it will bee otherwise with her then hee looketh for: Whereuppon this Examinate saith, that his wife had a most straunge sicknes, and was deliuered of childe, which within short time after dyed. *** The enformation of Felice Okey widowe, taken by mee Brian Darcey esquire, one of her Maiesties Iustices of the peace, the xx. day of March against Elizabeth Ewstace. THe saide Felice sayeth, that shee was the late wife of Thomas Crosse, and that shee on a time finding the geese of Elizabeth Ewstace in her grounde, did driue them out, and that by mischaunce one of her geese was hurt: whereat the sayde Elizabeth fell out exceeding lye with this Examinate, and gaue her harde speeches, saying, that thy husbande shall not haue his health, nor that whiche hee hath shall not prosper so well as it hath done, and that shee also sayde, thou haste not had so good lucke with thy gooslings, but thou shalt haue as badde: And shee sayeth, that neuer after that shee coulde haue any of them geese whiche shee her selfe kept: and also the same night shee sayeth, that one of her Kine gaue downe blood in steede of mylke, and after for the space of viii. dayes. THis examinate saith, that her late husbande T. Crosse, was take~ in a stra~ge sort, & therof pyned, and sayeth, that on a time as her said husbande was a walking in his grounde, hee was ca[...] amongest B[...]hes, and was in that case that hee coulde neyther see, heare, nor speake, and his face all to bee scratched: and shee sayeth, that hee beeing in that strange case, when hee came to his memorie, hee woulde alwayes crye out vpon the sayde Elizabeth euen vnto his dying day, and woulde say that sithence shee the sayd Elizabeth had threatned him he was consumed, and that shee had bewitched him. ()