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Assertions for a specific person.

Name Description Original Text
Bennet LaneA woman likely from Little Oakly in the county of Essex and wife of William Lanes, and a liberal users of countermgics. Bennet Lane testifies at the Annis Herd's indictement/ examination after a series of strange incidents happen in her home, following uncomfortable encounters with Annis Heard. Two or three weeks after having given Heard a pint of milk, Lane wanted to know from Heard's daughter, Annis Dowsing, when she might get her container back. Although the girl returned with the dish, Lane suspected foul play: "she could no lo~ger spin nor make a thread to hold," despite sharping her needle. She finally used a bit of countermagic, firing her needle and found it cured. This was not the last encounter which called for countermagic, however. Lane, having called in a loan from Heard, found her dairy processing came to a halt, no matter what she did, she could not seperate the milk and cream: "ye next day she would haue fleet hir milk bowle, but it wold not abide ye fleeting but would rop & role as it werethe white of an egge." She tried scoring the bowl with salt; she tried scaling it, but to no avail. The milk would burn and stink. She finally heated up a milk horseshoe, and submerged it in the milk and "shee coulde seath her milke, fleete her creame, and make her butter in good sort as she had before." Lane does not act as an accuser, per say, but as a witness to these events. Moreover, she provides an excellent example of the accessibility of countermagics. the white of an egge, also the milk being on the her it did not so soone seath but it would quaile, burne by and stincke, the which shee saide shee thought might be lo~g of y^ feeding of her beasts, or els that her vessels were not sweete, wherevpon she saith, she scalded her vessels, and scoured them with salt, thinking that might helpe, but it was neuer the better but as before: then she saith, shee was full of care, that shee shoulde loose both milke and creame, then shee saith it came into her minde to approoue another way, which was, shee tooke a horse shue and made it redde hote, and put it into the milke in the vessals, and so into her creame: and then she saith, shee coulde seath her milke, fleete her creame, and make her butter in good sort as she had before. (E7v-E8v)Bennet Lane wife of William Lane, saith, yt when she was a widdow, Annis Herd beeing at her house she gaue her a pint of milke & also lent her a pish to beare it home, the which dishe she rep a fortnight or 3. weekes, & then y^ girle of the said Annis Herds came to her house on a message & she asked the girle for the dish, & said though I gaue thy mother milk to make her a posset I gaue her not my dish, she this examinat being then a spinning: & so yt girle went home, & as it seemed told her mother, who by her sent her dish home to her yt which girle hauing done her arrand, & being but a while gone: shee this examinat saith, she could no lo~ger spin nor make a thread to hold, whereat she was so greeued yt she could not spin, she saith, she tooke her spindle and went to the grindstone therewith once or twise, & grownd it as smoth as she coulde, thinking it might be by some ruggednesse of ye spindle that did cause her thread to breake, and so when she had grownd it as wel as she could, she went againe to worke therewith, thinking that then it would haue done, but it would not do no better then it did before: then she saith, yt shee remembred her self and tooke her spindle and put it into ye fire, & made it red hot, & then cooled it gaine and went to worke, and then it wrought as well as euer it did at any time before. This examinat saith, that on other time the saide Annis Herd owed her two pence, and the time came that shee shoulde pay the Lordes rent, and she beeing a poore woman was constrained to aske her the two pence, and to borow besides (as shee said): whereto she the saide Annis answered, that shee had paied eight or nine shillings that weeke, and shee had it not nowe: saying she should haue it the next weeke, whereto shee this Examinat saide, you must needes helpe me with it now, for this day I must paye the Lordes rent, then shee saide shee must goe borrowe it, and so went and fetched it, saying, there is your money, whereunto shee this examinat answered, and said, now I owe you a pint of milke, come for it when you will & you shall haue it: the which she came for ye next day, & had it with ye better, this examinat saith, yt ye next day she would haue fleet hir milk bowle, but it wold not abide ye fleeting but would rop & role as it were the white of an egge, also the milk being on the her it did not so soone seath but it would quaile, burne by and stincke, the which shee saide shee thought might be lo~g of y^ feeding of her beasts, or els that her vessels were not sweete, wherevpon she saith, she scalded her vessels, and scoured them with salt, thinking that might helpe, but it was neuer the better but as before: then she saith, shee was full of care, that shee shoulde loose both milke and creame, then shee saith it came into her minde to approoue another way, which was, shee tooke a horse shue and made it redde hote, and put it into the milke in the vessals, and so into her creame: and then she saith, shee coulde seath her milke, fleete her creame, and make her butter in good sort as she had before. 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