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Assertions for a specific person.

Name Description Original Text
Thomas CartwrightA man from Little Oakly in the county of Essex . Thomas Cartwright testifies at the indictment / examination of Annis Heard about a strange incident which transpired after he annoyed her. Heard had evidently used bough which had fallen off of Cartwright's tree after a heavy storm to make a ramp over a "wet or durtie place to goe ouer." Cartwright picked up the bough, to Heard's great annoyance, and "she said, that the churle (meaning this examinat) to a neighbour of hers had carried away the peece of the bough that she had laied to go ouer, saying, that shee woulde bee euen with him for it." Soon after two of Cartwright's cows wandered off in a snow storm. One fell in a ditch, twisting her neck so badly, she simply was not recovering, and Cartwright brained the animal to death. The other cow "caluing in a most strange sorte died. Cartwright said, without qualification, that "hee verily thinketh to be done by some witchery by the saide Annis Herd."(E6, E7-E7v)The enformation of Iohn Wadde, Thomas Cartwrite, Richard Harrison with seueral others the parishioners of little Okeley, taken by mee Brian Darcey Esquire one of her Maiesties Iustices the 16. day of march. [...] Thomas Cartwrite saith, that after a great winde & snowe wel neere three yeeres sithence, there was an arme or houghe of a tree of his that was blowen downe, whereof Annis Herd had remoued a peece and laid the same ouer a wet or durtie place to goe ouer, which being to this examinat vnknowen, hee tooke the same & the rest and carried it home: the which the saide Annis knowing, that hee had carried the same away, she said, that the churle (meaning this examinat) to a neighbour of hers had carried away the peece of the bough that she had laied to go ouer, saying, that shee woulde bee euen with him for it. After which this Examinat saith, within three nights after, there then beeing a snowe two of his beasts went from all the rest, where as they lay as he might well perceiue by the snowe, and the head Cowe fell ouer a great bancke into a ditch on the other side, and there lay with the necke double vnder her, and the head vnder the shoulder, but a liue, and he saith, he gate it home by good helpe and laied it in his harne, and faith, that it lay fourteene dayes in a growing and piteous sort, but of all that time woulde eate nothing: whereupon hee saith hee tooke an are & knocked it on the head. And also the other Cowe that was with the said Cow being a caluing in a most strange sorte died, the which this examinat faith, yt hee verily thinketh to be done by some witchery by the saide Annis Herd.()