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ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
1265

A man from High Halden in the county of Kent, described as an doctor and chemist. Dr. Jorden is most famously known for having been chief doctor in the cases of Mary Glover and Anne Gunter, two demoniacs. In both cases, Dr. Jorden refuted witchcraft as being the cause of their symptoms. During the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, the woman accused of bewitching Mary Glover, he came forward with another doctor, Dr. Argent, despite not having been asked to appear by the court. This was likely devised by Bishop Bancroft, a man who believed Mary Glover was counterfeiting her symptoms. Dr. Jorden testified during the trial, attempting to provide evidence with Dr. Argent that Glover's "ailment was not supernatural." Dr. Jorden claimed that the girl was likely afflicted with "passio hysterica." However, when pressed by the judge, Jorden "would not confirm that the disease could be cured," and further declined to treat the girl. He admitted during the trial that he did not thing Mary Glover was counterfeiting, prompting the judge, Lord Anderson to reply, "Then in my conscience, it is not naturall; for if you tell me neither a Naturall cause of it, nor a naturall remedy, I will tell you, that it is not naturall." Elizabeth Jorden was found guilty of witchcraft despite his attempt to intervene. This prompted Dr. Jorden to write his first text, "A Briefe Discourse of a Disease Called the Suffocation of the Mother." (1603) The text was written to show how "diuers strange actions and passions of the body of a man, which in the common opinion, are imputed to the Diuell, haue their true naturall causes, and do accompanie this disease." This text spurred a huge controversy, prompting fellows from both the College of Physicians such as Dr. Stephen Bradwell, and students of divinity, such as John Swan, to write their own texts, accusing Dr. Jorden of being a fearful scholar, unwilling to identify Mary Glover in his works, and dividing the opinion of physicians with "misconceipts." Dr. Bradwell further explains that Dr. Jorden "found, that neither all his books, observations, nor friends, were able to drawe out, the just limitts of that dissease." Yet, the first text he published, "A Briefe Discourse," was "the first book by an English physician which reclaimed the demoniacally possessed for medicine." Because of this, it was a notable text, that was responsible for dividing opinions at the College in London. Historically, the text has also been noted for its "transfer of the seat of all hysterical manifestations from the uterus to the brain," which was a "major turning point in the history of hysteria." Despite the trying of Elizabeth Jackson as a witch, and the response to his first published text, Dr. Jorden "played a major part in events that began the decline of witchcraft." The King came to value his opinion; the impression that Dr. Jorden left claiming that "much apparent witchcraft and possession was caused by hysteria," was strong. King James would call upon Dr. Jorden in 1605, when a young woman in Berkshire named Anne Gunter claimed to be bewitched. Her symptoms were similar to those of Mary Glover, save that Anne Gunter was thought to vomit pins - a classical sign of possession. Dr. Jorden immediately suspected that Gunter was conterfeit, giving her "neutral potions" that he claimed were powerful medicine. When Gunter reported that these "greatly relieved her symptoms," Dr. Jorden was more convinced. He next tested the woman using a test that was performed on Mary Glover: reciting the Lord's Prayer and the Apostle's Creed. Anne Gunter reacted with "expected convulsions," but only when the prayers were spoken in English, not Latin. This confirmed Anne Gunter's counterfeit, as the Devil was believed to be "an expert Latinist," resulting in Anne Gunter's confession. Dr. Jorden would publish a second text in his lifetime, "A Discourse of Naturall Bathes, and Minerall Waters" (1631). "A Discourse of Naturall Bathes" was a much more successful book than the former, going through five editions in the seventeenth century. Dr. Jorden was in fact a Fellow at the College of Physicians at the time of the publishing of both his texts, although he spent much of his practice in Bath. During his work, he gained the confidence of King James, and was allowed the treat the Queen on her visits to Bath, although he was never a Royal Physician. The physician married into the gentry, and wed his daughter to a mayor of Bath. (12-13)

Appears in:
Jorden, Edward. A Discourse of Natural Bathes, and Mineral Waters. London: 1669, 12-13

Edward Jorden Dr. Edward Jorden Witness
1265

A man from High Halden in the county of Kent, described as an doctor and chemist. Dr. Jorden is most famously known for having been chief doctor in the cases of Mary Glover and Anne Gunter, two demoniacs. In both cases, Dr. Jorden refuted witchcraft as being the cause of their symptoms. During the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, the woman accused of bewitching Mary Glover, he came forward with another doctor, Dr. Argent, despite not having been asked to appear by the court. This was likely devised by Bishop Bancroft, a man who believed Mary Glover was counterfeiting her symptoms. Dr. Jorden testified during the trial, attempting to provide evidence with Dr. Argent that Glover's "ailment was not supernatural." Dr. Jorden claimed that the girl was likely afflicted with "passio hysterica." However, when pressed by the judge, Jorden "would not confirm that the disease could be cured," and further declined to treat the girl. He admitted during the trial that he did not thing Mary Glover was counterfeiting, prompting the judge, Lord Anderson to reply, "Then in my conscience, it is not naturall; for if you tell me neither a Naturall cause of it, nor a naturall remedy, I will tell you, that it is not naturall." Elizabeth Jorden was found guilty of witchcraft despite his attempt to intervene. This prompted Dr. Jorden to write his first text, "A Briefe Discourse of a Disease Called the Suffocation of the Mother." (1603) The text was written to show how "diuers strange actions and passions of the body of a man, which in the common opinion, are imputed to the Diuell, haue their true naturall causes, and do accompanie this disease." This text spurred a huge controversy, prompting fellows from both the College of Physicians such as Dr. Stephen Bradwell, and students of divinity, such as John Swan, to write their own texts, accusing Dr. Jorden of being a fearful scholar, unwilling to identify Mary Glover in his works, and dividing the opinion of physicians with "misconceipts." Dr. Bradwell further explains that Dr. Jorden "found, that neither all his books, observations, nor friends, were able to drawe out, the just limitts of that dissease." Yet, the first text he published, "A Briefe Discourse," was "the first book by an English physician which reclaimed the demoniacally possessed for medicine." Because of this, it was a notable text, that was responsible for dividing opinions at the College in London. Historically, the text has also been noted for its "transfer of the seat of all hysterical manifestations from the uterus to the brain," which was a "major turning point in the history of hysteria." Despite the trying of Elizabeth Jackson as a witch, and the response to his first published text, Dr. Jorden "played a major part in events that began the decline of witchcraft." The King came to value his opinion; the impression that Dr. Jorden left claiming that "much apparent witchcraft and possession was caused by hysteria," was strong. King James would call upon Dr. Jorden in 1605, when a young woman in Berkshire named Anne Gunter claimed to be bewitched. Her symptoms were similar to those of Mary Glover, save that Anne Gunter was thought to vomit pins - a classical sign of possession. Dr. Jorden immediately suspected that Gunter was conterfeit, giving her "neutral potions" that he claimed were powerful medicine. When Gunter reported that these "greatly relieved her symptoms," Dr. Jorden was more convinced. He next tested the woman using a test that was performed on Mary Glover: reciting the Lord's Prayer and the Apostle's Creed. Anne Gunter reacted with "expected convulsions," but only when the prayers were spoken in English, not Latin. This confirmed Anne Gunter's counterfeit, as the Devil was believed to be "an expert Latinist," resulting in Anne Gunter's confession. Dr. Jorden would publish a second text in his lifetime, "A Discourse of Naturall Bathes, and Minerall Waters" (1631). "A Discourse of Naturall Bathes" was a much more successful book than the former, going through five editions in the seventeenth century. Dr. Jorden was in fact a Fellow at the College of Physicians at the time of the publishing of both his texts, although he spent much of his practice in Bath. During his work, he gained the confidence of King James, and was allowed the treat the Queen on her visits to Bath, although he was never a Royal Physician. The physician married into the gentry, and wed his daughter to a mayor of Bath. (12-13)

Appears in:
Jorden, Edward. A Discourse of Natural Bathes, and Mineral Waters. London: 1669, 12-13

Edward Jorden Dr. Edward Jorden Physician
1265

A man from High Halden in the county of Kent, described as an doctor and chemist. Dr. Jorden is most famously known for having been chief doctor in the cases of Mary Glover and Anne Gunter, two demoniacs. In both cases, Dr. Jorden refuted witchcraft as being the cause of their symptoms. During the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, the woman accused of bewitching Mary Glover, he came forward with another doctor, Dr. Argent, despite not having been asked to appear by the court. This was likely devised by Bishop Bancroft, a man who believed Mary Glover was counterfeiting her symptoms. Dr. Jorden testified during the trial, attempting to provide evidence with Dr. Argent that Glover's "ailment was not supernatural." Dr. Jorden claimed that the girl was likely afflicted with "passio hysterica." However, when pressed by the judge, Jorden "would not confirm that the disease could be cured," and further declined to treat the girl. He admitted during the trial that he did not thing Mary Glover was counterfeiting, prompting the judge, Lord Anderson to reply, "Then in my conscience, it is not naturall; for if you tell me neither a Naturall cause of it, nor a naturall remedy, I will tell you, that it is not naturall." Elizabeth Jorden was found guilty of witchcraft despite his attempt to intervene. This prompted Dr. Jorden to write his first text, "A Briefe Discourse of a Disease Called the Suffocation of the Mother." (1603) The text was written to show how "diuers strange actions and passions of the body of a man, which in the common opinion, are imputed to the Diuell, haue their true naturall causes, and do accompanie this disease." This text spurred a huge controversy, prompting fellows from both the College of Physicians such as Dr. Stephen Bradwell, and students of divinity, such as John Swan, to write their own texts, accusing Dr. Jorden of being a fearful scholar, unwilling to identify Mary Glover in his works, and dividing the opinion of physicians with "misconceipts." Dr. Bradwell further explains that Dr. Jorden "found, that neither all his books, observations, nor friends, were able to drawe out, the just limitts of that dissease." Yet, the first text he published, "A Briefe Discourse," was "the first book by an English physician which reclaimed the demoniacally possessed for medicine." Because of this, it was a notable text, that was responsible for dividing opinions at the College in London. Historically, the text has also been noted for its "transfer of the seat of all hysterical manifestations from the uterus to the brain," which was a "major turning point in the history of hysteria." Despite the trying of Elizabeth Jackson as a witch, and the response to his first published text, Dr. Jorden "played a major part in events that began the decline of witchcraft." The King came to value his opinion; the impression that Dr. Jorden left claiming that "much apparent witchcraft and possession was caused by hysteria," was strong. King James would call upon Dr. Jorden in 1605, when a young woman in Berkshire named Anne Gunter claimed to be bewitched. Her symptoms were similar to those of Mary Glover, save that Anne Gunter was thought to vomit pins - a classical sign of possession. Dr. Jorden immediately suspected that Gunter was conterfeit, giving her "neutral potions" that he claimed were powerful medicine. When Gunter reported that these "greatly relieved her symptoms," Dr. Jorden was more convinced. He next tested the woman using a test that was performed on Mary Glover: reciting the Lord's Prayer and the Apostle's Creed. Anne Gunter reacted with "expected convulsions," but only when the prayers were spoken in English, not Latin. This confirmed Anne Gunter's counterfeit, as the Devil was believed to be "an expert Latinist," resulting in Anne Gunter's confession. Dr. Jorden would publish a second text in his lifetime, "A Discourse of Naturall Bathes, and Minerall Waters" (1631). "A Discourse of Naturall Bathes" was a much more successful book than the former, going through five editions in the seventeenth century. Dr. Jorden was in fact a Fellow at the College of Physicians at the time of the publishing of both his texts, although he spent much of his practice in Bath. During his work, he gained the confidence of King James, and was allowed the treat the Queen on her visits to Bath, although he was never a Royal Physician. The physician married into the gentry, and wed his daughter to a mayor of Bath. (12-13)

Appears in:
Jorden, Edward. A Discourse of Natural Bathes, and Mineral Waters. London: 1669, 12-13

Edward Jorden Dr. Edward Jorden Author