Go back

Assertions for a specific being.

Name Description Original Text
The DevilThe Devil allegedly appeared to Thomas Sawdie first in the form of a woman who offered him money, and when Sawdie refused, as a great black dog with fiery eyes for the next three nights until the boy accepted and agreed to meet him in a field in eight weeks' time. The morning after Sawdie made his compact, he began suffering fits. Sawdie also began howling and whistling whenever anyone prayed or read scripture, and then would fall into a dead sleep. The Devil appeared thereafter in the form of "a little man, with long fingers, and great eyes, clad all in black, and that usually like Velvet" who would sometimes be pleasant and show Sawdie wondrous things, and at other times would threaten him. The Devil was finally cast out when Sawdie's Master, John Roberts, gathered the aid of several ministers, led by Mr. Teag, to pray over the boy, which weakened the possession enough that Sawdie was freed the next day after being made to recite the Lord's Prayer repeatedly out in the field. Sawdie claimed that reciting the Lord's Prayer caused the Devil to leave him out his mouth in the form of a rat which went into a fire at the hedge in the ditch bordering the field, at which time the fire ascended into the air with the rat and sailed off into the distance.In a Field, as he was on his way alone, not far from his Masters house, there met him the appearance of a Woman very gawdy, all in white: who asked him, whether he wanted any money: whether he would have any money: reaching out money to him with her hand. The Boy refused it. On this the Spectrum or appearance vanished away, rushing by him with some muttering, discontented words, which he did not understand, and suddenly a great Black Dog, with very great and fiery eyes stood before him; on which he fel to the ground as dead, but when he recovered, and rose up, he saw nothing. After this he went home, and followed his business; but that night lying with his Fellow-servant he rested very unquietly, and there appeared to him again the former spectrum in the shape, or likeness of a great black Dog, which charged him, that he should not discover any thing that he has seen, and that he would come again to him the next night. The second night, when his Bed-fellow was asleep, it came again, and stood by his bed-side, as before; made him some tempting proffers, and went off. And the Boy confesseth, that he was not then afraid, though he heard the voice of a man out of the mouth of a Dog. The third night it came as formerly; and asked him whether he would have any money? and the money tendred was eight pieces, as great as pieces of Eight, very specious, which were given hm, and received by him, on this condition, that he shouly come to it neer the Bakes-Park-Gate (which was neer his Masters house) on the Lords Day in the afternoon (which is called Ugly Day) which was to be the Evening before the next Fair, to be held at Lawricks, eight weeks distant from the former: To which Fair he should be carried, and have all his desires. On this the boy fell sick, swelling in his stomack and belly, and almost totally lost his appetite to mead. In which manner he continued for a Fortnights space: then the swelling struck up into his neck and throat, most thinking that it was an impostume: some that it was wormes; but the apparition told the Boy that this was not sickness[.]

Appears in:
Anonymous. A Return of Prayer: or A Faithful Relation of Some Remarkable Passages of Providence concerning Thomas Sawdie. London: 1664, 1-2

The DevilThe Devil appears in the form of "prodigious and horrid shapes" to Christian shaw during her fits and threatens "to devour her, and then she would fall dead and stiff with all the parts of her body distepded and stretched out as a Corpse without sense or motion."About the eight of December, being brought home again from Glafgow having had six or seven days refpite from her fits, fhe afterwards fell into awful and terrifyig fits: The occafion whereof fhe declared to be, her feeing the Devil in prodigious and horrid fhapes, threatening to devour her, and then fhe would fall dead and ftiff with all the parts of her body diftepded and ftretched out as a Corpse without fenfe or motion, which fits as they came fuddenly on without her knowledge, fo fhe did as fuddenly recove[r] and grew perfectly well[.]

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. A True Narrative of the Sufferings and Relief of a Young Girle; Strangely Molested, by Evil Spirits and their Instruments. Edinburgh: 1698, 12-13

The DevilThe Devil appears to Lewis Gaufredy of Marcelles, Fance "in humane shape, apparelled like a Gallant Fellowe." Gaufredy describes how the Devil appeared to him after he "began to reade on a Magicke Booke," which he had recieved from his uncle. Gaufredy was initially frightened by the Devil's visit, and was also "possessed with two verie badde affections," which he clarifies are ambition and being in the "companie of some special Maidens." I[t] is about some 13. or 16. y[e]eres since I began to reade on a Magicke Booke, which I had from an Unckle of mine, about the same time, & during these entercourses, the Diuell appeared vnto mee in humane shape, apparelled like a Gallant Fellowe. At the first confcontment I was affrighted, and then I was possessed with two verie badde affections, which I had affected of long time before; One was of Ambition, to liue in great reputation in the world, but especially amo[n]gst honest men; and the other was, a certaine disordinate affection, to inioy the companie of some speciall Maidens.

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Life and Death of Lewis Gaufredy. London: 1612, 10

The DevilA being described as the Devil is alleged to have appeared, first in the shape of a young handsome man and later in the shape of a blackish-grey cat or kitten, to Aubrey Grinset. Aubrey Grinset alleges that the Devil, in both forms, sucked blood from a teat on her body. She also claims that the Devil bid her to send her imp against Thomas Spatchet, and would allow her no rest until she did. As she lay dying in prison, she attributes damage to her arms and hands to the Devil coming to her when alone, and dragging her from the bed to under and back again. She keeps two cudgels in her bed to to fight him off with.And then She Confessed, that She had made a league with the Devil, and was inticed to it by a Witch at a Wedding, that She had been a Witch above Twen[t]y Years [...] Also She Confessed to them, that the Devil had drawn Blood of her, and that he did appear in the form of a Pretty handsom Young Man first, and spake to her [in] a hollow Solemn Voice, but She would not declare what he spake; and since Appeareth to he[r] in the form of a blackish Gray Cat or Kitling, that it sucketh of a Tett (which Searchers sin[c]e saw in the place She mentioned and hath drawn Blood. [...] He asked her whether She had imployed her Imp to him and why She did it? She Confessed that She had sent it to him and said that She did bear him no Ill will, but it was against her Will, She could not help it, the Devil would let her be at no quiet [...] She would not Confess to him any thing of Witchery, but only this; That She had made an agreement with the Devil, and it was now too late for Her to Repent; for she was Damned, or to this Effect she spake. She had two Cudgels lay on her Bed, and he asked her what she did with those. She answerd, she had them there to Fight with the Devil, he did so misuse her. She was there alone, and he dragged her out of the Bed, and under the Bed: they below, hearing such a Noise, and knowing there was no Body with her, they went up and she was Bloody; she Confessed to them it was the Devil that came to her.

Appears in:
Petto, Samuel. A Faithful Narrative of the Wonderful and Extraordinary Fits . London: 1693, 18, 27-28

The DevilThe Devil appears in the form of a human to Lewis Gaudefry and asks him, "What wilt thou with me, for thou hast called me." Gaudefry replies that he desires two things: that "all the women that I shall be in loue withall, doe affect and follow me," and to "gaine estimation and honour aboue all other Priests of this Country, and amongst men of worth and credit." The Devil promises to do these things if Gaudefry gives him "his body, his soule, and his workes."[...] in conclusion the Diuell did visibly appeare vnto him in a humane shape, and said. What wilt thou with me, for thou hast called me? And after some discourse, the said Lewes Gawfridi said vnto him, If thou hast power to giue mee what I desire, I aske of thee two things. First that all the women that I shall be in loue withall, doe affect and follow me: Secondly that I may gaine estimation and honour aboue all other Priests of this Country, and amongst men of worth and credit. The diuell hauing promised him these two things did reciprocally demand, to haue giuen him his body, his soule, and his workes: whereunto hee answered, that hee would freely bestow these three things vpon him, onely hee desired to make reseruation of administring the Sacraments.

Appears in:
Machaelis, Sebastien. The Admirable History of the Posession and Conversion of a Penitent Woman. London: 1613, 7

The DevilThe Devil allegedly appears to Christian Shaw "About the Eighth of December" after she had "had six or seven days respite from her Fits." When the Devil appeared, "in Prodigious and Horrid Shapes," Shaw "fell into a frightful and terrible Relapse." The Devil also allegedly appeared to Shaw a second time, when she was "in a Light-headed-fit," this time taking "the Shape of a man." Upon the Devil's second appearance, Shaw is "struck with great Fear and Consternation," and desired to "Pray with an Audible Voice, The Lord Rebuke thee Satan."About the Eighth of December, being brought home again from Glasgow, and having had six or seven days respite from her Fits, she fell into a frightful and terrible Relapse: The occasion whereof she declar'd to be, her seeing the Devil in Prodigious and Horrid Shapes, threatning to devour her

Appears in:
Cullen, Francis Grant. Sadducimus Debellatus. London: 1698, 9

The DevilThe Devil appears to prisoners in the Ipswich prison and haunts, possesses, and torments them. He also appears to various others either to haunt or help them in the practice of witchcraft.A young Gentlewoman told me at Ipswich, she was in Prison with a Witch, who was exhorted to repent, and did endeavour it, and then the Devil made her fume and sweat, and stopped her breath almost; and after half an hour she came to her self, and being asked if the Devil did not possesse her, to diverts her from Repenting, she answered, Yea. So Ramigius the Judge of Lotharingia observed, that at the Bench, or in Prison, or at their Liberty, (as we have also heard Relations thereof) the Devil would come and stop their Ears, or almost choak them, or anoy them like a swarm of Flies, or throw them along, when they had good Counsel given, or intended to lay hold on God's Mercy, whom they had at their Witch-making-covenant so solemnly renounced, together with all Faith in him, and Religion towards him. [...] But it is the Devil that doth these things; for such Ceremonies do nothing, or at least most of them, in other Peoples hands; the Devil and they make a Bargain, he to help them to Money, or Revenge, and they to give him their Souls at last, to live in servitude and Vassalage eternally with him. [...] Remigius saith, The Devil gave one Woman a little Hay, which she was to put into her Neighbours Thatch; and the house would be soon on Fire. [...] that the Devil gave them this Powder thus; After they had all anointed themselves, or flyen on Goats, Besoms, or the like, enchanted by their Diabolical Arts to carry them either high or low, that is, on the ground, or aloft in

Appears in:
Drage, William. Daimonomageia a Small Treatise of Sickness and Diseases from Witchcraft. London: 1665, 12-18

The DevilThe Devil appears in the form of a mouse to William Sommers while in prison and urges him to say his possession was counterfeit. According to the Devil, if Sommers makes this claim then he will save Sommers from being hung.So[m]mers was committed to prison, where the Deuil appeared vnto him in liknes of a mouse: threatning that if he would not let him and would not saie that all that he had done touching his tormenting during his possessio[n] was but counterfeyt, then he should be hangd: but if he would yeeld to him, he would save him.

Appears in:
Co., G.. A Breife Narration of the Possession, Dispossession, and, Repossession of William Sommers. Amsterdam: 1598, 8

The DevilThe Devil appears to Margaret Byrom in the form of Hartlay, a person she will be examined on the following day. The Devil warns Margaret to be careful concerning the things she says about Hartlay, and offers her "silluer and gould," but she does not accept his offer. The two next nights before the day of her examination concerning Hartlay, appeared the deuill in the liknesse of Hartlay requesting her to take heed what she sayd, and to speake the truth, for the time was come promissing her siiluer and gould. she answered (thinking it to be Hartlay) that the truth she had spoken already, & that she would not favour him neither for siluer nor gold: the 2 night he departed say+ing doe as thou wilt. the day before Hartlay his execution was a sore day vnto her, after which euery day she went to morning prayer, & was neuer troubled in the Church save the 1 day, wheron it took her about the middest of the sermon, in heaving vp her shoulders, de|priuing her of her sences after the recouery of her sences, it tooke a|way the vse of her leggs: and thus it molested her in the Church, to the admvration of the people, about an hower and halfe.

Appears in:
Darrel, John. A True Narration of the Strange and Greuous Vexation by the Devil, of 7. Persons in Lancashire, and William Somers of Nottingham. Unknown: 1600, 7

The DevilThe Devil appears to Richard Dugdale and points "at something which the said Richard had lately done." This alleged appearance leads people to believe that Richard offered "himself to Satan as a Bond, or some other Compact, or Consent to Satan, for satisfying his desires, either of dancing or of some other matter." [...] ever after the faid Rufhburying Riot, he had a great refrain from it, and that in the week after, the faid James-tides Dancing and Drunken Fit, or after the faid Dancing Humor did thereupon poffefs him, he had the Apparition of a Mans head all along in the way as he went to Weftby-Hall, where as he was working hard at the Hay, he was taken with an unufual Merrinefs, and in the Evening of the fame day he made himfelf Drunken, and then he was tranfported into fuch a height of Prophanenefs as did aftonish the Bynary power over him; yea, he himfelf faid, that in the faid Evening, he had an Apparition of the Devil, pointing at fometing which the faid Richard had lately done, which we concluded was Richards offering himfelf to Satan as a Bond, or fome other Compact, or Confent to Satan, for fatisfying his defires, either of Dancing or of fome other matter[.]

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. The Surey Demoniack, or, An Account of Satans Strange and Dreadful Actings. London: 1697, Image 6

The DevilThe Devil allegedly possesses Richard Dugdale in Surrey near Lancaster, causing Richard Dugdale to experience a number of unnatural fits over the course of a year. These fits are characterized by the vomiting of many objects, his ability to foretell that "which he could know by any ordinary means," his speaking in another voice, extreme weight change, his blasphemy against God, speaking other languages, abnormal lumps in his chest and belly, the transformation of these lumps into animals, strange movements of his body, dancing fits, and the inability to feel pinpricks. The Devil allegedly speaks through Richard Dugdale's body, claiming that Richard Dugdale was in a contract with him "That he might excel all others in Dancing: That the Contract was for 18 months." Once, the Devil appears to Richard Dugdale in one of his fits, causing Richard Dugdale to confess to his contract. The Devil commonly refers to Richard Dugdale as "Dicky" when he speaks through Richard Dugdale during his fits.1. His telling, and foretelling of things in his Fits, which he could not possibly know by any ordinary means. In his Fits he always, so far as we can learn, told when his next Fit would come, tho he had no external direction at all; yet still his fits came at that time exactly as those who had Watches, and observed, can aver in manifold Instances: He could tell of Persons coming at a considerable distance, who they were; and whence they came; and what they did by the way; with many such like Instances. Can those who call this a Cheat, hire, or threaten him to the doing of these, and of the following Feats as formerly? 2. His Ability of Body in his Fits, beyond the Joint Strength of many Lusty Men : His Agility also, beyond any Art, he had at other times: Yea, beyond the Lawful Art of any other. Whenas his Ability was but ordinary, and his Agility less than ordinary, at other times. 3. The speaking in him of another Voice, besides his own, sometimes speaking many Words, and Sentences, in which were Dental and Labial Letters, when he made no use of the Organs of Speech: Yea, two Voices at once have been heard from him, the one being of a very hideous sound: And his words, as in his ordinary discourse, distinctly heard at a Mile and a half distance. 4. his being in the same Fit, one while as heavy as a Lump of Lead of that bigness, and other while as light as a Bag of Feathers of 14 or 16 pound weight. Also as to the siffness of his Body, it being inflexible in some part of his Fits, as a Bar of Iron, yea Brethless, Sensless, and Lifeless to other apprehension for a considerable time. [...] 6. His speaking several languages, which he never learned, nor understood any thing of (tho at other times it seemed to be a sort of Gibberish, to some of us; or a Language which the Hearers understood not) and sometimes singing in Latin Verse, whilst in his Fits. [...] The Devil taking advantage by his Lunacy, to get Possession of him, as we call Melancholy

Appears in:
Jollie, Thomas. A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack as no Imposter. London: 1698, 45-47

The DevilThe Devil who appears to Mother Lakeland in that hour, "between sleeping and waking." it speaks to her in "a hollow voyce, telling her, that if she would serve him she should want nothing." Lakeland refuses The Devil numerous times. Finally she agrees to work with him and he "stroke his claw (as she confessed) into her hand, and with her blood wrote the Covenants."The Devil came to her first between sleeping and waking, and spake to her in a hollow voyce, telling her, that if she would serve him she should want nothing. After often sollicitation she consented to him; then he stroke his claw (as she confessed) into her hand, and with her blood wrote the Covenants. (Now the subtilty of Sathan is to be observed, in that he did not presse her to deny God and Christ, as he useth to do to others; because she was a Professour, and might have lost all his hold by pressing her too far)[.]

Appears in:
Lakeland, Mother. The Laws Against Witches and Conjuration. London: 1645, 7

The DevilThe Devil appears in the "likeness of a young man" to Rebecca West, and promises "that she should be revenged of all her Enemies" if she denies God. West uses the Devil to seek revenge upon John Star and Thomas Hart. West also claims that "the Devil came to her one Night as she was going to Bed, and told her he would Mary her, and that he then kissed her, but was as cold as Clay."The Court being Sat, Rebecca West was brought to the Bar, when after her Indictment was Read. Iohn Edes was call'd as an Evidence against her, who Deposed that the said Rekecca West some Weeks a go Confess'd to him; that she had familiarity with the Devil, who came to her in the likeness of a young Man, promising her that she should be revenged of all her Enimies, and have what she desired, if she would deny God and wholy trust to him; and that the said Prisoner further told him, that upon requesting the Devil to revenge her on one Iohn Start who Livd in the same House, he quickly after Sickned and Dyed, so that she then thought he could do as God, and thereupon desired him to joyn in that Wicked and Develish Art, Mathew Hopkins, also Deposed that the said Prisoner Confessed to him since in Prison, that the Devil came to her one Night as she was going to Bed, and told her he would Mary her, and that he then kissed her, but was as cold as Clay, and that he took her by the Hand and leading her about the Chamber a turn or two, he said they were Married, and promised to be her Loving Hu[1 letter missing]band, and to avenge her of her Enimies; and that she sent the Devil to Kill the said Iohn Hart, which was done accordingly. Thomas Hart Father of the Deceased Deposed that he verily believed that his Son dyed by Witchcraft, and that during his Torture he heard him cry out against Rebecca West; a Docter of Physick also spoke to the same Effect, as did several otheres; Upon which being asked by the Court what she could say for herself, she only alledged that her great Povety had occasion'd all this, and pleaded guilty, desiring Mercy, but the Jury after having received their Charge, Imediatly brought her in guilty of Murther and Witch-craft.

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Full Trials, Examination, and Condemnation of Four Notorious Witches. London: 1690, 2-3

The DevilThe Devil appears to Margaret Johnson in the shape of a well dressed (and by extension wealthy) man. He promises to provide for "all her wantes," and "helpe her to kill and revenge her either of men or beeste, if she will give him her soul." She agrees and he asks that she call him MemillionIn a fit of anger and discontent a devil had appeared to her in the form of a man 'apparrelled in a suite of blacled, ties about with silk pointes, whow offered her, if she would give him her soule, he would supply all her wantes, and at her appointment would helpe her to kill and revenge her either of men or beeste, or what she desired'. To this she agreed and the devil bade her call him Memillion, and when she called he would be ready to do her will.

Appears in:
Keynes, Geoffrey. The Life of William Harvey. Oxford: 1966, 209

The DevilThe Devil forms a covenent with Mr. Lowes Parson of Brandon, Suffolk, enabling Mr. Lowes Parson to bewitch a ship, and give suck to Imps, an act that leaves "a teat on the crowne of his head, and two under his tongue. This malefic compact also gives Lowes the ability to perform "threescore sermons" while deceiving others.THIS above-named Mr. Lowes Parson of Branson in Suffolke, (being araigned there for witch-craft,) confessed that he bewitched a Ship neere Harwidge, so that with the extreame tempesteous Seas raised by blusterous windes the said Ship was cast away, wherein were many passengers, who were by this meanes swallowed up by the mercilesse waves, further he confessed that he had done many other most hanous, wicked, and accursed acts, by the help of six Jmpes which he had that frequented him daily. This Mr. Lowes preached about threescore sermons after he had made his Covenent with the Devill, and had a teat on the crowne of his head, and two under his tongue: and there is none that maketh a Covenant with the Devill but hath from him a private marke.

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 3

The DevilThe Devil appears to a number of witches imprisoned in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. With one in particular (Anonymous 273), he engages in "carnall copulation" so that she conceives twice by him, the offspring of which "run away in most horrid long and ugly shapes."Besides these are 120. more suspected Witches in prison, at St. Edmunds-bury, who had all their Tryall now: but that the Judge and Justices were compelled to adjourne the said Sessions till another time by reason of the neere aproaching of the Cavaliers. And of those Witches some have confessed that they have had carnall copulation with the Devill, one of which said that she had (before her husband dyed) conceived twice by him, but as soone as she was delivered of them they run away in most horrid long and ugly shapes.

Appears in:
Anonymous. A True Relation of the Araignment of Eighteene Witches. London: 1645, 5

The DevilThe Devil allegedly convinces Mistress Bodenham through much discussion to sign her soul to him "in a bloody scroule," and convinces her to corrupt Anne Styles, so that she too signs over her soul. When Anne Styles attempts to flee to London to repent her action, the Devil stops her at Stockbridge, and "cast her to and froe." While a Gentleman prays for Anne Styles for a period of four days, he torments her, and appears before her in the form of a snake (Anonymous 75).When men and women leave the way of God, and goodnesse quite, They practice mischief every day, and therein take delight The Divel then is nye at hand When these things he doth understand, You that will goe, High or low Resolve upon this doubt. As by the Story you shall heare []ft you will list a while The Divell lately did appetite; and a Woman did beguile. But she did make the way before, And to her heart did him adore You that will goe, &c. Sin Fisherton this dame did dwell of conversation bad, She did converse with the Divell of Hell, which made her friends all sad, Unto the Divell she gave her soule Sealed in a bloody scroule, You that will goe, &c.

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Salisbury Assizes. Or the Reward of Witchcraft. London: 1653, 1

The DevilThe Devil who meets James Day in a field on June 15, 1686 and who convinces him to "sell himself to him for ever, in consideration of seventeen years Life and Happiness," and asks him to write a lease for his soul in blood. However, when James Day takes too long, the Devil "bit him tare it," and drew up a lease himself, which James Day refuses to sign as he does not understand it. The Devil takes James Day to an unknown Tavern and plies him with drink which magically filled themselves, and pressures him to sign the lease. After, the Devil allows James Day to return home with the promise he will return in a week to perfect the lease.; and that accordingly he did go to those fields, and there met the Devil, and that after a a good while Conference with him, he agreed to Sell himself to him for ever, in consideration of seventeen years Life and Happiness, and that pursuant to this Agreement, the Boy was writing a Lease, or Deed, or Sale in his own Blood, having cut his Finger for that purpose; but when he had written part of it, the Devil bid him tare it, for that he himself could do it better and faster; and accordingly the Devil did draw up a lease, and read it to the Boy, wherein he was assured of Gold and Silver in great plenty, but some of the Words he could not understand; and that the Devil would have had him sign the said Lease at that time, which he was unwilling to do, without some further time to consider it, but appointed to meet him again the Saturday following for the perfecting of it; and that the Devil carryd him that afternoon to a House that lookt like a Tavern, he knows not where, but that they had there Sack and March Beer sugard, with other Liquours; and that all the while they were drinking, the sat one on each side of a Table hand in hand, the Devil pressing him all the time to sign the said Lease; and that they had no Drawer, or Attendant to supply them with Drink, but that notwithstanding, they drank plentifully, the Cups were always full; and that there were in the said Tavern a great many people of all sorts, little and big: When they were parted thence, the Boy came home Frighted and Disorderd as twas thought, and he told these things to his Master and others of the Neighbourhood, telling them withal. That all their Advice, and that all they could do for him would be in vain. For that he must necessarily go to the Devil the Saturday following, according to the appointment that was made.

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Detection of a Popish Cheat. Dublin: 1696, 1

The DevilThe Devil who appears before Joseph Buxford, a fifteen year old boy from Devon, and his father, as a carrier with four horses. Joseph Buxford and his father have been arguing, for Joseph Buxford does not desire to apprentice himself to a weaver in Crediton, but instead ran away to the army. Upon returning home, John Buxford threatens to "bind [his son] Apprentice to the Devill, which rash and in considerate threatenings, he often times used and repeated." John Buxford vows to "put the same in execution." The boy further exclaims that he "would rather go to the Devill," than apprentice himself to a weaver in Crediton. A carrier encounters the father and the boy on the road, and inquires as to why the father "did fall a beating of him, so that by meere force compelled him along." The father explains his son's situation, and the carrier, whom the father "had often observed to frequend the roade," to take the boy as an apprentice for eight days. The carrier, who is in fact the Devil in disguise, assures the father that he would put the son "in a way so gaine a compleat estate to maintaine himself and helpe his friends." As soon as John Buxford leaves, the carrier in a "stupendious Miracle," transforms into a "flying Hourse in a black and ugly shape and colour," (Anonymous 145) who carries the boy over the earth and oceans, and eventually down into Hell. Once in Hell, the horse transforms again, this time into "a more terrible shape then that of the flying Horse." Once in Hell, the Devil tells Joseph Buxford, "Bee not dismayed, thy employment here shall be onely to take a view of divers men, who thou hast formerly seene or knowne in the Malignant Army, whose base course of life have occasioned their suddaine and unexpected deaths, and now are sent to me to receive their due recompence for the same." Joseph Buxford is shown the torment of many apparitions in Hell, whom are familiar to him from his time in the army. The Devil also shows Joseph Buxford the torments of Sir Peter Ball, Greevile, Goring, Lady Scot, and Lady Dolkeat. Once the eight days of Joseph Buxford's employment are finished, the Devil delivers Joseph Buxford back to Devon, where the boy is found and confesses to all he had seen. That same day of Joseph Buxford's release from Hell, the Devil also appeared to a number of "stragling Troopers of the Malignant Party," in his previous form of a carrier. When the troopers attempt to rob the Devil as a carrier of his horses, "the Carrier and his Horses suddainely vanished away in the flames of fire," killing three of the men, and leaving the rest "so terribly shaken and almost stifled with the noisome sent of Brimstone, that they hardly espaced to carry newes in this strange accident."In the County of Devon at a Market Town called Bow, liveth one John Buxford by profession a Wolsted-comber having a son named Joseph, aged fifteene years or thereabout, whome he had bound Apprentice to a Weaver, named Simon Culsver dwelling in Crediton: this Joseph being a stubborne and untowardly Boy, could not brooke his Masters service, but after a Moneths time secretly departed away to the Kings Army with one Byerly a Leiutenant to a Troop of House in the Lord of Cleavelands Brigade, with whom he continued a roguish course of life; most of this last Summer till the defeat with the Cavaliers received at Langport-Moore, where the Leiutenant his Master lost his Hourse, and cloathes, and the Boy was stripped and tured into rages: so that seeing no probability to be furnished with apparell from his Master, he came home to the old man his father, who cloathed him and would have had him returne to the Weaver againe, but no perswasions or entreaties could prevaile or worke upon the forward disposion of this obstinate and disobedient Boy, which so incensed the old man, that he swore in great fury, that he would not consent to goe to the Weaver, he would bin him Apprentice to the Devill, which rash and in considerate threatenings, he often times used and repeated, but perceiving that words tooke small effect, he determined to take a more rigerous course, and shortly put the same in execution.

Appears in:
Massey, Edward. A True and Perfect Relation of a Boy, Who was Entertained by the Devill. London: 1645, 2

The DevilThe Devil who causes the sound of a "great Bell tolling" in Mr. Harlakenden's chamber, built above a "Tomb-House" in Colne's Priory near Colne in the county of Essex. The bell tolls "at Two of the Clock in the Morning," causing Mr. Harlakenden "Fright and Sweat." However, one night, Mr. Thomas Shephard, "with some other Ministers, and good People, spent a Night in Prayer," and paying respects to the place to serve God. This casts out the Devil, and "from that time, never was any such noise heard in the Chamber."IV. Mr. Harlakenden, who lived at Cols-Priory in Essex, (where I often was, his only Son being my Pupil,) formerly the House of the Earls of Oxford: Off from the House was a Tomb-House, with a Chamber over it; his Butler, Robert Crow, and William, his Coach-man, used to lie in that Room. At Two of the Clock in the Morning there was always the sound of a great Bell tolling: They affirming it so, Mr. Harlakenden slept in the Evening, so as to be awaked at One of the Clock, and lay betwixt his two Sevants to satisfie himself. At Two of the Clock comes the usual Sound of a great Bell 158 tolling, which put him into a Fright and Sweat, so as he jogg'd his Servants; who awaking, said, Hark, Tom is at his Sport. It revived him to hear them speak. Upon a particular Occasion, Mr. Thomas Shepheard, (who after went to New England,) with some other Ministers, and good People, spent a Night in Prayer, and had some respect to the place, serving God, to cast out the Devil: And from that time, never was any such noise heard in the Chamber.

Appears in:
Baxter, Richard. The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits and, Consequently, of the Immortality of Souls. London: 1691, 157-158

The DevilThe Devil who appears to John Palmer when he is unable to avenge himself on his adversaries, and takes advantage of that man, convincing him to join with the Devil. Upon this malefic compact, the Devil gave John Palmer two familiars: one in the form of a dog named George, and the other in the form of a woman named Jezabell. The Devil then made John Palmer draw his blood, "and caused him to write his mark upon the ground with his own hand therewith." John Palmer serves the Devil through witchcraft somewhere between 50 and 60 years.By the plain confession of Palmer it may certainly be guessed that the Divel took advantage of him i[...] this breach, and brought him into [...] upon this ground; in as much as hee was (as hee said)of a fretfull and revengfull nature, and not being [...] himself to aveng himself of his adversaries hee [...] joyned himself to the Divel, and wrought [...] in the eyes of the Lord: upon his [...] with the Divel, hee received a [...] side, which gave suck to two familiars [...] form of a dog which hee called George, and the oth[...]r in the likenesse of a woman called Jezabell, when the Divel first made this mark he drew his bloud and caused him to write his mark upon the ground with his own hand therewith; his trading in this horrid and abominable practice of Witchcraft was (as hee confessed) betwixt the space of 50 and 60 years

Appears in:
Anonymous. The Devils Delusions or A Faithfull Relation of John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott. London: 1649, 2