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List of all events occurring in the personshorttitle of a given text

ID Short Description & Text Name Preferred Name Person Type
2298

A man from London, once the Somerset Herald and a victim of the persecutions of Queen Mary. Robert Glover was known as an Anglican martyr, who died by being being burned "at the stake in Smithfield," in Oxford. Upon his death, he allegedly cried out, "O he is come, he is come, the comforeter is come, the comforter is come, I am delivered, I am delivered!" Years later, his granddaughter, Mary Glover, experiences a number of violent fits, thought to be caused by the cursings of the old woman, Elizabeth Jackson. Eventually, an exorcism is performed on Mary Glover, in order to speed her dispossession. At the moment of her dispossession, Mary Glover allegedly cries these same words, causing her father to say "with a faultring voice," that "these were her Grandfather's words" when he "died on the pyre." This event was significant - it made Mary Glover "the central figure in a struggle between religious truth and official persecution."(14)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 14

Robert Glover Robert Glover Relative of Victim
2310

A number of women from London, gathered by the Recorder of London, Sir John Crook, to witness and participate in the testing of Mary Glover, a fourteen year old girl allegedly suffering from mysterious fits, and thought to be counterfeiting. These "several Neighbors," come in two groups: one with Mary Glover herself, and Gawthren Glover, the girl's mother; and another group with Elizabeth Jackson, the woman accused of bewitching the girl. One of the group is chosen to disguise herself as Elizabeth Jackson, and all witness that Mary Glover reacts to seeing the real Elizabeth Jackson nonetheless, as well as the numerous burns Sir John Crook gives Mary Glover in her fit. A second test that Anonymous 439 participated in was the touching of Mary Glover: the group of women stood around Mary Glover in her fit, on the bed, and each touch her. However, only when Elizabeth Jackson touches Mary Glover does she "cast" herself towards her, and her alone. The women believe Mary Glover to be bewitched. (12)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 12

Anonymous 439 (Plural) Witness
2312

A man from London, who serves as Lord Chief Justice for the trial of Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of bewitching the young girl, Mary Glover. Judge Anderson initially orders the Recorder of London, Sir John Crook, to verify the authenticity of Mary Glover's fits when Bishop Bancroft initially accuses Mary Glover of counterfeiting her symptoms in October 1602. Sir John Crook comes to the conclusion that Mary Glover truly is possessed, and so Elizabeth Jackson is appointed a trial on December 1, 1602, where Sir Edmund Anderson serves as Lord Chief Justice. Sir Edmund Anderson was an eminent figure in London, whose "opinions were strongly against Elizabeth Jackson." Anderson had previously presided over many witchcraft trials, "including two involving victims who had been exorcised by the famous Puritan thamauturgist, John Darrell." As such, Judge Anderson "was something of an expert inquisitor." During the trial, he examines Mary Glover, including having Elizabeth Jackson touch the girl's body during a fit, causing her to cast herself towards Jackson. He also bids Elizabeth Jackson say the Lord's Prayer and the Apostle's Creed, during which she cannot say the line "Deliver us from evil." He also evaluates evidence with his fellow justices, including Sir John Crook, Sir William Cornwallis, and Sir Jerome Bowes. When the doctor, Dr. Jorden, testifies that he believes Mary Glover's illness is caused by natural disease, he challenges the doctor. Judge Anderson asks the doctor the name of the disease and if he were willing to cure the girl. Dr. Jorden names the disease "Passio Hysterica," but declines treating the girl or identifying a cure. Lord Anderson sternly replies that he believes Mary Glover's disease "is not naturall: for if you tell me neither a Naturall cause, of it, nor a naturall remedy, I will tell you, that it is not naturall." In a similar vein, before the jury leaves to come to a verdict on Elizabeth Jackson at the trial, Sir Anderson advises the jury that "The Land is full of Witches," and that he has "hanged five or sixe and twenty of them." He elaborates that witches have "on their bodies divers strange marks," as Elizabeth Jackson is reported to have. Further, Judge Anderson declares that "you shall hardly finde any direct proofes in such a case," as the Devil is devious in his dealings. He reminds the Jury that Elizabeth Jackson is not afraid to threaten others, "She is full of Cursings, she threatens and prophesies, and still it takes effect." Judge Anderson also points out how illogical it is to believe that the cause of Mary Glover's fits is natural, considering the nature of her fits. Following him, the Recorder of London also gives his opinion that Mary Glover is bewitched. The jury, under this advice, finds Elizabeth Jackson guilty of witchcraft, and she is sentenced to a year's imprisonment. (12)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 12

Edmund Anderson Sir Edmund Anderson Examiner/Justice
2313

A man from London, who is both a doctor, and Bishop of London. Richard Bancroft believes that Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of witchcraft against the young girl, Mary Glover, is innocent. To this end, he petitions the court to examine Mary Glover for counterfeit symptoms, which the Lord Chief Justice Anderson agrees to, appointing the Recorder of London to examine the girl. Bishop Bancroft is a powerful man, who also manages to pull many strings, including helping Elizabeth Jackson plan a petition to the College of Physicians in November, 1602; and arranging for Dr. Jorden and Dr. Argent to testify that Mary Glover suffers from natural causes at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson. Despite his input, Elizabeth Jackson is found guilty of witchcraft. However, some months later, Bishop Bancroft is approached by the minister Mr. Lewis Hughes, who wishes to tell the Bishop of his success in dispossessing Mary Glover. However, Mr. Lewis is never granted an audience with the Bishop, and called "Rascall and varlot," for his stories. He is imprisoned for four months, and named along with the five other preachers present during Mary Glover's dispossession "Devil finders, Devil puffers, and Devill prayers," by the Bishop Bancroft. (12)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 12

Richard Bancroft Bishop Richard Bancroft Accuser
2313

A man from London, who is both a doctor, and Bishop of London. Richard Bancroft believes that Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of witchcraft against the young girl, Mary Glover, is innocent. To this end, he petitions the court to examine Mary Glover for counterfeit symptoms, which the Lord Chief Justice Anderson agrees to, appointing the Recorder of London to examine the girl. Bishop Bancroft is a powerful man, who also manages to pull many strings, including helping Elizabeth Jackson plan a petition to the College of Physicians in November, 1602; and arranging for Dr. Jorden and Dr. Argent to testify that Mary Glover suffers from natural causes at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson. Despite his input, Elizabeth Jackson is found guilty of witchcraft. However, some months later, Bishop Bancroft is approached by the minister Mr. Lewis Hughes, who wishes to tell the Bishop of his success in dispossessing Mary Glover. However, Mr. Lewis is never granted an audience with the Bishop, and called "Rascall and varlot," for his stories. He is imprisoned for four months, and named along with the five other preachers present during Mary Glover's dispossession "Devil finders, Devil puffers, and Devill prayers," by the Bishop Bancroft. (12)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 12

Richard Bancroft Bishop Richard Bancroft Examiner/Justice
2313

A man from London, who is both a doctor, and Bishop of London. Richard Bancroft believes that Elizabeth Jackson, a woman accused of witchcraft against the young girl, Mary Glover, is innocent. To this end, he petitions the court to examine Mary Glover for counterfeit symptoms, which the Lord Chief Justice Anderson agrees to, appointing the Recorder of London to examine the girl. Bishop Bancroft is a powerful man, who also manages to pull many strings, including helping Elizabeth Jackson plan a petition to the College of Physicians in November, 1602; and arranging for Dr. Jorden and Dr. Argent to testify that Mary Glover suffers from natural causes at the trial of Elizabeth Jackson. Despite his input, Elizabeth Jackson is found guilty of witchcraft. However, some months later, Bishop Bancroft is approached by the minister Mr. Lewis Hughes, who wishes to tell the Bishop of his success in dispossessing Mary Glover. However, Mr. Lewis is never granted an audience with the Bishop, and called "Rascall and varlot," for his stories. He is imprisoned for four months, and named along with the five other preachers present during Mary Glover's dispossession "Devil finders, Devil puffers, and Devill prayers," by the Bishop Bancroft. (12)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 12

Richard Bancroft Bishop Richard Bancroft Preacher/Minister
2315

A man from London, who was keenly involved in the Mary Glover case on many levels, as both a minister and a witness. Mr. Lewis Hughes was witness to the testing the Recorder of London of the young girl, including a series of tests such as bringing Elizabeth Jackson to Mary Glover in disguise, and burning the young girl when she is in a fit. Mr. Lewis Hughes further advises the Recorder, Sir John Crook, to test Elizabeth Jackson by bidding her saying the Lord's Prayer. Sir John Crook takes this advice, and has Elizabeth Jackson recite the prayer, and she is unable to utter the line, "Deliver us from evil." Mr. Lewis Hughes confirms that when he had frequented Elizabeth Jackson before, he had found it to be the case that she could never utter that line. Some months later, on December 1, 1602, Mr. Lewis Hughes testifies at the trial of Elizabeth Glover, against the old woman. Mr. Lewis Hughes admits in court that he was "willing to admonish the said Elizabeth Jackson of her lewde tongue," and so went to visit the old woman at her house. As soon as he entered her abode, she "very intentively fixt her eyes upon him," facing him. As the Preacher prepared to speak with her, he "had suddenly his speech taken from him, his necke became stiffe, and his Chin borne inwards into his bosome, his knees (withall) yeelding under him, as though he should fall." Calling upon God, the Preacher finds the strength to prevail, and is able to depart from Elizabeth Jackson's house. However, he is not able to speak for two hours afterward. He further confesses in court to visiting Elizabeth Jackson while she was in Newgate Prison, but he could "by no meanes cause her, to rehearse the beliefe," of God and Jesus Christ. Further, she refused of her own accord to say, "Deliver us from evil," once again. This evidence is heavily weighed in court. After Elizabeth Jackson is found guilty of witchcraft, Mr. Lewis Hughes is ordered by Sir John Crook to perform an exorcism on Mary Glover, as she still experiences fits. Leading a group of witnesses (Anonymous 437) in fasting and prayer with five other preachers: Mr. Swan, Mr. Bridger, Mr. Evans, Mr. Barber and Mr. Skelton; Mr. Lewis Hughes aids in the dispossession of Mary Glover, and takes the girl and her family includings Gawthren Glover, and Anne Glover, into his house at St. Helen's Bishopsgate in London for a year in order to watch over her and prevent the girl from being possessed again. It is also during this time that Mr. Lewis Hughes visits Bishop Bancroft on the advice of Sir John Crook, in order to report the success of Mary Glover's dispossession. Bishop Bancroft, however, is not pleased to hear this news, having been the first to accuse Mary Glover of counterfeit. He grants no audience to Mr. Lewis Hughes, and calls the man "Rascall and varlot," for his stories. Mr. Lewis Hughes is imprisoned for four months, and named along with the five other preachers present during Mary Glover's dispossession "Devil finders, Devil puffers, and Devill prayers." Some forty years after all these events, Mr. Lewis Hughes records them in a text he authors, named, "Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open." The text for the most part is dialogue between ministers. Often, Mr. Lewis Hughes is referenced as a very divine minister.(12-13)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 12-13

Lewis Hughes M. Lewis Hughes Preacher/Minister
2315

A man from London, who was keenly involved in the Mary Glover case on many levels, as both a minister and a witness. Mr. Lewis Hughes was witness to the testing the Recorder of London of the young girl, including a series of tests such as bringing Elizabeth Jackson to Mary Glover in disguise, and burning the young girl when she is in a fit. Mr. Lewis Hughes further advises the Recorder, Sir John Crook, to test Elizabeth Jackson by bidding her saying the Lord's Prayer. Sir John Crook takes this advice, and has Elizabeth Jackson recite the prayer, and she is unable to utter the line, "Deliver us from evil." Mr. Lewis Hughes confirms that when he had frequented Elizabeth Jackson before, he had found it to be the case that she could never utter that line. Some months later, on December 1, 1602, Mr. Lewis Hughes testifies at the trial of Elizabeth Glover, against the old woman. Mr. Lewis Hughes admits in court that he was "willing to admonish the said Elizabeth Jackson of her lewde tongue," and so went to visit the old woman at her house. As soon as he entered her abode, she "very intentively fixt her eyes upon him," facing him. As the Preacher prepared to speak with her, he "had suddenly his speech taken from him, his necke became stiffe, and his Chin borne inwards into his bosome, his knees (withall) yeelding under him, as though he should fall." Calling upon God, the Preacher finds the strength to prevail, and is able to depart from Elizabeth Jackson's house. However, he is not able to speak for two hours afterward. He further confesses in court to visiting Elizabeth Jackson while she was in Newgate Prison, but he could "by no meanes cause her, to rehearse the beliefe," of God and Jesus Christ. Further, she refused of her own accord to say, "Deliver us from evil," once again. This evidence is heavily weighed in court. After Elizabeth Jackson is found guilty of witchcraft, Mr. Lewis Hughes is ordered by Sir John Crook to perform an exorcism on Mary Glover, as she still experiences fits. Leading a group of witnesses (Anonymous 437) in fasting and prayer with five other preachers: Mr. Swan, Mr. Bridger, Mr. Evans, Mr. Barber and Mr. Skelton; Mr. Lewis Hughes aids in the dispossession of Mary Glover, and takes the girl and her family includings Gawthren Glover, and Anne Glover, into his house at St. Helen's Bishopsgate in London for a year in order to watch over her and prevent the girl from being possessed again. It is also during this time that Mr. Lewis Hughes visits Bishop Bancroft on the advice of Sir John Crook, in order to report the success of Mary Glover's dispossession. Bishop Bancroft, however, is not pleased to hear this news, having been the first to accuse Mary Glover of counterfeit. He grants no audience to Mr. Lewis Hughes, and calls the man "Rascall and varlot," for his stories. Mr. Lewis Hughes is imprisoned for four months, and named along with the five other preachers present during Mary Glover's dispossession "Devil finders, Devil puffers, and Devill prayers." Some forty years after all these events, Mr. Lewis Hughes records them in a text he authors, named, "Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open." The text for the most part is dialogue between ministers. Often, Mr. Lewis Hughes is referenced as a very divine minister.(12-13)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 12-13

Lewis Hughes M. Lewis Hughes Witness
2315

A man from London, who was keenly involved in the Mary Glover case on many levels, as both a minister and a witness. Mr. Lewis Hughes was witness to the testing the Recorder of London of the young girl, including a series of tests such as bringing Elizabeth Jackson to Mary Glover in disguise, and burning the young girl when she is in a fit. Mr. Lewis Hughes further advises the Recorder, Sir John Crook, to test Elizabeth Jackson by bidding her saying the Lord's Prayer. Sir John Crook takes this advice, and has Elizabeth Jackson recite the prayer, and she is unable to utter the line, "Deliver us from evil." Mr. Lewis Hughes confirms that when he had frequented Elizabeth Jackson before, he had found it to be the case that she could never utter that line. Some months later, on December 1, 1602, Mr. Lewis Hughes testifies at the trial of Elizabeth Glover, against the old woman. Mr. Lewis Hughes admits in court that he was "willing to admonish the said Elizabeth Jackson of her lewde tongue," and so went to visit the old woman at her house. As soon as he entered her abode, she "very intentively fixt her eyes upon him," facing him. As the Preacher prepared to speak with her, he "had suddenly his speech taken from him, his necke became stiffe, and his Chin borne inwards into his bosome, his knees (withall) yeelding under him, as though he should fall." Calling upon God, the Preacher finds the strength to prevail, and is able to depart from Elizabeth Jackson's house. However, he is not able to speak for two hours afterward. He further confesses in court to visiting Elizabeth Jackson while she was in Newgate Prison, but he could "by no meanes cause her, to rehearse the beliefe," of God and Jesus Christ. Further, she refused of her own accord to say, "Deliver us from evil," once again. This evidence is heavily weighed in court. After Elizabeth Jackson is found guilty of witchcraft, Mr. Lewis Hughes is ordered by Sir John Crook to perform an exorcism on Mary Glover, as she still experiences fits. Leading a group of witnesses (Anonymous 437) in fasting and prayer with five other preachers: Mr. Swan, Mr. Bridger, Mr. Evans, Mr. Barber and Mr. Skelton; Mr. Lewis Hughes aids in the dispossession of Mary Glover, and takes the girl and her family includings Gawthren Glover, and Anne Glover, into his house at St. Helen's Bishopsgate in London for a year in order to watch over her and prevent the girl from being possessed again. It is also during this time that Mr. Lewis Hughes visits Bishop Bancroft on the advice of Sir John Crook, in order to report the success of Mary Glover's dispossession. Bishop Bancroft, however, is not pleased to hear this news, having been the first to accuse Mary Glover of counterfeit. He grants no audience to Mr. Lewis Hughes, and calls the man "Rascall and varlot," for his stories. Mr. Lewis Hughes is imprisoned for four months, and named along with the five other preachers present during Mary Glover's dispossession "Devil finders, Devil puffers, and Devill prayers." Some forty years after all these events, Mr. Lewis Hughes records them in a text he authors, named, "Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open." The text for the most part is dialogue between ministers. Often, Mr. Lewis Hughes is referenced as a very divine minister.(12-13)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 12-13

Lewis Hughes M. Lewis Hughes Victim
2315

A man from London, who was keenly involved in the Mary Glover case on many levels, as both a minister and a witness. Mr. Lewis Hughes was witness to the testing the Recorder of London of the young girl, including a series of tests such as bringing Elizabeth Jackson to Mary Glover in disguise, and burning the young girl when she is in a fit. Mr. Lewis Hughes further advises the Recorder, Sir John Crook, to test Elizabeth Jackson by bidding her saying the Lord's Prayer. Sir John Crook takes this advice, and has Elizabeth Jackson recite the prayer, and she is unable to utter the line, "Deliver us from evil." Mr. Lewis Hughes confirms that when he had frequented Elizabeth Jackson before, he had found it to be the case that she could never utter that line. Some months later, on December 1, 1602, Mr. Lewis Hughes testifies at the trial of Elizabeth Glover, against the old woman. Mr. Lewis Hughes admits in court that he was "willing to admonish the said Elizabeth Jackson of her lewde tongue," and so went to visit the old woman at her house. As soon as he entered her abode, she "very intentively fixt her eyes upon him," facing him. As the Preacher prepared to speak with her, he "had suddenly his speech taken from him, his necke became stiffe, and his Chin borne inwards into his bosome, his knees (withall) yeelding under him, as though he should fall." Calling upon God, the Preacher finds the strength to prevail, and is able to depart from Elizabeth Jackson's house. However, he is not able to speak for two hours afterward. He further confesses in court to visiting Elizabeth Jackson while she was in Newgate Prison, but he could "by no meanes cause her, to rehearse the beliefe," of God and Jesus Christ. Further, she refused of her own accord to say, "Deliver us from evil," once again. This evidence is heavily weighed in court. After Elizabeth Jackson is found guilty of witchcraft, Mr. Lewis Hughes is ordered by Sir John Crook to perform an exorcism on Mary Glover, as she still experiences fits. Leading a group of witnesses (Anonymous 437) in fasting and prayer with five other preachers: Mr. Swan, Mr. Bridger, Mr. Evans, Mr. Barber and Mr. Skelton; Mr. Lewis Hughes aids in the dispossession of Mary Glover, and takes the girl and her family includings Gawthren Glover, and Anne Glover, into his house at St. Helen's Bishopsgate in London for a year in order to watch over her and prevent the girl from being possessed again. It is also during this time that Mr. Lewis Hughes visits Bishop Bancroft on the advice of Sir John Crook, in order to report the success of Mary Glover's dispossession. Bishop Bancroft, however, is not pleased to hear this news, having been the first to accuse Mary Glover of counterfeit. He grants no audience to Mr. Lewis Hughes, and calls the man "Rascall and varlot," for his stories. Mr. Lewis Hughes is imprisoned for four months, and named along with the five other preachers present during Mary Glover's dispossession "Devil finders, Devil puffers, and Devill prayers." Some forty years after all these events, Mr. Lewis Hughes records them in a text he authors, named, "Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open." The text for the most part is dialogue between ministers. Often, Mr. Lewis Hughes is referenced as a very divine minister.(12-13)

Appears in:
Hughes, Lewes. Certaine grievances, or the errours of the service-booke; plainely layd open. London: 1641, 12-13

Lewis Hughes M. Lewis Hughes Author